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Publication numberUS3338250 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1967
Filing dateJul 30, 1965
Priority dateJul 30, 1965
Publication numberUS 3338250 A, US 3338250A, US-A-3338250, US3338250 A, US3338250A
InventorsMehelich John J
Original AssigneeWolverine Toy Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin bank
US 3338250 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1967 J. J. MEHELICH 3,

' i com BANK Y v Filed July so, 1965 V 3 e Sheets-Sheet 1 Y E ii l E g? g} I 5%, a" 'I t uu i ii INVENTOR. Jam/J MEI-{EL /c/-/ C1420 THEES nun (74/20 171525 H13 Arraeusvs g- 29, 1967 J. J. MEHELICH 3,338,250 7 com BANK Filed July 30, '1965 7 6 Sheet-Sheet 2 I NVENTOR.

JO NJ. Mam IC'H BY (A20 THE'ESANO (A/2a 11/525 H15 A TToRNEYS .1. J. MEHELICH Aug. 29, 1967 COIN BANK 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed July 30, 1965 INVENTOR. Y Jam/J. MEI-{EL IC'H BY C'Ago n/Ees AND CYEOTHEIS H/s Arraeuevs J. J. MEHELICH 3,338,250

COIINYBANK 6 Sheets-Sheet I INVENTOR. JOHN J. MEI/EL 0! BY 7 C14 20 THEES AND C420 rh'ses HH HMMMH H MMMH r p \m Aug. 29, 1967 Filed Jul 30, 1965 29, 1967 J. J. MEHELICH 3,338,250

COIN BANK Filed July 30, 1965 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Cmea rwsnas 44/0 (1420 was /-/16 A r TOQNE rs United States Patent 3,338,250 COIN BANK John J. Mehelich, Pittsburgh, Pa., assignor to Wolverine Toy Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvauia Filed July 30, 1965, Ser. No. 476,125 9 Claims. (Cl. 133-3) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A coin bank with a vertically disposed helical coin track having a series of spaced openings increasing in size and located above compartments so that inserted coins are assorted according to size as they roll down the track.

This invention relates generally to coin banks and more particularly to coin banks receptive to the receiving, classification and storage of various sizes of coins all in a single unit.

Coin banks are well known in the art as a method or means of saving currency whether the currency being saved is in the form of coins, certificates or notes. The most popular type of bank is a simple container in which the coins or paper money is placed in an opening in the top thereof until the bank is completely filled. When the bank is completely filled it may be opened and the contents removed and sorted into the various denominations of currency in order that the currency may be readily counted and deposited elsewhere. Banks of this type may be either utilized for the saving again of currency or are of the type which are not available for subsequent use again due to the necessity of destruction of the bank in order to remove its contents.

The principal object of this invention is a currency bank receptive of multi-sizes of coin currency which are classified by size and subsequently placed in independent compartment means for storage until their removal from the bank. The currency bank of this invention is receptive to any size of currency depending, of course, on the currency involved. Coins placed into the bank are subsequently classified according to their size and thus in accordance to their denomination. Each coin denomination has a separate compartment means independent of the other compartment means for other coin denominations.

Another principal object of this invention is the provision of a vertically disposed helical coin track which is supported from the base of the coin bank which track has a sloping surface disposed at an angle relative to the axis of the helical track. The helical track and track slope receive and support coins for rolling movement down the helical track.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a series of spaced selectively coin port openings in the track slope of increasing coin sizes from the upper to the lower port of the helical track which receive and remove and, thus, classify the proper size coins as the coins travel down the helical track.

Another object comprising this invention is independent compartment means under the helical track to receive the coins as classified by selective ports. These compartment means include coin storage holders or members having an opening at their upper end below a corresponding selective coin port and thus are positioned to receive a coin selected from its corresponding port. The coin storage holders or members may be constructed in any manner as long as they are capable of receiving the selected coin from the corresponding port in the helical track. The coin storage holders, therefore, may be completely cylindrical in shape or they may be arcuate permitting easy removal 3,338,250 Patented Aug. 29, 1967 of the coins from the storage member upon removing of the storage member from the coin bank. Actually the shape of the coin storage holders may take any form such as, for example, a rectangular box form. However, it is preferred that the coin storage holder be of arcuate or cylindrical form to permit easy transfer of the coins from the coin storage holder to the well-known tubular wrappers for coins.

