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Publication numberUS3337836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1967
Filing dateOct 3, 1963
Priority dateOct 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3337836 A, US 3337836A, US-A-3337836, US3337836 A, US3337836A
InventorsChurla Jr John J
Original AssigneeKent Mfg Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Plug and receptacle connector
US 3337836 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

8- 22, 1967 'J. .LCHURLA, JR

PLUG AND RECEPTACLE CONNECTOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 3, 1963 INVENTQR. JOHN d. CHUAPLA, (/1

ArrZeA/c'ys Aug. 22, 1967 J. J. CHURLA, JR 3.337336 PLUG AND RECEPTACLE CONNECTOR Filed Oct. 5, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 22, 9 J. J. cHuRLA, JR 3,337,836

PLUG AND RECEPTACUE CONNECTOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 5, 196a S ./H w Ma/K Ee W M3 C fl MM w? United States Patent G 3,337,836 PLUG AND RECEPTACLE CONNECTOR John .I. Charla, Jr., Raritan, N.J., assignor to Kent Manufacturing Corporation, Elizabeth, N.J., a corporation of New Jersey Filed Oct. 3, 1963, Ser. No. 313,586 15 Claims. (Cl. 339-49) This application relates to a plug and receptacle connector of novel construction and design. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel connector of the plug and receptacle type whereby a multiple number of wires positioned accurately in shells are simultaneously interconnected by means of polarized mating, individual, identical shells, each of which may be either a plug or a receptacle.

Plug and receptacle connectors are a common type of connector employed in the appliance, automotive and many other industries where wiring harnesses are employed and where a number of connections are involved. The commonest type of plug and receptacle are those which employ two separate elements, one of which is known as a receptacle and the other of which is known as the plug. Under current practice, these elements are completely different in that the receptacle is very often mounted through the wall of a cabinet. The plug is then pushed into the opening at the inner end of the receptacle with the terminals aflixed to the respective leads carried by the plug and receptacle mating to make contacts.

This common type of plug and receptacle requires that there be two separate molds prepared and that the plug be formed in a completely different manner from the receptacle. There are many disadvantages to the present type of plug and receptacle now widely in use which are eliminated by the plug and receptacle of this invention.

In general, the plug and receptacle of this invention involves a single housing which is polarized by its construction, such that a single element can be either a plug or a receptacle, depending upon its desired use.

In other words, the shell or housing which forms the interconnecting portions of the plug and receptacle is identical for both parts. Thus, a hermaphroditic type of plug or receptacle is provided by this invention. The plug or receptacle is designed so that on reversal, it will mate with a corresponding plug or receptacle prepared in accordance with the teachings of this invention. This eliminates the necessity for a separate molding operation and a separate piece for each receptacle and each plug. This simplifies inventory control and simplifies the manufacture of the device and materially affects the economy of the manufacturer who employs plugs and receptacles.

Plug and receptacle connectors which are commonly employed in the industry are such that the terminals with their wires attached which are positioned within the plug or receptacle are more or less permanently affixed and cannot be removed without difficulty. This often makes it necessary to replace a number of wires where a single wire is at fault. The device of this invention is designated so that any wire and its respective terminal is rigidly supported and fixed within the housing or shell of the plug or receptacle, but it may be removed from either end of the plug or receptacle by a simple manipulation.

To accomplish these latter-mentioned features, this invention provides for a novel type of terminal. In particular, the terminal of this invention is a blade terminal having special design and construction which is adapted particularly to insure proper orientation and support within the plug and receptacle housing of this invention as described in detail below.

The two terminals, which are interconnected by mating the respective plug and receptacle in which they are 3,337,336 Patented Aug. 22, 1967 carried, are constructed so that intimate contact is effected between the respective terminals. By employing a cantilever type of effect, the intimate contact and effective mating of the terminals are assured.

