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Publication numberUS3337133 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1967
Filing dateAug 23, 1965
Priority dateAug 23, 1965
Publication numberUS 3337133 A, US 3337133A, US-A-3337133, US3337133 A, US3337133A
InventorsManfred F Duerkob
Original AssigneeManfred F Duerkob
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fountain and valve and spray apparatus therefor
US 3337133 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug- 22, 1967 M. F. DUERKOB 3,337,33

FOUNTAIN AND VALVE AND SPRAY APPARATUS THEREFOR Filed Aug. 25, 1965 FGJ 2 Sheets-Sheet l ff 56, f

z 57- 58 0 ma? Z 65 64 i A A i Y s 5a n y /4 .A if# 7 l //Z FGZ 40 I f INVENTOR MANFRED F. DUERKOB ATTORNEY Aug. 22, 1967 M. F. DUERKOB 3,3375133 FOUNTAIN AND VALVE AND SPRAY APPARATUS THEREF'OR Filed Aug. 23, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR MANFRED F. DUERKOB ATTORNEY United States Patent O 3,337,133 FOUNTAIN AND VALVE AND SPRAY APPARATUS THEREFOR Manfred F. Duel-kob, 7301 Whitehaven, St. Louis, Mo. 63123 Filed Aug. 23, 1965, Ser. No. 481,646 Claims. (Cl. 239-18) The present invention relates generally to an improved ornamental fountain, and more particularly to thel cornbination therein of a unique spray head and water-distribution valve especially adapted for use with a self-contained portable fountain of the .general type.

Heretofore, a satisfactory variety of fountain spray patterns was obtained generally only where a complex and costly water-distribution system, including numerous conduits, valves, connectors, etc., was employed. Where it was especially `desired to attain a completely self-contained, portable fountain, spray patterns suffered from lack of variety and insuicient illumination. In addition, fountains of this general type required separate power sources for varying the distribution of water and continuously changing the colored lighting for the spray patterns.

Therefore, among the objects of the present invention are the provisions of an illuminated, ornamental fountain and component parts therefor wherein: the initial production costs and subsequent maintenance costs are minimal; a satisfactory number of spray patterns may be provided with relatively uncomplicated parts and mechanisms; the same power source used to vary the Water distribution to the several spray nozzles is utilized to change the colored lighting projected upon the spray patterns; the illumination of the spray patterns, by means of a light source housed within the fountain itself, is greatly enhanced; and a predetermined restricted flow to the fountain nozzle maintains a minimum spray height.

These objects (as well as others apparent herein) are achieved generally by providing a hollow pedestal, which supports a basin. The basin serves as a water-tight top for an upper mechanism-housing portion of the pedestal and includes an outer saucer-like portion and an inner annular wall-like member, at the center of which is mounted my novel light-transmitting spray head. Flow conduits Within the light-transmitting spray head connect the spray nozzles with distribution outlets of my novel rotary-type water-distribution valve, which in turn is connected to a recircuating pump housed within the pedestal below the basin. a

A light source is also housed in the pedestal beneath the light-transmitting head. Interposed between the light source and the light-transmitting head is a color wheel type disc having a shaft mechanically interconnecting it with the water-distribution valve. An electric motor powers tbe shaft to synchronously drive the rotary-type valve and the color wheel.

My novel spray head includes inner and outer plastic plates which meet at mating surfaces, provided with conduit grooves which distribute the flow of water between flow-inlets in the inner plate and arrays of spray nozzles in the outer plate.

My novel Water-distribution valve includes a distribution chamber in a main body portion, an outlet plate,y

and a rotor which is positioned in the water-distribution chamber and is rotatably secured to a drive shaft. The rotor and outlet plate have a plurality of flow-passages and flow-outlets so spaced radially from the shaft that, upon rotation of the shaft, the rotor flow-passages are brought into and out of llow communication with the flow-outlets of the outlet plate, to provide varying ows to the several flow inlets of the spray head.

Utilization of the present invention will be apparent tov ice those skilled in the art from the following disclosure of a preferred embodiment as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view, partially broken away, of the ornamental fountain of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is across-sectional View of the ornamental fountain of FIG. 1 taken along the line 2-2;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical cross-section of the water distribution valve included in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view thereof taken along line 4 4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a table showing diagrammatically the individual and composite spray patterns and intervals.

