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Publication numberUS3338417 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1967
Filing dateMay 4, 1965
Priority dateJul 31, 1963
Also published asDE1206808B
Publication numberUS 3338417 A, US 3338417A, US-A-3338417, US3338417 A, US3338417A
InventorsBergisch Gladbach, Friedrich Fischer, Joseph Heckmann Wolfgang Gertr
Original AssigneeKloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vibratory centrifuge
US 3338417 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

llg. 29, i967 Wl Q J. HECKMANN ET AL 3,338,417

VI BRATORY CENTR IFUGE Filed May 4, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet l Allg. 29, 1967 W. Q jv HECKMANN ET AL 3,338,417

VIBRATORY CENTRIFUGE Filed May 4, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent O 3,338,417 VIBRATORY CENTRIFUGE Wolfgang Gertrud Joseph Heckmann, Bergisch Gladbach, and Friedrich Fischer, Cologne-Sulz, Germany, assignors to Klockner-Humboldt-Deutz Aktiengesellschaft, Cologne-Deutz, Germany Filed May 4, 1965, Ser. N o. 452,978

Claims priority, application Germany, July 31, 1963,

6 Claims. (Cl. 210-370) This application is a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 370,522, liled May 27, 1964, now abandoned and entitled, Vibratory Centrifuge.

The present invention relates to centrifuges.

More particularly, the present invention relates to centrifuges of the type which are particularly adapted for removing liquid from granular material.

Centrifuges of this type generally include a perforated drum which may, for example, have a horizontal axis and which is driven about its horizontal axis so that granular material introduced into the perforated drum will be pressed Iby centrifugal force against the inner surface of the perforated drum whereby the liquid can be cenrtifugally removed from the granular material. Such drums, in addition to being rotated, are vibrated so as to oscillate back and forth substantially along their axis, and in this way the material in the drum progresses axially thereof while having liquid removed therefrom.

Although centrifuges of this general type are known, there are particular problems involved in mounting such drums because of the complex movements which the perforated drum is required to carry out. Thus, as is apparent from the above discussion, the perforated drum is required not only to rotate but also to reciprocate axially.

Up to the present time while there are structures designed to provide a drum mounting enabling the drum to rotate and to reciprocate axially, if there is the least bit of lack of alignment between the pair of I'bearings at the ends of the drum, considerable difficulties arise because of the fact that such drums are incapable of operating properly where there is such a lack of alignment. In other words, an elongated horizontal perforated rum of a centrifuge of the above type will be supported substantially at its opposed ends between a pair of bearings which are respectively located adjacent the opposed ends of the drum.

With constructions as known up to the present time, it is absolutely essential that the bearings at the opposed ends of the drum have their centers located along a common axis. However, during the assembly of such -bearings and the mounting of a drum thereon, it has been found almost impossible to achieve precise coincidence between the drum bearings. The result is that the rotary drum cannot cope with this lack of alignment between these axes so that it is subjected to undesirably large stresses resulting from unbalanced forc'es acting on the drum during rotation thereof and having as their source the almost unavoidable lack of alignment Ibetween the axes of the bearings at the ends of the drum.

It is accordingly a primary object of the present invention to provide a centrifuge of the above type which avoids the above drawbacks with respect to the lack of coincidence between the axes of the drum bearings.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a centrifuge construction of the above type which is capable of accommodating itself to any lack of coincidence between the drum bearings so that even though the axes of these bearings are not precisely in alignment nevertheless the drum is capable of being driven and vibrated axially without being subjected to undesirably large un ice balance forces resulting from the lack of alignment between the axes of the drum bearings.

It is in particular an object of the present invention to provide for a rotary centrifuge drum of the above type a support which will give to the drum at least limited free tilting movement with respect to the point of intersection between an axis which is substantially parallel to the axis of the drum and a plane normal to the former axis.

It is also, in general, an object of the present invention to provide a structure which will be capable of transmitting rotary movement to a centrifuge drum while at the same time supporting the drum for limited free tiltability in all directions with respect to a given point and at the same time protecting the drum from large stresses to which the drum would 'be subjected in conventional structure and furthermore enabling the drum to be reciprocated axially.

