Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3335714 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1967
Filing dateAug 28, 1964
Priority dateAug 28, 1964
Publication numberUS 3335714 A, US 3335714A, US-A-3335714, US3335714 A, US3335714A
InventorsGiesy Jerry D
Original AssigneeGiesy Jerry D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for obtaining urine samples
US 3335714 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

15, 1967 J. o. GIESY APPARATUS FOR OBTAINING URINE SAMPLES Filed Aug. 28, 1964 Jerr D. 61' 65y INVENTOR.

United States Patent 3,335,714 APPARATUS FOR OBTAINING URINE SAMPLES Jerry D. Giesy, 8335 S. Ridgway Drive, Portland, Oreg. 97225 Filed Aug. 28, 1964, Ser. No. 392,745 2 Claims. (Cl. 128-2) This invention relates to collecting urine samples from female patients, where special problems are introduced in obtaining urine samples free from extraurethral contamination.

Medical science has become increasingly aware of the importance of obtaining urine samples in performing a thorough examination of a patient. It has been discovered, for instance, that in the vast majority of cases, urine samples collected from patients either show very few bacteria, or a bacteria count which is many times what is usual. A low bacteria count is indicative of a normal condition, while a high bacteria count often indicates an unhealthy condition which suitable diagnosis may correct. A bacteria count falling between these low and high ranges is a relatively rare event. Thus, in order that urine analysis be a useful diagnostic tool for the physician, it is important that a means be devised that makes possible the taking of urine samples where the bacteria therein is an accurate reflection of the condition of the urine as it exists in the bladder.

In the female, because of the position of the urethra, difliculties have been encountered in obtaining truly representative urine samples. Commonly, such samples are obtained by inserting a catheter into the urethra, with urine then flowing directly from the bladder. This, however, has the potential danger of introducing bacteria into what previously was a sterile bladder, a particularly disadvantageous feature with patients susceptible to urinary tract infections. With other techniques, urine samples frequently are contaminated with bacteria derived from extraurethral sources, such as the vagina, so that the samples do not show the condition of the urine as it exists in the bladder.

Generally, an object of this invention is to provide a device for obtaining urine samples from the urethra, where such samples are collected without penetration of the urethra and are relatively free of extraurethral contamination.

More specifically, an object is to produce such a device which includes means that forms a relatively tight seal about the meatus of the urethra, such seal defining a zone which excludes regions outside the urethra from where extraurethral contamination might be derived.

Yet a further object is to provide a device for taking urine samples which may be placed simply and rapidly in operative, urine-collecting position. The device features means which senses the anterior vaginal wall and with reference to this wall properly positions the sealing means described. The device is particularly well adapted to be used with the patient in a sitting position.

Yet another object is to provide a novel method for obtaining urine samples from females, which relies upon establishing a sealed zone about the meatus of the urethra, with such zone being properly positioned by reference to the anterior vaginal wall but excluding the vagina proper and adjoining areas.

These and other objects and advantages are obtained by the invention, and the same is described in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 illustrates apparatus as contemplated herein,

with portions broken away, such including a tubular body and a container for collecting urine mounted on one end of the tubular body;

FIG. 2 is a top view of the apparatus in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional View, taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 illustrates in dashed outline a representative female pelvis in median section, and shows how the device is used to obtain urine samples.

Referring now to the drawings, it will be noted that the apparatus illustrated comprises an elongated tubular body 10, comprising tube 12, and mounted on an end of this tube, an annular pad indicated at 14.

Tube 12 preferably is .made of a rigid or semirigid material, such as Pyrex, to enable suitable positioning of end 12a thereof by manipulation of end 12b. Pad 14 may be of compressible and resilient relatively soft material, whereby a cushion is formed at one end of the tubular body, and by way of example may be made of foamed rubber or other elastomer.

Extending :along through the tube is a channel 16. Pad 14 has a center opening extending therethrough, shown at 18, and opening 18 and channel 16 together form a passage extending the length of the tubular body with an entrance end adjacent end 12a of tube 12.

It will be noted that tube 12 is bent at 2.0 between the ends thereof, so that tubular body 10 has a concavo-convex outline viewing a side profile thereof. Thus, two reaches of tube are present which extend out to opposite ends of the tube and which define an obtuse angle, shown at A. This angle in a typical case may be in the range of plus or minus 5".

