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Publication numberUS3335922 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1967
Filing dateJul 22, 1965
Priority dateJul 22, 1965
Publication numberUS 3335922 A, US 3335922A, US-A-3335922, US3335922 A, US3335922A
InventorsSamuel Leff
Original AssigneeSamuel Leff
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Erectable container for granular materials including simultaneously erectable pour spout
US 3335922 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. LEFF ERECTABLE CONTAINER FOR GRANULAR MATERIALS INCLUDING SIMULTANEOUSLY ERECTABLE POUR SPOUT Filed July 22, 1965 Aug. 15, 1967 3,335,922

INVENTOR 5411 1/62, ZFFF ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,335,922 ERECTABLE CONTAINER FOR GRANULAR MATE- RIALS INCLUDING SIMULTANEOUSLY ERECT- ABLE PUUR SPOUT Samuel Leif, 101 Harold Road, Woodmere, N.Y. 11598 Filed July 22, 1965, Ser. No. 474,089 9 Claims. (Cl. 222-528) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A rectangular container for fluent granular material. The container is shipped to a filler in flat folded condition and is erected prior to filling. One wall of the container near the top includes a pouring spout which is so integrated with the flat container that the spout itself is flat at the time of shipment to the packager and, furthermore, so that the spout, in closed condition, remains closed and a part of the wall of the container when the container is erected. The spout can be partially freed from said wall so as to swing to an open position when desire-d.

This invention relates to an erectable container for fluent granular materials, the container including a simultaneously erectable pour spout. The term erectable as used herein denotes convertibility from a flat folded shape to a larger space-defining shape, e.g. in the case of the container to the shape of a rectangular prism, by mere relative swinging movement of the panels of which the container and spout are composed, and without the use of adhesive for the erecting, i.e. setting-up operation, although adhesive or paper locks may be used to maintain the erected condition.

It is the primary object of my invention to provide a container for granular materials which can be quickly changed from flattened to erect condition, the container including a pour spout which is converted from flattened condition to erect condition by the erection of said container.

It is a further object of my invention to provide an erectable container, including an erectable pour spout, of the character described which can be manufactured and set up by standard machinery in the packaging industry so that my novel erectable container-cum-spout can be sold at an insignificantly higher price than a conventional erectable container.

It is another object of my invention to provide an erectable container, including an erectable pour spout, of the character described, wherein a standard container blank is utilized to which is fixed an inexpensive insert, whereby standard container blanks and packaging machinery coordinated therewith can be used in the practice of the present invention.

It is a further object of my invention to provide an erectable container, including an erectable pour spout, of the character described, wherein outward swinging movement of the erected pour spout uncaps an aperture in the container through which granular material may be discharged and wherein closing movement of the pour spout shuts the aperture, thereby providing a convenient dispensing means for removing the contents of the container for the home user.

It is yet another object of my invention to provide an erectable container, including an erectable pour spout, of the character described, wherein the components of the pour spout are added to and formed integrally with a standard container blank in a simple and inexpensive manner, so that manufacturers marketing a standard container will be induced to utilize a container with a pour spout in accordance with my invention.

It is another object of my invention to provide an 3,335,922 Patented Aug. 15, 1967 "Ice erectable container, including an erectable pour spout, of the character described, wherein the flat folded spout is integral with the flat folded container so that the container-cum-spout can be transported and stored in a flat compact condition and can be conjointly erected without having to employ machinery or personnel to secure an already erected spout, e.g. a metal spout, to an already erected container.

I wish it to be understood that the term spout as used herein denotes a chute type discharge instrumentality which is hinged to a container wall at an edge of an aperture therein so that the spout has side walls that when open laterally confine the flow of material from the aperture and when closed cooperate with the base of the chute and the side walls of the container to prevent dribbling of the containers contents.