The objects of the present invention also include the provision of a centrifuge structure which is of very light weight so that the stresses resulting from rotary and vibratory movement are maintained relatively small.

Also, it is an object of the invention to provide a centrifuge in which the material can flow along the inner surface of a perforated drum without encountering any sudden, sharp changes in the diameter of the drum.

According to the invention the rotary perforated drum of the centrifuge has a substantially horizontal axis and is supported for at least limited free tiltability in all directions about the point of intersection between a second axis which is in substantial concidence with the drum axis and a plane normal to this second axis, and in addition the means which supports the drum for free limited tiltability about this point of intersection also functions to transmit rotary movement to the drum.

The invention is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional illustration of one possible embodiment of a structure according to the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of another embodiment of a structure according to the present invention.

FIG. 1 illustrates -an elongated perforated drum 1 in a schematic manner. 4The `drum includes an elongated cylindical portion 2 and a frustoconical portion 3- which at its smaller end is removably connected with the right end of the cylindrical portion 2, as viewed in the drawing, by way of a ring 4 which is removably fixed in an unillustrated manner to a inwardly directed flange at the small end of the frustoconical drum portion 3 and an outwardly directed ilange at the right end of the cylindrical drum portion 2. The drum Iportions 2 and 3 have a common axis which is substantially horizontal.

At its left end, as viewed in FIG. l, the drum 1 is fixed with a ring which surrounds and engages a yieldable resilient ring S made of rubber, for example, and the ring 5 is capable of yielding axially in the region of its outer periphery during axial reciprocation of the drum. The ring 5 surrounds and is carried by an elongated hollow tubular shaft '6 which is supported -for rotary movementl by bearings 7 which are in turn carried by a machine frame 8. A supply conduit 9, for supplying granular material to the drum, extends through the hollow shaft 6 and at its left end, as viewed in FIG. l, is connected in an unillustrated manner to a hopper or the like supplied with the moist granular material which ows through the conduit 9 into the cylindrical portion 2 of the drum, as

indicated by the arrows in FIG. 1.

A connecting means is provided for connecting the j perforated drum 1 to a structure which will rotate they drurn as well as support the latter for limited tilting movement in all directions about a given point, as described below. This connecting means includes an inner frustoconical member which is of substantially the same inclination as the member 3 and which is surrounded by and substantially uniform-ly spaced from the latter, the mem-ber 10 being closed at its left end and open only at its right end, and of course, the `right end of the frustoconical member 10 is the larger end thereof. A plurality of elongated rigid projections 11 are xed to the smaller end of the yfrustoconical member 10, are uniformly distributed about the axis of the drum, and at their outer ends which are distant from the f-rustoconical member 10, these rigid projections 11 are fixed to the ring 4,'so that in this way, the connecting means 10, 11 is iixed to the drum 1.

At its outer, larger end, the rustoconical member 10 is fixed rigidly with an outer channel 12 having a pair of inwardly directed side walls 13 and 14, and a pair of yieldable resilient rings 15 made of rubber, `for example, are received within the channel 12 and engage the walls 13 and 14 thereof, as is shown in FIG. l. The rings 15 press against opposed faces, respectively, of an outwardly directed annular i'lnage 16 which is fixed to, and in fact may form an integral part of, a cylindrical member 17, the outwardly directed ange 16 being located in a plane normal to the axis of the member 17, and of course the ilange 161s received in the outer channel 12.

Thus, the connceting means 10, 11, through the channel 12, compresses the rings 15 against the ange 16. In other words the distance between the walls 13 and 14 is somewhat smaller than the total width of the rings 15 when they are unstressed, and thus these rings 15 when assembled with the flange 1-6 and the channel 12 in the manner shown in FIG. l are compressed between the ange 16 and .the side walls 13 and 14, respectively. The hollow cylindrical member 17 is supported for rotary movement `by a pair of bearings 18 which are in turn carried by a hollow stationary shaft 19 also iixedly carried by the machine frame 8. A pulley 20 is fixed to and surrounds the hollow shaft 17 and is driven through unillustrated belts and an unillustrated motor, so that a drive means 20 drives the cylindrical member 17 which transmits its rotation to the drum 1 through the rings 15 and the connecting means 10, 11.

