Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3335396 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1967
Filing dateSep 14, 1964
Priority dateSep 14, 1964
Also published asDE1540298A1, DE1540298B2
Publication numberUS 3335396 A, US 3335396A, US-A-3335396, US3335396 A, US3335396A
InventorsBurton Alvin R, Nava Joseph A
Original AssigneePyle National Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector with collet retention means
US 3335396 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1957 J. A. NAVA ETAL I 3,335,396

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR WITH COLLET RETENTION MEANS Filed Sept. 14, 1964 2 SheetsSheet 1 1O FIGI INVENTORS JOSEPH A. NAVA ALVIN R. BURTON n/w sZwA W' ATTORNEYS Aug. 8, 1967 J. A. NAVA ETAL ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR WITH COLLET RETENTION MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 14, 1964 S R m N E V N JOSEPH A. NAVA ALVIN R. BU RTON FIG9 / TORNEYS United States Patent 3,335,396 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR WITH COLLET RETENTION MEANS Joseph A. Nava, Villa Park, and Alvin R. Burton, Northbrook, lill., assignors to The Pyle-National Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Sept. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 396,172 4 Claims. (Cl. 339217) The present invention relates generally to electrical connectors and more particularly relates to an electrical connector wherein a single one-piece rigid insulator having a cylindrical bore for receiving a contact member and a retaining collet is provided with an abutment means in the bore and in which the collet is provided with mating abutment means thereby to effect a snap-in assembly of the parts.

In accordance with this invention, the connector, which may be of the separable multiple-pin type, is adapted to receive one or more tubularly shaped collets made of resilient material and split axially to render them radially compressible for insertion into their respective bores. The collets are elastic and after insertion return to shape for engagement with the shoulder surfaces of the walls of the respective bores to place the collets in firm assembly in the corresponding insulator.

One aspect of the invention resides in the novel configuration of the walls of the bores of the insulator wherein a plurality of keys each having sloping ramps, are utilized to facilitate radial compression and insertion of the collets.

Another feature resides in the construction of the collets whereby thecollets are retained in a one-piece rigid insulating member. The collet construction of the invention requires substantially no additional expense in manufacture, and furthermore makes possible retention in a one-piece insulator while minimizing assembly time and costs.

Further, the invention affords full retention of the collets as well as sealing of the contact members retained thereby by means of a flexible rubber-like insulator seal sandwiched between a pair of rigid insulators.

It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a connector requiring only a single one-piece rigid insulator for retaining contact member retaining collets therein.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a sing e one-piece insulator with a collet-receiving bore formed therein and provided with shoulder surfaces for retaining a unitary tubular resilient collet having complemental circumferential shoulder surfaces adapted to be compressed to a reduced diameter for insertion into the bore without interference with said shoulder surfaces of the bore and to be resiliently expansible to an enlarged diameter to abuttingly engage the shoulder surfaces of the bore upon insertion of the collet.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an electrical connector constructed'to provide rapid assembly thereof and requiring only a single rigid insulator for receiving and retaining unitary contact member retaining collets which can be easily inserted into the insulator.

Many other features, advantages and additional objects of the present invention will become manifest to those versed in the art upon making reference to the detailed description which follows and the accompanying sheets of drawings, in which preferred structural embodiments incorporating the principles of the present invention are shown by way of illustrative example only.

On the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary elevational view of a multiple-pin connector incorporating the principles of the present invention with portions thereof shown in crosssection to illustrate the relation between parts;

FIGURE 2 is an end view of a contact member retaining collet incorporating the principles of the present invention;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view of a collet taken substantially along'lines III-III of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view of a collet which illus trates the sheet form configuration of the collet after a plurality of tines and key slots have been formed therein but before the collet has been rolled into a tubular configuration for insertion into the connector;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of an insulator of the connector of FIGURE 1 and illustrates a collet just before complete insertion into a bore formed in the insulator, but wherein the collet struck-out tines are omitted from the view for the purpose of simplifying the drawing;

FIGURE 6 is a view taken substantially along lines VIVI of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is similar to FIGURE 5 but illustrates the collet after it has been completely inserted into the bore of the insulator, and also omits the struck-out tines for purposes of clarity; I

FIGURE 8 is taken along lines VIII-VIII of FIGURE 7; and

FIGURE 9 is similar to FIGURE 7 and illustrates a pin or contact member in the collet but before complete insertion thereof.

