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Publication numberUS3338022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1967
Filing dateOct 14, 1964
Priority dateOct 14, 1964
Publication numberUS 3338022 A, US 3338022A, US-A-3338022, US3338022 A, US3338022A
InventorsSkidmore Richard H, William Moonan
Original AssigneeSprayon Products
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for filling aerosol cans
US 3338022 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,338,022 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FILLING AEROSOL CANS William Moonan, Shaker Heights, and Richard H. Skidmore, Lyndhurst, Ohio, assignors to Sprayon Products,

Inc., Bedford Heights, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Oct. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 403,886 11 Claims. (Cl. 53-36) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A method and apparatus for filling aerosol cans containing a liquid propellant with a liquid to be dispensed in which the can is supported in the apparatus that is employed to force the liquid to be dispensed into the can by locking engagement of the upper portion of the can with the apparatus.

This application is directed to a modification of methods, articles and apparatus for filling pressurized containers disclosed in application Ser. No. 340,261, filed Jan. 27, 1964, in the name of William Moonan and assigned to the same assignee as the instant application.

Frequently, paints and the like are sold in different sizes of aerosol containers or cans. In filling these cans it is necessary securely to support the can in alignment with the pressurized filling apparatus. Further, this supporting arrangement must include means for quickly and easily engaging and releasing the aerosol can while including means for positively locking the can during the filling operation.

Accordingly, general objects of the present invention are the provision of an improved method whereby it is possible economically and efliciently to fill small numbers of aerosol cans of different sizes by injection of a portion of the material, to be dispensed after the liquid propellant has been supplied to the container. Another object of this invention is to provide a pressurized aerosol container filling apparatus with a securing device securely for engaging the aerosol can in a filling position and quickly and easily releasing the can after the can has been filled. Still another object of this invention is to provide methods and apparatus for engaging the tops of aerosol cans which method and apparatus do not require any modification of the existing aerosol can structure. Yet another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus for filling pressurized aerosol cans of different heights, which apparatus is simple in construction, easy to manipulate and has a positive locking engagement with the can.

Briefly, in accordance with aspects of this invention, we have discovered that a novel method and apparatus for filling pressurized aerosol containers of different sizes can be provided with a pump which is removably mounted on a base and including locking means for locking the upper portion of the aerosol can to and in axial alignment with the pump cylinder and with the dispensing nozzle of the can in engagement with a liner mounted within the pump cylinder. In accordance with other aspects of this invention we have discovered a novel arrangement for locking an aerosol can to a pump cylinder by employing means for exerting radially directed forces on a portion of the cap on the aerosol can. In accordance with the still other aspects of this invention, we employ, as a cap for an aerosol can, a metallic member having a recessed portion, which recessed portion includes an inwardly directed annular recess which is preferably C shaped in cross-section. We also provide suitable means on the discharge end of the purrip cylinder or pump nozzle for quickly and easily producing forces directed radially outwardly on these annular recessed portions of the cap of the aerosol can. In accordance with one illustrative embodiment of this invention, a sliding ring or sleeve, which is preferably spring biased, is slidably mounted on the pump nozzle and cooperates with a can locking bushing including at least a pair of locking members, such as balls, for engaging the C-shaped annular recess in the can cap. This combination quickly and easily locks the aerosol can in a position of axial alignment with the pump cylinder and provides an arrangement which can be quickly and easily unlocked from the pump cylinder after the can is filled but will not accidentally become unlocked because of the biasing spring.-