Within the teaching of my invention, I desire to provide an erectable container for fluent granular materials which can be shipped and stored in flattened condition and which can be quickly opened to an erect position by conventional set up machinery immediately prior to filling the container with granular material, and thereafter closed by such machinery. In order to preserve the valuable feature of such containers which permits them to be shipped and stored flat, yet be quickly erected, I provide a pour spout which is secured to the container and which can be folded flat within the container. My container with its pour spoutcan subsequently be erected by and simultaneously with erection of the container.

In carrying out my invention, I need only slightly modify a standard container blank thereby ensuring that packaging machinery prepared for use with such blanks can still be utilized, with no expense for conversion to work with dilferent blanks. I thereby provide a new and improved container, having a pour spout, which can be formed, set up, filled and closed by machinery already existing in the industry.

The foregoing and various other objectives and advantages of my invention will become apparent to the reader in the following description.

My invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements and arrangements of parts which will be exemplified in the erectable containers with pour spouts and the manner for forming the same hereinafter described and of which the scope of application will be indicated in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings in which are shown various possible embodiments of my invention,

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a standard container blank slightly modified in accordance with the teaching of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the blank insert;

FIG. 3 is a reduced perspective view of the container in fiat folded condition;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the container in erect condition with its pour spout closed;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 but showing the pour spout partially open;

FIGS. 6 and 7 are enlarged cross-sectional views taken substantially along the lines 66 and 7-7, respectively, of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line 88 of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the pouring spout of a container embodying another form of my erectable container.

Referring now in detail to the drawings and more particularly, to FIGS. 1 and 2, the reference numeral 10 denotes a blank from which the container 12 will be formed. Similarly, the reference numeral 14 denotes a for the pour spout blank from which will be formed an insert to be utilized as a part of a pour spout 16.

The blanks and 14 may be formed from any relatively stiff or semi-stiff material which is conventional for containers for granular materials in the packaging industry. Preferably, the blanks are formed from stiff paper stock such as card-board which is light in weight. If desired, the blanks can be faced with a synthetic plastic impregnate or laminate and may carry appropriate advertising matter imprinted thereon. Each blank is made from a larger piece of such material in a conventional manner as, for instance, with steel rule dies which cut out the forms of the blanks, cut various slits and perforations and pressure crease the fold lines within the blanks.

Formed in the blank 16 are two like broad rectangular walls 18, 20 and two like narrow rectangular walls 22, 24. The broad wall 20 is connected to the narrow wall 24 by a fold line 26, and the broad wall 18 is connected to the narrow wall 24 by a fold line 28 and to the narrow wall 22 by a fold line 30. The broad wall 28 is connected by another fold line 32 to an elongated flap 34. The walls and fold lines are of equal height and are located across the width of the blank in the order shown.

The blank 18 further includes four bottom segments 36, 38, 40, 42 which when glued together will form a standard multi-layered bottom wall for the container. The segments 36, 38, 4 8, 42 are connected to the walls 22, 18, 24 and 28, in that order, by fold lines 44, 46, 48, 50, respectively. The adjacent edges of the segments are separated by slits. The fold lines 44, 46, 48 and 50 are colinear. The blank 10 also includes three top segments 52, 54, 56 which are connected by fold lines, respectively, 58, 60 and 62 to the walls 22, 18, and 20 in that order. The segments 52, 54 and 56 when glued together form a multilayered top wall 64 for the container. The adjacent edges of the segments 52, 54 are separated by slits. The fold lines 58, 60 and 62 are colinear. The blank 10 to the point thus far described is conventional for forming containers in the packaging industry and, therefore, constitutes a component of my invention which can be manufactured and handled by existing machinery in this industry.