A reciprocating means is provided for moving the drum back and forth along its axis, and this reciprocating means includes a rotary crank 22 driven in any suitable way and shown only schematically in FIG. 1 since it forms no part of the invention. This rotary crank is pivotally connected to one end of an elongated connecting rod 21 which extends through and beyond the hollow stationary shaft 19, and at its left end the conecting rod 21 is received within the inner race of a bearing. The inner race is situated between a pair of collars which are fixed to the connecting rod 21, as illustrated in FIG. l, so that the bearing will reciprocate back and forth with the connecting rod 21 during rotation of the crank 22. The connecting rod 21 has a limited free slidability with respect to the bearing so that a loose connection is provided between the connecting rod 21 and the bearing which surrounds its left free end, as viewed in FIG. 1.

The outer race of the bearing 23 is fixed to an inner channel 24 which has outwardly directed side walls, and a pair of yieldable resilientrings 25, also made of rubber, for example, are received between the side walls of the inner channel 24. The left side wall 14 of the channel 12 has at its inner periphery an inwardly directed frustoconical extension 27 which terminates at its smaller end in an inwardly directed flange which is received in the channel 24 between the rings 25 therein. Rings 25 are compressed between the side walls of the channel 24 and the inwardly directed annular ange which is fixed with lthe channel 12.

It is also to be noted that the inwardly directed annular ange received between the rings 25 is located substantially in the same plane as t-he outwardly directed annular flange 16. It is apparent that with this construction, when the connecting rod 21 is .driven by the crank 22, the channel 24, which rotates with the channel 12, will be reciprocated vback and forth and will have its reciprocation transmitted through the connecting means 10, 11 to the d-rum 1 which is thus rotated and simultaneously vibrated axiallly.

It is to be noted that the wall 14 together with its extension 27 and together with the channel 24 and the bearings 23 serve to close the open end of the frustoconical member 10.

The machine frame 8 is supported by rubber springs 29 on the oor where the centrifuge is located. Also, the machine frame is lodged within a housing 30 which is open only at its bottom but otherwise completely encloses the structure with substantial clearance, as shown in FIG. 1.

During operation the rotary drive from the pulley 20 is transmitted through the cylindrical member 17 and its liange 16 to the rings 15 which in turn transmit the rotation to the channel 12 and from the latter rotation is transmitted through the member 10 and projections 11 to the drum 1 which thus rotates at the same speed as the cylindrical member 17.

Simultaneously, the rotary crank 22 serves through the connecting rod 21 and the elements 23, 24 and 14 to set the drum 1 into substantially axial vibratory movement through the connecting means 10, 11. In this Way, the rings 15 will alternately become further compressed and then permitted to expand slightly while the ring 5 will freely move at outer speripheral portion back and forth in response to the axial vibratory motion of the drum 1.

Moreover, the rubber rings 5 and 15 form, from the rotary drum 1 and the machine frame which is supported by the rubber springs 29, a two-mass system so that the machine frame vibrates oppositely to the drum and, in this way, the yforces resulting -from the vibratory movements are compensated.

When the granular material is supplied through the conduit 9 into the drum, this material progresses under the influence of the vibratory motion longitudinally along the drum wall toward the right, as viewed in the drawing, while liquid is centrifugally extracted from the granular material, and the dried granular material leaves the drum at its right free edge where it falls down into a suitable bin or the like. The centrifugally separated liquid is received in the chambers 32 and 33 of the centrifuge housing and is drained away in an unillustrated manner.

With the construction of the invention, the rings 15 not only serve to transmit rotary movement to the drum but in addition they permit the drum to assume any inclination about the axis of the cylindrical member 17, within certain limits. This tiltability of the drum is achieved without any tendency of the drum to fall downwardly as a result of its weight.

The results achieved by the invention are particularly clear if one visualizes the structure with the ring 5 removed. With this ring 5 removed the left open end of the drum can be tilted in all directions. When the drum is thus tilted, it tilts about the point of intersection between the axis of the cylindrical member 17 and the plane normal to this axis in which the ange 16 is located. Thus, the drum has limited free tiltability about the point S which is situated at the intersection between the axis of the cylindrical member 17 and the plane in which the ange 16 is located.

