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Publication numberUS3336011 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1967
Filing dateSep 27, 1966
Priority dateSep 27, 1966
Publication numberUS 3336011 A, US 3336011A, US-A-3336011, US3336011 A, US3336011A
InventorsFutty Robert C
Original AssigneeIrl Daffin Associates
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System and means for selectively mixing concrete and incorporating additives therein
US 3336011 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. C. FUTTY ELE 3,336,011 ETE AND SYSTEM AND MEANS F'OR S CTIVELY MIXING CONCR ADDITIVES THEREIN 2 Sheets-Sheet l INCORPORATING Filed Sept. 27, 1965 dOPJDOm SOIE i n @i Aug. l5, i967 R. c. FUTTY 3,336,611

SYSTEM AND MEANS FOR SELECTIVELY MIXING CONCRETE AND ADDITIVES THEREIN 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INCORPORATING Filed sept. 27, 196e /A/l/.EA/ra, 05587 C Furry Arrow/frs United States Patent C) 3,336,011 SYSTEM AND MEANS F OR SELECTIVELY MIX- This invention relates to concrete mixing equipment of the type disclosed in co-pending application Ser. No. 378,133, now Patent No. 3,310,293, and is particularly concerned with means associated with such equipment to permit liquid additives of various -types and/or gases to be easily intermixed with other concrete ingredients in such equipment.

Conventional concrete mixing equipment now in general use rely on a ready-mix truck having a rotatable mixing drum into which all the required ingredients, including water are introduced, prior to departure of the ready-mix truck from its base of operations. The rotation of the mixing drum is continued until all its contents have been delivered regardless of the number of partial deliveries that must be made by the concrete mix truck or the time elapsed before making a single delivery of its entire contents. Accordingly, it is virtually impossible with such equipment to selectively add liquids or gases -to parts of a truck load as all adding operations are performed at an initial loading station.

Specifically, so-called ready-mix trucks are not equipped to readily provide for the addition of anti-freeze solutions, water-reducing chemicals, or coloring materials -to the concrete mix in selected batches.

Still another shortcoming that attaches to the use of conventional Iready-mix trucks resides in the fact that they are unable to deliver partial loads of concrete to customers who require concrete having different proportions of ingredients iu the mix without returning to their base of operations for the rotary drum to be supplied with a dierent ybatch of ingredients capable of providing a concrete mix of the desired composition.

Taking into consideration the foregoing deficiencies of systems which provide ready-mix concrete it is a primary object of the present invention to provide concrete mixing and delivery equipment which permits selective small batch operation with the ability to selectively change not only ingredient but also additive proportions at will.

Another primary object of the invention is to provide a concrete mixing system in which dry ingredients are independently and continuously delivered, in the desired proportions, -to a mixing device where water to which other substances can be conveniently added, is supplied to the dry mix.

Other significant objects hereof are: (a) to provide a concrete mixing system in which the dry ingredients are continuously fed to a mixing device that can be simultaneously supplied with an anti-freeze solution in winter and a retarder agent in summer that is known to reduce the time required for the concrete mix to set; (b) to provide a concrete mixing system in which the dry ingredients are continuously fed to a mixing device which is simultaneously supplied with a water reducing agent; (c) to provide a concrete mixing system of the continuous delivery type wherein uid or fluids for coloring the concrete mix can be easily supplied to the'concrete mix; (d) to provide a concrete mixing system of the continuous delivery type wherein air can be fed into the concrete mix, and (e) to provide a mixing nozzle in which a flowing stream of water is impregnated with other uids.

A further important aspect hereof is to provide a con- ICC crete mixing system which conforms with the preceding objects and can be carried on and operated from power and fluid sources conveniently carried on a vehicle, such as a truck.

The invention will be better understood, and objects other than those set forth above will become apparent, after reading the following detailed description thereof. Such description refers to the annexed drawings presenting preferred and illustrative embodiments of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a schematic view of a system for feeding one or more fluids to the water being delivered to the concrete mixing device.

