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Publication numberUS3335946 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1967
Filing dateApr 12, 1965
Priority dateApr 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3335946 A, US 3335946A, US-A-3335946, US3335946 A, US3335946A
InventorsJan Putterlik
Original AssigneeCeskoslovenska Akademie Ved
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Separating disks for centrifuges
US 3335946 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 15, 1967 .1. PUTTERLl K 3,335,946

SEPARATING DISKS FOR CENTRIFUGES Filed April 12, 1965 INVENTOR.

United States Patent VO 3,335,946 SEPARATING DISKS FOR CENTRIFUGES Jan Putterlik, Prague, Czechoslovakia, assignor to Ceskoslovenska akademie ved, Prague, Czechoslovakia Filed Apr. 12, 1965, Ser. No. 447,209 Claims priority, application Czechoslovakia,

Apr. 14, 1964, 2,155/64 2 Claims. (Cl. 233-41) This invention relates generally to the separating disks of centrifuges used in separating the liquid and solid constituents of a slurry or dispersion so as to obtain a concentrated slurry or dispersion, that is, the solids with a much reduced proportion of the liquid, or a clarified liquid.

Centrifuges of the type described above generally include a hollow bowl rotated about its axis and containing an axial series of spaced, frusto-conically shaped separating disks of somewhat smaller diameter than the bowl shell. The slurry, dispersion or other incoming material to be centrifuged, is admitted through feed channels which discharge near the outer edges of the separating disks, and the clarified liquid is removed from the bowl through an outlet positioned at or near the axis of rotation. Thus, the liquid constituent is made to flow centripetally, or radially inward, through the spaces between the separating disks in order to reach the outlet for the liquid and, during such flow, the solid particles are driven centrifugally so as to collect in the radially outward portion of the bowl shell beyond the perimeters of the separating disks. Discharge nozzles are further provided, in certain existing centrifuges, for discharging the concentrated solids which collect in the outer peripheral portion of the bowl shell.

In existing centrifuges of the described character, the separating disks are formed of thin sheet metal which is either stainless steel or treated so as to resist corrosion. Such existing sheet metal separating disks are further provided with spacing projections in the form of metal stampings which are welded to the conical surfaces of the disks at radially spaced intervals. It will be apparent that the manufacture of such sheet metal separating disks is difiicult and costly, as the disks must be accurately shaped and have smooth surfaces in order to ensure the high operating efliciency, and relatively low power consumption of the centrifuge.

The existing separating disks of sheet metal have two further substantial disadvantages. The sheet metal pre viously used for the separating disks has a high modulus of elasticity in tension, for example, up to 20,000 kg./mm. in the case of steel, and, by reason of such high modulus of elasticity, the separating disks formed of sheet metal respond readily to vibration of the bowl or rotor of the centrifuge, which vibration may result from the dynamic unbalance of the separating disks. The vibrations of the separating discs interfere with the centrifugal separation of the dispersion or slurry in the thin layers or flows passing between the separating disks. Further, the sheet metal for forming the separating disks usually has a specific gravity of approximately 8.0 which may be almost eight times larger than the specific gravity of the dispersion flowing between the separating disks so that any inaccuracy in the shape and balance of the separating disks with respect to the axis of rotation constitutes a source of dynamic unbalance giving rise to vibration of the rotated bowl or rotor. Such dynamic unbalance cannot be easily eliminated by balancing of the several separating disks, as it is difiicult to ensure the same relatively large number of disks will be assembled in the same order or sequence whenever the bowl or rotor is opened and has the disks removed therefrom.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide separating disks for centrifuges which avoid the above mentioned disadvantages of the separating disks that have been heretofore available.

In accordance with an important aspect of this invention, separating disks for centrifuges are formed of a material having a modulus of elasticity which is no greater than 1,000 kg./mm. and a specific gravity no greater than approximately 2.0, that is, not exceeding approximately two times that specific gravity of the dispersion which is to be centrifuged.

The above, and other objects, features and advantages of this invention, will be apparent in the following detailed description of an illustrative embodiment thereof which is to be read in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIG: 1 is an elevational view of a separating disk for a centrifuge in accordance with this invention; and

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the lines 22 on FIG. 1.