Another object comprising this invention is a coin storage holder base rotatably supported relative to and underneath the main base of the coin bank. The holder base has a two fold purpose of first, supporting the coin storage holders within the coin bank with their open ends adjacent their corresponding ports underneath the helical track. Secondly, the coin storage holder base has an opening which is large enough to selectively permit the individual withdrawal or insertion of each of the coin storage holders. The coin storage holder base is of disc form with its opening near the edge of the coin holder base. The coin holder base is rotatably supported and when rotated may be aligned with any of the coin storage holders so that the holderv may be withdrawn from the coin bank structure through the holder base opening. Since there is only one opening in the coin holder base only one coin storage holder can be moved at one time. The same is, of course, true when inserting the storage holders through the coin holder base into their respective compartment means.

Another object comprising this invention is the provision of coin holder guides on the inner side wall of the coin bank structure. The base of the coin bank comprising this invention is provided with a series of openings orports of increasing size adjacent the peripheral edge of the base. The coin storage holders are provided with a perimetral flange and also longitudinal abutment surfaces along its arcuate edges. The perimetral flange limits the insertion of the coin storage holder into the coin bank structure and thus prevents the holders from completely passing into the inner chamber compartment means of the coin bank which is the area defined between the helical track and the main base of the coin bank. The out- Wardly turned guide flange along the edges of each coin storage holder slidably cooperate with its respective coin holder guides in order to properly retain the holder within the coin banks compartment means in proper alignment with its corresponding selective coin port in the helical track.

Another object comprising this invention is the provision of a coin receiving slot for reception to various sizes of coins and positioned at the upper extremity of the helical track. The coin slot is positioned in such a manner to properly place each coin on the helical surface out on the helical track and track slope. Thus, the coin receiving slot cooperates with the helical track and track slope to properly pre-position each coin ,on the track slope in order to insure subsequent proper classifying and storage of each coin so positioned.

Another object comprising this invention is the provision of additional slope area to the track slope of the helical track at the approach of each of the selective coin ports in order to properly guide and position a selected coin into the opening of the port. In this connection it should be noted that coins of larger size will readily pass a smaller part in the helical track not only because the port is of a smaller size than the dimensions of the coin but also due to the fact that the additional guide slope surface or guide channel before each port is not wide enough to be receptive of a coin possessing a larger diameter. Thus, the guide channel aids in properly positioning and guiding the coin into the opening of the proper port. The classifying of various sizes of coins through the use of the helical coin track and spaced coin ports in the track slope is the combination of various elements which comprises the pitch of the helical coin track, the angular slope of the helical coin track relative to its helical axis, the relative sizes of each of the spaced coin ports which are of progressively increasing size starting at the upper extremity of the helical track, and the relative size of the guide channel or cuts in the track slope to approach each selective coin port.

Another object comprising this invention is the provision of locking means on the coin storage holder base which locks the coin holder base from rotating relative to the coin bank base preventing the removal of the coin storage holders until the locking means is unlocked.

Another object comprising this invention is the provision of a fastening means which extends through the interior of the coin bank structure to hold the top, the side wall and helical track structure, the coin bank base, the coin storage tubes or holders and the coin storage holder base in fixed relation relative to one another as assembled but permitting rotation of the coin storage holder base upon unlocking of the lock means and subsequent removal of selective coin storage holders.

The coin bank of this invention being receptive for the receiving, classifying and storage of various sizes of coins enables the coin saver to store or otherwise save any denomination of currency wherein the various sizes of coins are classified according to their size and, therefore, their denomination. This structure eliminates the necessity of sorting coins into different denominations after the removal of the coins from the bank unit and permits the simple transfer of the coins as sized to other places of storage such as coin wrappers or saving bank accounts. Not only does the bank possess a unique sizing and storage facility for multi-sizes of coins but also possess toy novelty in delighting the minds of adults as well as children in observing the dropping of coins into their proper coin storage holder compartments upon insertion of the coins into the bank and their subsequent rolling movement down the track and proper selection by the coin port.

It should be understood that the pitch of the helical coin track may readily vary within a predetermined range with respect to the pitch length which is also true of the angle of the sloping surface of the track relative to the helical axis. Thus, the helical pitch may be correlated with the angle of the slope of the track in such a way to produce the desired results of selection and classifying of the coinage by the coin ports in the helical track.