There are many features which make the device of this invention superior to those which have been employed in the art before. They will be described in detail below in connection with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a plug and receptacle of this invention illustrating a receptacle in position through a wall and the plug separated from its receptacle. This figure illustrates the respective positioning of the elements in order that mating may be accomplished;

FIG. 2 is an end view of the receptacle or plug illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a rear end view of the receptacle illustrated in FIG. 1 with the wires shown in position and illustrating the rear portion of the terminals as they are positioned within the respective channels into which they fit within the receptacle or plug;

FIG. 4 is a side view of a plug and receptacle with the plug being in cross section illustrating the position of the terminal within the receptacle and the plug being positioned adjacent to the receptacle in proper mating relationship;

FIG. 5 is a further illustration, similar to FIG. 4, with the exception that the plug and receptacle have been properly mated;

FIG. 6 is a top section illustrating the position of the receptacle as it is positioned through an opening in a wall;

FIG. 7 is a detailed isometric view of a portion of the interior of the channel within the plug or receptacle of this invention, illustrating the position of the locking portions of the terminal within the channel; and

FIG. 8 is an isometric view of the wire and terminal as well as an isometric cross-sectional view of the plug and receptacle of this invention.

Referring now to the form of this invention illustrated in FIG. 1, it will be seen that the receptacle 10 is arranged so that it can be positioned within a wall 12 and firmly attached thereto. Throughout the description below, the member which is fixed in a wall will be referred to as the receptacle 10, whereas the member to be mated therewith will be referred to as a plug 11. It should be kept in mind that the receptacle 10 and plug 11 are identical and either may be used interchangeably. Accordingly, the elements of construction for both members 10 and 11 will be given common reference characters.

Attachment of the receptacle 10 in the wall 12 is accomplished by'means of side locking elements 14 positioned on either side wall of the receptacle 10. In actual practice, side locking elements 14 are molded plastic elements which form a part of the receptacle 10 and are, in effect, spring elements. The inner ends of locking elements 14, in the form of pointed hook members 13, are forced through an opening in the wall 12. The side locking elements 14 are forced inwardly toward the side walls of the receptacle 10 until they pass through the opening, whereupon they snap out and the locking shoulders 16, found on hook members 13, come into contact with the inner face of the wall 12.

At the same time, the top and bottom members 18, formed on the top and bottom wall of thereceptacle 10, become engaged with the front surface or outer surface of wall 12 and thereby provide additional stability for the receptacle 10 in the wall 12. The elements 18 have two plastic spring wings 20 which bear against the wall 12 and are forced rearwardly until the receptacle 10 has been inserted far enough, or in other words, until the stop portion 22 is positioned directly against the face of the wall 12. The purpose of stop portion 22 of element 18 is to 3 prevent over-insertion of the receptacle through wall 12 and to greatly increase the stability of the receptacle 10 as it is positioned within wall 12.

The inner top surface portion 24 of receptacle 10 has a shoulder portion 26 which mates with the extended lower end portion 28 of the plug 11 where shoulder portion 26 of receptacle 10 is abutted by the extended lower end 28 of plug 11. This provides for a definite end to the insertion of the receptacle 10 into the plug 11. Shoulder portions are found on both plug 11 and receptacle 10 and are provided along both sides of the top surface portion 24 to prevent the plug 11 from being improperly inserted into the receptacle 10. Thus, it will be seen that, since the shoulder portions 26 are formed by a cut-out portion of the top surface portions 24 of the inner ends of receptacle 10 and plug 11, unless the members 10 and 11 are in the position illustrated in FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, the extended lower end portions 28 will abut to prevent interconnection.

The inner top surface portions 24 beyond the shoulders 26 are arranged to provide for accurate mating, as well as stability of connection of, the plug 11 and receptacle 10. In general, it is a flat surface which is of less length than the inner extended lower end portion 28. Rails 30 are formed on its upper surface which match with grooves 30a formed in the top surface of the bottom interior wall 34. The rails 30 and grooves 30a match in such a way as to provide a substantial amount of sidewise stability for the receptacle 10 and plug 11 when put together. Additional stability is provided by the position of dimples 36 in between each of the rails 30 which match with bumps 38 formed between the grooves 32. Thus, when the members 10 and 11 are properly oriented and the inner end of the top surface portion 24 is inserted far enough into the opening 33 between the top surface portions 24 and the extended lower end portions 28, the dimples 36 will match with the bumps 38 and will act to additionally lock the two members 10 and 11 together. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 8, opening 33 is formed between upper interior wall 26a extending from shoulder 26 and bottom interior wall 34. Upper interior wall 26a contains recessed areas 74 into which lip portion 46 is adapted to be depressed. Ridges 26b extending between recessed areas 74 serve to segregate each recessed area from the ones adjacent to it. The upper interior wall 26a intersects shoulders 29 formed along both sides of top surface portion 24. Bottom interior wall 34 includes grooves 30w which face recesses 74. Grooves 30a are separated from one another by ridges 34a which underlie ridges 26b. With this construction it can be understood that upper interior wall of member 11 is adapted to extend into opening 33 of member 10 during assembly of the connector.

