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Publication numberUS3335436 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1967
Filing dateJul 15, 1965
Priority dateJul 15, 1965
Publication numberUS 3335436 A, US 3335436A, US-A-3335436, US3335436 A, US3335436A
InventorsSharp David H
Original AssigneeSharp David H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water-borne vessels
US 3335436 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 15, 1967 D. H. SHARP WATER-HORNE VESSELS Filed July 15, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR David H. SHARP D. H. SHARP WATER-BORNE VES SELS Aug. 15, 1967 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 15, 1965 5 Mm N0. 2 M H w w. MW 0 3 4 5 2 3 J 2 3 .3 W y J m m 2 M Fl I .1 S 5 6 4 m I .v M H 0,0 H 9 7 A Mm 4/ U INVENTOR 1 Dov id H. SHARP A TTORNEY D. H. SHARP Aug. 15, 1967 WATER-HORNE VESSELS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 15, 1965 David H. SHARP A TTORNEY United States Patent 3,335,436 WATER-HORNE VESSELS David H. Sharp, 6 Linnet Crescent, Strathmore, Quebec, Canada Filed July 15, 1965, Ser. No. 472,163 14 Claims. (Cl. 91)

This invention relates to water-borne vessels and is primarily concerned with the provision of an improved vessel which, while employing the same basic constructional principles, can be equipped for use as a sight-seeing pleasure boat, a tugboat or a ferry.

Vessels having a distinct bow and stern and a relatively narrow beam arnidship constitute practically all the shipping tonnage in existence at this time. A configuration of this type is obviously necessary for ocean-going vessels Where very great fore and the capability for high speed travel is required. These considerations do not necessarily apply to vessels which ply on lakes or rivers or in sheltered harbours. Vessels of the sight-seeing, tugboat and ferry types fall within this category. As regards ferry and sight-seeing vessels the main requirement is carrying capacity and, as regards tugboats, power and stability are essential. Speed is not usually of paramount importance.

Considering first of all sight-seeing vessels, the main disadvantage which arises when conventional vessels are employed for this purpose is that generally speaking every tourist on the vessel wishes to sit in the same region. For example, if the vessel sails towards the attraction then all the passengers wish to be in the bow of the vessel and if the vessel sails around the attraction every passenger on board wishes to be at the side of the vessel which is adjacent the attraction. Although this does not have any effect On the stability of the sight-seeing vessel, it is somewhat irritating for the tourist.

This problem is solved in accordance with the present invention by providing a vessel which, in plan, is substantially circular and which can rotate as it proceeds in any direction. The same basic hull construction is also em ployed for ferry and tugboats in accordance with the invention.

Thus the general object of the present invention is to provide an improved vessel which is intended for use on sheltered water.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved sight-seeing craft which affords every passenger a view of whatever scenic attraction is being toured regardless of where the passenger is sitting.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a tugboat which has great stability in all directions and thus is not limited to towing in the fore and aft directions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a vessel the propulsion mechanism of which can be removed as a unit for maintenance purposes.

These and other objects of the invention will become apparent as it is described in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of a sight-seeing vessel in accordance with the present invention,

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the vessel of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 3 is a section on the line 33 of FIGURE 2,

FIGURE 4 is a vertical section, to a greatly enlarged scale, through the control cabin or bridge of the vessel,

FIGURE 5 is a section of the structure illustrated in FIGURE 4, taken on the line 5-5 of FIGURE 4,

FIGURE 6 is a cross section of one of a number of flaps provided beneath the vessel,

FIGURE 7 is a side elevation, partly in section, showaft stability is required or where 3,335,436 Patented Aug. 15, 1967 ing an alternate embodiment of the invention, and taken along the line 77 of FIGURE 8; and

FIGURE 8 is a plan view of the vessel of FIGURE 7.

The water-borne vessel according to the present invention generally consists of a substantially circular hull having an inner core and an outer portion, means securing the inner core and outer portion together in a relatively rotatable manner, and propulsion means carried by the inner core.

Referring firstly to FIGURES 1 through 3 the vessel includes a substantially circular hull 10 the structure of which will be described with reference to FIGURES 4 and 5 hereinafter. The under surface 11 of the hull is in the form of a very shallow saucer. The control cabin or bridge for the vessel is located centrally of the hull 10 and is generally indicated by the reference numeral 12. A large number of seats 13, all facing radially outwardly of the hull, are provided, the seat-s being arranged in a circular pattern concentric with the hull 10. The total passenger carrying capacity of the illustrated embodiment is plus the crewman in the control cabin 12 and its diameter is approximately 40.