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view through a mixing nozzle.

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal sectional view through a modified form of cement batcher.

FIGURE 4 is a horizontal sectional View showing the spring activated hammer of the batcher of FIGURE 3.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown in FIGURE 1 a mixing trough A mounted for pivotal movement relative to a horizontal'plane and a vertical plane by a hollow swivel coupling B. Mounted vadjacent the swivel coupling B and arranged lto deliver material therein is an endless conveyor C. The endless conveyor receives sand and gravel delivered thereto from either separate tanks (not shown) or a tank provided with a partition dividing it into separate compartments (not shown). Cement is also fed from a tank or other container by means of a conventional compartmented rotary metering drum D onto the endless conveyor C. A detailed description of elements vA, B, C and D appears in copending application Ser. No. 378,133, now Patent No. 3,310,293, referred to previously.

The present application differs from copending application, Ser. No. 378,133, now Patent No. 3,310,293, pn'- marily in the arrangement now to be described for introducing into the water for wetting the solid concrete ingredients, additional fluid substances, or ingredient f as employed in system F except that those in system F vhave been primed. A description of system F will therefore, suffice for a description of system F.

Fluid handling system F comprises a Huid-tight tank or other container 10 of any desirable shape so long as it is adapted to t within the available space on the concrete-mixer truck on which it is to be mounted. Assuming the material to be discharged from the tank 10 to be liquid at normal atmospheric conditions, such liquid may be introduced into tank 10 through filling opening 12 which is provided with a conventional closure cap 14.

Air under pressure is supplied to tank 10 through an air inlet connection 16 and conduit 18 that at its remote end is connected to conduit 20. Conduit 20 receives its air supply from either (a) the normal air supply on the truck, or (b) the normal air supply on the trailer, depending on the particular design of the concrete-mixer. Air conduit 18 adjacent its point of connection with conduit 20 is provided with a conventional shut-olf valve 22 which may,

28. Check valve 28 is arranged to preclude reverse flow of air under pressure from the tank should the pressure upstream of the check valve drop due to leakage, a break in the air supply line of for any other reason.

A sight gauge 30 is connected by means of gauge valve 32 and conduit 18 with the top of tank 10. Sight gauge 30 is connected by means of gauge valve 34 and conduit 36 with the bottom of tank .10. With this conventional arrangement, when tank l() contains liquid, the level of such liquid can readily be observed.

A conduit 38 is arranged to establish communication between conduit 36 and a flow meter 40. Conduit 38 is provided with a strainer 42 Aand iiow to the strainer and meter may be precluded, when desired, by means of a gate or equivalent shut-off valve 44.

In order to adjust the uid ilow leading to kmeter 40 to very small quantities, a stop cock valve 46 is provided in the inlet to flow meter 40 since such valves are known for their ability to be frequently adjusted to control the delivery of small quantities of iiuid Iand yet remain fluid tight.

Extending from tlow meter 40, hose 48 leads to mixing nozzle E. Mixing nozzle E is arranged to discharge into swivel coupling B, which in turn feeds the dry concrete ingredients delivered thereto by the endless conveyor, as well as the liquid ingredients supplied by mixing nozzle E, to the mixing trough A.

Mixing nozzle E is shown in greater detail in FIGURE 2. -It is provided with a threaded inlet 50 that is supplied with water from any convenient source of supply on the truck or trailer. A longitudinal passage 52 extends from the inlet 50 through the nozzle body to the discharge outlet 54. Nozzle E has formed thereon integral oppositely disposed lateral tubular members 56, 58 that extend from the exterior of the nozzle body into longitudinal passage 52. These extensions are, respectively, provided with passages 60, 62 that open into passage 52 at such an angle to the direction of flow of fluid passing through passage 52, that such flow past the terminal ends of passages 60, 62 will induce a flow of fluid through passages 60, 62 into passage 52.