Referring now to FIGS. 2-5, it will be seen that channels 40 are formed throughout the length of members 10 and 11. The channels 40 are adapted to receive terminals 42 to which have been attached wires 44. The purpose of the channels 40 is to accommodate the correct position of the terminals 42 and to firmly affix them within the receptacle 10 or plug 11 while still permitting their removal in the event of the desirability of doing so.

The construction of the channels 40 can best be described as they would appear to the tip 46 of terminal 42 as it is being inserted from the rear of receptacle 10.

The first element appearing to the tip 46 of a terminal 42 is a stabilizer stop 48 which has no effect on the tip 46 of the terminal 42 as it passes in through channel 40. The next elements in a channel 40 is a pair of inclined plane surfaces 50 with a groove 51 between them. The tip 46 of terminal 42 will pass through groove 51 unless it is slightly out of line, in which case chamfered areas 58 will properly align the tip 46 and guide it into groove 51.

Once the tip 46 of the terminal 42 passes beyond the flat surfaces 54 just beyond inclined surfaces 50 in the channel 40, the tip 46 continues unimpeded. When the locking cars 56 are positioned far enough into channel 40,

they contact inclined plane surfaces 50 and ride downward, as viewed in FIG. 4, along those surfaces. This causes spring element 52 to be rotated slightly clockwise, as viewed in FIG. 4, until the locking ears 56 ride over the end of flattened surf-aces 54. At this point, the effect of the spring element 52 bearing on the top surface of the terminal 42 is to push the terminal up into position so that it is supported at the narrow point in the channel 40 in the area of groove 51 between the two portions of flat surf-ace 54. In order to assure that the locking ears 56 are properly guided and to avoid the shaving of inclined surfaces 50 by the edges of locking ears 56, the inclined surfaces 50, where they join the flattened surfaces 54, are provided with an additional chamfer area 58 so as to further smooth and guide the locking ears 56 into their proper position.

Once the locking ears 56 have passed over the end of the flat surface 54, the terminal is properly inserted. However, there is nothing in front of the flattened surface 54 to prevent the terminal from continuing to be forced forward and, in fact, forced right through the inner end of the channel 40. For this reason, the stabilizer stop 48 has been provided. This stop 48 engages lug members or extended ears 62 which form the stabilizer portion of the terminal 42 and as such are effective to prevent overinsertion of the terminal 42 through channel 40.

The construction of the members 10 and 11 of this invention and the manner in which the elements within channel 40 are formed and operate are illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5, 6 and 7. The details of the guiding and locking functions of the channel 40, in addition to the structure involved, are illustrated best in FIG. 7.

The terminal 42 of this invention is of novel construction. The stabilizer portion 60 with its extended cars 62, which contact the stabilizer stop 48, is substantially the same as has been provided on other types of terminals. There is nothing novel in either the insulation gripping portion 64 or the conductor gripping element 66. However, from this point onward, the terminal 42 is of novel construction. As can best be seen in FIG. 8, the terminal 42 is of the blade type. Locking ears 56 are provided for the purpose described above. In addition, a raised rectangular are-a 68 is provided on which will bear spring element 52, when the terminal is properly inserted with the stabilizer cars 62 being in contact with the stabilizer stop 48 and the locking ears 56 being positioned over the ends of the flattened areas 54.

A raised portion 70 is provided on the terminal which acts as a guide to insure that when the receptacle 10 and its corresponding plug 11 are mated, the respective terminals 42 will be in proper contact with each other to effect an electrical connection, as is best shown in FIG. 5.

The inner end of terminal 42 is provided with a bent lip portion 46. This lip 46, as can be seen in FIG. 1, and in FIGS. 4 and 5, falls into a slightly recessed area 74 near the inner end of receptacle 10 or plug 11 and insures that the terminals 42, 42', as the receptacle 10 and plug 11 are being mated, will not butt head on but will be guided into their proper position. As illustrated in FIG. 5, when the receptacle 10 and the plug 11 have been joined, the terminals 42 and 42' are in intimate contact with each other. The raised portions 70 insure that the two terminals will be in line contact with each other across their width in at least two places.