In accordance with other aspects of this invention we provide a pump cylinder for filling aerosol cans with a locking bushing which is secured to the lower end of the pump cylinder, which locking bushing is preferably annular in shape and has at least two radially directed recesses which terminate in apertures in one surface of the bushing. Each of these recesses contains a ball or movable locking member. Preferably, the diameter of the apertures in the surface of the bushing is less than the diameter of the balls so that the balls will be retained in the passages. With this passage arrangement, when the bushing is in an upright position, the balls may be urged to a terminal locking position in the surface of the bushing by a sliding spring biased sleeve. If the balls are locked in this terminal position, the periphery of the balls will extend beyond the bushing to provide a locking engagement with a suitable recess in the can cap. Advantageously, we provide, in combination with this bushing, a sliding ring or sleeve having a right circular cylindrical and a flange portion extending radially from the cylindrical portion and position the cylindrical portion in sliding engagement in a cylindrical recess in the locking bushing. The end of the cylindrical portion of the sliding ring is moved beyond the centers of the balls by the biasing spring and the cylindrical surface of the sleeve securely locks the balls in their terminal position. Preferably, the sliding ring or sleeve is provided with a tapered surface joining one edge of the cylindrical surface for engaging the surfaces of the balls to urge the balls in their terminal can-engaging position. By positioning the sliding ring above the locking bushing, and employing a spring compressed between the ring and a portion of the pump cylinder cap the sliding ring will be spring urged into engagement with the balls and thus tend to lock the balls in their terminal position. When it is desired to release the locking engagement between the balls of the locking bushing and the annularly recessed cap surface, the sliding sleeve is manually moved away from the locking bushing with sufiicient force to overcome the spring bias. This releases the balls in the locking bushing and permits these balls to move radially relative to the locking bushing in response to a radial force produced by the can when an axial pulling force is applied to the can. When the balls move radially they disengage the surface of the aerosol can cap.

According to the present method, cans intended for relative to the axis of the cylinder in response to the radial force applied by the can. The sleeve is held in this position while the aerosol can is inverted and the dispensing nozzle of the can is inserted within the lower end of the cylinder and within the discharge end of the plastic liner in the cylinder. Preferably, the valve stem is inserted into the bottom, or discharge end of the plastic liner, with a relative twisting motion between the aerosol can and the pump cylinder. After the valve stem is fully inserted in the cylinder, the sliding sleeve is released, the pump cylinder and aerosol can are inverted and the pump cylinder is moved radially to engage a U-shaped or horseshoe-shaped top plate on the base. The portions of the horseshoe substantially engage the greater portion of the periphery of a collar or cylindrical surface on the pump cylinder and a sprin biased detent ball in the plate engages the cylinder to frictionally lock the cylinder in position on the base. After the pump cylinder is positioned on the base, the paint or other liquid to be supplied to the aerosol container is poured into the plastic liner until the proper level is obtained. Subsequently, the pump piston assembly is positioned on and locked to the pump cylinder and the piston is connected to a handle pivotally linked to the base assembly. The pump piston assembly includes a sleeve slidably mounted on the pump piston and the sleeve lockingly engages the top of the pump cylinder to define a guide for the piston and to limit the stroke of the piston. Preferably, the sleeve has a plurality such as three indentations which frictionally engage suitable peripherally extending fingers in the pump cylinder upon rotation of the sleeve to lock the sleeve to the pump cylinder.

The pump handle is now manually operated to pump the fluid into the aerosol can. After the desired amount of liquid has been pumped into the aerosol can by developing within the pump a pressure greater than the pressure within the can plus the pressure of the spring biasing the aerosol can valve into its normally closed position, the piston is detached from the handle and the piston sleeve is rotated to unlock it from the top of the cylinder. The piston assembly is now removed from the cylinder and the cylinder and aerosol can are detached from the top plate. The cylinder and can are now inverted and suflicient force is applied to the sleeve to overcome the spring bias to unlock the balls from the annular recess in the can cap. The can is now rotated and pulled until the dispensing nozzle is removed from within the cylinder liner, Subsequently, the can may be shaken to' thoroughly mix the contents and a plastic actuator may be inserted on top of the valve core and seated firmly by any convenient means such as by means ofa notched metal tool. The plastic liner is now removed from the pump cylinder and the piston wiped to remove any adhering liquid. T he pump is now ready to perform a subsequent filling operation on a can of any desired height by again employing the novel looking engagement between the pump cylinder and the top of the can. One of the many advantages of this novel method of filling aerosol containers is that when removing the inverted container from the end of the cylinder, any excess liquid will flow away from the aerosol dispensing nozzle and toward the pump cylinder rather than into the can cap and between the can cap and the base of the nozzle.