By reason of the shape of the portions of tubular members S6, 58 that extend into passage 52, the angularity of the passages 60, 62 and the proximity of the fluid discharged from passages 60 and 62, considerable turbulence is created in the nozzle which results in a thorough and intimate mixing of the ingredient means supplied to the nozzle. Furthermore, it should be apparent that because of the angular disposition of passages 60 and 62 relative to passage 52, flow of fluid through 52 produces a venturi effect in passages 60 and 62 so that the likelihood of any backflow of fluid into passages 60 and 62 is eliminated.

The fluid handling system F is also provided with a quick acting valve 64 located upstream of stop cock valve 46 and iiow meter 40. Valve 64 is arranged to be operated by linkage 66 that is operatively associated with clutch 70. Clutch 70 interconnects the power shaft 68 with shaft 72 which in turn supplies the power necessary for the simultaneous operation of endless conveyor C and compartmented rotary metering `drum D. A clutch operating lever 74 is so arranged that when it is operated to effect engagement of the clutch 70, linkage 66 is actuated to effect opening of quick acting valve 64.

In the operation of the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGURE 1, closure cap 14 is removed from tank 10 and a liquid ingredient means to be added to the concrete mix, such as an anti-freeze solution, water reducing chemical, retarding agent, air entraining agent or coloring material is introduced into the tank 10. Simultaneously with the adjustment of the clutch lever 74 to effect engagement of the clutch 70 and thereby operation of the endless conveyor C and rotary metering drum D to deliver sand, gravel and cement along with water supplied through nozzle E into mixing trough A, linkage 66 is operated to open quick-acting valve 64. Assuming gate valve 44 to have been previously opened and stop cock 46 adjusted to provide for a predetermined small iiow of fluid therethrough, a suction is created in hose 48 by the venturi action of water passing through passage 52. Such suction action produces a metered flow of liquid from tank 10 through hose 48 and passage 60 into passage 52 of nozzle E. The rate of such iiow is shown by meter 40.

In addition to the venturi action for effecting flow from tank 10 to the nozzle E, air pressure may be applied above the surface of the liquid in tank 10 to augment the venturi action. Furthermore, the presence of air under pressure above the surface of the liquid in tank 10 tends to make for a more uniform ilow of liquid from the tank.

Air for applying pressure to the liquid in tank 10 is derived from any available source on the truck. Such air is supplied through conduits 20 and d8 which are provided with gate valves 22 and 26, a pressure regulator 24 and a check valve 28.

While the operation of system F has been described above, in a manner to provide for the addition of a liquid ingredient means to the water being supplied to the dry concrete ingredients, such liquid can be an air entraining agent, or if desired, air along could be supplied to tank 10. Air from tank 10, controlled in the same manner as liquid, could be fed to nozzle E. Air and air entraining agents present the advantages discussed below. Such air or air entraining agent would produce a concrete mix containing microscopic bubbles and render it less vulnerable to cracks on freezing. Concrete containing microscopic bubbles has also been found to have some flexibility. It has for that reason been recommended by highway departments for use in areas subject to freezing temperatures.

It has also been found that concrete mixes containing entrained air are easier to handle during pouring.

Since the concrete mixing truck is provided with a second fluid handling system F similar to system F described above, it is apparent that a liquid ingredient means could be supplied to the water passing through nozzle E by way of passage 56 while air could be simultaneously supplied to the water passing through nozzle E by Way of passage 58. On the other hand, it may be found desirable to supply but one uid either air or a liquid to the nozzle E. In such case, one of the hoses 48, 48 is disconnected and replaced by a conventional closure plug.

In some instances it may be desirable tol supply two different liquids either together or at different times to the water passing through nozzle E. In order to provide for such operation it is only necessary that different liquids be supplied, respectively, to tanks 10 and`10'.