As shown on the drawings:

Although the principles of the present invention are of general applicability, a particular useful application is made to a multi-pin electrical connector and an illustrative embodiment herein shown consists of a line connector.

An assembled connector embodying the principles of the present invention is shown generally at 10 in FIGURE 1 having a male component indicated at M and a female component indicated at F. The two components M and F constitute separable members of a multi-pin or a multicontact connector'assembly.

The male component M has a cylindrical housing 11 internally structured to receive a mounting means 12 for retaining a plurality of male contact members as at 13 and a rigid thin sleeve or tube 14 and a split ring member 16 around the mounting means 12. The mounting means 12 is retained and positioned by the sleeve 14 and the split ring 16. The sleeve 14 is retained in position by a nut member 17 which is internally threaded for engagement with an externally threaded portion of the housing 11. The cylindrical male housing 11 has a radially outwardly extending rib 18 for bottoming a sealing ring 19 on one side 18a thereof and shouldering on its opposite face 18b a flange 20 of an internally threaded nut 21.

Internally, the male housing 11 has a chamber 22 in which male contact portions 23 of the male currentcontinuing members 13 are adapted to be positioned. At the end of the cylindrical chamber 22 there is provided a radially inwardly extending flange 24 bottoming on the back shoulder thereof a pre-stressed resilient biasing means 26 yieldably deformable in an axial direction. A grooved recess 27 is formed in the housing 11 adjacent the back shoulder of the flange 24 to confine the biasing means 26.

Extending away from the grooved recess 27 is a cylindrical bore wall 28 with internal keys. The wall is adapted to closely receive the peripheral surface of a resilient rubber sealing member 29 of the male mounting means 12 and has an inner diameter preferably of somewhat smaller diameter than the outer diameter of the sealing member 29 to yieldably deform the periphery of the sealing member 29 for improving the seal between the housing 11 and the mounting means 12.

The female component F has a housing 30 having a cylindrical chamber 31 sized to receive in telescoping relation the end of the housing 11 and providing a radial end wall 32 for sealingly engaging against the sealing member 19 abutting the male flange shoulder 18a. The housing 30 has one end externally threaded as at 33 so that the male component M may be locked in joined together relationship with the female component F by threading the nut member 21 onto the female housing 28.

A tool-engaging flange 34 is formed on one end of the female housing 30 with the other end thereof threaded as at 36 for cooperation with a nut member 37.

In general, the female housing 30 is grooved as at 38 to receive a biasing means 26. A plurality of female current-continuing contacts as at 39 are mounted by mounting means 40 and a tubular member 41 surrounds the mounting means 40 which is retained and positioned by the nut 37.

Each male contact 13 has a socket portion 42 terminating in a first radially enlarged circumferentially continuous rib 43. Spaced from the rib 43 is a second rib 44 having substantially the same outer diameter as the first rib and forming therewith a male contact groove 46 having a forward shoulder 47 and a back shoulder 48. Extending inwardly from the second rib 44 is the contact body portion 49 which converges into the reduced diameter cylindrical male insertion portion 23.

The male mounting means 12 comprises two rigid cylindrical insulating members 50 and S1 and the cylindrical resilient rubber seal member 29 sandwiched therebetween. The rear insulating member 50 has formed therethrough a plurality of cylindrical passages as at 53 each of which receives a male contact member 13 and has a cylindrical wall 54 of an inner diameter larger than the diameter of the first male contact rib 43 and has an outer surface 56 that has a stepped configuration so as to be spaced approximately an equal distance from the inner walls of the tube 14, the split ring member 16 and the housing 11.

The forward insulating member 51 has an outer surface 57 that is spaced from the bore wall 28 of the housing 11 and has a shoulder 58 for bottoming the biasing means 26. The insulating member 51 is counterbored at each end to form a cylindrical passage 59 having a diameter slightly larger than the diameter of the male contact portion 49 of the male current-continuing member 13; a back counterbored cylindrical contact bore 60 having a diameter equal to the diameter of the rear insulating member bore 54 and in contact with the forward face of the rubber seal 29; and a forward counterbored passage 61.