Referring now to FIGURES 4 and 5 the control cabin 12 consists of an outer vertical drum 14 and an inner vertical drum 15 mounted concentrically within the drum 14. The drum 14 forms part of the hull 10 and constitutes a main structural component of the vessel. As will be seen from FIGURES 4 and 5 the hull 10 includes a plurality of ribs 16 which radiate from the drum 14 and supports a further series of chordal ribs 19A upon which decking plates 17 are supported. By way of vertical strengthening partitions 19, the ribs 16 also support an outer skin 18 of the hull. The chambers formed within the hull are filled or partially filled with flotation material such as foamed plastic to aid in the production of a suflicient degree of buoyancy. The lower part of the dnnn 14 is welded to ribs 16, and the plates 17 and 18 and the configuration of the lower part of the drum 14 is such as to provide a series of part cylindrical, open sided chambers 20 for receiving a series of rubber-tyred wheels 21. The wheels 21 are mounted on vertical axles 22.

The inner drum 15 is rotatably mounted within the drum 14 by means of a roller arrangement generally indicated at 23 (FIGURE 4). The upper end of the drum 15 carries an outwardly directed, annular flange 24 which is turned downwardly at its outer edge to form a short cylindrical lip 25. A series of rollers 26 are carried by horizontal axles 27 which are themselves mounted in the drum 15 and lip 25. The upper edge of the drum 14 is T-shaped in cross-section and includes an upper, horizontal flange 28. The upper surface of the flange 28 forms a track for the rollers 26.

An inwardly directed, annular flange 29 of the drum 15 supports a floor 30 of the cabin 12. A seat 31 for the crewman is mounted on the floor 30.

The lower end of the drum 15 is closed by a horizontal disc-like plate 32 which lies substantially flush with the plate 16. For strengthening purposes, a further disc-like plate 33 extends across the drum 15 at a level slightly above the disc 32. Partitions 34 extend vertically between the plates 32 and 33, for strengthening purposes. As Will clearly be seen from FIGURE 4 the tyres 21 run on the outer surface of the part of the drum 15 that is between the plates 32 and 3-3 and to resist the inward thrust of the wheels 21- a strengthening ring 35 is welded or otherwise secured around the inside of the drum 15.

In the illustrated embodiment the vessel is electrically powered and batteries 36 are mounted in the chamber formed'betweeu the floor 30 and the plate 33, these batteries being supported by the plate 33. It will be understood that the usefulness of electrical power is limited and that, consequently, while electrical drive has been illustrated, a conventional diesel engine or a large motor of the outboard type would more usually be employed.

The motor for the vessel is bolted beneath the plate 32 and is referenced 37. This motor, in the illustrated embodiment, is obviously an electric motor suitably connected to the batteries 36. It is thought that the controls and circuitry for the motor 37 will be sufficiently well understood by a person skilled in the art to make detailed description thereof unnecessary. The motor 37 drives a propellor 38 of conventional design.

The steering mechanism for the vessel includes two vertical control elements 39 and 40 (see particularly FIG- URE 4) each of which is in the form of a vertical board mounted at the lower end of a shaft. The shafts for the boards 39 and 40 are referenced 41 and 42 respectively and are rotatably mounted in bearings carried by the flange 29 and the plate 33.

The shaft 41 terminates at the level of the flange 29 whereas the shaft 42 includes an upward extension 43 carrying a control handle 44 at the upper end thereof. The control handle 44 is free to execute an arcuate movement with the shaft 42 as axis and it will be seen that the upper end of the extension 43 is mounted in a bracket 45 projecting inwardly from the drum 15.

A lever 46 (see also FIGURE is mounted on the shaft 42 immediately beneath the floor 30 and this lever 46 consequently duplicates the arcuate movements of the handle 44. Two control wires 47 and 48 are secured to the lever 46. The control wire 47 passes round two pulleys 49 and 50, the pulley 50 being a double pulley, and then around a further double pulley 51 before being fixed to a second lever 52 which is secured to the shaft 41. The control wire 48 passes round a single pulley 53 and then around the pulleys 51 and 50 before being joined to the lever 52.