A modified form cement batcher, designated D', is illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4. Batcher D includes a bin or tank 78 which is provided with a discharge compartment 80. The discharge compartment is formed with a pair of inner arcuate walls with which the vanes 86 of a compartmented metering drum 87 cooperate. The leading faces of one or more of the vanes 86 are provided with inclined plane surfaces 88, 88 which cooperate with a pair of hammer members 90, 90 4on rotation of the metering drum in the following manner.

Hammer members 90, 90 are supported by spring elements 92, 92' respectively, for rotation about shaft 94 and are normally biased by the spring elements 92, 92' into engagement with inclined plane surfaces 88, 88'. On rotation of the metering drum, hammer elements 90, 91 are displaced by inclined plane surfaces 88, 8S thereby causing springs 92, 92' to be placed under added stress. As metering drum 87 continues to rotate hammer members 90, 90 are freed from engagement with the inclined plane surfaces 88, 88 and impart a hammer blow to the metering drum 87 releasing any cement that may have become trapped in recesses of the batching device.

After reading the foregoing detailed description, it will be apparent the objects set forth initially have been successfully achieved. Accordingly,

What is claimed is: 1. An apparatus for continuously producing a concrete mix which comprises:

(a) final mixer means;

(b) means to continuously feed dry concrete mix to said mixer means;

(c) means to feed a rst liquid ingredient means of a concrete mix to said mixer means;

. (d) means associated with said rst liquid ingredient feed means and responsive to the flow therethrough to create a region of subatmospheric pressure in said rst liquid ingredient feed means;

(e) means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means of a concrete mix into said region; and

(f) means for delivering the final mixture of said dry ingredients, said rst liquid ingredient means said second ingredient means from said mixer means.

2.. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means to feed ingredients of a va first liquid ingredient means comprises a water supply means.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means.

4. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the means in communication with said region `of subatmospheric pres- .sure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid supply means. 5. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises an air supply means. y

6. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the means in communication with said region `of subatmospheric pressure Yfor supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means and an air supply means.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in comrmunication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means.

8. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure .for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid supply means.

9. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means ycomprises an air supply means.

10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a iliquid supply means and an air supply means.

11. The apparatus in claim 1 wherein the means for creating a region of subatmospheric pressure comprises a venturi.

12. The apparatus in claim 11 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means.

13. The apparatus in claim 11 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid supply means.

14. The apparatus in claim 11 wherein the means in communication with said region lof subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises an air supply means.

15. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means and an air supply means.

16. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid ingredient storage tank, means for applying fluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tank, and means for establishing communication between the liquid in the bottom of said tank and said region of subatmospheric pressure.

17. The apparatus of claim 16 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a uid pressure regulating valve.

18. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a shut-olf valve and a check valve.

19. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid ingredient storage tanks, means for applying Huid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tanks, and means for establishing communication between the liquid in the bottom of said tanks and the region of subatmospheric pressure.

20. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein'the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a fluid pressure regulating valve.

21. The apparatus of claim 20 wherein the means for applying uid under pressure includes a shut-olf valve and a check valve.

22. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying said second ingredient means com- Y prises a liquid ingredient storage tank, means for applying fluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tank and means for establishing communication between the bottom of said tank and said region of subatmospheric pressure; and wherein said mixer means comprises a trough having spaced apart mixing blades and screw conveyor flights. I Y

23. The apparatus of claim 22 wherein the means for applying uid under pressure includes a fluid pressure regulating valve.

24. The apparatus of claim 23 wherein the means for applying Huid under pressure includes a shut-olf valve and check valve.

25. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid ingredient storage tanks, means for applying fluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tanks, and means for establishing communication between the liquid in the bottom of said tanks and the region of subatmospheric pressure; and wherein said mixer means comprises a trough having lspaced apart mixing blades Y and screw conveyor ights.

wherein the means for pressure includes a fluid pressure communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying said second ingredient means comprises a liquid ingredient storage tank, means for applying tluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tank and means for establishing communication between the bottom of said tank and said region of subatmospheric pressure; and wherein said mixer comprises a trough mounted for pivotal movement about a vertical and a horizontal axis, and havingspaced apart mixing blades and screw conveyor llights.