If a standard container were being formed, the fiat 34 would be glued to a vertical marginal zone of the narrow wall 22, and with the box flattened as shown in FIG. 3, in this condition the box would be shipped and stored, prior to being filled by the packager. Immediately before the container was filled, it would be erected by outfolding the narrow walls from the broad walls, i.e. by expanding into rectangular shape the parallelogram formed by the ring of flat folded narrow and broad walls, and it would be mounted erect by overlapping and gluing either the top or bottom segments so as to form either a top or bottom wall. The notches 65 aid in expanding the box into rectangular shape. The container would then be filled with fluent granular material such as soap flakes, soap powder, rice, sugar, salt, cake mix, cereal, dry bleach and the like from the other still open end. Then the remaining set of segments would be overlapped and glued to complete the other wall of the container. A discharge opening would be formed in the container by tearing the same along preformed perforated lines.

The blank 10 made in accordance with the present invention differs from the conventional blank in that a panel 66 of rectangular configuration is formed in and is actually an end part of one of the walls of the container, this desirably being in a narrow wall 24. The panel 66 will, when the container is fully erected, be the front (base) panel of the pour spout 16.

It will be appreciated that the panel 66 is an end portion of the narrow wall 24, and is integral with the remainder of said wall. The panel 66 is connected to said remainder of the narrow wall 24 by a transverse fold line 68 which runs perpendicular to the fold lines 26, 28

and which continues across the entire width of the narrow wall 24. The front panel is connected on opposite parallel sides by perforated parallel fold lines 70/, 72 to the broad walls, respectively, 1-8, 20. The perforated fold lines 70, 72 are extensions of the fold lines, respectively, 28, 26. A tab 74 is connected to the top edge of the front panel 66 by a fold line 76, the tab 74 having a distant free edge 78 which is outwardly convex. The fold line 76 is offset upwardly from the adjacent fold lines 60, 62. The tab 74 is separated from the adjacent segments by slits.

To form the remainder of the pour spout 16 other than the base-forming front panel 66, I provide a onepiece pour spout insert 80 which is to be fixed during assembly to the front panel 66. The blank 14 for the insert 80 includes two like mirror-image side panels 82, 84 connected by a relatively narrow elongated back panel. The length of the back panel 86 is the same as the width of the narrow Wall 24. The side panels 82, 84 are connected to the back panel 86 by parallel fold lines, respectively, 88 and 90. The opposed edges 92, 94 of the side panels 82, 84 are arcuate and preferably are of constant radius. Optionally, the edges may be of increasing radius, in this case, the greatest radius of the edges of the side panels being at the point at which they approach the back panel 86. Each side panel has at a like front edge, a like tab, the side panel 82 being connected to the tab 96 by a fold line 98 and the side panel 84 being attached to the tab 106- by a fold line 162. The side panels are of the same width Where they are connected to the back panel.

During assembly to prepare the container so that its pour spout can assume a Hat folded condition prior to erection, the insert 8D is fixed to the interior face of the front panel 66, as by infolding the tabs 96, 100 and adhering them to said panel at the side edges thereof. Said tabs are positioned so that the fold lines 98, 102 lie against the perforated lines, respectively, 70, 72 with the tabs being located inwardly from and between said fold lines. Further, the bottom edges of the tabs 96, 109 are positioned along the fold line 68. The insert is so dimensioned that when the tabs 96, 100 are located in their aforesaid position on the interior of the front panel 66, the curvature of the arcuate edges 92, 94 is approximately tangent to the fold lines 69, 62 connecting the broad walls to the top segments and so that the upper ends of the side panels 82, 84 are at or a few hundredths of an inch above the line of fold lines 58, 60, 62.

Then, the narrow side Wall 22 is fixed, as by gluing, to the flap 34, thereby completing a parallelogram ring of side walls, still having an open top and bottom. In this condition, the container 12 can be folded fiat, the ring of walls 22, 18, 24 and 20 being collapsed with one broad wall 20 and an adjacent narrow wall 24 being substantially in one plane and the other broad wall 18 and its associated narrow wall 22 being in another plane parallel to and closely adjacent said first plane. (See FIG. 8.)