Referring to the drawing in detail, it will be seen that a separating disk 10 embodying this invention may be generally fr-usto-conical in shape and have radially directed rims 11 and 12 extending along its inner and outer peripheries. At least one of the conical surfaces of the disk 10 has suitably spaced projections 13 extending therefrom for the purpose of uniformly spacing apart adjacent separating disks when the latter are assembled in the bowl or rotor of a centrifuge.

In accordance with this invention, the separating disk 10 is formed of a material having a modulus of elasticity not greater than approximately 1,000 kg./mm. and a specific gravity not greater than approximately 2.0. Many different types of synthetic resin materials satisfy the foregoing requirements for forming separating disks in accordance with this invention, such as, for example, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, textile and glass laminates, resins and the like. Separating disks for centrifuges formed of such synthetic materials in accordance with this invention can be conveniently molded, for example, by injecting molding, so that the spacing projections 13 can be simultaneously formed with the remainder of each separating disk and form integral parts of the latter.

When separating disks are formed of a material with a relatively low modulus of elasticity, as in accordance with this invention, such disks serve to damp the vibrations of the rotated rotor or bowl and thus do not vibrate or respond to vibration of the rotor or bowl arising from any dynamic unbalance of the latter. By reason of their vibration damping properties, the separating disks embodying this invention secure the smooth and elfective centrifugal separation of the solids from the liquid constituents in the layers of flows passing between the adjacent separating disks. Due to the fact that the material forming the separating disks in accordance with this invention has a specific gravity which is much closer to the specific gravity of the dispersion or slurry being centrifuged than is the specific gravity of the previously known sheet metal separating disks, the disks embodying this invention do not cause any appreciable or significant dynamic unbalance of the rotor or bowl. Even if there are inaccuracies in the shapes of the separating disks embodying this invention or in their concentricity with respect to the axis of rotation, such inaccuracies are substantially compensated by the filling of the spaces between adjacent separating disks with the dispersion flowing therethrough and having a specific gravity which is, at the worst, only one-half of the specific gravity of the material forming the disks.

Since separating disks embodying this invention can 3 be conveniently molded by injection molding or other conventional molding procedures, the same can be very economically produced, particularly when one considers that the spacing projections are simultaneously formed thereon, rather than being separately attached, as in the case of the previously existing sheet metal separating disks, It will also be apparent that injection molded separating disks embodying this invention can be formed with a perfectly accurate shape and with smooth surfaces so as to promote the effective centrifugal separation of the liquid and solid constituents of a dispersion.

Although the materials proposed for forming of the separating disks in accordance with this invention have a strength which is relatively low when compared with that of the sheet metal previously used for separating disks, such relatively low strength is not disadvantageous by reason of low specific gravity of the proposed materials which makes it possible for the stress resulting from the centrifugal force to be compensated, at least to a considerable extent, by the centripetal, or radially inwardly directed force or hydrostatic lift acting on the separating disks as a result of the radially inwardly directed flow between adjacent disks. The separating disks formed from the proposed synthetic materials in accordance with this invention have a further advantage in the resistance to abrasion of such materials by the dispersion flowing between the separating disks.

Although an illustrative embodiment of this invention has been described in detail herein with reference to the accompanying drawing, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to that precise embodiment, and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein by one skilled in the art without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention, except as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A separating disk for a centrifuge, said disk being of a material having a specific gravity of less than approximately 2.() and a modulus of elasticity in tension of less than approximately 1000 kg./mm.

2. A molded separating disk for a centrifuge, said disk being of generally frusto-conical configuration and having integral spacing projections extending from at least one surface thereof, said disk being of a synthetic material having a specific gravity of less than approximately 2.0 and a modulus of elasticity in tension of less than approximately 1000 kg./mm.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 989,099 4/1911 Wright 233- 1,168,452 1/ 1916 Anderson 233-29 3,235,174- 2/1966 Downey 233-l9 M. CARY NELSON, Primary Examiner.