29. The apparatus of claim 28 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a pressure regulating valve.

30. The apparatus of claim 29 wherein the means for applying lluid under pressure includes a shut-off valve and a check valve.

31. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying said second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid ingredient storage tanks, means for applying fluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tanks, and means for establishing communciation between the bottom of said tanks and said region of subatmospheric pressure; and wherein said mixer means comprises a trough having spaced apart mixing blades and screw conveyor flights.

32. The apparatus of claim 31 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a pressure regulating valve.

33. The apparatus of claim 32 wherein the means for applying lluid under pressure includes a shut-olf valve and a check valve.

34. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying said second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid ingredient storage tanks, means for applying a uid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tanks, and means for establishing communication between the bottom of said tanks and said region of subatmospheric pressure; and wherein said mixer comprises a trough mounted for pivotal movement about a Vertical and a horizontal axis, and having spaced apart mixing blades and screw conveyor ights.

35. The apparatus of claim 34 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a pressure regulating valve.

36. The apparatus of claim 35 wherein the means for applying uid under pressure includes a shut-olf valve.

37. The apparatus of claim 1, further including a vehicular support means for said apparatus to thereby enable said apparatus to be transported between spaced apart locations.

38. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means.

39. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication with said region of subatrnospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a pair of liquid supply means.

40. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication withthe region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises an air supply means.

41. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a liquid supply means and an air supply means.

42. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure for supplying second ingredient means comprises a storage tank, means for applying lluid under pressure to the surface of liquid in said tank, and means for establishing communication between the liquid in the bottom of said tank and the region of subatmospheric pressure.

43. The apparatus of claim 42 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a fluid pressure regulating valve.

44. The apparatus of claim 43 wherein the means for 8 applying fluid under pressure includes ashut-ol valve and a check valve.

45. The apparatus of claim 37 wherein the means in communication with the region of subatmospheric pressure comprises a pair or" liquid ingredient storage tanks, means for applying Huid under pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tanks, and means for establishing communication between the liquid in the bottom of said tanks and the region of subatmospheric pressure.

46. The apparatus of claim 45 wherein the means for applying fluid under pressure includes a uid pressure regulating valve.

47. The apparatus of claim 46 wherein the means for applying uid under pressure includes a shut-off valve and a check valve.

48. A method of continuously forming a concrete mix from a plurality of dry and liquid ingredient means stored in separate storage areas, said method comprising the steps ot:

separately and simultaneously feeding the dry ingredient means from the storage areas to a mixing area;

propelling a rst liquid ingredient means at a velocity suliicient to create a region of subatmospheric pressure within the stream;

flowing a second liuid ingredient means into said region of subatmospheric pressure to effect a thorough mixing of said rst liquid and said second fluid ingredient means;

discharging said mixed rst liquid and said second fluid ingredient means into said mixing area;

nally mixing all of the dry ingredients, the first liquid ingredient means, and said second-Huid ingredient means in said mixing area; and

delivering the nally mixed dry ingredients, first liquid ingredient means and second lluid ingredient means from said mixing area.

49. The method of claim 48 wherein said rst liquid ingredient means is water and said second fluid ingredient means is a liquid stored under fluid pressure.

50. The method of claim 48 wherein said first liquid ingredient means is water and said second fluid ingredient means is individually stored liquids under lluid pressure.

51. The method of claim 48 wherein said first liquid ingredient means is Water and said second uid ingredient means is stored air under pressure.

52. The method of claim 48 wherein said first liquid ingredient means is water and said second fluid ingredient means is individually stored liquid under iluid pressure and stored air under pressure.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,159,184 5/1939 Skrzynski 259-168 2,191,419 2/1940 Bohmer et al 259-168 X 2,413,488 12/1946 Draeger 259-168 2,501,566 3/1950 Hill 259-161 2,894,732 7/ 1959 Taber et al 259-154 3,114,478 12/ 1963 Hilkemeier et al. 259-168 WALTER A. SCHEEL, Primary Examiner.