The pedestal and `basin Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate like or corresponding parts throughout the several views, there is shown in FIG. 1 an ornamental, portable fountain, generally designated 10. The fountain 10 includes a vacuum-formed, polystyrene pedestal 12 having a hollow interior in which all of the working mechanisms for the fountain are contained and a heavy plastic basin 14 which forms a water-tight top for the pedestal 12. The basin 14 includes an outer saucerlike portion 16 and an inner annular wall-like member 18 which rises slopingly inward and upward from the bottom of the basin and terminates slightly below the level of the rim 20 of the saucer-like portion 18. The basin 14 is filled with water between its saucer-like portion 16 and the annular wall-like member 18, the preferred water level being slightly above the top of the wall-like member 18.

The nozzle arrays At the center of the annular wall-like member 18 there is mounted a light-transmitting spray head, generally designated 22. In the embodiment illustrated, there are provided three concentric nozzle arrays projecting upward from the upper surface of the spray head 22. The central nozzle array 24 consists of a single nozzle which directs a spray of water vertically from the spray head 22. The inner nozzle array 26 consists of several nozzles positioned in ci-rcular fashion and concentric with the central nozzle 24. The individual nozzles of this array are directed to spray water upwardly and somewhat outwardly. The outer nozzle array 28 likewise consists of several similarly positioned nozzles. It is concentric with the inner and central nozzle arrays 24, 26. Each nozzle is directed to vspray water upward and substantially outward and into the basin 14.

The internal .mechanisms Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is provided a support shelf 30 which mounts the working mechanisms of the ornamental fountain 10 within the hollow pedestal :12 between its bottom and the basin 14. Such working mechanisms include a recirculating motor driven pump 32, a rotary-type Water-distribution valve generally designated 34, a light source 36, a color wheel 38 including segments of differently colored high temperature acrylic material, and a small geared electric motor 40.

The spray head Referring particularly to FIG. 2 and the structural details of the light-transmitting spray head 22, there are provided outer and inner clear plastic plates 42 and 44 respectively. The plates 42, 44 are generally circular, the inner plate 44 being of somewhat larger diameter so that it may be bolted to the upper portion of the wall-like member 18. The outer plate 42 is secured to and in contact with the inner plate 44 by wing screws 46 so that it may be readily removed for cleaning. The outer and inner plate surfaces so secured together are referred to as the mating surfaces 50 and 52, respectively. Where they mate, concentric passages are provided for feeding water to the several nozzles of the nozzle arrays 26, 28. In the particular embodiment shown, the outer plate 42 has in its surface 50 circular grooves 54 and 56 which communicate with the lower ends of nozzles of the inner and outer nozzle arrays 26 and 28 respectively. In radial registration with the three arrays the inner plate 44 is provided with three ow-inlets 58, 60 and 62 having metal fittings threaded within them. The flow-inlet 58 leads the flow of water from a conduit 64 through its fitting and directly to the central nozzle 24, while the flow-inlets 60 and 62 direct the ow of water from conduits 66 and 68 through their fittings and into the circular grooves 54 and 56 respectively.

The rotary-type water-distribution valve 34 includes a hollow cylindrical body portion 70 which is secured to the under side of the support shelf 30 by bolts 72 inserted through spacing `sleeves 74 and turned into threaded bores 76 within the wall of the body lportion 70. In its side it has a flow-inlet 78 which opens into a central water-distribution chamber 80; also it has a centrally positioned bearing boss 82 presented downwardly. Passing through an O ring 81, recessed in the upper surface of the body portion 70, and extending downwardly through the bearing boss 82 and the chamber 80 is a shaft 84. The shaft 84 is secured to the color wheel 38 at its upper end by means of a connection 86. This positions the color wheel 38 between the light source 36 and a light-transmitting spray head 22. The shaft 84 is rotatably mounted within the bearing boss 82 and at its lower end is secured by a tight splined connection to the valve outlet plate 90. by a tight splined connection to a disc-like valve rotor 88 which rotates within the chamber 80 adjacent to the valve outlet plate 90. The valve rotor 88 has an upwardly presented central boss 89 which is held separated from the body portion boss 82 by a cupped spring washer 91.

The valve outlet plate 90 is bolted to the valve body portion 70 through plate bores 93 in registration with the lower ends of the bores 76 in the wall of the body portion 70. The youtlet plate 90 shown has three flow-outlets 92, 94 and 96 spaced radially outwardly from the rotatable shaft 84, and angularly from each other, FIGS. 2, 4. These flow-outlets 92, 94 and 96 are connected in iiow communication lwith the iiow-inlets 58, 60 and 62 of the spray head 22 by means of the conduits 64, 66 and 68.

