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Publication numberUS3334208 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1967
Filing dateJul 15, 1964
Priority dateJul 15, 1964
Publication numberUS 3334208 A, US 3334208A, US-A-3334208, US3334208 A, US3334208A
InventorsGreen Franklin C
Original AssigneeGreen Franklin C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electro-magnetic trigger
US 3334208 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 1, 1967 F C. GREEN 3,334,208

ELECTRO -MAGNETI C TRIGGER Filed July 15, 1964 2 sheets-shet 1 20a- 23 26 I9 2O /3a 4 /9 7d 44f 20e 23 23C l F165 27e 25a I7 FRANKLIN C. GREEN 20d l INVENTOR,

25 23u24l 26 [9 2O FIG. 4

A TTGRNEY Aug. '1, 11967/v F. C. GREEN 3,334,208

' ELECTROMAGNETIC TRIGGER Filed Jul)r l5, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 30b 27g 27m l2f [2Q 3/27h 38 39 37 40 32 35 so 27j27c 36 45 FIG. 6

l 32 32H3-, 30a o L FRANKLIN CA. GREEN 12x INVENTOIL m k 53 5/7 so 47d \57a 56 BY' FIG. Il

ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,334,208 ELECTRO-MAGNETIC TRIGGER Franklin C. Green, 115 Ebbtide Drive, San Antonio, Tex. 78227 Filed luly 15, 1964, Ser. No. 382,763 5 Claims. (Cl. 200-157) The present invention relates to a trigger for use in weapons or the like and more particularly to a trigger whiclh may lbe incorporated in any electrically operated weapon or the like.

In firearms in general, it has heretofore been the practice to use a mechanical trigger which includes a trigger spring or a plurilty of springs in conjunction with close fitting, finely honed parts, It is well known that any mechanical device with close tting parts, without due protection from atmospheric effects and contaminants, is subject to variation in performance. In addition, any variation in trigger feel or performance and any variation in the mechanism which can be sensed will have an adverse effect on mark-smanship. These factors become increasingly apparent as trigger pulls are reduced from the order of several pounds to several ounces as is required in high level, competitive shooting.

The subject invention, on the other hand, relates to positioned magnetic elements which activate an electrical firing mechanism and provides trigger pulls in an extremely light range. In-asmuch as the switch utilized is hermetically sealed, atmospheric changes and contaminants have no effect thereon. The trigger, being magnetic and requiring only a simple bearing, isl uneffected by atmospheric changes and relatively uneifected by contaminants. The resulting device has proven extremely consistent in operation as `compared `to mechanical counterparts.

An object of the present invention is the provision of a trigger that is reliable, trouble-free and consistent in its operation.

Another object is to provide a trigger without critically fitted parts.

A further object is the provision of a unitized trigger assembly which may conveniently be used in any electrically iired weapon.

Still another object is to provide such a trigger with extremely light trigger pull as required by competitive marksmen. l

A iinal object of the present invention is the provision of such a trigger which is extremely simple in construction, inexpensive to manufacture, capable of mass production techniques and easyto use.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art as the disclosure is made in the following detailed description of preferred embodiments of the invention as disclosed in the accompanying sheets of drawing vin which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary, side elevational view showing the breech portion of a conventional rifle including the electro-magnetic trigger of the subject invention incorporated therein.

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the longitudinal plane of the embodiment of FIG. l.

FIG. 3 is a horizontal sectional view of the device, revolved 90, taken on the line 3 3 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 4 is a horizontal sectional view of the device taken on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary, side elevational view showing the breech portion of another weapon including a modification of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional View through the longi- "ice tudinal plane of the embodiment of FIG. with the trigger set in extended condition.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, side elevational view, partly in section, of a modification of the trigger set mechanism.

