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Publication numberUS3333735 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1967
Filing dateFeb 21, 1966
Priority dateFeb 21, 1966
Publication numberUS 3333735 A, US 3333735A, US-A-3333735, US3333735 A, US3333735A
InventorsAndrew S Odasso
Original AssigneeAllegheny Ludlum Steel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Puncturing device for removing residual gas from aerosol containers
US 3333735 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

3,333,735 SIDUAL @As Aug. l, 1967 A. s. oDAsso PUNCTURING DEVICE FOR REMOVING RE Filed Feb. 2l, 1966 //.-//////f/l////J.

IN VEN TOR.

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United States Patent O 3,333,735 PUNCTURING DEVICE FOR REMOVING RESIDU- AL GAS FROM AEROSOL CONTAINERS Andrew S. Odasso, West Leechburg, Pa., assignor to Allegheny Ludlum Steel Corporation, Brackenridge, Pa., a

corporation of Pennsylvania Filed Feb. 21, 1966, Ser. No. 528,939 8 Claims. (Cl. 222-5) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A puncturing device for relieving the pressure in pressurized containers by providing a first member for receiving the container in an inverted position, a second cup-shaped member slidably engaging the rst member to enclose the container, puncturing means secured to the second member and being adapted for piercing the bottom of the container, other means within the puncturing means for exhausting gases from the container, and means for moving the second member relative to the first members for puncturing the container.

With increasing usage of arerosol containers and other similar pressurized containers, a safety hazard has been created when attempting to dispose of the empty containers which may still be pressurized. Such containers when subjected to excessive heat may explode, and similar attempts to crush such containers without rst relieving the pressure can cause an explosion.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a new and improved puncturing device for relieving the pressure in empty pressurized containers.

It is another object of this invention to provide a new and improved puncturing device for relieving the pressure in pressurized containers in a safe and eilicient manner.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a new and improved puncturing device for relieving the pressure in a pressurized container in a manner to prevent the expulsion of any residual contents of the container.

Briey, the present invention accomplishes the abovecited objects by providing a cup-shaped base member for receiving the pressurized container in an inverted position. A second cup-shaped member is adapted to engage the open end of the base member in a close tting slidable relationship to completely enclose the pressurized container. Generally centrally located in the base portion of the second member is an aperture having inserted therethrough a plunger, one portion of which is tapered and beveled for cutting through the bottom of the pressurized container for relieving the pressure. A spring member is circumferentially disposed about and atixed to the plunger intermediate the base portion of the second member and the bottom of the pressurized container. This spring after puncturing of the Vcontainer asserts pressure against the container bottom to facilitate removal thereof. The portion of the plunger which is external of the second member is provided with a conduit to the atmosphere for expulsion of the gases from the container through an orice in the plunger through the conduit to the atmosphere. The second member is pivotally supported from a handle which is fixed for motion relative to the base member.

Further objects, features, and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation View (partly sectioned) of the device according to this invention, and

FIG. 2 is an exploded view, in section, of the puncturing means of FIG. l.

Referring now to the drawing, in FIG. 1, there is shown a support member 10 which is of generally rectangular configuration having an aperture 12 located therein. Aixed to the support member 10 is a base mem- -ber 14 which is of cylindrical configuration being opened at both ends and secured to the support member 10 so as to enclose the aperture 12 at the lower end thereof. The support member 10 and base member 14 may be made of steel or any other material of sufl'icient strength to withstand the maximum force expected from puncturing the pressurized container. Spaced from the base member 14 is an upwardly extending post 16 secured at its lower end to support member 10 a predetermined distance from the base member 14. At the upper end of post 16 which extends a distance greater than the height of the base member 14 there is located an aperture for a pivot point 18. A lever or handle 20 is pivotally secured to the post 16 by means of insertion of a bolt, or the like, through the aperture of post 16.

A cap 22 is provided to enclose the open end of base member 14, the cap 22 being made of material similar in strength to that of the base member 14. The cap 22 is of a substantially cup-shaped configuration having a base portion 24 and side walls 26, the inner surfaces of which engage in close mating relationship to outer walls of base member 14 in slidable relation therewith. Aixed to the base portion 24 of cap 22 is an upwardly extending link 28 which is pivotally secured to the handle 20 at a position intermediate the free end thereof and the pivot point 18.

Disposed generally centrally of the base portion 24 of cap 22 is an aperture through which is inserted puncturing means or a plunger 30 having an annular cross section. The end of the plunger 30 located within the cap 22 is tapered and beveled (see FIG. 2) to provide a cutting edge for puncturing the pressurized container 32 (shown by dotted lines in an inverted position) through the bottom thereof. Secured to the other end of the plunger 30, which end is external of the enclosure formed by the base member 14 and the cap 22, there is connected thereto conduit means shown as a pipe 34 and a right angle elbow connector 36. Secured to the -inner surface of the base portion 24 of cap 22 by a spring retainer 42 is a spring 38 which encircles the annular plunger 30, and in its extended position the lowermost portion of the spring 38 is adjacent the beveled end of plunger 30.