The valve rotor 88 shown has four flow-passages 98, 100, 102 and 104 which are spaced radially from the r0- tatable shaft 84 a distance which corresponds to the spacing of the flow-outlets 92, 94 and 96 `of the outlet plate 90. The flow-passages 98, 100, 102, 104 are angularly spaced from each other so that depending upon the angle of rotation of the rotor 88 with respect to the outer plate 90, a predetermined correspondence `with the flow-outlets 92, 94 and 96 will be obtained. Water flows through either a single flow-outlet at the outlet plate 94 or through any number of various combinations of the how-outlets.

While the iiow-outlets and flow-passages referred to 4rnay be of such shape as desired, I prefer to utilize circular outlets and passages, whose diameter is roughly equal to a 30 chord at ltheir radial distance from the shaft. Each r-otor flow-passage may thus be considered as passing twelve different stations on each cycle of rotation.

In the combination illustrated of three ow-outlets 92, 94, 96 with four rotor flow-passages 98, 100, 102, and 104, I use the following combination `of angular spacings:

The three flow-outlets at 90 and 210; and the four iiow-passages at 0, 60, 180 and 270. This cornbination yields the variation of spray patterns shown in FIG. hereafter referred to.

The valve rotor 88 has its under surface spaced to provide tolerance between the outlet plate 90, and tolerance between the periphery of the Valve rotor 88 and the inner wall surface of the body portion 70 of the valve 34 is also provided. This tolerance allows suflicient spacing between the valve parts to permit a desirable restricted ow of water from the valve inlet 78, through the water-distribution chamber 80, and around the peripheral portions of the valve rotor 88 to the flow-outlets 92, 94 and 96, even though none of the flow-passages are in registration with the How-outlets. Thus a single constant delivery pump 32 may be used, without undue back-pressure. Furthermore, for aesthetic reasons it may be desired to provide at least a minimum height of spray from each outlet at all' times. For this purpose I provide means for adjustment of this spacing. An adjustment screw 105 in the center of outlet plate bears upwardly against the inner shaft end 107 within the valve body 70. The cupped spring washer 91 biases the shaft downwardly in opposition to the screw 105. In this manner a `controllable flow of water is delivered to the flow-outlets to maintain sprays of a minimum height at the nozzle arrays 24, 26 and 28.

Electric motor and pump mechanisms The electric motor 40 which is mounted on the support shelf 30 has an output shaft (not shown) which is mechanically coupled through a spur gear 109 to a meshing ydrive gear 106 secured to the shaft 84. Upward and downward spacing of the shaft by the adjusting screw does not substantially affect the meshing of these gears.

A suitable electrical cable 108 is led in through a side opening in the hollow pedestal 12 to supply electrical power to the pump 32, the electric motor 40 which drives the valve and color wheel, an-d the centrally positioned light source 36.

A bracket 110 mounts the recirculating pump 32 to the support shelf 30. Preferably the recirculating pump 32 is a motor driven, constant-delivery vane-type pump having its inlet `connected through a curved hose 112 to a recirculating ow-inlet 114 located in the sloping portion of the wall-like member 18. A screen-type filter 116 is set Within the recirculating flow-inlet 114 to assure that debris which might fall into the basin 14 is prevented from being introduced into the working mechanisms of the ornamental fountain 10. The pump outlet is connected by means of a conduit 118 to the liow-inlet 78 of the water-distribution valve 34.

Operation Initially the upper basin 14 is filled with water. The location of the recirculation flow-inlet 114 in the upwardly and inwardly sloping wall-like member 18 and the curved hose 1112 prevent cavitation of the pump 34 at start-up. As the basin is gradually filled, air that otherwise would be entrapped is permitted to escape from the recirculation pump 32 and its connecting hose 112.