FIG. 8 is a horizontal sectional view of the device taken on the line 8 8 of FIG. 6 looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary, side elevational view showing the breech portion of a free pistol including another ernlbodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10 is a horizontal sectional view of the device taken on the line 10-10 of FIG. 9 looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 11 is a vertical sectional view through the longitudinal plane of the embodiment of FIG. 9; and

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary, vertical sectional view through the longitudinal pl-ane of another embodiment of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings the breech portion of an electrically operated rifle 10 comprising a barrel 11 which is secured to a stock 12 in a conventional manner.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, an essentially rectangular, integrally formed battery housing 13, consisting of sides 13a-13b, ends 13o-13d and top 13e, is secured to the undersurface of the stock as by means of screws 14 or other conventional securing means which pass through bores 13jc in the top 13 of said housing. As viewed in FIG. 2 of the drawings, the innermost terminal portions of bores 13]t preferably are countersunk to accommodate the heads of screws 14. A cover 13g of desired configuration secures the housing 13 in closed condition as by means of screws 13h or the like which threadingly insert into the downwardly depending sides and ends of the said housing. The required number of batv teries B (see FIG. 2) may be provided in the housing to serve as a power supply for the weapon; bores 131', 13j are provided in the top`13e and cover 13g, respectively, and are in communication with bores 12a-12b in the stock whereby electrical conductors connect to the said power supply and the firing mechanism of the weapon in a manner hereinafter to lbe described.

Top 13e further includes an intergrally formed, rearwardly extending, .rectangular portion 13k of .slightly lesser Width than casing 13, as shown in FIG. 3, whichportion includes countersunk `bores 13m along theV longitudi- -nal axis thereof. An integrally formed, essentially Y- shaped swivel arm 15 inserts into -a recess 12C provided in the undersurface of the stock, said arm is secured to portion 13k as by means of screws 16 which pass through the bores 13m and threadingly insert into the bottom of base 15a. Swivel arm 15 further includes rearwardly extending, bifurcated arms 15b-15e; an aligned bore 15d is provided in each of said arms, the axis of which is transverse to the longitudinal axis of the said arms.

A trigger 17 includes fiat, parallel sides 17a-17b at its upper end, (see FIG. 3), which sides insert between arms 15b, 15C and pivotally connect thereto as by a pin 18 which passes through bore 15a. and a bore 17e provided in the trigger. A longitudinal recess 17d is provided in the rear surface of said trigger wherein a plurality of cylindrical magnets 19 are secured by means of epoxy resin or other adhesive. The lower portion of trigger 17, as shown in FIG. 4, is essentially oval in section, however, it is to be understood that said trigger may be of any desired shape or configuration which conforms to the trigger finger of the marksman if such configuration can laccommodate either one ora plurality of magnets, as will be described.

Referring again to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, an elongate ybar 20 is secured to housing 13, said bar includes a slightly tapered leading portion 20a and an elongate, rectangular channel 20b in the bottom surface, which channel terminates in said tapered portion 20a. Slots 20c are provided in the channel 20h; bolts 21 pass through the said slots and threadingly insert into the bottom of cover 13g whereby the said bar is adjustable longitudinally to a limited extent. Bar 20 further includes an elongate, rectangular channel 20d in the top surface thereof, said channel 20d is of sufficient length and width to Iaccommodate either a single magnetic reed switch 22 or a plurality of such switches, as will hereinafter be described.

A rectangular plate 23, including bores 23a-23C, is secured to the web portions 20e-20f of said bar as by screws 24 which pass through bores 23a, 23e, respectively, and threadin-gly insert into thewebs 20e, 20f. An upstanding, rectangular bar 25 (see FIG. 4) includes a longitudinal, concave recess 25a; said bar is secured to plate 23 by screw 26 which passes through lbore 23b and threadingly inserts into the bottom thereof, as shown in FIG. 2. A cylindrical magnet 26 inserts into recess 25a and may be secured in such position as by means of a conventional adhesive suitable for binding dissimilar metals. The uppermost portion 25h of the bar 25 preferably inserts into a recess 12d in the stock which provides additional support for the said bar. In like manner, the rearmost, terminal portion 20e of the bar may additionally be secured as by inserting into a recess 12e in the stock, as shown in FIG. 2.