These and various other objects and features of the invention will be more clearly understood from a reading of the detailed description of the invention in conjunction with the drawing in which:

' FIGURE 1 is a view in elevation and in perspective of an aerosol can and one embodiment of filling apparatus therefor;

FIGURE 2 is a view in section, to an enlarged scale, partly broken away, ferred embodiment of can locking means of FIG, 1 and taken along the diameter of a pre with the locking means partially engaged with an aerosol can;

FIGURE 3 is a view in section and in elevation, partly broken away, taken along the line 33 of FIG. 1 to the same scale as FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows showing the locking engagement between the locking means and the aerosol can cap;

FIGURE 4 is a view in elevation, partly in section and to the same scale as FIGS. 2 and 3, of an alternative embodiment of locking means for locking the filling apparatus to a peripheral portion of an aerosol package; and

FIGURES 5a and 5b are views in plan and section, respectively of a thrust spring employed in this invention, the views being to a reduced scale compared to the scale of FIGURES 2, 3 and 4.

FIGURE 1 shows in perspective, a pressurized can filling apparatus 10 in accordance with one illustrative embodiment of this invention for filling aerosol cans such as a can 11. The filling apparatus 10 includes a generally U-shaped base portion 12 with a pair of legs 13 from which a group of rubber feet 14 depend, a generally horseshoe-shaped top plate 15. which is secured to the base portion by means of screws such as the screws 16 and a web 17 connecting the legs 13.

A pump assembly is mounted 'on and linked to the top plate 15 by means of a pair of projecting arms 18, 19 which receive a pump handle pivot arm 20 and connect to the pivot arm 20 by means of a pin 21. The pivot arm 20 has a bifurcated end which receives and is linked to one end ofa handle 23 by means of a pivot pin 24. The handle 23 may be manually actuated by means of a handle grip 25 on the end of the handle 23 opposite from the pivot pin 24 as indicated by a hand 26. The pump assembly also includes a pump cylinder 30 which receives a piston assembly including a cylinder top 31 and a piston 32 slidably engaging the top 31 and connected to handle 23 by means of a pin 33. Downward movement of the handle 23 produces pressures within the pump cylinder 30 sufiicient to overcome the pressure of the liquefied propellant and the spring in the discharge nozzle valve such that the liquid in the cylinder 30 is forced into the can 11. The top 31 has a right circular cylindrical portion 34 which slidably engages and acts as a guide for the pump piston 32 as it is reciprocated by vertical movement of the handle 23. The cylinder top 31 includes a flat, radially extending portion 35 having a plurality of oval-shaped apertures 36 therein to permit the entry of air into cylinder 30. Top 31 also includes a cylindrical rim 37 which frictionally engages the upper periphery of cylinder 30 and has radially inwardly projecting portions 38 struck therefrom to define a locking engagement with individual ones of a plurality of circumferentially extending fingers 39 on the top edge of the cylinder 30. Positioned within the pump cylinder 30 is a suitable liner 40 made of plastic or similar material,

which liner receives the material to be supplied to the aerosol can 11. The pump cylinder 30 is provided with an elongated oval-shaped slot 41 extending axially of the cylinder 30 through which theliquid level in the liner 40 may be observed.

Advantageously, the can 11 locks onto the end of the pump cylinder 30 by means of a suitable locking means which will be subsequently described. Because the can 11 locks to the end of the cylinder 30 it is possible to fill cans of difierent sizes. For example as indicated in FIG. 1, the can 11 clears the flat base portion or web 17 of the base portion 12. Thus is would be possible to fill larger size cans by selectively locking these cans to the pump cylinder 30. The locking means for locking the can 11 to the pump cylinder 30 are shown in detail in a partially engaged position in'FIG. 2, which is a view in elevation, partly in section of the top portion of the can 11 and the lower portion of the cylinder 30 of FIG.

1 to an enlarged scale. As shown in FIG. 3, the pump' cylinder 30 includes a cylindrical portion 43 which is crimped to a suitable cylindrical cap portion 44 as indicated at 45.