After the basin is filled with water, the electrical cable 108 may be connected to a source of electrical energy, such as a typical volt electrical outlet. When the electricity is applied to the vane-type pump 32, water is drawn through the hose 112 and delivered through the conduit 118 to the flow-inlet 78 of the water-distribution valve 34. Simultaneous with the energization of the pump 32, electricity is supplied to the electric motor 40 so that it drives the gear 106 to initiate the rotation of the valve rotor shaft 84. Rotation of the shaft 84 produces synchronous rotation of the valve rotor 88 and the color wheel 38. Water delivered to the water-distribution valve 34 through its iiow-inlet 78 enters the water-distribution chamber 80 from whence (except for the controlled restricted flow to all outlets as heretofore described) it passes through the flow-passages 98, 100, 102 and 104 of the rotating rotor 88 as they are brought into registration with the correspondingly spaced fiofwoutlets 92, 94 and 96 of the `outlet plate 90. The water emerging from the outlets is delivered to the nozzle arrays, 24, 26 and 28 either singly or in combination depending upon the particular registration of the How-passagesV of the rotor 88 with the flow-outlets of the plate 90.

A typical timed program for the spray patterns is illustrated by the table of FIG. 5, in which the letters C, I and O designate respectively the oW-outlets 92, 94 and 96 which connect respectively to the central nozzle array 24; the inner ring nozzle array 26; and the outer ring nozzle array 28. Further the numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 refer to the first, second, third, and fourth rotor how-passages 98, 100, 102 and 104 respectively. With the rotor 88 and outlet plate 90 initially positioned as shown in FIG. 4, only 'the central nozzle 24 will be spraying (not taking account ofthe minimum ow to all nozzles); and the central nozzle will then reach maximum height. This results because only the now-passage 98 of the rotor 88 is in ow communication with the flow-outlet 92 of the plate 90. Shortly after the rotor 88 has begun rotating in the clockwise direction, now-passages 100 and 102 arebrought into registration with outlets 94 and 96, respectively. This permits water to ow from the water-distribution chamber 80 to the now-outlets 94 and 96 and thence to the nozzle arrays 26 and 28. Thus, upon a 30 angular movement of the rotor, by the motor 40 and its attendant gears, all three nozzle arrays are in operation. During the subsequent 30" interval the central nozzle turns off as passage 98 rotates beyond the fixed ow outlet 92. However, the inner and outer nozzle arrays 26, 28 continue to provide sprays of maximum height because the How-passages 100 and 102 remain in registration with the flow-outlets 94 and 96. After rotation through 60 none of the flow-passages 98, 100, 102 or 104 are in registration with the flow-outlets 92, 94 or 96. Even so, the tolerance between the parts of the water-distribution valve 34 permits water to be sprayed from all the nozzles at the adjusted minimum height. Further rotation of the rotor 88 and its flowpassages through 360 provides the sequence of spray patterns illustrated diagrammatically under the column labeled pattern of FIG. 5.

If, when one or only a few nozzles are flowing, they vspray to an excessive height, this may be reduced by turning the adjustment screw 105 to increase the spacing of the valve rotor 88 from the valve outlet plate 90. Such adjustment will divert a larger part of the flow to those nozzle arrays not then directly fed by the valve rotor.

Many modifications and variations are possible in view of the above teaching. Therefore, it is to be understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described.

I claim:

1. A spray head for an ornamental fountain, comprising.

outer vvand inner light-transmitting plates meeting at mating surfaces,

a plurality of nozzle arrays mounted onto the outer of said plates and spaced from the other,

the inner of said plates including a plurality of spray head How-inlets,

said mating surfaces of said plates including conduit groove means interconnecting each of said flow-inlets with one of said nozzle arrays,

whereby said light-transmitting plates may be readily separated to permit cleaning of said groove means, spray head flow-inlets, and nozzle arrays.

2. For use with an ornamental fountain, the apparatus comprising a spray head including outer and inner light-transmitting plates meeting at mating surfaces,

a pluralityof nozzle arrays mounted onto the outer of said plates and spaced from each other,

the inner of said plates including a plurality of spray head flow-inlets,

said mating surfaces of said plates including groove means interconnecting each of said flow-inlets with one of said nozzle arrays, together with a light source beneath said spray head,

a valve including a body portion having an inlet and a water-distribution chamber communicating therewith, said |body portion rotatably mounting a shaft therein,

an outlet platepxedly secured to said body portion of said valve and having a plurality of flow-outlets spaced from said rotatable shaft and spaced angularly from each other,

a valve rotor rotatably secured to said shaft within said water-distribution chamber of said body portion and adjacent to said outlet plate, said rotor having a plurality of flow-passages spaced from said shaft a distance substantially corresponding to the spacing of said flow-outlets of said outlet plate,

means to impart rotation to said valve shaft,

means to supply said valve inlet with water under pressure, and

means connecting each of said flow-outlets of said valve in water-flow communication with said owinlets of said spray head,

whereby water-flow out ofsaid respective nozzle arrays will rise and fall as said flow-passages of said rotor come into registration wi-th said flow-outlets connected to 'said nozzle array How-inlets.