To permit access to the control cabin 12 the roof of the cabin, generally indicated at 54 in FIGURE 1, is suitably hinged so that the entire structure can be tilted to an inclined position thereby permitting the crewman to enter the cabin from above. An excess ladder (not shown) is provided.

A series of flaps 55 (see FIGURES 2, 3 and 6) are located beneath the vessel, the position of these flaps varying during the passage of the vessel through the Water. One extreme position (indicated at 55A in FIGURE 6) the flaps lie flush with the under surface 11 of the boat and obviously have no effect on the operation of the vessel. However, in the other extreme position (illustrated in FIGURE 6) these flaps project downwardly and consequently exert a drag on the vessel. The hull is formed with a slot 10A (FIGURE 6) to receive each flap S5. The flap S5 is carried by an axle 56 which is mounted at its ends in hearings in the walls of the slot. The flap proper projects from the slot 10A and into the water flowing beneath the vessel and a short handle 57 projects above the axle 56. An aperture 58 is formed in the handle 57 and a cable 59 passes through the aperture. Two spaced apart stops 60 and 61 are carried by the cable 59. The same cable 59 passes through the handle of each flap 55 so that the structure of FIGURE 6 is repeated at each flap. Thus the cables carries a series of stops 60 and 61, there being two stops for each handle. The cable 59 leads to a lever mounted on the drum 14 but available to the crewman in the control cabin 12. The crewman, by actuating the lever can urge the cable to the right in FIGURE 6 and bring the stop 60 to a position adjacent the handle 57 or vice-versa for opposite rotation of the hull.

In the use of the vessel, if it is desired to rotate the hull, the crewman moves the control lever for the flaps to the right or to the left depending on the desired direction of rotation. The speed of rotation is controlled by the same lever, the speed varying with the extent of movement of the lever between a central position and one of the extreme end positions. These positions correspond to flaps closed to flaps fully open. The movement of the lever urges the cable 59 to the right or to the left causing one or the other of the stops 60 or 61 to be located adjacent to the flap handle 57. If there is no forward motion of the vessel and no current, all the flaps will be partially or fully open with handles resting against the appropriate stops. Thus the flaps are free to close due to the slots 58 in the handles but are unable to open any further. As soon as the vessel begins to move in any directions, the flaps on one one side of the vessel will be pushed closed or partially so by the water pressure Whereas the water on the opposite side will keep the flaps open with the flap handles 55 forced against the stops on the cable 59. Thus a drag will be created on one side of the vessel but not on the other and rotation of the hull 10 will result.

In view of the fact that the vessel does not have a distinct fore and aft direction, fore and aft must be considered relative to the direction in which the control cabin is facing. Consequently, the bow of the vessel can be considered to be the point on the circumference of the vessel immediately in front of the crewman and the stern of the vessel can be considered to be the point on the circumference of the vessel diametrically opposed to the bow. These points, as will be explanied hereinafter, change during the course of a journey. The fore and aft diameter is thus the line joining the bow and stern.

The vessel is, for quick turn rounds, desirably boarded by passengers at a U-shaped dock into which the vessel enters. This means that passengers can board a vessel over a portion of the circumference of the vessel.

When the vessel is in motion it travels in a direction which depends on the direction in which the thrust of the propellor 38 is directed. To change the direction of motion the crewman turns the lever 44 thus rotating the shaft 42 and turning the lever 46. This has the eflect of exerting a pull on one of the control wires 47 and 48. In FIGURE 5 the lever 46 is illustrated in phantom and in a position which would result in a pull being exerted on the wire 47. This in turn results in the lever 52 (and consequently the centre board 39) being rotated to the position illustrated in phantom in FIGURE 5. Both centre boards now lie at angles to the direction of movement of the vessel and the water flow impinging on the two control boards 40 and 39- results in the production of a turning movement. The drum 15 consequently begins to rotate within the drum 14. In other words, the control cabin 12 rotates with respect to the hull 10. As a consequence the direction of thrust of the propellor 38 is also varied so that the vessel begins to change course. Once the vessel is travelling in the desired direction the crewman returns the handle 44 to its central position thus restoring the boards 39 and 40 to the position thereof in which they are aligned with the direction of thrust of the propellor 38 and consequently aligned with the direction of motion of the vessel. The turning couple is consequently eliminated and the rotation of the cabin 12 ceases. The entire vessel now proceeds in its new direction. The orientation of the hull is not altered.