Thus, another principal object comprising this invention is the provision of the desired correlation of the pitch length of the coin track helix relative to its helical axis to the magnitude of the track slope angle relative to the same helical axis. There is a multiple of variations which determines a range based upon track slope angle relative to the pitch of the helical track. The lower limit of this range would be that pitch length and sloping angle magnitude suflicient to induce downward movement of the receptive coins for a proper sizing and selection which would be that force suflicient to overcome the frictional forces between the coin placed on the track, the helical track and track slope. The upper limit of this range would be limited and thus governed by that pitch length or slope angle magnitude being of such length or small magnitude, respectively, as to induce the respective coin to override its proper corresponding selective coin port.

Other objects and advantages appear hereinafter in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show for the purpose of exemplification without limiting the invention or claims thereto, certain practical embodiments illustrating the principles of this invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the coin bank comprising this invention. Y

FIG. 2 is a horizontal section taken along the lines 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a partial vertical section of the annular wall and helical track taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a vertical section of the annular wall and helical track taken along the lines 44 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal section taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the base of the coin bank comprising this invention.

FIG. 7 is a bottom view of the coin storage holder base.

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of the base and coin storage tube cover, or holder base.

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the top of the coin bank comprising this invention. a FIG. 10 is a side elevation of a coin storage holder.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a coin storage holder.

Referring to FIG. 1 the coin bank comprising this invention consists of the annular body section 1, the top 2 and the coin bank base 3. The body section 1 forms the transparent annular side wall 4 of the coin bank which supports the helical track 5. The helical track 5 also includes the track slope 6 which has its inside helical edge secured to the central cylindrical section 7 as indicated at 8.

As shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4 the helical track 5 consists of a helical path having a central axis 10. The track slope 6 is provided with selective coin ports 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 which are openings in the track slope 6 of different sizes depending upon the currency which is to be classified or'sized by the coin port openings. For example, under the present U.S. coin currency the port 11 would be for dimes, port 12 pennies, port 13 nickels, port 14 quarters and port 15 half dollars.

The area before each of the coin ports 11 through 15 on the track slope 6 is somewhat indented to form a sloped cut or guide channel 16 which leads into its corresponding port in order to perform the function of properly selecting and thus guiding a coin moving down the helical track 5 into its proper coin port. The guide channels 16 precede the approach area before each port on the track slope 6 and the depth of their cut as well as their width is dependent upon the particular size of the coin to be selected and guided into the port opening. Thus the properly selected coin will fall into the guide channel 16 and subsequently directed to its proper port, whereas, a larger coin due to its size will not fit into the smaller guide channel and will be directed on further down the helical track 5 until it is selected by a corresponding and proper guide channel and led into its proper port opemng.

Although it is not necessary, the rearward edge 17 of each of the ports maybe slightly curved upwardly and tapered inwardly to further insure proper selection of a coin after it has been guided, into its proper guide channel 16 from jumping over the coin port and proceeding downwardly on the helical track 5 to an improper coin port.

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 8 the top 2 of the coin bank comprising this invention has a coin slot 18 for receiving the various size coins'that are to be classified by the selective coin ports 11 through 15 thereafter directed into the storage compartment means 20. The top 2 is also provided with an opening 21 for placing paper currency or bills into the central storage area of the coin bank in the compartment means 20. The pin members 22 on the top 2 maintain the top in a stationary position relative to the body section 1 so that the coin receiving slot 18 will likewise be maintained in its proper position which is the upper extremity of the helical track 5 indicated at 23. The vertical wall 24 is provided at the upper extremity 23 of the helical track 5 as well as the lower extremity 29 and is engaged between the pin members 22. The wall 24 prevents coins from falling, into thev area located at the lower extremity 29 upon being immediately inserted into the slot 18.

It should be noted that the coin receiving slot 18 has a'bevelled surface 25 in order to insure that coins placed in the slot 18 are properly positioned when dropped and received by the helical track 5 at 23. Thus the surface 25 aids in two ways. It functions to position the coin on the track slope 6 at substantially the same angle as the track slope angle 26 and also functions to place the edge of the coin, as dropped into the slot 18, immediately in the helical track 5.