The upper end of the tubular body in FIG. 1, i.e., end 12a of the tube and pad 14, is placed between the labia of a female when taking a urine sample, and to facilitate such positioning, end 12a of tube 12 may be flattened slightly, as best shown in FIG. 2, whereby a somewhat eliptical outline is given to the cross section thereof. This outline is shared by cushion or pad 14.

At end 12a of tube 12, opposite lateral sides of the tube are shown bounded by concave edges such as the one indicated at 24. Pad 14 is grooved at 26 on the underside thereof and this groove receives the edges bounding the end of the tube'including edges 24.

As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, pad 14 includes a shoulder 28 located beyond end 12a of the tube and supported by a wall 29 adjacent one side of tube 12. A surface 30 bounds shoulder 28 on the inside of the shoulder, and, as best illustrated in FIG. 3 by the angle B, the surface slopes away from the axis of passage 12 progressing axially inwardly from the end of the tubular body. Integral with opposite ends of shoulder 28 are lip portions 32, and these smoothly meet with a heel portion 34, the heel and lip portions also being beyond end 12a of the tube. Wall 29 is flexible, and thus permits shoulder 28 to flex outwardly (or to the left in FIG. 3) when the deviceis used. Lip portions 32 joining with the shoulder are stretchable and elongate when shoulder 28 is bent outwardly. With the pad of compressible, resilient material, they are also compressible to a degree, in an axially inward direction at the end of the tubular body.

As best shown in FIG. 1, the outer end of shoulder 28, the lip portions, and the outer part of portion 34 generally define a plane C which is inclined from perpendicularity to the axis of the tube adjacent end 1211. Describing the relationship in another way, the heel portion is disposed inwardly toward end 12a of the tube from a plane passing through the outermost extremity of the shoulder and normal to the axis of end 12a of the tube.

Further describing the device, lower end 12b of the tube extends through a stopper 48 which is employed to mount the tube in the top of a flask or container 50, with the passage within tube 12 communicating with the interior of the flask. At 52 is indicated a vent conduit which communicates with the interior of the flask through the stopper. A diaphragm 54 forms a dam between the top of the flask and upper portions of tube 20. Thus, the crevice around the stopper where the stopper meets the neck of the flask is covered.

Referring to FIG. 4, where a female pelvis is illustrated in median section with such female in a sitting position, bodily portions shown include a bladder 69, the vagina 62, the symphysis pubis 64, and rectum 66. The urethra which connects with the bladder is shown at 68 and the urethral meatus at 68a. The distal end of the anterior wall of the vagina is indicated at 62a, and it will be noted that the anterior wall of the vagina and tissue adjacent the urethral meatus form what is referred to herein as a vaginal vestibule angle designated at 70.

When using the device of the invention, as an initial step, the device is thoroughly sterilized so as to be free of contamination. The patient whose urine is to be analyzed may then be placed in a seated position with her legs spread slightly apart. To obtain a sample, the upper end of the tube with pad 14 thereon is inserted between the labia and the pad brought to bear on tissue surrounding the urethral meatus with the pad thus forming a sealed zone about the meatus. Positioning of the pad is accomplished by proper manipulation of the flask and lower portion of tube 12. In positioning the pad, shoulder 28 is utilized as a positioning aid by moving surface 30 of the shoulder against the distal end of the anterior vaginal wall. With the pad positioned so as to encircle the urethral meatus and vestibule angle, the pad is pressed firmly against the tissue surrounding the meatus so that through prolapse of the meatus and adjacent tissue a protrusion is formed (shown in FIG. 4 at 72) extending into the space bounded by the pad. The pad itself deforms somewhat, with shoulder 28 bending outwardly or to the left. In FIG. 4 it will be noted that surface 30 more nearly parallels the side wall of the tube than it does in FIG. 3. With outward bending of the shoulder, there is stretching and elongation of lips 32. Since the lips are bearing against tissue, they also tend to be compressed inwardly somewhat, and thus in FIG. 4 a concave curvature is illustrated for the edges of the lips which is not shown in FIG. 3.