In practice, the receptacle 10 will be prepared in advance prior to the time it is inserted into wall 12. While the figures illustrate three channels 40 in each receptacle 10 and plug 11, there may be as many channels 40 as are necessary to carry the number of wires desired. It is possible of course to use the device of this invention for effecting a single connection. However, this type of connector is most often employed in order to eflect a plurality of connections at one time.

It will be seen from FIG. 1 and from the discussion above that the receptacle 10 and plug 11 are identical,

though they do not necessarily have to be the same insofar as their elements are concerned which are not directly related to the mating operation of the members or the orientation, locking and support of the terminals. In order to'assist in the assembly, each of the channels 40 may be provided with a number or letter so that the proper connections may be effected without ditficulty.

It will further be seen that there is no way to improperly assemble the receptacle and plug 11 of this invention, since there is only one way in which the device can be properly arranged. For example, the terminals 42 with the stabilized elements 60 formed as illustrated in their particular way cannot be inserted into channels 40, except in the proper manner. If an attempt is made to reverse or turn the terminals upside down, the stabilizer portion 60 of terminals 42 will not permit insertion of the terminals into the channel 40 because the cars 62 will engage with surfaces 75. If such occurs, the tip 46 of terminal 42 cannot be inserted far enough into channel 40 for the locking of ears 56 to take place. Thus, the proper orientation of the terminals 42 is assured.

The way in which the bottom wall 34 and the top wall 24 are constructed or formed is such that there is no way to put a plug 11 and receptacle 10 together unless the positions are exactly reversed. In other words, if the plug 11, illustrated in FIG. 1,'were to be in the same oriented position as receptacle 10 to be mated with the receptacle 10, the plug 11 would have to be rotated about'its longitudinal axis 180 before the members can be put together. This is assured by the fact that the inner top surface 24 is of less width than the extended lower end portions 28, as well as by the position of rails 30 and grooves 30a and the position of the shoulders 29 formed along both sides of the top surface portions 24.

Once the two members 10 and 11 have been inserted, it will be seen from FIG. 5 that the completed connector is substantially tight and the connections are effectively covered. This prevents dirt, moisture, and the like, from entering into the plug and receptacle and thereby fouling the connection.

The receptacle 10 which is inserted into a wall 12 is quite stable, since it is held by the locking elements 14 on the side walls which bear against the inner surface of wall 12 and the elements 18 with the spring wings 20 which bear against the outer surface of the wall and the position of the stop elements 22. The elements 14 and 18 give a great degree of stability to the device and are arranged such as to make the device quite stable in its position in wall 12.

The device of this invention has been described in such a manner as to bring out its particular features. However, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that minor changes can be made in design and construction in order to accomplish some specific purpose. Thus, it is possible to change the design of the terminals 42 or channels 40 slightly without changing the result. Furthermore, the number of channels 40 which are provided depends entirely upon the use to which the device of this invention is to be employed. A three-channel device has been illustrated and described, but it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that four, six, nine, twelve or any desired number of channels may be provided which employ the same mating principle and the terminals of this invention.

As has been pointed out above, the terminal 42, when properly positioned within channel 40, is not only properly oriented but is quite stable. The blade portion of the terminal 42 is free to move the amount necessary to assure proper contact with its mating terminal 42'. The locking ears 56, positioned as described and shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, lend additional support to the terminal, and the portions of channel 40 between the stabilizer stop and the rear end of receptacle 11 are such to insure that the stabilizer 60, with its extended ear 62, Will be in contact with the most rearward portion of channel 40 and thus stabilize the rear end of terminal 42. Thus, the terminal 42 is supported at two separate areas while leaving the tip 46 free to act as a cantilever beam or leaf spring assuring elfective contact between the mating terminals 42 and 42'.

To remove a terminal 42 from channel 40 from the inner end of the receptacle 10, a tool is inserted through opening 33 in a position between the lower Wall of top surface 24 and the tip 46 of terminal 42. If the tool is inserted far enough, the locking ears 56 may be forced downwardly against the spring 52 until the ears are free to pass over flat surface 54. Then, by pulling the wire from the opposite end or by pushing on the tip 46 of terminal 42, the terminal may be pushed rearwardly through channel 40 and hence the Wire 40 and its terminal 42 removed.