As stated above, all the flaps 55 to one side of the fore and aft centre line of the vessel (fore and aft being as explained above) are lowered and all the flaps to the other side of the centre line are pushed up by the flow of water to a position flush with the hull. As stated, there is consequently, to one side of the centre line, a considerable drag on the hull and the effect of this drag is to rotate the hull 10 about the control cabin 12 as the vessel moves through the water. As explained above the flaps 55 are automatically pushed towards a vertical position by the water flowing past one side of the hull and pushed closed by the water flowing past the other side of the hull. The change over occurs as the flaps cross the fore and aft centre line of the vessel. The degree to which the flaps are pushed towards the vertical position is controlled by the position of the stops on the cable, and the position of these is controlled by the position of the stops on the cable 59, which is itself controlled by the crewman. The hull 12 can therefore be caused to turn continuously so that all the passengers, at intervals, view whatever scenic attraction is being toured. The speed of rotation depends on the attitude of the flaps and on the speed of the craft. The crewman in the control cabin 12 always remains directed in the direction of motion of the vessel.

A practical embodiment of the vessel described above would have an overall diameter of some 40 feet and would, as explained above, carry about 140 passengers. The normal water-line to control cabin roof height (in the unladen condition) would be in the region of 9 feet. A vessel of the described type can readily be constructed as a ferry. Without seats and with a hull of the requisite diameter, a very large area of free deck space is provided. Obviously, the construction would have to be considerably stronger than is required for a passenger vessel but it is thought that the necessary constructional changes would be well within the skill of a person familiar with this art.

A very considerable advantage of the form of vessel described above is that the propulsion system for the vessel is located within a readily removable central core constituted by the drum 15. In the event of a mechanical failure in the propulsion system there is, in many cases, no need to take the vessel out of service. A crane can very readily lift the drum 15 and all the parts carried thereby from the vessel and lower a further drum 15 and the propulsion system carried thereby into place. Repairs to the unserviceable power unit can then be effected on land. If desired, the rotation of the hull 10 can be created by means of a small driven propellor mounted towards the periphery of the hull.

With modifications to be explained below a craft having the general constructional form described above is suitable for use as a tug boat. The need for these changes will be better understood if it is borne in mind that in tug boats the power requirements are very substantially in excess of those of a sightseeing craft or ferry. In addition, it is also essentiial that the vessel be constructed in such a manner as to permit unobstructed passage of the tow rope over the side of the tug.

In the tug in accordance with the present invention the relative dimensions of the central core, represented by the cabin 12 in the above described embodiment, and the hull 10 are changed very considerably. Thus the hull 10 on a tug of 66 feet diameter is reduced to an annular rim or ring having a radial dimension of some 5 feet, the remainder of the vessel being constituted by the core. The rim or ring is releasably mounted on the remainder of the tug boat and is rotatable with respect to the remainder of the tug boat as is the hull 10 described above. By way of example, the edge of the core of the vessel can include a horizontal shelf extending inwardly from the periphery of the core and then upwardly to deck level. The ring is supported on this upper surface by means of rollers located between the ring and said surface and the ring carries a series of rubber tyred wheels (equivalent to the wheels 20) which run on the annular surface that extends upwardly from the level of said upper surface vto the deck. As tugs are also used for pushing against the side of the vessels which they are moving the outer periphery of the ring would be suitably covered by means of a rope bumper.

The main bollard of the tug is located in the centre of the vessel.

The control cabin for the tug is mounted to one edge of the vessel and preferably includes an upwardly extending structure which can be compared with the island of an aircraft carrier including cabins, washrooms, etc. However, in the tug an upper deck is provided projecting radially inwardly from this structure. The control cabin itself is mounted at a location vertically above the main bollard of the tug boat.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate the tug in accordance with the invention. This vessel has a hull which supports an outer rim 101. The rim 101 carries a circumferentially spaced series of rubber tyred-wheels 102 mounted on vertical axes 103. The wheels 102 when the rim 101 rotates with respect to the hull 100, run on a track 104 of short cylindrical height formed on the hull 100. An annular series of rollers 105, located by means of a roller cage, are disposed between the underside of the rim 101 and an upwardly facing track of the hull 100. A rope fender 106 extends around the periphery of the rim 101. The hull 100 carries a motor 107 which is of suflicient power for the intended purpose of the vessel. In some constructional forms two motors, mounted in opposed relation, 'may be required. The vessel includes two control boards 108 mounted for rotation with vertical shafts 109. These shafts are suitably connected to a control element within a control cabin 110. As will be seen the cabin 110 is mounted on a bridge or island 111 which extends upwardly and then inwardly.