As described thus far, the coin bank comprising this invention is unique in that it is receptive to multisize coin currency which are classified by size according to the respective coin ports. A coin placed through the opening 18 is positioned on the upper extremity 23 of the helical track 5, the pitch of the helical track 5 being suflicient to cause the coin to commence rolling down the track 5' on its edge. At the same time the coin is permitted to rest on the track slope so that it may be guided into the proper guide channel 16 and thence into the proper port opening for the particular coin involved. The pitch of the helical coin track 5 as well as the angle 26 of the track slope 6 relative to the helical axis are important factors in determining the speed of the coin as it proceeds down the track 5 as well as its selection by its proper guide channel 16. Thus the pitch length 27 of the helical track 5 must be correlated with the slope angle 26 of the track slope 6 in order to obtain the desired result which would be a pitch length and slope angle suflicient to induce downward movement of any of the coins to be sized and selected by the coin ports but at the same time not of such magnitude that would induce the coin to miss or ride over its proper corresponding coin port. The variance of the slope angle 26 relative to the pitch length 27 results in a range of possibilities to produce the above mentioned desired result. For example, the pitch length 27 may be increased resulting in a helical track 5 of greater depth which will cause a coin to travel faster down the same. However, the slope angle 26 maybe simultaneously increased in magnitude to increase the frictional forces on the coin as it travels down thetrack and thus compensate for the increase in pitch length. The opposite circumstances would be true also in order to maintain and produce the desired results in that upon reducing the pitch length 27 it would be desirable to correspondingly decrease the slope angle 26 in order to maintain proper movement of the coin down the helical track 5.

Thus there is a range of variance with respect to the pitch length 27 of the helical track 5 and the slope angle 26 of the track slope 6 which will produce the proper movement of the coin down the helical track 5 to bring about arcuate and consistent selection by the coin ports 11 through 15. This downward movement of the coin to be properly sized and selected by a coin port is actually controlled by the amount of frictional forces placed upon the coin as it travels down the track which, of course, is dependent upon the magnitude of the slope angle 26.

As noted in FIGS. 2, 4 and 5 the annular side wall 4 is provided with coin tube guides 28 in the area of the storage compartment means which slidably receive the outwardly turned opposed flanges 30 of each of the coin storage holders or members 31. The compartment means 20 comprises the area of the coin bank'below the helical track 5 and track slope 6 and above the coin bank base 3 and consists of the different sizes of coin storage holders 31 dependent upon the sizes of the coins to be received, classified and stored in the coin bank. As noted in FIGS.. 10 and 11 each of the coin storage members 31 comprises the outwardly turned flanges 30 and its arcuate body section 32. The bottom of each coin member 31 is provided with a base 33 which has an extended flange 34. The arcuate radius of each body section 32 as well as its length is dependent upon the size of the coinwhich it is to receive and stack as indicated in FIG.

6 1. The length of each coin storage holder 31 is also dependent upon the length between the base 3 and the helical track 5. Each coin storage member may have a lip 29 to aid in guiding coins selected by its corresponding coin port into the container area of the coin storage member. I

The ends of the arcuate sections 32 may be provided with the abutment surfaces 39 as indicated by dotted lines in FIGS. 10 and 11 to aid in guiding the fall of coins into the coin storage members 31 and retain the coins from falling out of the coin storage member upon removal of the same from the compartment means 20.

Eachcoin storage holder 31 may be identified by ourrency markings 35 which indicate at a glance the amount of currency in each storage holder since each of the storage holders 31 are visible through the annular side wall 4. Each of the coin storage holders 31 may be of different colors adding to the overall aesthetic appearance of the coin bank.

The guides 28, as noted in FIG. 2, are positioned in pairs under each of the respective .ports 11 through 15 and upon slidably engaging the flanges 30 of a corresponding coin storage holder 31, maintain the storage holder or member in the compartment means 20 beneath its corresponding coi'n port opening in the helical track 5; As will be apparent later, the guides 28 are not neces sary, although preferred, since the flange 34 will maintain the coin storage members 31 in an upright position in their respective base openings 36 properly aligned beneath each of the coin ports 11 through 15.

As shown in FIG. 6 the base 3 is provided with openings 36 to receive proper size coin storage members 31 which are placed upwardly through the openings 36 and maintained in the compartment means 20 by the guides 28 and the flange 34. The flange 34 prevents the coin storage member 31 from proceeding all the way into the compartment means 20 and also aids in maintaining storage members 31 in their proper upright position as previously mentioned.