At the same time the pour spout insert 80 is collapsed flat and in this state it lies between the collapsed ring of walls. One of the side panels 84 thereof is in one plane and the other side panel 82 and the back panel are in another plane, said planes being essentially parallel. (See FIG. 8.) The side panel 82 forms a angle with (is coplanar with) the back panel 86, and the latter panel forms a 360 angle with the other side panel 84, with the back panel being juxtaposed against said side panel 84.

In this condition, the flattened containers 12 with their afiiliated flattened pour spouts 16 assembled therewith are shipped and stored. When a container is to be filled, it is erected manually or by conventional setting-up machines by pressing toward one another the opposite edges A and B of the container as indicated in FIG. 3, the container being thereby brought to an erect rectangular state with the broad walls 18, 2.1 being spaced apart by the narrow walls 22, 24. Then the bottom segments 36, 38, 40 and 42 are overlapped and glued in a conventional manner to form a bottom wall. This retains the container in an erect condition, ready for filling with granular material. Alternately, at this point, the top wall 64 can be closed and the bottom wall left open.

It will be appreciated that as the flattened box is brought to erect condition, simultaneously therewith, and by the moving of the broad walls with respect to the side walls, the panels of the pour spout insert are also erected, i.e. brought to a rectangular positional relationship. (See FIGS. 6 and 7.) That is, as the broad walls, and more specifically the broad wall 20 moves into a right angle with respect to the narrow panel 24, said broad wall forces the side panel 84 into a right angle with respect to the front panel 66. As said side panel swings into rectangular position, it simultaneously moves the other side panel to a similar position through the back panel 86 because the spout has a parallelogram cross section. In this erect rectangular position, the side panel 84 is flat against the interior face of the broad wall '18, the opposed side panel 82 is flat against the interior face of the broad wall 20, and the back panel 86 runs parallel to the front panel 66 and holds the rear portions of the side panels spaced apart and against their associated abutting walls.

In this described erect condition, the container is filled with fluent granular material in a conventional manner.

After filling, the container is closed by conventional machinery by forming the top wall 64. This is accomplished as by overlapping and gluing the elongated segment 56 against the end segment 52, and then overlapping and gluing the elongated segment 54 against the segment 56. (See FIG. 6.)

To firmly hold the top of the front panel 66 in place, the tab 74 is lightly detachably fixed to the top wall 64 as by spot gluing as at 104 at areas or along a zone spaced from its tip 78 in order to allow its tip to be lifted when the tab is to be detached from its as-sold position. In this state, the container with its contents is placed on the retail market.

When the housewife desires to dispense the granular material from the container, the pour spout is opened by grasping the tab 74 and pulling it away from the top wall 64. This is easily done since the tip 78 of the tab is not fixed to the top wall and can be easily gripped, and because the tab is only lightly secured to the top wall.

Continuing to grasp and pull the tab, the front panel is then broken away from the broad walls of the container by tearing along the perforated fold lines 70, 72 on each side of the front panel. The panel then can be swung outward, hinging on the fold line 68 (see FIG. 5), and opening a rectangular discharge aperture 106 at the top end of the narrow wall 24. As the container is tilted so that granular material pours out therefrom, its flow is guided by the interior face of the front panel 66 and the interior faces of the side panels 82, 84.

As the pour spout swings outwardly, there is constant friction between the arcuate edges 92, 94 of the side panels and the edge 107 of the container defining the top of the discharge aperture 106. The friction between the side panel edges and the discharge edge tends to maintain the pour spout in any position in which it is left. The back panel is positioned by the two like small rearwardly extending stepped protrusions 108 each at the rear edge of a different side panel of the pour spout.

Rotative movement of the pour spout completely out of the container is prevented by abutment between the leading edge of the back panel and the inside face of the top wall 64 adjacent the edge 107 of the discharge opening 106. Said abutment acts to limit the outward swing of the pour spout.