In operation, a pressurized container 32 is inserted into the base member 14 in an inverted position so that the top of the container 32 extends through the aperture 12 in support member 10 and rests on shoulders 40 adjacent the aperture. The cap 22 is then lowered into position by means of the handle 20 so that the inner surfaces of the side walls 26 slidably engage the outer surfaces of base member 14. As the handle 20 is further depressed, the cutting edge of annular plunger 30 pierces the bottom of the pressurized can while the tapered edges of plunger 30 provide a seal during the puncturing operation. 'Ihe gases from the container 32 then escape through the orifice ofthe plunger 30 through the elbow 36 and through the pipe 34 to the atmosphere. As shown in the drawing, the pipe 34 extends away from the .position occupied by the operator. In the event the escaping gases ignite, they will burn harmlessly at the outlet of pipe 34. Furthermore, by puncturing the container 32 in an inverted position, very little of the contents of the container 32 will come out of pipe 34 even if inadvertently a full or partially lled container 32 is punctured instead of an empty one.

During the puncturing operation the spring 38 is compressed. As the handle 20 is raised after the gases have escaped the spring 38 disengages the plunger 30 from the container 32.

As is obvious, the dimensions `of the device can be varied in order to accommodateV any size pressurized container, the main requirement being that the relative dimensions be so determined to permit suflicient movement of the cap 22 and the plunger 30 to permit puncturing of the container Y32. If desired, 'the aperture 12 may be omitted and shoulders provided within base member 14 at the appropriate height to receive the container 32.

While there has been shown anddescribed one specific embodiment, it is to be understood that Vvarious other modifications and adaptations can be readily made without departing from the scope of the invention.

I claim:

I 1. In a device for puncturing a pressurized container for relieving pressure therein, said device comprising:

(a) a iirst -generally cup-shaped member adapted for receiving a pressurized container at least partially therein;

(b) a second generally cup-shaped member adapted forV mating slidable engagement with said lrst member to form an enclosure for said container, said second member having a base portion;

(c) puncturing means secured to the base portion of said second ymember within said enclosure for piercing said container;

(d) gas-exhausting means disposed adjacent said puncturing means, said gas-exhausting means bein-g adapted for releasing gases from within the enclosure upon the piercing of said container, and

(e) means for moving said second member relative to said first Vmember foretfect'mg the piercing of said container by said puncturing means.

2. A device according to claim 1 wherein said first member and said second member have cylindrical configurations, the outer diameter of said iirst member'approximating the inner diameter of said second member for slidable engagement therewith.

3. A device. according to claim 1 wherein said puncturing means includes gas-exhausting means by providing aV plunger having an annular cross section, the orifice created thereby extending through said second member, said plunger having the end within the enclosure adapted for piercing the container, the gases from said container being exhausted through said orifice. Y

4. A device according to claim 1 wherein said first member has a base portion, and shoulder means are provided within said first member adjacent the base portion thereof, said first member being adapted for receiving the container in an inverted position with the container resting on said shoulder means.

5. A device according to claim 1 wherein said first member has a base portion with an aperture therein, said first member being adapted for receiving the container with the top thereof partially extending through said aperture, the aperture being of such size to prevent passage of the container therethrough.

6. In a device for puncturing pressurized containers for relieving pressure therein, said device comprising:

(a) a generally cylindrical member having inwardly extending shoulder means in the lower portion there-y of, said member being adapted for receiving the container in an inverted position with the container resting on said shoulder means; j (b) a generally Ycup-shaped capk having a generally circular base portion and a generally cylindrical wall portion, said cap being adapted for slidable engagement of the inner surface of. said wall portion with the outer surface of said base member for enclos-V ing the container, said base portion of said cap having an aperture therein',

(c) puncturing means extending through said aperture and secured to said base portion of said cap, said puncturing means having gas-exhausting means extending therethrough, said -puncturing means being adapted for piercing the bottom of said container and exhausting gases contained therein, and

(d) means for moving said cap relative to said base member for effecting the piercing of said container UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,060,258 4/1913 raving 222-835 V2,098,807 7/1935 williams 222-87 X V2,545,991 3/1951 cooper 222-5 XY 2,925,937 2/1960 schmidt et a1. 222-80 3,139,343 6/1964 Basen zzz-83.5 X 3,303,968 2/1967 Compere 222-82 RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3438548 *Nov 21, 1967Apr 15, 1969Ceyba George AAerosol can perforator-gas and air releaser
US3863808 *Mar 20, 1974Feb 4, 1975Volstatic CanadaParticulate material conveying apparatus
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US4349054 *Dec 15, 1980Sep 14, 1982Plough, Inc.Method and apparatus for safely destroying aerosol containers
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US5086814 *Dec 17, 1990Feb 11, 1992Taito Co., Ltd.Device for releasing remaining gas in pressure can containers and storage cap of the degassing device
US5114043 *Oct 9, 1990May 19, 1992Collins Jr Elia EAerosol can emptying device
US5163483 *Jul 3, 1991Nov 17, 1992Emergency Technical Services Corporation Of IllinoisApparatus for accessing pressurized members
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/5, 222/83.5, 222/82, 222/80, 141/330
International ClassificationB67C9/00, B65D83/14, B05B1/00, B23D27/00, B09B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/75, B09B3/0058, B67B7/24, B23D27/00
European ClassificationB23D27/00, B65D83/75, B09B3/00F, B67B7/24