The cylinder 30 is positioned within the horseshoeshaped portion of the top plate and moved to seat in the slot defined by the horseshoe-shaped top plate the cylinder 30 is locked in position by a ball type detent locking arrangement which will be subsequently described in detail. The ball type detent includes a ball 46 sliding in a generally cylindrical passage 47 and urged into engagement with a portion of the cylinder 30 by means of a spring 48 and a detent screw 49 which acts to compress the spring 48 against the ball 46. The pump cylinder cap 44 includes a frusto-conical portion 50 and a cylindrical portion 51 communicating with the frustoconial portion 50. The cylindrical portion 51 terminates in a threaded end 52 for supporting a can locking means including a can locking bushing 53, a sliding annular ring or sleeve 54 and an annular thrust spring 55.

The can locking bushing 53 is generally cylindrical in configuration and includes a pair of cylindrical segments 56, 57 spaced apart in parallel relationship by means of a radially extending flange portion 58. The space between the cylindrical portions 56, 57 is also cylindrical in shape to receive a cylindrical projection 60 of the sliding sleeve 54. The sliding sleeve 54 also includes a radially extending flange 61. The locking bushion carries a plurality of locking balls 64 which are each positioned in an individual radially directed passage such as passages 65, 66. These passages 65, 66 have diameters greater than the balls 64 to permit the balls 64 to slide and roll and terminate in openings 67, 68 respectively, each having a smaller diameter than the diameter of the balls 64 such that the balls 64 are retained within the passages. Advantageously, the cylindrical portion 60 of the sliding sleeve 54 includes a frusto-coical surface 70 on the lower outer edge thereof for engaging the balls 64 and forcing these balls 64 radially outwardly as the sliding sleeve 54 moves downwardly as viewed in FIG. 2. The locking means including bushing 53, locking balls 64, sleeve 54 and spring 55 produces and maintains a locking engagement with the top portion of the can in a manner which will be subsequently described. The details of spring 55 are shown in FIGS. 5:: and 5b, which are views of spring 55 in plan and section, respectively to a reduced scale as compared to the scale of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. The spring 55 is in the form of an annular ring having an aperture 71 in the center thereof to receive the cylindrical portion 51 of the can cap 44. The spring 55 is dish-shaped in cross-section as shown in FIG. 5b and is formed of a suitable resilient material such as metal.

As shown in FIG. 2, the can 11 includes a cap 72 which supports a discharge nozzle 73 containing a spring biased valve which will be subsequently described. Advantageously, the cap 72 is generally concave and includes a C-shaped side wall portion 75 which terminates in an inverted U-shaped outer lip 76. The outer surface of the portion 75 and the inner surface of lip 76 secure a resilient sealing ring 77 in fluid sealing relationship against the top portion or lip 78 of the can 11. The locking engagement between the balls 64 of the locking bushing 53 and C-shaped portion 75 of the cap 72 is obtained by positioning the balls in engagement with the C-shaped portion 75 of the cap 72 and locking the balls in this position by means of the cylindrical portion 60 of the sliding sleeve 54. In FIG. 2, the sliding sleeve 54 is manually moved upwardly from its position of engagement with the balls 64 by compressing spring 55 such that the balls are free to move radially within their respective passages 65, 66. Because the outer diameter of the cylindrical portion 57 of the locking bushing 53 is smaller than the inner diameter of U-s-haped lip 76 of the cap 72, the locking bushing 53 freely enters the bowl-shaped cap 72. During this entry, the balls 64 are forced radially 6 inwardly when they engage the U-shaped lip 76 of the cap 72. Preferably, the engagement depicted in FIG. 2 is accompanied by relative rotary motion between cylinder 30 and can 11 about their common axis until the nozzle 73 reaches a position within the plastic liner 40 which is shown in detail in FIG. 3.

After the locking bushing 53 has reached a position in which the radial flange portion 58 engages the cap 72, the sliding ring 54 is released and permitted to move downwardly in response to the force of spring 55 until the frusto-conical surface 70 passes the balls 64 and the balls are locked into position by means of the cylindrical portion 60, as best seen in FIG. 3. Because the balls 64 are now secured in their terminal outward position, these balls securely engage the axially extending C shaped surface 75 on diametrically opposite portions of the cap 72, in this particular example, and thus lock the can 11 to the cylinder 30.