Each of the openings 36 in the base 3 are provided with a pair of cutouts 38 which [permit the passage of the outwardly turned opposed flanges 30 of each of the 'coin storage holders 31 when placed in position through the base 3.

The annular side wall 4 may be glued or othewise secured to the base 3 at the area indicated at 40 in FIG. 6. The upwardly extending annular flange 41 aids in maintaining the annular side wall 40 in its proper position when securing the same to the base 3 and also adds to the overall support and structural strength of the coin bank.

The base 3 is also provided with legs 42 in order to maintain the coin bank in a stable and upright position so that helical track 5 and the track slope 6 can properly perform the functions of classifying and sizing upon insertion of coins in the slot 18 of the top 2.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 8 the body section 1, top 2 and base 3,'the coin storage holder base 37 and each of the coin storage holders 31 are maintained in fixed cooperative relationship by .the fastening member 43 which consists of a nail shaped member 44 which is knurled at its upper end (not shown) in order to receive the nut member 45, which in this case is in the shape of a dollar sign to improve the overall aesthetic appearance of the coin bank.

The coin storage holder base 37 is annular in shape and has a peripheral flange 46 having a height of substantially the thickness of the base 33 of each of the coin storage holders or members 31 so as to maintain the area indicated as 49 in FIG; 8 for the bases 33 of the coin storage members 31.

As shown in FIG. 7 the coin storage cover 37 is also provided with a large opening 47, of suflicient size to receive the largest of said coin storage holders 31 which in the case of American coin currency, would be the half dollar size coin storage holder.

As noted in FIG. 8 the coin storage holder base 37 is rotatably supported by the fastening member 43 and may be rotated to selectively withdraw or insert any one of the coin storage holders 31 into or from the compartment means 20.

The coin storage holder base 37 is provided with a housing 48 on the bottom thereof which includes a slot or opening 50 at one end and parallel flange members 51 at the other end thereof. The opening 52 is provided in the center of the holder base 37 for receiving the fastening member 43. The opening 52 is countersunk as indicated at 53 in order to receive the head 54 of the fastening member 43.

The housing 48 houses the locking means which prevents the holder base 37 from rotating in order to maintain the coin storage holders 31 in their aligned positions below their respective coin ports 11 through 15 in the track slope 6. The locking means consists of the spring latch 55 and the latch cover 56. The spring latch 55 has a latch head 59 which extends through the slot or opening 50 and thus is maintained in the area indicated as 49 between the bottom of the coin bank base 3 and the top of the holder base 37 as shown in FIG. 8. The spring latch 55 at the end opposite to the latch head 59 has an extended lug 57 for receiving the end of the spring member 58. The spring 58 is maintained between the flange members 51 of the housing 48 and the end opposite to that engaged by the lug member 57 rests against the housing 7 48. Thus the spring latch 55 may slide rearwardly and forwardly within the housing 48. The spring member 58, however, maintains the spring latch 55 in a forward biased position as shown in FIG. 8 which is the locking position of the spring latch 55.

In order to maintain the spring latch 55 within the housing 48, the latch cover 56 is pressed over the abutments 60 which hold the same in place and thus hold the spring latch 55 in the bottom of the housing 48. The latch cover 56 is provided with the key hole 61 for insertion of a key which will, upon rotation, cause the spring latch 55 to move from right to left as shown in looking at FIG. 8. When the key is removed from the key hole 61, the spring latch 55 will retract to the position shown in FIG. 8 due to the compression of the spring member 58.

The locking head 59 of the spring latch 55 is permitted to be engaged between the two pin members 62 indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 6 when the latch member 55 is in its normally forward position. Thus upon insertion and rotation of. the key in the key hole 61, the key will engage an abutment surface on or protrude through an opening in the spring latch 55 (not shown) forcing the key against the same and thus causing the spring member 58 to slide rearwardly and release the locking head 59 from between the pin members 62 and permitting rotation of the coin storage holder base 37. It should be noted that the pin members 62 may be placed in any suitable position underneath the base 3 at the properly selected distance from the center opening of the base indicated at 63. Furthermore, the largest of the coin tube holders 31, which in the case of American coin currency would be the half dollar size, may be provided with a slot 64 as indicated in FIG. 11 to be engaged by the locking head 56 and thus used to maintain the older base 37 in its stationary locked position.