R. W. JENKINS, Assszant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3430929 *Nov 16, 1967Mar 4, 1969Southington Mfg IncContinuous operation mulling apparatus and method for accurately proportioning foundry sand ingredients
US3430930 *Apr 4, 1968Mar 4, 1969Southington Mfg IncPneumatically fed continuous operation mulling apparatus and method for accurately proportioning foundry sand ingredients
US3623708 *Apr 1, 1969Nov 30, 1971Irl Daffin AssociatesSystem and means for selectively mixing concrete and incorporating dry additives therein
US3682448 *Nov 5, 1969Aug 8, 1972Kedzior AndrzejMethod of continuous and controlled preparation of the liquid self-hardening moulding sand and the installation for its application
US4081109 *Jun 11, 1976Mar 28, 1978Irl Daffin Associates, Inc.Hammer system for cement meter
US4406548 *Apr 2, 1982Sep 27, 1983Haws Paul MMobile concrete mixing apparatus
US4556323 *Mar 7, 1984Dec 3, 1985Elkin Luther VMetering sheel assembly
US5452954 *Jun 4, 1993Sep 26, 1995Halliburton CompanyControl method for a multi-component slurrying process
US5522459 *Jun 3, 1993Jun 4, 1996Halliburton CompanyContinuous multi-component slurrying process at oil or gas well
US5570743 *Feb 21, 1996Nov 5, 1996Halliburton CompanyContinuous multi-component slurrying process at oil or gas well
DE1783081B1 *Sep 30, 1968Feb 8, 1973Budney CoKontinuierlich betriebener mischbehaelter fuer giessereisand
DE3930978A1 *Sep 16, 1989Mar 29, 1990Sandoz AgVerfahren und vorrichtung zum mischen von fluessigkeiten
DE3930978C2 *Sep 16, 1989Dec 17, 1998Mbt Holding AgVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Mischen von Flüssigkeiten
DE10033331A1 *Jul 8, 2000Jan 17, 2002Dieter OttoMembrane pump for liquid, tixotropic, abrasive additives for mixing of dry compounds has automatically regulated dosing system operated by fluid motor without outside energy
DE19626312A1 *Jul 1, 1996Jan 8, 1998Wilhelm HaaseColouring fine plaster to obtain body coloured mortar
DE19729110A1 *Jul 8, 1997Jan 14, 1999Wilhelm HaasePlant for colouring fluid media used in e.g. mortars and finishing plaster
EP0630728A1 *Jun 2, 1994Dec 28, 1994Halliburton CompanyContinuous multi-component slurrying process at oil or gas well
WO2001003899A1 *Jun 30, 2000Jan 18, 2001Jedrzejewski AndrzejA method of manufacturing dyed plaster masses
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/3, 222/223
International ClassificationB28C9/00, B28C7/04, B28C7/00, B28C7/12
Cooperative ClassificationB28C9/002, B28C7/12, B28C7/0413
European ClassificationB28C7/12, B28C9/00B, B28C7/04B3
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 27, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BARBER-GREENE COMPANY, 400 NORTH HIGHLAND AVENUE,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:B.V. OCEANIC FINANCE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004730/0767
Effective date: 19861229
Owner name: BARBER-GREENE COMPANY, A DE. CORP.,ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:B.V. OCEANIC FINANCE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004730/0767
Jan 16, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BARBER-GREENE COMPANY, 400 N. HIGHLAND AVE., AUROR
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO AS AGENT FOR SEE DOCUMENT FORNAMES;REEL/FRAME:004688/0001
Effective date: 19861224
Owner name: BARBER-GREENE COMPANY,ILLINOIS
Mar 26, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: M & I MARSHALL & ILSELEY BANK, NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BARBER-GREENE COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004246/0253
Effective date: 19840203