The plastic insert 40 includes a main reservoir 81, a cylindrical discharge nozzle 82 and an inwardly directed circular flange, or integral O-ring 83, extending from the cylindrical portion 82 into a tight fitting engagement with the nozzle 73. FIG. 3 also shows the frictional engagement of the detent ball 46 with a cylindrical surface 85 of the cap portion 44 of the pump cylinder 30. The cap portion 44 of the pump cylinder 30 includes a circular flange 86 which engages one surface of the horseshoeshaped top plate 15 so that the cylinder 30 is securely held in axial alignment with the piston 32. This engagement prevents the pump cylinder 30 from sliding from the U-shaped top plate 15 of the filling apparatus 10. The plastic insert 40 also includes a pair of inwardly directed circular flanges or integral O-rings 87, 88 at the top edge of a cylindrical section 90 such that the rings 87, 88 produce a tight working engagement With the pump piston 32 when the pump piston is forced downwardly by the handle 23. The discharge nozzle contains a ball-type valve 96 which is spring-biased into a filling and discharge orifice 97 by means of a spring 98.

In filling the can 11 with liquid from the plastic liner 40 the handle 23 is raised until the piston 32 moves to a position in which the upper edge of a conical portion 92 of piston 32 clears the O-rings 87, 88 to permit the liquid in the main reservoir 81 to flow along a pair of conical sections 94, 95 until the liquid reaches the space within the cylindrical piston-engaging sections 90 and a conical section 99. This build-up of pressure continues until the pressure overcomes the pressure Within the can 11 plus the spring bias normally applied to the valve within the discharge nozzle 73, and the liquid begins flowing into the can 11. Additional downward movement of the piston 32 maintains the pressure in cylinder 90 and forces more of the liquid into the can 11. The pump is operated by repeated strokes of the piston 32 into and out of the cylindrical section 90 until the liquid level, as measured on the graduated scale 42, indicates that the desired amount of liquid has been supplied to the can 11.

From the foregoing explanation it is apparent that the filling apparatus constitutes a simple and effective device for filling cans of different heights by overcoming the pressure of the propellant and the spring pressure on the discharge valve. Although the device was described with respect to a pair of locking balls engaging the curved surfaces of the cap 72, it will be apparent that a larger number of locking balls or locking members could be employed. An important aspect of the invention is the production of radial movement of the locking members relative to the axis of the can to produce locking engagement with a recess in the surface of the can. By employing this form of locking engagement the filling apparatus can fill containers of different heights and configurations. For example, the apparatus might be employed to fill a spherical apparatus which contained a liquid propellant and had a surface which could be gripped by the locking means.

FIG. 4 is a view, in elevation and in section, of another illustrative embodiment of locking means according to this invention. As therein depicted, the locking means includes a locking bushing 102, a cooperating sliding ring orsleeve 103 and a thrust spring 55. The locking bushing 102 includes a cylindrical portion 105 which threadably engages the threaded section 52 by means of the threads 106. Projecting radially from the cylindrical section 105 is a radially directed circular flange portion 107 which projectsv a distance suflicient to clear the outer flange of the cap 72 of the containers 11. Connected to the flange 107 is a downwardly projecting cylindrical portion 108 having a plurality of radially directed passages 109 therein, each of which contains a suitable ball-type locking device such as the ball 110. The locking bushing 102 also includes a second radially directed flange portion 111 which connects and is formed integrally with a vertically directed cylindrical section 112. The sliding ring or sleeve 103 includes a cylindrical portion 114 which slides between the cylindrical sections 108, 112 and has a tapered edge 115 which is positioned to engage the locking balls 110 and to move the locking balls radially inwardly'to- Ward the lip 76 of the cap 72. The sliding ring 103 also includes an outwardly directed circular flange 117 which extends a suflicient distance beyond the cylindrical section 112 to permit the flange 117 to be manually gripped for movement along a vertical axis. Advantageously, this embodiment of locking means can be employed with aerosol cans which do not have the C-shaped bowl profile 75 described in conjunction with FIGS. 2 and 3. Stated in another manner, this embodiment of locking means can be employed to engage an annular recess or a radially directed recess in the periphery of the aerosol can. Preferably, the engagement is such that the locking means engages a suitable recess in the upper portion of the can 11. In the embodiment of FIG. 4, the engagement between locking members such as the balls 110 and the cap 72 facilitates the locking and unlocking means by requiring a minimum of relative axial movement between the can 11 and cylinder 30.