The rubber seal means 29 is sandwiched between the rear insulating member 50 and the forward insulating member 51. The mouths of the respective contact bores 54 and 60 are in sealing contact with opposite faces of the rubber seal. Both of the insulating members 50 and 51 have chamfers 62 and 63 respectively on their facing end walls to receive expanded portions of the rubber seal 29. The outer diameter of the rubber seal is larger than the diameter of the housing bore wall 28. Therefore, when the mounting means 12 is inserted in the housing 11, the

outer periphery of the seal 29 is compressed, as indicated at 64, to seal the housing 11.

It will be understood that the embodiment of the rubber seal 29 illustrated in the drawings is merely exemplary, and other configurations of the seal may be advantageously utilized in accordance with the principles of the invention.

A plurality of holes as at 66 are formed through the rubber seal 29 and are arranged to be concentric with the insulator passage walls 54 and 60. The seal holes have a diameter smaller than the diameter of the male contact groove 46 and protrude radially inwardly into the groove such that the rubber seal will be compressed to present pressure surfaces in abutting sealing relation against adjacent shoulder surfaces of the ribs 43 and 44.

The female contact mounting means 40 is similar to the male mounting means 12 and comprises a rear rigid insulating member 67 similar to the insulating member 50, a rubber seal 68 similar to the rubber seal 29 and a front rigid insulating member 69 sandwiching the rubber seal 68 between it and the back insulating member.

The insulating member 69 has a plurality of elongated contact bores 7 0 formed therein in register with a plurality of holes 71 in the front end thereof for receiving the male contact insertion portions 23.

Also, the rear insulator member 67 has a plurality of elongated axially aligned contact bores 72 wherein the mouths thereof abut the back face of the rubber seal 68 and the mouths of the bores 70 abut the front face of the rubber seal 68. The dimensional characteristics of the contact bores 70 and 72, the rubber seal 68 and the female mounting means 40 are identical to that described previously in connection with the male portion M of the con nector 10.

The female contacts 39 have an enlarged contact rib portion 73 disposed similarly relative to the female contact as is the rib 43 disposed to the male contact member 13. In addition, housed within the bores 54 and 72 of the rear insulating members 50 and 67 of the male and female M and F components respectively is a contact member retaining collet 74 for retaining its respective contact member snugly in place to preclude withdrawal thereof.

It will be noted that each of the collets 74 is housed completely and exclusively within its respective rear insulating member, which is of the rigid one-piece type. Retention of the collets within the rear insulating members is not dependent upon any retention means within the front insulating members or the rubber seals.

Referring to FIGURES 2 and 3, the collets 74 are constructed from a thin, elongated rectangularly shaped sheet form member 74a as illustrated in FIGURE 4. A plurality of tines 76 are formed in aligned side-by-side relation by struck-out portions formed in the slots. Each of the tines 76 has adjacent thereto a pair of spaced parallel leg slots 77 interconnected at one end thereof by means of a transverse slot 78.

The sheet form member 74:: is constructed of resilient material having parallel front and rear walls 79 and 80 respectively, and a pair of parallel end walls 81 and 82, and may be folded or wound into the circularly shaped, tubular or annular configuration of FIGURES 2 and 3, in which configuration the opposed end walls 81 and 82 form an axially or longitudinally extending slot 83. In its assembled form, a forward or free end 84 of each of the tines is pushed radially inwardly to engage the contact member received in the collet 74.

FIGURES 5 through 9 will be described in relation to the male component M, but it will be appreciated that the description and the figures are equally applicable to the female component F.

Referring to FIGURES 5 and 6, it will be noted that the passage 54 of the rear rigid insulating member 50 is more particularly characterized as comprising a plurality of circumferentially spaced radially inwardly projecting collet retaining key portions as at 86 which are comprised of a radially inwardly inclined and axially outwardly extending sloping surface 87 and a radially extending shoulder surface 88. Also formed in the passage 54 in axially spaced relation to the shoulder surface 88 is a collet retaining shoulder 89 which is constituted of a chamfered portion 90 and a radially extending shoulder surface 91 which, in cooperation with the shoulder surface 88, forms therebetween an axially extending groove 92, the diameter of which is equal to the diameter of the passage 54.