Only a very small force is required to provide this tilting of the drum so that it is clear that the rings 15 with the structure which cooperates therewith serve to support the drum 1 in substantially the same way as a universal joint permitting limited tiltability of the drum 1, in all directions with respect to the point S.

Inasmuch as the flange received between the rings 25 is located in the same plane as the fiange 16, it is clear that the vibratory motion imparted through the loose connection between the rod 21 and the bearing 23 has substantially no influence on the universal free movability of the drum.

The ring 5 serves only as a freely yieldable support for the end of the drum distant from the ring 15. Thus, the ring 5 is made for this purpose of quite'a small size and is relatively weak and very easy to compress or to bend so that it has practically no infiuence on the inclination of the drum. In this way, the ring 5 permits the drum 1 to assume any tilt angle with respect to the point S without transmitting any additional ystresses to the hollow shaft 6 and the bearings 7. Thus, the rubber spring 5 forms a universal joint between the drum 1 and the hollow shaft 6.

As a result of the above-described universal joint type of connection between the drum, and the cylindrical member 17, on the one hand, and the hollow shaft 6, on the other hand, even if there is a lack of alignment between the axes of the bearings 7 and 18, nevertheless the drum will be capable of assuming any angle of tilt resulting from such lack of alignment between these axes without, however, causing the drum to have any tendency as the result of its own weight to lfall or move downwardly because of the angle of inclination of its axis.

Thus, the structure of the invention guarantees that the drum as well as the bearings 7 and 18 will have a long life of useful operation even if it should happen that the axis of the cylindrical member 17 does not coincide with the axis of the hollow shaft 6 but instead is either offset with respect to this axis or extends at .an angle thereto.

In the embodiment of the invention which is illustrated in FIG. 2, there is also a rotary perforated drum 41 composed of parts 42 and 43, but it will be noted that in this case both of these parts are of a frustoconical configuration with the part 43 forming substantially a continuation of and having the same slope as the part 42. At their adjoining ends the frustoconical perforated drum parts 42 and 43 of the drum 41 have outwardly directed flanges between which is located a flat ring 44 to which the fianges of the frustoconical drum parts 42 and 43 are releasably fixed, so that in this way the parts 42 and 43 form a unitary structure and are held together through the ring 44.

At its end which receives the material which is to be centrifuged, the rotary drum 41-is supported by way of a rubber ring 45, which is capable of yielding axially, on a hollow supporting shaft 46 which is supported for rotation by the bearings 47 and 48. These bearings are carried by the machine frame 49. 'I'he material-supply pipe 50 extends with clearance through the hollow shaft 46 so as to deliver to the interior of the perforated drum the particulate material from which the moisture is to be centrifuged.

At its opposite end, the drum 41 accommodates, in its interior, a frustoconical member 51 which is inclined oppositely to the frustoconical per-forated drum member 43 which surrounds the inner frustoconical member 51. The inner, larger end of the frustoconical member 51 is provided with a plurality of cutouts 52 through which the centrifuged material can freely pass. The frustoconical member 51 includes elongated integral fingers 53 which form continuations of and are of the same slope as the lfrustoconical wall of the member 51. These fingers are situated between the cutouts 52, and it is the free ends of these fingers 53 which are fixed to the ring 44, so that in this way the frustoconical member 51 is fixedly mounted within the drum 41 for rotation therewith.

It is particularly `to be noted that with this construction it is possible for the material to progress from the frustoconical pa-rt 42 to the frustoconical part 43 without any substantial change in the slope of the inner surface of the drum so that a smooth, stepless transfer of the material takes place from the drum part 42 to the drum part 43. In this respect the embodiment of FIG. 2 is superior to that of FIG. l where it will be noted there is a sudden increase in the diameter of the drum at the region where the frustoconical part 3 thereof joins the cylindrical part 2. Thus, the drum 41 of FIG. 2 has a smooth interior surface which is free of any shou-lders, steps, or the like, and in this way the relatively high wear of the perforated drum, at a stepped region thereof such as the region where a pair of successive drum parts adjoin each other as shown in FIG. 1, is avoided with the structure of FIG. 2.