The coin storage holder base 37 may be provided with an annular bearing surface 65 of comparatively much smaller size than the annular flange 46 of the coin storage holder base 37. The bearing surface 65 would maintain the bases 33 of each of the coin holders 31 off the surface of the holder base 37 and thus aid in the rotation of the holder base 37 as one rotates the same to selectively insert or withdraw any of the coin storage holders 31.

From the foregoing description it is evident that the principal novel feature residing in the coin bank comprising this invention is the utilization of a helical track 5 having a track slope 6, the latter of which has a series of selective coin ports 11 through 15 progressively increasing in size commencing from the upper extremity 23 of the helical track 5 to properly select, receive and then remove a corresponding size coin as the coin rollsdown the helical track 5. The larger coins pass over the smaller coin ports and are not hung up at the smaller coin ports. since they are not permitted to be guided by the channel 16 into an improper coin port.

The coins as properly classified are placed in the com partment means 20 which consist of individual coin storage holders 31 of different sizes depending upon the dilferent sizes of coins involved. The coin storage holders 31 may have suitable markings 35 to visibly show the amount of currency stored in the holder. When coin holder 31 is filled, the coin storage holder base 37 may be unlocked by releasing the latch means 55 from between the pin members 62 or from the slot 64 which permits the rotation of the holder base 37 so that the opening 47 may be placed under the coin storage holder 31 to .be. removed from the compartment means 20, thecoins emptied and the holder returned through the corresponding opening 36 in the base 3 and thus into the compartment means 20. The coin storage holder base 37 may again. be rotated and the locking head 56 of the spring latch 55 again positioned between the pin members 62 or in the slot 64 to maintain the holder base 37 in a fixed position and thus prevent removal, whether accidental or intentional, of any of the coin storage holders 31.

As mentioned previously, the body section 1, the top 2 and the base 3 as well as the coin storage holder base .37 are secured together by the fastening member 43 which is placed through the opening 52 in the holder base 37' and thence through the opening 63 of the base 3 and thence through the center of the body section 1 and compartment means 20 and finally through the opening 66 in the top 2 whereupon the nut member 45 is placed over the end of the fastening member 43 to maintain these parts in a fixed relationship and at the same time to permit rotation of the holder base 37 upon unlocking the spring latch 55.

I claim:

1. A coin bank receptive for multisizes of coins having an annular wall, a vertically disposed helical coin track supported from said wall, said coin track having a slope. disposed at an angle relative to the helical axis, said track slope receiving and supporting coins for rolling movement down the track, a series of spacedselective. coin ports in said helical track of progressively increasing coin size from the upper to the lower port of said helical track to selectively receive and remove the proper sized coins as they travel down said track, compartment means. under said helical track including upwardly open coin storage members, each of said coin storage members are arcuately shaped to form a longitudinal opening therein with outwardly extended and opposed flanges at said opening, and longitudinal guides in said compartment means to slidably engage said flanges to maintain said coin storage members in alignment with their respective selective ports in said helical track.

2. The coin bank of claim 1 characterized by longitudinal abutment surfaces along the inner edges of said opening to guide the fall of coins into said coin storage members and retain the coins therein upon subsequent removal'of said members from said compartment means.

3. A coin bank receptive for multisizes of coins havingan annular wall, a vertically disposed helical coin track supported from said wall, said coin track having a slope disposed at an angle relative to the helical axis, said track slope receiving and supporting coins for rolling movement down the track, a series of spaced selective coin ports in said helical track of progressively increasing coin size from the upper to the lower port of said helical track to selectively receive and remove the proper sized coins as they travel down said track, compartment means under said helical track including upwardly open coin stor age members, a base secured to said annularwall having peripheral entries of increasing size to selectively receive said coin storage members, a rotatably selective coin storage holder base supported relative to and underneath said base for supporting said coin storage members in said compartment means and having an opening larger than the largest of said coin storage members to selectively permit individual Withdrawal or insertion, upon rotation thereof, of each of said coin storage members through said opening, and lock means on said coin storage holder base to prevent the same from rotating and removal of said coin storage members.