Similarly, to remove terminal 42 from channel 40 of receptacle 10 from the rear or outer 'end, a tool is inserted in slot 76 so as to cause spring 52 to be depressed. This will permit locking cars 56 to drop down from engagement from the inner side of flat surfaces 54 and by pulling on wire 44, terminal 42 may be removed from channel 40. Thus, with a simple tool, the terminals 42 and their respective wires 44 may be readily removed from either end of the receptacle 10 or plug 11 of this invention.

Of course, it is understood that those having skill in the art may modify the device of the invention by means which are the equivalents of one or more of those provided. However, such modifications would be within the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A housing for an electrical connector means of the class described having at least one longitudinal channel formed therethrough beginning at the rear end thereof and extending towards the front end thereof:

(A) said housing having:

(1) a lower wall surface;

(2) a first upper wall surface having a length less than the length of said lower wall surface;

(3) a second upper Wall surface which:

(a) has a length that is substantially the same as the difference between the lengths of said lower wall surface and said upper wall surface;

(b) is positioned closer to said lower wall surface than is said first upper wall surface; and

(c) has a portion of its length from said front end towards said rear end which has a width less than the width of said upper wall surface and the remainder of said second upper wall surface having a width which is substantially the same as said first upper wall surface;

(4) transverse shoulder means formed by the juncture of said first and second upper walls; (5) right and left side walls which;

(a) are substantially continuous from said rear end; and

(b) have a central portion with a length which is less than the length of said lower wall surface and is greater than the length of said first upper wall surface; and

(6) a transverse opening extending continuously across the front end thereof and extending from said front end through at least a'portion of the length thereof; and (B) each said longitudinal channel being adapted to receive electrical terminal means and. having:

(1) a length which is substantially equal to the length of said housing;

(2) terminal supporting means formed therein;

and

(3) terminal locking means formed. therein.

7 2. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(A) said housing having:

(1) a lower wall surface having:

(a) a top surface having a plurality of longitudinally extending grooves formed therein corresponding to the number of said longitudinal channels in said housing and in longitudinal alignment therewith;

(3) a second upper wall surface which:

(d) has a number of rails formed therein corresponding in number, size and vertical position to said grooves in the top surface of said lower wall surface, said rails being adapted to longitudinally engage said grooves of a corresponding housing to mate the housings of one another.

3. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(A) said housing having:

(1) a lower wall surface having:

(b) a plurality of raised members on its top surface near its front end;

(3) a second upper wall surface which:

(e) has a plurality of dimple members corresponding in number, size, relative position and shape to said raised members.

4. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(A) said housing having:

(1) a lower wall surface having;

(a) a top surface having a plurality of longitudinally extending grooves formed therein corresponding to the number of said longitudinal channels in said housing and in longitudinal alignment therewith;

(b) a plurality of raised members on its top surface near its front end;

(3) a second upper wall surface which:

(d) has a number of rails formed therein corresponding in number, size and vertical position to said grooves in the top surface of said lower wall surface, said rails being adapted to longitudinally engage said grooves of a corresponding housing to mate the housings with one another; and

(e) has a plurality of dimple members corresponding in number, size, relative position and shape to said raised members.

5. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(B) each said longitudinal channel being adapted to receive electrical terminal means and having:

(3) terminal locking means formed therein, in-

cluding:

(a) a pair of inclined plane members sloping toward said front end and having a groove therebetween for receiving electrical terminal means; and

(b) said inclined plane members including a pair of flat shoulders formed as a continuation thereof, the forward ends of said flattened shoulders constituting locking shoulders for terminals which have been advanced along said inclined planeshoulders and adjacent the forward ends of said flattened shoulders until the terminal is disposed in said groove.

6. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 5:

(B) each said longitudinal channel being adapted to receive electrical terminal means and having:

(3) terminal locking means formed therein, in-

cluding:

(c) spring means formed on the bottom surface of said channel opposite said inclined plane members, said spring means being forwardly inclined towards said front end and being adapted to urge a terminal positioned in said channel toward engagement with the forward ends of said flattened shoulders.

7. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(B) each said longitudinal channel being adapted to receive electrical terminal means and having:

(3) terminal locking means formed therein, in-

cluding:

(a) a pair of inclined plane members sloping toward said front end and having a groove therebetween for receiving electrical terminal means;

(b) a pair of flat shoulders formed as a continuation of said inclined plane shoulders, the junction of said flat shoulders and said inclined plane shoulders being chamfered, the forward ends of said flattened shoulders constituting locking shoulders for electrical terminal means being urged by said spring means toward said groove after advancing with respect to said inclined plane members and said flattened shoulders to adjacent the forward ends thereof; and

(c) cantilever spring means extending from the bottom surface of said channel opposite said inclined plane members, said spring means being forwardly inclined towards said front end and being adapted to urge a terminal positioned in said channel toward said groove and into engagement with the forward ends of said flattened shoulders.