The main bollard 112 of the tug is placed centrally of the hull end.

I claim:

1. A water-borne vessel comprising a hull which is substantially circular in plan and includes an outer annular hull portion and a central core portion, means rotatably securing said hull and core portion to one another with said hull portion encircling said core portion, a control constituting part of said central core portion, propulsion means carried by said central core portion, for propelling the vessel and for rotating the core portion, said propulsion means operating in conjunction with vertical control surface means carried by said central core portion, said vertical-control surface means being freely rotatable independent of said propulsion means, and operating means for permitting the orientation of said control surface means in vertical planes to be adjusted.

2. A water-borne vessel comprising a hull which is substantially circular in plan and includes an outer annular hull portion and a central core portion, means rotatably mounting said core portion and hull with respect to one another with said hull portion encircling said core portion, a control cabin constituting part of said central core portion, propulsion means carried by said central core portion for producing a thrust for propelling the vessel, two vertical boards projecting downwardly and constituting directional control means for the vessel and being freely rotatable independent of said propulsion means, means rotatably mounting said boards on said core portion for rotation about vertical axes, said axes being in a vertical plane aligned with the direction of thrust of the propelling means, and control means for rotating said boards about said vertical axes.

3. A vessel according to claim 2, wherein said control means includes handle means within said cabin.

4. A water-borne vessel comprising a hull Which is substantially circular in plan and includes an outer annular hull portion and a central core portion, means rotatably mounting said core portion and hull portion with respect to one another with said hull portion encircling said core portion, a control cabin constituting part of said central core portion, propulsion means carried by said core portion for producing a thrust for propelling the vessel, two boards projecting downwardly and constituting directional control means for the vessel, means mounting said boards on said core portion for rotation about vertical axes, cables secured to said boards, and control means for exerting a pull on said cables to rotate the boards in opposite directions about said vertical axes.

5. A water-borne vessel having a hull composed of a central core portion and an annular hull portion, said core portion being of relatively small diameter compared with the diameter of said hull, means rotatably mounting said core within a central aperture of said annular hull portion with said hull portion encircling the core portion, said annular hull portion having an annular upper surface for receiving a load to be transported, propulsion means fixedly secured to said core portion for propelling the vessel, control surface means projecting downwardly from said core, and constituting directional control means for the vessel, said control surface means being freely rotatable independent of said propulsion means, means rotatably mounting said control surface means on said core portion, means for rotating said control surface means thereby to vary the vertical plane of orientation of said control surface means, and a control means forming part of said central core.

6. A vessel according to claim wherein said control surface means comprises two vertical boards, and wherein said propulsion means includes a propulsion element for producing a vessel propelling thrust, said vertical boards including axes of rotation lying in a plane aligned with the direction of thrust of said element.

7. A vessel according to claim 5, wherein said central core includes a vertical drum having a horizontal floor there-across, said cabin being constituted by a space within said drum and above said floor, and said propulsion means being within said drum and below said floor.

8. A vessel according to claim 7, and including wheels for taking up lateral-thrust, mounted adjacent the inner periphery of said hull portion and running on the outer surface of said core.

9. A tugboat having a hull which in plan is substantially circular and consists of a core portion of relatively large radial dimension and an annular outer hull portion of relatively small radial width, means rotatably mounting said annular hull portion on said core, propulsion means carried by said core portion and control surface means depending from said core portion for propelling said tug boat and for rotating the core portion, said core portion including two vertical boards projecting downwardly and constituting directional control means for said tug boat, said vertical boards being mounted about vertical axes and being rotatable thereabout independent of said propulsion means, said hull including a plurality of circumferentially spaced wheels mounted on vertical axes, said tires being rotatable in a track mounted on said hull, and a control cabin mounted on said hull.