3. A spray head for an ornamental fountain, comprising outer and inner plastic light-transmitting plates meeting at mating surfaces, and secured to each other by means to permit ready separation thereof,

a plurality of concentric nozzle arrays mounted onto the outer of said plates and spaced radially from the other,

the inner of said plates including a plurality of spray head flow-inlets,

said mating surfaces of said plates including circular groove means having the same radial spacing as said nozzle arrays and inter-connecting each of said owinlets with one of said nozzle arrays,

whereby said light-transmitting plates may be readily separated to permit cleaning of said groove means, spray head How-inlets, and nozzle arrays.

4. For use with an ornamental fountain, the apparatus comprising a spray head including outer and inner plastic light-transmitting plates meeting at mating surfaces, and secured to each other by means to permit ready separation thereof,

a plurality of concentric nozzle arrays mounted onto the outer of said plates and spaced radially from each other,

the inner of said plates including a plurality of spray head flow-inlets,

said mating surfaces of said plates including circular groove means having the same radial spacing as said nozzle arrays and interconnecting each of said flow-inlets with one of said nozzle arrays, together with a light source beneath said spray head,

a valve including a body portion having an inlet and a water-distribution chamber communicating therewith, said body portion rotatably mounting a shaft therein,

an outlet plate xedly secured to said body portion of said valve and having a plurality of flow-outlets `spaced radially from said rotatable shaft and spaced angularly from each other,

a valve rotor rotatably secured to said shaft within said water-distribution chamber of said body portion and adjacent to said outlet plate, said rotor having a plurality of flow-passages spaced radially from said shaft a distance substantially correspondwater, including a body portion having an inlet connectable to a source of water under pressure and a water-distribution chamber communicating therewith, said body portion rotatably mounting a shaft therein,

an outlet plate Xedly secured to said body portion of said valve and having a plurality of flow-outlets spaced outward from said rotatable shaft and spaced angularly from each other, and

a valve rotor rotatably secured to said shaft within said water-distribution chamber of said body portion and adjacent to said outlet plate, said rotor having a plurality of ow-passages spaced from said shaft a distance substantially corresponding to the spacing of said flow-outlets of said outlet plate, said flow-passages being angularly spaced from each other partly in and partly out of correspondence with the angular spacing of the flow-outlets,

whereby on rotation of said shaft water is delivered by said owpassages of said valve rotor to said flow- Outlets of said Xed outlet plate singly and in combination at varying ow rates as the several ow-passages come into and out of registration with said ow-outlets,vthe valve rotor having a plate-like surface spaced sufficiently from the outlet plate to permit restricted flow between the adjacent surfaces of said plates,

whereby a restricted flow of water is delivered to all of said flow-outlets when no rotor flow-passage is in registration with a ow-outlet.

6. For use with an ornamental fountain, the apparatus comprising a spray head including outer and inner light-transmitting plates meeting at mating surfaces,

a plurality of nozzle arrays mounted onto the outer of said plates and spaced from each other,

the inner of said plates including a plurality of spray head flow-inlets,

said mating surfaces of said plates including groove means interconnecting each of said flow-inlets with one of said nozzle arrays, together with a light source beneath said spray head,

a valve including a body portion having an inlet and a water-distribution chamber communicating therewith, said body portion rotatably mounting a shaft therein,

an outlet plate xedly secured to said body portion of said valve and having a plurality of flow-outlets spaced from said rotatable shaft and spaced angularly from each other,

a valve rotor rotatably secured to said shaft within said water-distribution chamber of said body portion and adjacent to said outlet plate, said rotor having a plurality of flow-passages spaced from said shaft a distance substantially corresponding to the spacing of said flow-outlets of said outlet plate, said flow-passages being angularly spaced from each other partly in and partly out of correspondence with the angular spacing of the flow-outlets,

means to impart rotation to said valve shaft,

means to supply said valve inlet with water under pressure, and

means connecting each of said flow-outlets of said valve in water-flow communication With one of said owinlets of said spray head,

whereby on rotation of said shaft water is delivered by said flow-passages of said valve rotor to said nozzle arrays singly and in combination at varying flow rates as the several flow-passages come into and out of registration with said How-outlets.