Ultimately a snug fit is produced about tissue protrusion 72. Surface 30 forms a seal with the anterior wall of the vagina, and the pad lips and portion 34 likewise form a seal with the tissue around the meatus. Because of the angularity described in connection with plane C defined by the top of the pad, tube 12 extends out from the labia at the slight incline illustrated in FIG. 4, thus to clear any means used to support the patient in her seated position. With the bend described in the tube, proper drainage into the flask occurs.

It will be noted that there is no penetration of the urethra. A relatively small sealed region is produced by the pad which includes only a small portion of the anterior vaginal wall. Urine flowing into the flask in this manner is kept free from extraurethral contamination and this is done without incurring the danger of introducing bacteria into the urethra.

Upon completing the taking of a urine sample, it is an easy matter to remove the device from the patient, and afterwards separate the stopper from the flask to accommodate the removal of urine from the flask.

The device of the invention may be utilized as described in taking urine samples from female patients of widely different ages and physical descriptions. Re-

sults have indicated that reliable bacteria counts are obtainable using the method.

While there has been described an embodiment of the invention, variations and modifications are possible without departing therefrom. It is desired to cover all such modifications and variations as would be apparent to one skilled in the art, and that come within the scope of the appended claims.

It is claimed and desired to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A device for obtaining urine samples from the urethra, with such samples free of extraurethral contamination, comprising an elongated tube of stiff material having a passage extending therethrough with an entering end of the passage at one end of the tube,

said tube between the ends thereof containing a bend whereby two reaches are present which define an obtuse angle, one of such reaches extending out to said one end of the tube,

an annular pad of stretchable and more pliable material than the tube mounted on said one end of the tube and extending around said entering end of said passage, said pad including a shoulder on one side of the tube at said one end, which is disposed outwardly beyond said one end of the tube and bounded by an inner surface that slopes away from the axis of said tube progressing axially inwardly from said one end,

said pad further including opposed lip means and a heel portion on the side of said tube opposite the tubes said one side which are outwardly beyond said one end of the tube and cooperate with said shoulder to bound said entering end and to produce encirclement of a urethral meatus and to form a seal therethereabout with the device in operative position,

said heel portion being disposed inwardly toward said one end of the tube from a plane passing through the outermost extremity of said shoulder and normal to the axis of said one end of the tube.

2. A device for obtaining urine samples from the urethra, with such samples free of extraurethral contamination, comprising an elongated tube having a passage extending therethrough with an entrance to said passage at one end of the tube,

said tube being of stiff material to enable positioning of said one end by manipulation of the opposite end of the tube,

an annular pad of compressible and resilient material mounted on said one end of the tube and extending around said entrance of said passage,

said pad including a shoulder on one side of the tube disposed beyond said one end of the tube and supported by a flexible wall in said pad permitting said shoulder to deflect laterally of the tube, said pad further including oppositely disposed lip portions joining with opposite ends of said shoulder, which are disposed outwardly beyond said one end of the tube and are stretchable to permit elongation, and deflecting of said shoulder,

said pad further including a heel portion disposed beyond said one end of the tube and on the side of the tube opposite the tubes said one side with opposite ends of the heel portion joining with said lip portions,

said lip portions, heel portions, and shoulder cooperating to produce encirclement of a urethral meatus and to form a seal thereabout with the device in operative position,

said heel portion being disposed inwardly toward said one end of the tube from a plane passing through the outermost extremity of said shoulder and normal to the aXis of said one end of the tube.

(References on following page) 5 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1867 Hadfield 128-300 12/1882 Simpson 4-110 10/1924 Behan 4-110 8/1945 Wells 4-110 6 2,490,969 12/ 1949 Kinyon 128-295 3,122,139 2/1964 Jones 128-275 3,259,920 7/1966 Voller 4-110 5 RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