8. A housing for an electrical connector means in accordance with claim 1:

(B) each said longitudinal channel being adapted to receive electrical terminal means and having:

(2) terminal supporting means formed therein,

including,

(a) stop means for limiting the extent of insertion of the electrical terminal means towards the front end of .said longitudinal channel; and

(b) means for preventing the insertion of electrical terminal means into said longitudinal channel in any position other than a predetermined position.

9. An electrical connector comprising:

(A) a housing being adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto, said housing includmg:

(1) a body member having a transverse slot extending into the thickness of said body member from an end surface thereof and forming upper and lower end portions of said body member,

(2) the upper surface of said upper end portion being lower than the surface of said body member adjacent thereto, the junction of said upper surface and the surface adjacent thereto forming a transverse abutment member,

(3) the distance between said slot and said upper surface substantially corresponding to the thickness of said slot,

(4) said body member having a channel extending through the length thereof and intersecting said slot; and

(B) an electrical terminal disposed in said channel with the free end portion of said electrical terminal disposed adjacent said slot, whereby said housing is adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto when the other housing is inverted, said slot of said housing receiving the upper end portion of the other housing with the upper surface of the upper end portion of said housing in a facing relationship with the upper surface of the lower end portion of the other housing and with the abutment member of said housing engaging the end surface of the lower end portion of the other housing.

10. An electrical terminal for use in the class of connectors described having: stabilizer means, insulating gripping means and wire gripping means on the rear end thereof and, extending forwardly from said wire gripping means, having:

(A) a substantially flat longitudinally extending cantilever blade portion extending to the front end thereof;

(B) at least one locking ear projection formed on an intermediate portion of said blade portion having a width which is greater than the width of said blade portion; and.

(C) a transversely depressed area formed on said blade portion at a position between said locking ear projection and said front end of said terminal; and

(D) means formed in said blade portion at a position corresponding substantially to the location on said blade portion of said locking ear projection for guiding said locking ear projection with respect to an abutment member of a connector.

11. An electrical terminal for usein the class of connectors described, having: stabilizer means, insulating gripping means and wire gripping means on the rear end thereof and, extending forwardly from said wire gripping means, having:

(A) a substantially flat longitudinally extending cantilever blade portion extending to the front end thereof having:

(1) said front end having a ti ortion formed thereon which is bent out of the plane of said blade portion;

(B) at least one locking ear projection formed on an intermediate portion of said blade portion having a width which is greater than the width of said blade portion;

(C) a transversely depressed area formed on said blade portion at a position between said locking ear projection and said front end of said terminal; and

(D) means formed in said blade portion at a position corresponding substantially to the location on said blade portion of said locking ear projection for guiding said locking ea-r projection with respect to an abutment member of a connector.

12. A housing for an electrical connector, said housing being adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto, said housing comprising:

(a) a body member having a transverse slot extending completely across said body member and into the thickness of said body member from an end surface thereof and forming upper and lower end portions of said body member,

(b) the upper surface of said upper end portion being lower than the surface of said body member adjacent thereto, the junction of said upper surface and the surface adjacent thereto forming a transverse abutment member,

() the distance between said slot and said upper surface substantially corresponding to the thickness of said slot,

(d) said body member having a channel extending through the length thereof and intersecting said slot,

(c) said channel being adapted to receive an electrical terminal with the free end portion thereof disposed adjacent said slot,

whereby said housing is adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto when the other housing is inverted, said slot of said housing receiving the upper end portion of the other housing with the upper surface of 10 the upper end portion of said housing in a facing relationship with the upper surface of the lower end portion ofthe other housing and with the abutment member of said housing engaging the end surface of the lower end portion of the other housing.