4. The coin bank of claim 3 characterized in that each of said coin storage members has a base with a perimetral flange to prevent their passing through each of said entries in said base, said members held in aligned and upright position in said compartment means relative to said selective coin ports by said coin storage holder base.

5. The coin bank of claim 3 characterized by a top for said annular wall having a coin receiving slot for receiving coins at the upper extremity of said helical coin track.

6. A coin bank adapted for the reception, classification and storage of various sizes of coins having a base, a vertically disposed helical coin track supported from said base and having a coin receiving slot positioned relative to the upper extremity thereof to properly orient a coin onto said helical coin track, said helical coin track having a slope disposed at an angle relative to the helical axis of said coin track, said helical track and said track slope receiving and supporting coins for rolling movement down the same, a series of selective spaced coin ports in said track slope of progressively increasing coin size commencing from the upper extremity of said helical track to select, receive and remove the corresponding size of coins as they roll down said track, compartment means under said track to receive the coins as they are selectively removed by said ports and including tublar shaped coin storage members for each coin size having a bottom with a peripheral flange to be positioned below a corresponding selective coin port in said track to receive a selected coin therefrom, a coin bank base having entries of various sizes to each receive a corresponding size coin storage member, a coin storage holder base rotatably mounted beneath said base for supporting said coin storage members below each of said corresponding ports in said compartment means, said peripheral flange On each of said coin storage members to maintain said coin storage members aligned with their corresponding coin ports upon engagement by said coin storage holder base, an opening in said holder base to selectively permit independent withdrawal or insertion, upon rotation thereof, of each of said coin storage members, and lock means on said holder base and coin bank base to prevent the rotation of said base holder and the removal of said storage members.

7. The coin bank of claim 6 characterized by guide channels in said track slope in the approach leadinginto each of said ports to properly select and guide a coin rolling down said track into its proper coin port.

8. The coin bank of claim 6 characterized by an annular side wall supported from said base to support said helical track and track slope, each of said coin storage members of arcuate shape with outwardly extended and opposed flanges along one side thereof forming a longitudinal opening into each of said members, guides vertically disposed on the inner surface of said annular side wall to slidably engage the opposed flanges of each of said coin storage members to maintain the same in proper alignment with their respective selective coin ports in said track slope.

9. The coin bank of claim 8 characterized by fastening means to hold said base, annular side wall and helical coin track, compartment means and coin storage holder base in fixed but operable relationship.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 812,327 2/1906 Cranner 133-3 875,712 1/1908 Jakobsson 133-3 3,161,351 12/1964 Lerner 232-5 ROBERT B. REEVES, Primary Examiner. STANLEY H. TOLLBERG, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US812327 *Mar 27, 1905Feb 13, 1906Bjarne CrannerApparatus for sorting or separating coins.
US875712 *Nov 13, 1906Jan 7, 1908Herman G JakobssonCoin sorting and counting machine.
US3161351 *Jan 9, 1963Dec 15, 1964Harold B SpectorSavings bank
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4239121 *Apr 23, 1979Dec 16, 1980Martin HodesVitamin organizer
US4495959 *Dec 23, 1983Jan 29, 1985Farber Hobart ACoin counting device
US5474496 *Oct 28, 1993Dec 12, 1995Perkitny; JerzyCoin bank
US5827117 *May 13, 1996Oct 27, 1998Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorter and packager
US5902178 *Feb 12, 1997May 11, 1999Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus
US6099401 *Jan 26, 1998Aug 8, 2000Mag-Nif IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus
US6165063 *Feb 10, 1999Dec 26, 2000Mag-Nif, IncorporatedCoin sorting apparatus
US6443829Jul 14, 2000Sep 3, 2002Jerzy PerkitnyCoin sorting apparatus
US7059477 *Jan 20, 2004Jun 13, 2006Wolf Ii Thomas ABartender's tip jar
USRE36966 *Aug 19, 1996Nov 21, 2000Perkitny; JerzyCoin bank
WO1997043739A1May 9, 1997Nov 20, 1997Mag Nif IncCoin sorter and packager
WO2009064307A1 *Nov 16, 2007May 22, 2009Marshall S HackerCoin bank with automated means for depositing groups of coins
Classifications
U.S. Classification453/9, 232/5
International ClassificationG07D3/08, G07D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/08
European ClassificationG07D3/08