Although it is necessary to provide only one key in each passage to retain a collet therein, more than one per passage may be effectively utilized, and in the em bodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURE 6, a total of two collet retaining keys 86 are shown within the passage 54 for the purpose of retaining the collet 74 therein, and such keys 86 are conveniently circumferentially spaced by 180. In order to receive the keys 86, one of the leg slots 77 of each of a pair of tines may be enlarged as indicated at 77a of FIGURE 4 and dimensioned to extend axially when arranged in assembled condition to receive the entire sloping portion 87 of the respective keys.

FIGURES 5 and 6 illustrate a collet after it has been wound or rolled into the assembled configuration as illustrated in FIGURES 2 and 3, and after it has been partially inserted into the passage 54. The front wall 79 of the collet 74 has been urged radially inwardly by the ramps provided by the sloping portions 87 of the keys 86 whereby a forward end 93 of the collet 74 has been radially compressed and the corresponding front ends of the walls 81 and 82 of the collet have been urged together to reduce the width of the slot 83 at such front portion of the collet.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate a collet after it has been completely assembled within its respective rear rigid insulating member 50 and it will be noted that the front Wall 79 of the collet has been moved forwardly sufficiently such that the key members 86 have been received by the enlarged slots 77a of the collet 74. As a result, the collet has resiliently expanded to a true tubular shape as exemplified by the spaced parallel disposition of the walls 81 and 82, which now form a rectangularly shaped slot 83.

The front wall 79, as illustrated in FIGURE 7, faces the opposing shoulder surface 91 of the collet retaining shoulder 89 to prevent further axial movement of the collet 74, and front walls 77b of the enlarged slots 77a are in oppositely-facing relation to the corresponding shoulder surfaces 88 of the collet key members 86 to preclude reverse axial movement or withdrawal of the collet.

As illustrated in the enlarged view of FIGURE 9, the free state diameter of the free ends 84 of the tines 76 is less than the diameter of the male contact members as indicated at 13a, and as a front wall 13b of the contact member is inserted in the direction of the tines, a spreading effect of the tines is produced. As best illustrated in FIGURE 1, after the contact members have been fully inserted into their respective bores, the free ends of the tines are resiliently radially inwardly contracted to abut against the enlarged rib portions 43 and 73 of the contact members, thereby satisfactorily preventing withdrawal of the contact members. In addition, in the sheet form configuration of the collets the tines 76 are bent sufficiently radially inwardly such that in an assembled condition, there Will be produced a radially outward bias exerted on the tines which will, in turn, maintain a radially outward bias on the collet to assist the natural resiliency or spring action of the collet to maintain engagement thereof with the collet key members 86.

Although minor modifications might be suggested by those versed in the art, it should be understood that we Wish to embody within the scope of the patent warranted hereon all such modifications as reasonably come within the scope of our contribution to the art.

We claim as our invention:

1. A contact member retaining collet for use in a connector having a one-piece rigid insulator with a tubular bore of a specified diameter formed therein and having a radially inwardly extending substantially circumferentially continuous first shoulder surface formed in said bore and a plurality of circumferentially spaced keys formed in said bore spaced axially from said first shoulder surface and each having a complemental radially inwardly extending second shoulder surface forming with said first shoulder surface a circumferential groove and having a radially inwardly sloping ramp leading to said groove, said collet comprising,

a tubu-larly shaped sheet form member made of resilient material and having a front end and a rear end and being split axially between said ends to render the collet radially compressible to reduce the diameter thereof for insertion into said bore and springably resiliently expansible to enlarge the diameter thereof after insertion into said bore,

a plurality of circumferentially spaced tines formed in said collet and sloping radially inwardly from said front end toward said rear end for engaging and retaining a contact member,

each of said tines being formed of a generally U shaped slot having a pair of axially extending leg members and a transverse portion interconnecting said leg portions,

a plurality of key slots formed in said collet situated to receive respectively one of the keys including said ramp portion thereof,

each of said key slots being with one of said leg shaped slots,

said front end of said collect being adapted to ride on said ramp of said keys during insertion into said bore to facilitate compression and insertion of the collet and said front end of said collet being adapted to bottom on said first shoulder surface upon insertion thereof.