13. A housing for an electrical connector, said housing being adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto, said housing comprising:

(a) a body member having a transverse slot extending into the thickness of said body member from an end surface thereof and forming upper and lower end portions of said body member,

(b) the upper surface of said upper end portion being lower than the surface of said body member adjacent thereto, the junction of said upper surface and the surface adjacent thereto forming a transverse abutment member,

(c) the distance between said slot and said upper surface substantially corresponding to the thickness of said slot,

(d) said upper surface of said upper end portion hav ing at least one rib overlying said channel and ex tending substantially parallel to the length of said housing,

(e) said body member having a channel extending through the length thereof and intersecting said slot,

(f) said channel being adapted to receive an electrical terminal with the free end portion thereof disposed adjacent said slot,

whereby said housing is adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto when the other housing is inverted, said slot of said housing receiving the upper end portion of the other housing with the upper surface of the upper end portion of said housing in a facing relationship with the upper surface of the lower end portion of the other housing and with said rib being engaged with the portion of said channel adjacent the lower end portion of the other housing.

14. A housing for an electrical connector, said housing being adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto, said housing comprising:

(a) a body member having a transverse slot extending into the thickness of said body member from an end surface thereof and forming upper and lower end portions of said body member,

(b) the upper surface of said upper end portion being lower than the surface of said body member adjacent thereto, the junction of said upper surface and the surface adjacent thereto forming a transverse abutment member,

(c) the distance between said slot and said upper surface substantially corresponding to the thickness of said slot,

(d) said body member having a channel extending through the length thereof and intersecting said lot,

(e) said channel being adapted to receive an electrical terminal with the free end portion thereof disposed adjacent said slot,

(f) said electrical terminal having a lug member extending transversely from the opposite side thereof,

(g) the upper surface of said channel having abutment members for engaging said lug members when said lug members are moved in the direction of the end surface of said housing to a predetermined position with respect to said abutment members,

whereby said housing is adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto when the other housing is inverted, said slot of said housing receiving the upper end portion of the other housing with the upper surface of the upper end portion of said housing in a facing relationship with the upper surface of the lower end portion of the other housing and with the abutment member of said houshing engaging the end surface of the lower end portion of the other housing.

15. A housing for an electrical connector, said housing being adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto, said housing comprising:

(a) a body member having a transverse slot extending into the thickness of said body member from an end surface thereof and forming upper and lower end portions of said body member,

(b) the upper surface of said upper end portion being lower than the surface of said body member adjacent thereto, the junction of said upper surface and the surface adjacent thereto forming a transverse abutment member,

(c) the distance between said slot and said upper surface substantially corresponding to the thickness of said slot,

(d) said body member having a channel extending through the length thereof and intersecting said slot,

(e) said channel being adapted to receive an electrical terminal with the free end portion thereof disposed adjacent said slot,

(f) said electrical terminal having a lug member extending transversely from the opposite side thereof,

(g) the upper surface of said channel having abutment members for engaging said lug members when said lug members are moved beyond the end abutment members in the direction of the end surface of said housing to a predetermined position with respect to said abutment members,

(h) the lower surface of said channel having an upwardly extending tongue member for urging said terminal toward the upper surface of said channel,

whereby said housing is adapted to be mated with another housing corresponding thereto when the other housing is inverted, said slot of said housing receiving the upper end portion of the other housing with the upper surface of the upper end portion of said housing in a facing relationship with the upper surface of the lower end portion of the other housing.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 526,078 9/ 1894 Henck 339-47 1,237,857 8/1917 Averill 339-47 2,299,787 10/ 1942 Beal 339-205 2,318,648 5/ 1943 Penfold 339-205 2,523,465 9/1950 Graham 339-47 2,838,739 6/1958 Winckler 339-47 2,891,103 6/1959 Swengel 174-153 2,974,302 3/1961 Ellis 339-278 3,002,176 9/1961 Yopp 339-176 3,011,143 11/1961 Dean 339-49 3,012,159 12/1961 Druesedow 339-217 3,021,503 2/1962 Hopkins et a1 339-213 3,034,089 5/ 1962 Curtis 339-49 3,072,340 1/ 1963 Dean 339-49 3,157,448 11/ 1964 Crimmins et al. 339-49 3,173,734- 3/ 1965 Hartwell 339-49 FOREIGN PATENTS 56,178 3/1944 Holland.

MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner.

EDWARD C. ALLEN, PATRICK A. CLIFFORD,

Examiners.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/295, 439/557, 439/350, 439/595, 439/732
International ClassificationH01R13/28, H01R13/422, H01R13/02
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/28, H01R13/4223
European ClassificationH01R13/28