One method which may be employed in filling cans of various heights and shapes with this novel apparatus will be described in detail. In performing this method, the plastic liner 40 is slidably inserted in cylinder 30 by movement in a direction axially of the cylinder 30 until the cylindrical projection 82 has reached its terminal position. The usual protective cap and plastic actuator are then removed from the dispensing nozzle of the can to be filled. With the cylinder 30 in an inverted position relative to its final position on the filling apparatus, the sleeve 54 is pushed downwardly and held in this position, the can 11 is inverted and placed in axial alignment'with the cylinder 30 and the discharge nozzle 73 is slowly inserted into the plastic liner 40 until the circular flange 58 of the locking bushing 53 engages the can cap 72. Preferably this insertion is accompanied by producing relative rotation between the can 11 and the pump cylinder 30. The sleeve 54 is released, the can 11 and pump cylinder 30 are inverted to a position cor-responding to that shown in FIG. 1 and the cylinder 30 is moved between the horseshoeshaped projections of the top plate 15 until the detent ball 46 securely engages the cylindrical surface 85 of the cylinder cap 44. The locking engagement defined by the locking bushing 53 including the balls 64 and the cap 72 is now tested by applying a downward force on the can 11. If the can is not securely locked, the can leaves the locking bushing 53. The locking engagement can now be obtained by pushing up the sliding ring 54, pushing the can upwardly over bushing 53 and releasing sliding ring .54 so that the balls 64 securely engage the cap 72. The next step in the filling operation involves the pouring of the liquid into the plastic liner 40, which liquid is to be supplied to the can 11. The liquid, such as paint, is poured into the plastic liner until the liquid reaches the desired graduation Any of this paint which 42 on the pump cylinder 30. The handle 23 is now moved to an upward position and pin 33 is inserted through the end of the piston 32 and through the handle 23. After the paint or lacquer or other liquid to be charged into the aerosol can 11 is poured into the plastic liner 40 the pump piston asembly, including cylinder top 31' and piston 32 is positioned on the top of the pump cylinder 30 and rotated into a locked position. Subsequently, the paint is pumped into the aerosol can 11. After a sufiicient amount has been pumped from the liner 40 into the can 11, the pump handle is disconnected from the piston and the piston assembly is detached from the cylinder. The piston step involves a removal of the cylinder 30 and the can 11 from the apparatus 10 by overcoming the force exerted on detent ball 46 by detent spring 48 and inverting the cylinder and can until the can moved from the locking bushing 53 by overcoming the force of spring 55. Thus, the balls 64 are free to roll radially inwardly away from engagement with the C- shaped surface 75 of the cap 72. The only force opposing the withdrawal of the can 11 from the cylinder 30 will be the frictional engagement between the inwardly projecting O-ring 83 of the plastic liner 40 and the discharge nozzle 73. Advantageously, by removing the can in this direction any small amount of paint within the cylindrical portion 82 of the liner 40 and around the end of the discharge nozzle 73 will tend to flow downwardly back into the liner 40 rather than around the discharge nozzle 73.

73 may be quickly and easily wiped from the ends of the discharge nozzle. The apparatus is now in condition to be employed to fill another aerosol package, which package may be of difierent height or shape than the package previously filled.

While we have shown and described in detail two illustrative embodiments of this invention, it is understood that other embodiments could be provided to encompass these features without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of filling a plurality of aerosol containers with paints and the like of several different colors, each container having the required amount of liquified propellant gas and at least a substantial quantity of a solvent for the paints or the like to be dispensed and a cap having a. normally closed discharge valve, said valve being openable by external fluid pressure substantially in excess of the fluid pressure within the container, including the steps of mounting said container by means of said cap beneath a discharge container containing the'paint desired to be injected in the said container and thereafter injecting said paint or the like into each individual container from said discharge container through the discharge valve of said aerosol container under a pressure sufliciently greater than the pressure within the container to open said valve.