7. The fountain apparatus as defined in claim 6, further comprising a rotatable color wheel disposed intermediate said spray head and said light source, and

means to rotatably drive said color wheel synchronously with said valve rotor.

8. The fountain apparatus as dened in claim 7, wheresaid means to rotatably drive said color wheel synchronously with said valve rotor is a connection Xedly securing said color wheel to said valve shaft. 9. A valve of the type for use in distributing the flow of water, including a body portion having an inlet connectable to a source of water under pressure and a water-distribution chamber communicating therewith, said body portion rotatably mounting a shaft therein,

an outlet plate fixedly secured to said body portion of said valve and having a plurality of ow-outlets spaced outward from said rotatable shaft and spaced angularly from each other, and

a valve rotor rotatably secured to said shaft within said water-distribution chamber of said body portion and adjacent to said outlet plate, said rotor having a plurality of flow-passages spaced from said shaft a distance substantially corresponding to the spacing of said How-outlets of said outlet plate, said owpassages being angularly spaced from each other partly in and partly out of correspondence with the angular spacing of the flow-outlets,

the valve rotor having a plate-like surface spaced sufficiently from the outlet plate to permit restricted ow between the adjacent surfaces of said plates.

together with means to adjust the spacing of said valve rotor surface from the outlet plate,

whereby to provide controlled restricted ilow to all of said flow-outlets regardless whether any rotor owpassage is in registration with a flow-outlet.

10. The valve as defined in claim 9,

said shaft having an inner end within said valve,

said means to `adjust including screw means in the outletdplate bearing axially against said shaft inner end, an

spring means to bias said shaft in opposition to said screw means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 586,310` 7/1897 Humphreville 239-18 949,267 2/1910 Dunlap 239--20 1,606,245 11/1926 Lang 239--66 2,360,321 10/ 1944 Griswold 239-66 2,879,944 3/1959 Musgrave Z39-20 3,233,865 2/1966 Panzica et al. 137-625.47 3,238,971 3/1966 Cerone IS7- 625.11

EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3570764 *Apr 11, 1969Mar 16, 1971Cdm Co LtdFountain apparatus
US3838816 *Jan 8, 1973Oct 1, 1974S HuffIlluminated aquatic fountain
US3894689 *Jul 25, 1974Jul 15, 1975Marvin A BillingsleyIlluminated fountain
US4265402 *Jul 13, 1979May 5, 1981Tsai Wen YingStrobed liquid display device and head therefor
US4844341 *Dec 22, 1987Jul 4, 1989Gibbs & Hill Espanola, S.A.Cibernetic fountain apparatus and valve therefor
US4955540 *Feb 26, 1988Sep 11, 1990Wet Enterprises, Inc.Water displays
US5069387 *Nov 21, 1988Dec 3, 1991Gibbs & Hill EspanolaCibernetic fountain apparatus and valve therefor
US5078320 *Jul 20, 1990Jan 7, 1992Wet DesignWater displays
US5165777 *Oct 28, 1991Nov 24, 1992Lumiere Design & Manufacturing, Inc.Lighting fixture incorporating fountain
US6882071 *Apr 14, 2003Apr 19, 2005Eden SrlMultiple-function pumping device for fountains, ornamental fountains and the like
US7270749 *Aug 3, 2004Sep 18, 2007Intellicool LlcPump system
US7581716 *May 26, 2006Sep 1, 2009Rong-Feng TsaiAeration equipment
US8978587 *Aug 22, 2012Mar 17, 2015Anthony Vaccaro II EdwardAuto-freshening water dispenser
US9278369 *Feb 4, 2015Mar 8, 2016Atake Digital Technology (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd.Water dancing speaker
US9492834Oct 15, 2009Nov 15, 2016Richard A BishelRobotic nozzle
US20030197441 *Apr 14, 2003Oct 23, 2003Eden SrlMultiple-function pumping device for fountains, ornamental fountains and the like
US20060163374 *Jan 25, 2005Jul 27, 2006Russ WootenFountain waterjet
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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/18, 239/66, 137/625.11, 239/20, 137/624.13
International ClassificationB05B17/08
Cooperative ClassificationF21W2121/02, F21S8/00, B05B17/08
European ClassificationF21S8/00, B05B17/08