2. In an electrical connector, a collet comprising a thin sheet-form member made of resilient material and shaped in the form of -a tubular longitudinally split sleeve,

said collet having struck out portions forming a plurality of tines disposed in aligned side-by-side relation with a pair of spaced parallel leg slots interconnected at one end thereof by a transverse slot, and

an insulator having a tubular bore for receiving said col-let inserted therein,

said bore having formed therein a radially inwardly extending collet retaining key,

said key having a radially inwardly inclined and axially outwardly extending sloping surface,

a corresponding one of said leg slots in said collet being enlarged to receive and seat said key,

whereby said collet may be slidably inserted in said bore and said sloping surface of said key will bias the collet radially and the entire key including said sloping surface will be received in said enlarged leg slot.

3. In an electrical connector, a collet comprising a thin sheet-form member made of resilient material and shaped in the form of a tubular longitudinally split sleeve,

said collet having struck out portions forming a plurality of tines disposed in aligned side-by-side relation with a pair of spaced parallel leg slots interconected at one end thereof by a transverse slot,

an insulator having a tubular bore for receiving said collet inserted therein,

formed contiguously portions of one of said U- said bore having formed therein a radially inwardly extending collet retaining key, said key having a radially inwardly inclined and axially outwardly extending sloping surface, a corresponding one of said slots in said collet being enlarged to receive and seat said key, and means forming in said insulator in axially spaced relation to said collet retaining key a collet retaining shoulder comprising a radially extending shoulder surface and a chamferred surface leading to said shoulder surface for receiving one end of said collet in abutting engagement.

4. An insulator having a tubular bore with a collet retaining key extending radially into the bore, a contact member retaining collet mounted in said bore and comprising a thin sheet-form member shaped in the form of a tubular longitudinally split sleeve,

said collet having struck out portions forming a plurality of longitudinally extending tines disposed in circ-umferentially spaced longitudinally aligned side-by-side relation for sloping radially inwardly of the collet to abut a shoulder of a contact member inserted into the collet, and

means forming a key slot in said sleeve within the longitudinal confines of said tines to receive and to seat the collet retaining key.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Quackenbush 339-89 Nava et a1. 339217 Bachman 339-217 Bowen 339-217 Kelly 339217 Dahlen 339217 X Nava 339-217 X FOREIGN PATENTS MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner.

PATRICK A. CLIFFORD, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2779008 *Jan 31, 1955Jan 22, 1957Whitney Blake CoElectrical connector having resilient insert
US3068443 *May 5, 1960Dec 11, 1962Pyle National CoMulti-conductor connector
US3112149 *Sep 22, 1961Nov 26, 1963Cannon Electric CoFront release contact retention device
US3158424 *Feb 13, 1964Nov 24, 1964IttContact mounting
US3172721 *Jun 20, 1962Mar 9, 1965 Electrical connector contact and insulator retention system
US3200355 *Nov 24, 1961Aug 10, 1965IttElectrical connector having rf filter
US3227990 *Sep 12, 1963Jan 4, 1966Pyle National CoElectrical connector
GB896105A * Title not available
GB936926A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4182542 *Jul 10, 1978Jan 8, 1980Matrix Science CorporationClipless contact
US4728296 *Sep 5, 1986Mar 1, 1988Stamm Bradley CElectrical adaptor for downhole submersible pump
US6319073Dec 16, 1999Nov 20, 2001Amphenol CorporationHybrid submarine streamer connector
US8579643 *Dec 30, 2011Nov 12, 2013Unison Industries, LlcConnector assembly and method of fabricating the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/744
International ClassificationH01R13/426
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/426
European ClassificationH01R13/426
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 6, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BRINTEC SYSTEMS CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE.
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:MANUFACTURER HANOVER COMMERCIAL CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004689/0462
Effective date: 19860411
Jul 16, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER COMMERIAL CORPORATION, A NY
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BRAND-REX COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004289/0418
Effective date: 19831121
Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER COMMERIAL CORPORATION
Jun 27, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BRAND-REX WILLIMATIC CT. A CORP OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:AKZONA INCORPORATED;REEL/FRAME:004283/0913
Effective date: 19831130