2. The method of filling aerosol containers with liquids to be discharged, each having the required amount of liquified propellant gas and at least a substantial portion of the liquid to be dispensed in the container and a cap thereon, said cap having a normally closed discharge valve mounted therein, said valve being openable by external fluid pressure substantially in excess of the fluid pressure within the container, including the steps of mounting said container beneath a filling apparatus by means of an axially extending surface of said cap and thereafter injecting the balance of the materials into the container through said valve under pressure sufliciently greater than the pressure within the container to open said valve.

3. The method of filling a plurality of aerosol containers with paints and the like of several different colors,

each container containing the required amount of liquified propellant gas and at least a substantial quantity of a' solvent for the paints or the like to be dispensed and hav- 11 is in an upside down position. In this position, the sliding sleeve 54 is manually adheres to the discharge nozzlev ing a cap containing a normally closed discharge valve, said valve being openable by external fluid pressure substantially in excess of the fiuid pressure within the container comprising the steps of mounting said aerosol container on the end of a discharge container by frictionally engaging an axially extending surface of said aerosol container and thereafter injecting said paint or the like into said aerosol container through the discharge valve of that container under pressure sufliciently greater than the pressure within the container to open said valve.

4. The method of filling aerosol containers with liquids to be discharged, each containing the required amount of liquified propellant gas and at least a substantial portion of the liquid to be dispensed and having a cap on the open end thereof, said cap having a normally closed discharge valve mounted therein, said valve being openable by external fluid pressure substantially in excess of the fluid pressure within the container, comprising the steps of locking said container to the discharge end of a filling apparatus by means of a radially directed recess in said container and thereafter injecting the balance of the materials into the container through said valve under pressure sufficiently greater than the pressure within the container to open said valve.

5. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into an aerosol can containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, said can having a discharge valve at the top thereof, said apparatus comprising a base, a cylinder member supported on said base, said cylinder member having a main working bore communicating at its lower end with a bore of reduced diameter for surrounding the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, means for forming a seal between said bore of reduced diameter and said valve, a piston making a working fit with said main working bore, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston within said working bore, a reservoir disposed above said working bore for supplying material to be injected into said aerosol can to said working bore and means for lockingly engaging the upper portion of said can.

6. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into an aerosol can containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, said can having a cap on the top thereof with a discharge valve therein, said apparatus comprising a base, cylinder means supported on said base, said cylinder means having a main working bore communicating at its lower end with a bore of reduced diameter that surrounds the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, a piston making a working fit with the interior of said cylinder means, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston within said cylinder means, means for supplying material to be injected into said aerosol can to said cylinder means and can locking means mounted on the lower end of said cylinder means including a sliding annular ring slidably mounted on said cylinder, a can locking bushing mounted beneath said sliding ring and a plurality of radially movable means for lockingly engaging a vertically extending surface of said can, said sliding ring including means for locking said radially movable means in engagement with said can surface.

7. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into an aerosol can containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, said can having a discharge valve at the top thereof, said apparatus comprising cylinder means having a main Working bore communicating with a bore of reduced diameter for surrounding the discharge valve of a can, a piston making a working fit with said main Working bore, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston within said working bore, a reservoir communicating with said working bore for supplying material to be injected into said aerosol can to said working bore and locking means for frictionally engaging an axially extending surface of said can including at least two members for frictionally engaging said axially extending surface of said can, supporting means supporting said members for 19 radial movement relative to said can and member locking means for locking said members in a position of engagement with said can surface.

8. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into aerosol cans of different heights containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, each of said cans having a cap on the top thereof with a discharge valve therein, said apparatus comprising cylinder means, said cylinder means having a main Working bore communicating at its lower end with a bore of reduced diameter that surrounds the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, a piston making a working fit with the interior of said cylinder means, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston within said cylinder means, each of said cans having a cap with an axially extending, annular recess therein, and means for selectively frictionally securing cans of different heights in a position of axial alignment with said cylidner means including at least two friction bearings, means supporting said bearings for radial movement relative to said can and sliding means for locking said bearings in their terminal outward position in engagement with said annular recess of said cap.

9. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into aerosol cans of different heights containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, each of said cans having a cap on the top thereof with a discharge valve therein, said apparatus comprising :a cylinder member, said cylinder member having a main working bore communicating at one end with a bore of reduced diameter for surrounding the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, a piston making a working fit with the interior of said cylinder member, manually operable means for reciprocat ing said piston with said cylinder member, means for supplying material to be injected into said aerosol can to said cylinder member, each of said cans having a cap with a vertically extending annular recess facing said discharge valve, and locking means for locking said cans to said apparatus including at least two friction bearings, bushing means mounted on said apparatus and having an individual radially outwardly directed passage encircling each of said bearings, a sliding sleeve for locking said bearings in their terminal position and spring means for biasing said sliding sleeve into engagement with said bearings.

10. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into an aerosol can containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, said can having a discharge valve at the top thereof, said apparatus comprising a cylinder member, said cylinder member having a main working bore communicating at one end with a bore of reduced diameter for surrounding the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, means for forming a seal between said bore of reduced diameter and said valve, a piston making a working fit with said main working bore, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston within said working bore, a reservoir communicating with said working bore for supplying a material to be injected into said aerosol can to said working bore, said can having a peripheral annular recess thereon, and means for locking said can to said apparatus by frictionally engaging said recess including at least two friction bearings, bushing means mounted on said apparatus and having a pair of inwardly directed passages relative to said can, each encircling one of said bearings, sliding means for locking said bearings in their terminal inward position in engagement with said recess and spring means for biasing said sliding means in engagement with said bearings.

11. Apparatus for charging material to be sprayed into aerosol cans of different heights containing a liquified propellant gas under pressure, each of said cans having a cap on the top thereof with a discharge valve therein, said apparatus comprising a cylinder member, said cylinder member having a main working bore communicating with a bore of reduced diameter that surrounds the discharge valve of a can disposed in the apparatus, a piston making a working fit with the interior of said cylinder member, manually operable means for reciprocating said piston and-can locking means mounted on said cylinder including a bushing having a pair of friction bearings slidably mounted in diametrically opposed passages therein for movement inwardly toward said can, a sliding sleeve slidably engaging said bushing for movement in the paths of said bearings for retaining said bearings in their terminal inward position in engagement with said can and thrust spring means between said cylinder member and said sliding sleeve for urging said sleeve into engagement with said bearings.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,638,456 8/1927 Pike 222-326 X 1,981,508 11/1934 Harris 222-340 X 2,279,146 4/ 1942 Schneller 285-316 X 2,860,893 11/1958 Clark 2853l6 X 2,914,096 11/ 1959 Foresman 14120 GRANVILLE Y. CUSTER, JR., Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3797534 *Feb 1, 1971Mar 19, 1974Sprayon Prod IncPower operated means for filling aerosol cans
US5647408 *Mar 12, 1996Jul 15, 1997The Sherwin-Williams CompanyAerosol can filling head
US5740841 *Jul 16, 1996Apr 21, 1998Hirz; Donald J.Can filling apparatus
US7252119Jan 10, 2005Aug 7, 2007Seymour Of SycamorePaint filling system and safety device for preparing a pressurized container of pigmented paint
US8171962 *Jul 28, 2006May 8, 2012Fillon Investissement, S.A.Device for filling an aerosol container with a liquid, filling arrangement able to accommodate such a device and cap, and an aerosol container equipped with such a filling device
US8469063 *Dec 20, 2007Jun 25, 2013Pro Form Products LimitedFilling head injector for aerosol can
US20120138188 *Dec 7, 2010Jun 7, 2012Seymour Of Sycamore Inc.Aerosol container filling system
WO2006076232A1 *Jan 6, 2006Jul 20, 2006Seymour Of Sycamore IncPaint filling system and safety device for preparing a pressurized container of pigmented paint
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/20
International ClassificationB65B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65B31/003
European ClassificationB65B31/00A