H. KLINKSIEK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US989099 *Jun 23, 1908Apr 11, 1911Laval Separator Co DeCentrifugal liquid-separator.
US1168452 *Sep 28, 1914Jan 18, 1916Champion Blower & Forge CoCentrifugal cream-separator.
US3235174 *Jan 24, 1961Feb 15, 1966Aero Flow Dynamics IncCentrifugal liquid purifier
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4036429 *Mar 18, 1975Jul 19, 1977Ivin Jury FBowl of centrifugal separator
US5045049 *Oct 3, 1989Sep 3, 1991Alfa-Laval Separation AbCentrifugal separator
US5052996 *Sep 27, 1989Oct 1, 1991Alfa-Laval Separation AbCentrifugal separator
US6210311 *Oct 21, 1998Apr 3, 2001Analytical Engineering, Inc.Turbine driven centrifugal filter
US6261455Oct 18, 1999Jul 17, 2001Baldwin Filters, Inc.Centrifuge cartridge for removing soot from oil in vehicle engine applications
US6296765Oct 18, 1999Oct 2, 2001Baldwin Filters, Inc.Centrifuge housing for receiving centrifuge cartridge and method for removing soot from engine oil
US6428700Sep 6, 2000Aug 6, 2002Baldwin Filters, Inc.Disposable centrifuge cartridge backed up by reusable cartridge casing in a centrifugal filter for removing soot from engine oil
US6517475Sep 6, 2000Feb 11, 2003Baldwin Filters, Inc.Centrifugal filter for removing soot from engine oil
US6520902Sep 6, 2000Feb 18, 2003Baldwin Filters, Inc.Centrifuge cartridge for removing soot from engine oil
US6579218Sep 6, 2000Jun 17, 2003Analytical Engineering, Inc.Centrifugal filter utilizing a partial vacuum condition to effect reduced air drag on the centrifuge rotor
US7635585May 31, 2002Dec 22, 2009Jae Chern YooMicro valve apparatus using micro bead and method for controlling the same
US8241891Nov 9, 2009Aug 14, 2012Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Micro valve apparatus using micro bead and method for controlling the same
US8308626 *Mar 29, 2007Nov 13, 2012Alfa Laval Corporate AbRotor unit for a centrifugal separator having undetachably joined separating discs
US8454487 *Apr 7, 2009Jun 4, 2013Alfa Laval Corporate AbSeparation disc and separator
US8562503 *Sep 30, 2009Oct 22, 2013Alfa Laval Corporate AbDisk package for a centrifuge rotor
US8678989 *Sep 30, 2009Mar 25, 2014Alfa Laval Corporate AbCentrifugal separator separating disc interspace configurations
US20040155213 *May 31, 2002Aug 12, 2004Yoo Jae ChernMicro valve apparatus using micro bead and method for controlling the same
US20060100083 *Sep 2, 2003May 11, 2006Torgny LagerstedtDisc stacking arrangement
US20060135339 *Jun 19, 2003Jun 22, 2006Martin SandgrenRotation body arrangement
US20090137378 *Mar 29, 2007May 28, 2009Alfa Laval Corporate AbRotor unit for a centrifugal separator
US20100055771 *Nov 9, 2009Mar 4, 2010Jae Chern YooMicro valve apparatus using micro bead and method for controlling the same
US20110136649 *Apr 7, 2009Jun 9, 2011Alfa Laval Corporate AbSeparation disc and separator
US20110195832 *Sep 30, 2009Aug 11, 2011Alfa Laval Corporate AbSeparation disk for a centrifuge rotor, and a disk package
US20110237417 *Sep 30, 2009Sep 29, 2011Alfa Laval Corporate AbDisk package for a centrifuge rotor
US20150126353 *May 13, 2013May 7, 2015Alfa Laval Corporate AbDisc package for a centrifugal separator
US20160001302 *Feb 14, 2014Jan 7, 2016Gea Mechanical Equipment GmbhSeparator Disk Package
DE102013101654A1Feb 20, 2013Aug 21, 2014Gea Mechanical Equipment GmbhTrenntellerpaket
EP2400039A2May 2, 2006Dec 28, 2011Jae-Chern YooBio-Disc, Bio-Driver Apparatus, And Assay Method Using the Same
WO1990004460A1 *Sep 27, 1989May 3, 1990Alfa-Laval Separation AbCentrifugal separator
WO1996027445A1 *Feb 21, 1996Sep 12, 1996Tetra Laval Holdings & Finance S.A.Stack of separation discs for centrifugal separator
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WO2007114766A1 *Mar 29, 2007Oct 11, 2007Alfa Laval Corporate AbRotor unit for a centrifugal separator
WO2014128063A2Feb 14, 2014Aug 28, 2014Gea Mechanical Equipment GmbhSeparator disc package
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/73, 494/82
International ClassificationB04B7/00, B04B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationB04B7/14
European ClassificationB04B7/14