The pour spout is closed by simply pushing it back to its original position, thereby again shutting the discharge opening 106. The pour spout remains in this position by the friction between it and contacting parts of the remainder of the container, and especially by friction between the arcuate edges 92, 94 of the side panels and the edge 107. Abutment of the tab 74 against the top edge 107 of the discharge opening 106 limits inward movement of said pour spout. In closed position the side panels 82, 84 prevent the contents of the container from dribbling out the side of the discharge aperture 106.

FIG. 9 illustrates a modifiedform 12 of my erectable container. In this form, the pour spout 16' is located at one corner of the container and has a front panel 66' located in and constituting a transverse segment of the narrow front wall 24' of the container 12'. The pour spout 16' is the same as the pour spout 16 in the first described container 12, except that it extends across only a lateral segment of e.g. about one half of the width of the container 12.

One edge of the front panel 66 is located at the side edge of the narrow side wall 24' and is connected to the adjacent broad wall 20 of the container 12' by a perforated fold line 72. The other side edge of the front panel 66' is defined by a perforated line 73" which runs parallel to the length of the narrow side wall 24 and between the fold line 68 and the top edge of the side wall 24'. The perforated line 73' is midway between the perforated line 72' and the opposed fold line 28'. The fold line 68' runs perpendicular to the perforated fold line 72' and between said perforated fold line and the perforated line 73'. The panel 66 has connected thereto a tab 74' which is one lateral part of a top segment 75 attached by a fold line 76' to the front narrow wall 24'.

The spout 16' is located at that corner of the container 12 defined by the narrow wall 24' and a broad wall 20. These are walls which when the container is erected from a flattened condition to an erect condition, move from a 180 relationship to a 90 relationship. Thereby, as the container 12' is erected, the pour spout 16 will simultaneously be erected by the positional change between the narrow wall and the broad wall. During this positional change, the broad wall 20 will swing the side panel 82' to a right angle with respect to the front panel 66, thereby bringing the pour spout insert 80 to a rectangular position. The second embodiment 12' is especially valuable where the wall 24 is wider than usual with respect to the remainder of the container and a pour spout formed across the entire width of this wall would be unduly large, or where due to the nature of the contents of the container, only a small discharge opening is appropriate because only a relatively small quantity of said contents would be desired by a home owner at any one particular time.

It thus will be seen that I have provided articles which achieve the several objects of my invention and which are well adapted to meet the conditions of practical use.

As various possible embodiments might be made of the above invention, and as various changes might be made in the embodiments set forth, it is to be understood that all matter herein described or shown in the accompanying drawings is to be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A rectangular container for storing fluent granular material and formed from paperboard stock, said container including a manually manipulatable pour spout integral therewith, said container with its spout being expansible from a flat folded condition to an erect condition, said erect container including a parallelogram ring of two opposed narrow and two opposed broad side walls, a top wall and a bottom wall, said walls being connected by fold lines, the pour spout having a front panel, two side panels and a back panel, said front panel being of rectangular configuration and constituting a portion of and formed across the entire width of one of said walls, one linear transverse edge of said front panel being connected to the remainder of the said one wall by a fold line 7 perpendicular to the two opposed walls to which said one Wall is connected and about which the panel can experience hinged swinging movement between an open position outwardly from said one wall and a closed position coplanar with the said one wall, cooperating means on the container and pour spout for limiting movement of the front panel beyond either of said positions, said side panels being parallel and each being connected by a fold line to a different one of the two edges of the front panel of the pour spout perpendicular to said fold line on which the front panel pivots, the back panel being connected to the side panels by fold lines and spacing the rear edges of the side panels apart a distance the same as the width of the front panel, the container in fiat folded condition having its ring of side walls collapsed with the panels of the spout collapsedly interposed therebetween and said container in erect condition erecting the spout by retaining the panels of the spout in rectangular position and said two opposed walls each being juxtaposed against a different side panel of the spout.

2. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein the front panel is formed in a narrow side wall of the container, the front panel constituting an end portion of said narrow side Wall.

3. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein opposed parallel side edges of the front panel are connected to the remainder of the container by perforated fold lines whereby the front panel can be broken away from the remainder of the container enabling the pour spout to be swung outwardly.

4. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein a tab is connected to the front panel, said tab holding said front panel closed by being initially lightly fixed to the container and being readily separable therefrom so as to permit the pour spout to be swung open.

5. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cooperating means includes a tab fixed to the front panel, said tab abutting a wall of the container when the spout is in its closed position thereby to prevent swinging movement of the pour spout inwardly of the container beyond said position.

6. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein the cooperating means includes the back panel of the pour spout, said back panel in its path of travel abutting a wall of the container when the pour spout is in its open position thereby to prevent swinging movement of the pour spout outwardly beyond said position.

7. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 1 wherein the front panel constitutes an end portion of a narrow wall of the container, each of the side panels having like edges arcuate in configuration, said edges being the upper edges of the pour spout so that as said pour spout swings outwardly, said edges slide against the top wall of the container, said side walls being dimensioned so that there is constant friction between said arcuate edges and the top wall.

8. A rectangular container for storing fluent granular material and formed from paperboard stock, said container including a manually manipulatable pour spout integral therewith, said container with its spout being expansible from a fiat folded condition to an erect condition, said erect container including a parallelogram ring of two opposed narrow and two opposed broad side walls, a top wall and a bottom wall, said wall being connected by fold lines, the pour spout having a front panel, a tab attached to the front panel and exposedly located for convenient grasping, two side panels and a back panel, said front panel being of rectangular configuration and constituting a portion of and formed in a corner of an end portion of one of said narrow walls which folds flat in collapsed condition, one linear edge of said front panel being connected to the remainder of the said one wall by a fold line perpendicular to the two opposed walls to which said one wall is connected and about which the panel can experience hinged swinging movement between an open position outwardly from said one wall and a closed position coplanar with the said one wall, cooperating means on the container and pour spout for limiting movement of the front panel beyond either of said positions, said side panels being parallel and each being connected by a fold line to a different one of the two edges of the front panel of the pour spout perpendicular to said fold line on which the front panel pivots, the back panel being connected to the side panels by fold lines and spacing the rear edges of the side panels apart a distance the same as the width of the front panel, the container in fiat folded condition having its ring of side walls collapsed with the panels of the spout collapsedly interposed therebetween and said container in erect condition erecting the spout by retaining the panels of the spout in rectangular position and at least one of said two opposed walls being juxtaposed against one of the side panels of the spout, the adjacent one of said panels sliding relatively against said Wall during hinged swinging movement of the spout.

9. A rectangular container, including a pour spout, as set forth in claim 8 wherein the front panel constitutes one lateral section of an end portion of one of the narrow Walls, the top of the panel being coincident with the end of said narrow wall and one side of the front panel being coincident with one of the fold lines connecting said narrow wall to an adjacent broad Wall, said fold line connecting a narow wall and a broad wall of the container in a 180 relationship when the container is flattened, and moving to a relationship when the container is erected.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,332,153 10/1943 Levin 222531 2,837,254 6/1958 Goldstein 222--531 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

R. PESHOCK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2332153 *Feb 17, 1941Oct 19, 1943Levin Eli HPouring spout for containers
US2837254 *May 17, 1955Jun 3, 1958Goldstein SaulPouring spout for standard blanks
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3581708 *Feb 28, 1969Jun 1, 1971Beck James WFolding animal house
US4921104 *Feb 13, 1989May 1, 1990Professional Packaging LimitedPackage with reclosable pouring spout
US6227440 *Feb 22, 1999May 8, 2001Smurfrit-Stone Container CorporationPre-lined carton with dispensing spout
US20060000880 *Jun 29, 2005Jan 5, 2006Sam WeinBox with widest possible pouring spout
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/528, 229/217, 229/215
International ClassificationB65D5/74
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/744
European ClassificationB65D5/74B2A