For purposes of convenience only, in the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. l, and 9 of the drawings, a magnet or set of magnets M1 are secured in the trigger while a co-acting second magnet or set of magnets M2 are fixedly secured in proximity thereto.

The magnets 19, 26, heretofore described, are secured in position in such a manner that like magnetic poles are preferably positioned `at the same end of their respective support members. Accordingly, the magnet 19 will normally be repelled by magnet 26, since like magnetic poles repel, in accordance with well known principles of magnetics. By selecting magnets of desired characteristics, a desired -repelling force will be provided.

Referring again to FIG. 2 of the drawings, a SPST magnetic reed switch 22 includes contacts 22a-22b with normally open contact arrangement. The said contacts are connected to conductors which pass through and are sealed in either one or both ends of envelope 22C; the switch 22 is connected to the power supply B and the remainder of the electrical system as by leads 22o-22e. Magnetic reed switches of various size, contact arrangement, voltage rating and life expectancy fare commercially available; typical magnetic reed switches are manufactured by Gordos Corporation of Bloomfield, NJ., and identified as part number MR 400-1 and MR 600-1; the contacts of such switches close in one millisecond and provide a life expectancy at maximum rating of at least 3 X 106 closings.

The switch 22 illustrated in FIG. 2 is shown positioned in channel 20d with the contacts 22a, 22b aligned approximately vertically beneath the longitudinal axis of magnets 19. As the trigger pivots rearwardly, the lines of magnetic flux from magnet 19 cause the said contacts to close thereby completing the electrical circuit through lead 22e, contacts 22a, 22b, lead 22e, the power supply B, lead 22d, and thence to the electrically operated tiring mechanism of the weapon. When the trigger is released, the repelling effect .between the like magnetic poles, heretofore mentioned, causes the trigger 17 to return to its original position and the contacts 22a, 22b return to normally open condition.

As will hereinafter be described, the housing 13 is constructed of any non-magnetic material, such as aluminum, other light weight metal, brass, or high impact plastic or the like. The switch 22 is adjusted in the channel 20d to provide closure of the contacts at a desired position of trigger travel and the switch may then be tixedly secured in such position by filling the said channel 20d around such switch with a filler 36 such as epoxy resin, wood ller or body filler; such materials do not affect the magnetic lines of flux emanating from the magnet 19 nor effect the closing of contacts 22a, 22b of the switch.

Referring now to FIGS. 5-8 of the drawings, there is shown another embodiment of the invention wherein the power supply of the electrically operated weapon is utilized and the magnetic reed switch utilized in the practice of the subject invention connects into the existing electrical circuit.

In this embodiment, the casing 27 is integrally formed and constructed of a non-ferrous, non-magnetic material, preferably aluminum. Casing 27 includes at its foremost end an outwardly extending portion 27a which includes a countersunk vertical bore 27b (see FIG. 6), a central portion 27e which houses the magnetic reed switch, an essentially vertical portion 27 d and a rearwardly extending portion 27e which includes a verti-cal bore 271. The undersurface of the stock is provided with a recess 12f which accommodates the uppermost, essentially rectangular portion 27g of the casing; the casing is secured in said recess as by screws 28, 29 which pass through bores 27b, 27f, respectively, and insert into the stock.

As shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings, the uppermost portion 27g of the casing includes a slot 27h. The trigger 30 is pivotally secured in such slot as by means of a pin 31 passing through an aligned bore 271', the axis of which is transverse to the longitudinal axis of the casing, and a bore 30a in the trigger. A plurality of cylindrical magnets 32 are secured in the rear surface of trigger 30 while repelling magnet 33 inserts in and is secured in a recess in the foremost surface of portion 27d as heretofore described. A longitudinal aligned bore 27j is provided in the central portion 27C of the casing; said bore terminates at its foremost end in fem-ale threaded portions which accommodate screw 34. The switch 35 is inserted in Ibore 27j; leads 35a-35b connect to switch 35 and both of said leads pass through the vertical bore 27k and the communicating bore 12g in the stock 12 and connect to the electrical circuit of the firing system.

The switch 35 is positioned relative to the trigger so that the contacts close at the desired point of trigger travel; both ends of the `bore 27j may be sealed with a filler 36 such as epoxy resin or the like thereby securing the switch in position.

In those instances where the marksman desires to increase or decrease trigger pull, i.e., in the lrange of an ounce to several pounds, there is shown in FIG. 6 of the drawings means which provide a synthetic load in addition to the repelling magnet forces. A longitudinal bore 27m is provided in portion 27g of the casing, which bore terminates in :a female threaded portion which accommodates screw 37.

A detent 30b is provided in trigger 30 above the pivot point, said detent accommodates a ball 38 or the like which is secured in position by means of a coil spring 39 inserting into bore 27m and bearing against screw 37. Any desired synthetic load may be applied against the trigger by varying the pressure applied to the ball by the spring 39; a locking nut 40 is provided to lock screw 37 in position when the desired tension on the trigger is obtained.

There is also shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 a trigger set mechanism whereby the trigger may be manually positioned at a desired, predetermined position prior to each shot. In this embodiment, the lower portion .of slot 27h is provided with a bevelled surface 27n which stops the forward travel of the trigger 30 before the said trigger strikes the set mechanism. A vertical bore 270 accommodates a cylindrical magnet 41 which inserts therein; the upper portion of bore 27o is threaded to accommodate a set screw 42. Coil spring 43 inserts into bore 270 and bears against the top of the magnet 41 and the bottom of set screw 42, respectively. The magnet may be secured at a desired position by means of set screw 43, as shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, which set screw bears against a side of the said magnet.

The set 44 is composed of steel or other ferrous metal, and as best seen in FIG. 6, includes a cylindrical shaft 44a and a knurled knob 44b integral therewith. A flat 44C is provided in shaft 44a and a longitudinal bore 44d passes through the shaft and knob, respectively. A rod 45, preferably of brass or of other non-magnetic material, inserts in the bore 44d and may be secured at any desired position in said bore by set screw 46. The bottom magnet 41, heretofore mentioned, bears against the flat 44e and is magnetically attracted thereto; as the weapon recoils the set 44 is extended as shown in FIG. 6- and is limited in its forward travel by the magnetic attraction and the magnet abutting shoulder 44e of said at. It is obvious that as the set 44 is moved manually n a rearward direction the end of rod 45 bears against trigger 30 and forces the trigger in a rearward direction until the innermost end 44f of set 44 abuts the casing 27, as best seen in FIG. 5 of the drawings. At such time the trigger is set at the desired, predetermined position. Recoil of the weapon is used to return the set to the open position.

In the modification of FIG. 7, the shaft 44a and knurled knob 44b are internally threaded to accommodate the threaded portions 45a of the rod. After the rod has been adjusted in the manner heretofore described, a set screw 46 positioned in the knurled knob may be adjusted to bear against the threaded portions 45a on the rod whereby the said rod is additionally secured in the desired position.

There is shown in FIGS. 9-11 a free pistol which has been modified t-o ire electrically and includes a magnetic reed switch in the circuitry of the tiring system.'