K. L. HOWELL, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US70087 *Oct 22, 1867 Geokge h adfiel d
US268555 *Sep 7, 1882Dec 5, 1882 perrin simpson
US1510973 *Aug 6, 1923Oct 7, 1924Thomas BehanUrine conductor
US2382276 *Sep 7, 1942Aug 14, 1945Martin WellsFemale urinal
US2490969 *Nov 15, 1947Dec 13, 1949 kinyon
US3122139 *Jun 13, 1960Feb 25, 1964Jones Jr James MSurgical drainage appliance
US3259920 *Nov 6, 1963Jul 12, 1966Ronald L VollerSanitary fluid receptacle
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3432863 *Jun 27, 1966Mar 18, 1969Theodore F SchwartzUrinals for use by humans when in supine position
US3432864 *Feb 27, 1967Mar 18, 1969Theodore F SchwartzUrinal
US3432865 *Jun 7, 1967Mar 18, 1969Theodore F SchwartzUrinal
US3432866 *Dec 29, 1967Mar 18, 1969Theodore F SchwartzDisposable urinal
US3460529 *Jun 30, 1965Aug 12, 1969Leucci GinoSterile device for extracting urine samples and the like and package for same
US3512185 *Nov 9, 1967May 19, 1970Ellis Jacob PUrinary collection device
US3556102 *Jan 15, 1968Jan 19, 1971Davis Ray DFemale urinary device
US3583388 *Feb 7, 1968Jun 8, 1971Gambrell James BGuide for collection of urine in females
US3680543 *Jul 2, 1970Aug 1, 1972Gillette CoUrine collection device
US3878571 *Mar 2, 1973Apr 22, 1975Bard Inc C RUrine collection device
US3900019 *Aug 23, 1973Aug 19, 1975Logiadis Barbara AnnUrine sampling device and method
US3963020 *Feb 7, 1975Jun 15, 1976Hall Kenneth FUrinal for human females
US4023216 *Apr 30, 1975May 17, 1977Victor F. C. LiUrinal device
US4202058 *Oct 31, 1978May 13, 1980Anderson Robert WFemale urinal
US4204527 *Sep 12, 1977May 27, 1980Rehabilitation Institute Of ChicagoDisposable urethral catheter assembly
US4246901 *May 30, 1978Jan 27, 1981NasaUrine collection device
US4608046 *Jul 3, 1985Aug 26, 1986Keivan TowfighFlat folded female urinary aid
US4784654 *Nov 16, 1982Nov 15, 1988Illinois Tool Works, Inc.Urinary collection system and improved female urinary appliance
US4832046 *Dec 31, 1987May 23, 1989Medical Implements, Inc.Urine specimen collectors and method of detecting spurious urine specimens
US4889533 *May 28, 1986Dec 26, 1989Beecher William HFemale urinary collection devices having hollow-walled filled urine receptacles
US5129892 *Dec 11, 1990Jul 14, 1992Mccarthy Dennis SAnatomically designed, disposable specimen cup
US5147342 *Nov 21, 1990Sep 15, 1992Kane Patricia BSystems for collecting urine and other body fluids
US5251639 *Jul 15, 1992Oct 12, 1993Medline Industries, Inc.Catheter device
US5342330 *Dec 1, 1992Aug 30, 1994Kane Patricia BAssemblies for collecting urine and other body fluids
US5406650 *May 27, 1994Apr 18, 1995Einbinder; EliUrine receiver
US5622183 *Oct 21, 1994Apr 22, 1997Hazard; James T.Urine specimen and other body fluids collection device
US5687430 *Aug 5, 1994Nov 18, 1997Itai; MiekoPerfumed urine collection vessel for men and women
US5797855 *Mar 10, 1997Aug 25, 1998Hazard; James TaylorUrine specimen and other body fluids collection device
US6338166 *Jun 23, 1998Jan 15, 2002Erma HerefordFemale urinary receptacle
US7025733Jun 23, 2003Apr 11, 2006Mcquaid MatthewBiological fluid collection accessory device
US7993312 *Apr 2, 2008Aug 9, 2011Padmanabhan MahalingamUrinary device
US8192412 *Sep 24, 2008Jun 5, 2012Larry WallerPortable fluid storage device
US20090187154 *Sep 24, 2008Jul 23, 2009Larry WallerPortable fluid storage device
USRE33686 *Oct 18, 1989Sep 10, 1991Medical Implements, Inc.Urine specimen collectors and method of detecting spurious urine specimens
EP0018749A1 *Apr 15, 1980Nov 12, 1980National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationUrine collection apparatus
WO1995032660A1 *Mar 1, 1995Dec 7, 1995Eli EinbinderUrine receiver
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/574, 604/329, 4/144.3, D24/117
International ClassificationA61B10/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B10/007
European ClassificationA61B10/00L8