10. A water-borne vessel comprising a hull which is substantially circular in plan and includes an outer annular hull portion and a central core portion, means rotatably mounting said core portion and hull with respect to one another with said hull portion encircling said core portion, a control cabin constituting part of said central core portion, propulsion means carried by said central core portion, for producing a thrust for propelling the vessel, two vertical boards projecting downwardly and constituting directional control means for the vessel, means mounting said boards on said core portion for rotation about vertical axes, said axes being in a vertical plane aligned with the direction of thrust of the propelling means, and control means for rotating said boards about said vertical axes, said control means comprising means for urging said boards in opposite directions about the respective axes.

11. A water-borne vessel having a hull composed of a central core portion and an annular hull portion, said core portion being of relatively small diameter compared with the diameter of said hull, means rotatably mounting said core within a central aperture of said annular hull portion with said hull portion encircling the core portion, said annular hull portion having an annular upper surface for receiving a load to be transported, propulsion means fixedly secured to said core portion, said propulsion means including a propulsion element for producing a vessel propelling thrust, control surface means projecting downwardly from said core, and constituting directional control means for the vessel, said control surface means comprising two vertical boards, means rotatably mounting said control surface means on said core portion, means for rotating said control surface means thereby to vary the vertical plane of orientation of said control surface means, about an axes lying in a plane aligned with the direction of the thrust of said propulsion element, said vessel including a plurality of flaps rotatably mounted on horizontal axes beneath said hull portion and exposed to the flow of water beneath said hull, there being stop means for limiting pivoting movement of said flaps about an axes under the influence of water flow beneath the vessel thereby to cause rotation of said hull.

12. A Water-borne vessel having a hull composed of a central core portion and an annular hull portion, said core portion being of relatively small diameter compared with the diameter of said hull, means rotatably mounting said core within a central aperture of said annular hull portion with said hull portion encircling the core portion, said annular hull portion having an annular upper surface for receiving a load to be transported, propulsion means fixedly secured to said core portion, said propulsion means including a propulsion element for producing a vessel propelling thrust, control surface means projecting downwardly from said core, and constituting directional control means for the vessel, said control surface means comprising two vertical boards, means rotatably mounting said control surface means on said core portion, means for rotating said control surface means thereby to vary the vertical plane of orientation of said control surface means, about an axes lying in a plane aligned with the direction of the thrust of said propulsion element, said vessel including propulsion means mounted beneath the hull for propelling said hull in a rotary motion about said core.

13. A vessel according to claim 1, and including propulsion means mounted beneath the hull for propelling said hull in a rotary motion about said core.

14. A vessel according to claim 2, and including propulsion means mounted beneath the hull for propelling said hull in a rotary motion about said core.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,791,981 5/1957 Lane.

2,844,120 7/ 8 Nelson.

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,170,482 9/1958 France.

MILTON BUCHLER, Primary Examiner.

T. M. BLIX, Assistant Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2791981 *Dec 13, 1954May 14, 1957Alton W LaneBoat
US2844120 *May 11, 1956Jul 22, 1958Fred L NelsonBoat construction with well mounted propulsion unit
FR1170482A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3468276 *Mar 25, 1968Sep 23, 1969Pollard Frank BowlesMarine vehicles
US3476071 *Feb 26, 1968Nov 4, 1969Joseph E O HareSea-going craft
US3548428 *Jan 15, 1969Dec 22, 1970Eades Carl ECircular pleasure boat
US3850132 *Jan 2, 1974Nov 26, 1974Jackson WSteering unit for marine craft
US4696251 *Jul 7, 1986Sep 29, 1987Robert SpieldienerRapid river ride boat
US5331914 *Nov 25, 1992Jul 26, 1994Salmons Larry WHighly stable one-man boat
US6962124 *Feb 17, 2004Nov 8, 2005Charles Dean NorthRound boat
US7610870May 27, 2008Nov 3, 2009Zaseybida Norman JInterlocking platform boats
DE10310581A1 *Mar 11, 2003Sep 23, 2004Maurer Söhne Gmbh & Co. KgRundboot
EP0155778A2 *Feb 26, 1985Sep 25, 1985Intamin AgRapid river ride boat
EP0155778A3 *Feb 26, 1985Oct 15, 1986Robert SpieldienerRapid river ride boat
EP2193989A1 *Oct 8, 2009Jun 9, 2010Akira NagayamaVessel with hexagonal underwater section for propulsion of a barge
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/346, 114/70, 114/363
International ClassificationB63B1/04, B63B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B1/041
European ClassificationB63B1/04B