In this embodiment, a shaped trigger guard 47 includes a forwardly extending porti-on 47a which includes a bore 47b, a downwardly depending portion 47C, a central portion 47d, an arcuately shaped rear portion 47e and a rearwardly extending terminal portion 47f which includes a bore 47g. Screws 48 pass through bores 47b, 47g and secure the trigger guard 47 to the trigger plate 49 of the weapon. As best seen in FIG. of the drawings, an essentially H-shaped swivel arm 50 includes at one end a groove 50a with a recessed shoulder 50b (see FIG. l1) which accommodates the head of screw 51 which bears thereagainst; the said screw threadingly inserts into plate 49. The rearmost portion of swivel arm 50 includes bifurcated arms 50c-50d with an aligned, transverse bore 50e. A bore 52a is provided in the upper portion of trigger 52 to allow passage of a pin 53. As viewed in FIG, l0, a longitudinal recess 52b is provided in the rear surface of the trigger and accommodates a single, cylindrical magnet 54, in a manner heertofore described. The repelling magnet 55 is vertically aligned and is partially encapsulated in a composition material 56 hereinafter to |be described. In like manner, the magnetic reed switch 57 is positioned at a desired position relative to the trigger and is encapsulated in the said composition material 56. Leads 57a-57b connect to the switch 57; the lead 57a attaches to a conventional Iconnector 58 which may be secured to portion 47c of the trigger guard, while the lead 57b passes through a bore 49a in plate 49, through a bore 12h in the stock and thence to the firing mechanism of the weapon.

Referring again to FIGS. 9 and l1 of the drawings, a forestop 59 and a trigger stop 60 limit the fore and aft travel of the trigger 5 2. The elements 59, 60 are composed of non-magnetic, deformable material such as brass or aluminum and are preferably inverted U-shaped, the lower portions of which insert and are secured in the composition material 56. The said elements may be bent to any desired angle to provide stops, as heretofore described. l,

Any non-magnetic composition material may be utilized to encapsulate and protect the repelling magnet, switch and leads in the aforementioned embodiment of the invention. Such compositions include, but are not solely restricted to, auto body filler, wood filler, commercially available potting compounds Fiberglas and epoxy resin.

In each of the embodiments of the invention the magnets lwhich have been illustrated are essentially cylindrical; however, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to such configuration only; bar magnets or the may also be utilized. The said magnets may be composed of Alnico or any other composition which exhibits permanent magnetic properties.

Furthermore, in many applications, as illustrated in FIG. 12. of the drawings, rst and second magnetic reed switches 61-62 may be utilized; said first and second switches are activated by the magnet 63 or a plurality of magnets secured in the trigger 64 in the manner heretofore described in detail. For example, as the trigger is pulled rearwardly, the magnetic iield may close the contacts of the rst magnetic reed switch 61 and activate a first circuit, as for example, the infra-red light utilized on a snipers riile or the like. As the trigger is pulled further rearwardly, the contacts of the second magnetic reed switch 62 are closed thereby firing the weapon.

In like manner, a lirst magnetic reed switch may be utilized to close a circuit which cocks the tiring mechanism of the weapon while the second such switch is used for firing the weapon.

It is to be understood, of course, that the foregoing disclosure relates to only preferred embodiments of the invention and that it is intended to cover all changes and modications of the invention herein chosen for the purposes of the disclosure, which do not constitute departures from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A firing mechanism for an electrically operated weapon comprising a housing, a trigger pivotally mounted in said housing, at least one magnet secured in said trigger, at least one second magnet xedly secured in said housing yand magnetically poled to oppose said rst magnet, reed switch means remote to said first and second magnets, said switch means consisting of rst and second contacts connecting to the -ring mechanism of said electrically operated weapon whereby the magnetic lines of ux emanating from said magnet in said trigger causes closure of said first yand second contacts 2. A ring mechanism for an electrically operated weapon comprising a housing, a trigger movably mounted in said housing, a rst magnetic element mounted in said trigger, 'a second magnetic element xedly secured in said housing in proximity to said rst magnet and poled to magnetically oppose said first magnetic element, a reed switch positioned in said housing remote to said first and second magnetic elements and connecting to the circuitry of the electrically operated weapon whereby the magnetic lines of flux emanating from said first magnetic element causes closure of said switch.

3. A ring mechanism for electrically fired weapons comprising a housing, a trigger pivotally mounted in said housing, a first magnet mounted in said trigger, a second magnet mounted in said housing in proximity to said first magnet and poled to magnetically oppose sai-d irst maget, a switch positioned in said housing, a trigger set in said housing, Asaid trigger set consisting of a vertical bore, a magnet in said bore, means providing a force upon said magnet, a iiat on said trigger set, said magnet bearing against said flat, a longitudinal bore in said set, a rod passing through said bore and adjustably secured therein, said rod bearing against said trigger.

4. A ring mechanism for an electrically operated weapon comprising a housing, a trigger pivotally mounted in said housing, at least one magnet secured in said trigger, at least one second magnet secured in said housing and magnetically poled to oppose said rst magnet, switch means consisting of rst and second contacts connecting to the tiring mechanism of said electrically operated weapon, a horizontal bore in said housing, a detent in said trigger, a ball inserting in said detent, and a spring positioned in said bore and bearing against said ball.

5. A tiring mechanism for an electrically operated weapon comprising a housing, a trigger pivotally mounted in said housing, at least one magnet secured in said trigger, at least one second magnet secured in said housing and magnetically poled to oppose said first magnet, first and second switch means connecting to` rst and second elec'- trical circuits respectively whereby said rst magnet causes closure of said rst switch at one position yof trigger travel and said second switch at a second position of trigger travel.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS '10 ROBERT K. SCHAEFER, Primary Examiner.

R. S. MACON, H. HOHAUSER, Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2520935 *Feb 3, 1945Sep 5, 1950Harvey HubbellMagnetically operated switch
US3051805 *Mar 9, 1959Aug 28, 1962Magnetrol IncElectric switch control means
US3114809 *May 3, 1962Dec 17, 1963Louis BensonReciprocating permanent magnet switching device
US3155792 *Aug 7, 1962Nov 3, 1964Gen ElectricMagnetic reed switch device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3678425 *Dec 10, 1970Jul 18, 1972Holmes Lawrence JrSelf-contained reed switch unit
US4162521 *Aug 22, 1977Jul 24, 1979Snyder Wesley LControl circuit arrangement for laser aiming system having magnetic decoupling means
US7451755Feb 13, 2006Nov 18, 2008Kee Action SportsGas governor, snatch grip, and link pin for paintball gun
US7921837Jul 7, 2008Apr 12, 2011Kee Action Sports I LlcGas governor, snatch grip, and link pin for paintball gun
US8074632Jun 29, 2009Dec 13, 2011Kee Action Sports I LlcVariable pneumatic sear for paintball gun
US8113189Nov 14, 2008Feb 14, 2012Kee Action Sports I LlcCompressed gas gun having gas governor
US8176908 *Oct 23, 2008May 15, 2012Kee Action Sports I LlcVariable pneumatic sear for paintball gun
US8505525Feb 10, 2012Aug 13, 2013Kee Action Sports I LlcCompressed gas gun having gas governor
US8534272Dec 12, 2011Sep 17, 2013Kee Action Sports I LlcVariable pneumatic sear for paintball gun
US8555868May 14, 2012Oct 15, 2013Kee Action Sports I LlcVariable pneumatic sear for paintball gun
US8573191Nov 6, 2009Nov 5, 2013Kee Action Sports I, LlcVariable pneumatic sear for paintball gun
WO2006010608A1 *Jul 27, 2005Feb 2, 2006Peter KronsederWeapon with a trigger
Classifications
U.S. Classification335/206, 335/205, 335/207
International ClassificationH01H9/02, H01H36/00, F41A19/69, F41A19/00, H01H9/06
Cooperative ClassificationH01H9/06, H01H36/0073, F41A19/69
European ClassificationF41A19/69, H01H36/00C, H01H9/06