In order to rotate the drum 41, a motor 54, shown at the upper right of FIG. 2, drives, through the V-belt drive 55, a pulley 56 which is coaxially fixed to a hollow shaft 57. This hollow shaft 57 is supported for rotation by the elongated hollow supporting pin 58 which is carried by the machine frame 49. For this purpose the hollow pin 58 carries a pair of bearings 59 and 60 which serve to support the hollow shaft 57 -for free rotary movement with respect to the stationary hollow -pin 58.

In the embodiment of FIG. 2, an annular channel member 61 is fixed to the hollow shaft 57 for rotation therewith, this channel member 61 having its hollow interior directed inwardly toward the axis of the shaft 57. One of the side walls of the channel 61 is fixed directly to the .hollow shaft 57 as by being formed integrally therewith.

This hollow channel 61 accommodates in its interior ya pair of rubber rings 62 and 63 which are compressed between the side walls of the -channel 61 and which press against a ring 64 which is fixed to the frustoconical member 51, coaxially therewith. Therefore, with the embodiment of FIG. 2, the channel which accommodates the pair of rubber rings is carried directly by the rotary drive means and the rubber rings press against a ange which is carried by the inner frustoconical member which is situated in the interior of the perforated drum, whereas in FIG. 1 it is the frustoconical member which carries the channel and the fiange which is compressed between the rubber rings is carried by the rotary drive.

This distinction of FIG. 2 over FIG. 1 is also of considerable advantage. Thus by fixedly connecting the channel 61, not to the frustoconical member 51, but instead to the hollow shaft 57, this channel 61 does not vibrate with the perforated drum, and in this way the forces of the vibratory masses can be held relatively low so that the structure of FIG. 2 can be designed with these relatively low forces taken into consideration and thus it is possible to make the machine of FIG. 2 lighter than the machine of FIG. 1.

The ring 64 is provided at its inner periphery with a channel 65 through which the ring 64 is in fact connected to the frustoconical member 51, this channel 65 being at least partly integral with the ring 64, in the example illustrated. The channel 65 also has its hollow annular interior directed inwardly. Within the channel 65 are situated the pair of rubber rings 66 and 67 which are compressed be'- tween the side walls of the channel 65 and which in turn press against a ring 68 -to which the structure -for axially reciprocating the centrifuge is connected.

This latter structure includes the elongated connecting rod 69 of the vibratory drive which, through the bearing 70 and the housing 71, which surrounds this Abearing 70, is fixed with the ring 68. Thus, the housing 71 can rotate freely with respect to the rod 69 but is constrained to reciprocate axially therewith. The ring 68 is fixed to the housing 71 so as to rotate and reciprocate axially with the housing 71, so that in this Way the axial reciprocation is transmitted to the perforated drum to cause the material therein to progress to the right, as viewed in FIG, 2,.

In the example illustrated in FIG. 2, the right end of the shaft 69 slidably surrounds an eccentric portion of a rotary shaft 72 which is driven by the V-belt drive 73, 74. Thus, the pulley 73 is fixed to the shaft 72 and is driven by the V-belts 74 which are in turn driven from a suitable pulley which is directly rotated, for example, by the motor 75. Therefore, with this construction the perforated drum 41 is set into axial vibratory motion.

By situating the rubber rings 62, 63 and `66, 67 in the manner illustrated in FIG. 2, tilting of the axis of the drum 41 with respect to the hollow shaft 57 is permitted without, however, undesirably transmitting any 0f the forces produced by such tilting either to the drum 41 or to the bearings which support the shaft 57. Moreover, since the rubber rings 62 and 63 are situated in the channel 61 which is fixed to the shaft 57, the coupling structure between the rotary drive and the axial vibratory drive is rendered extremely simple. Also, with the structure of FIG. 2, the connection of the drum 41 to the rotary vibratory drives permits the drum 41 to have its axis somewhat inclined because of a lack of precise alignment in the bearings, without, however, transmitting in this way any additional forces to the drum 41 or the hollow supporting pin 58 or the bearings 59 and 60.

The machine frame 49 is supported with respect to the floor or the like by way of the rubber springs 76. Also, the machine frame carries a housing 77 which is open at its bottom but otherwise is completely enclosed and freely surrounds the drum 41 without engag-ing the latter. Thus, it is to be noted that at its right end, as viewed in FIG. 2, the drum 43 has a ange which is directed outwardly and rearwardly, to the left as viewed in FIG. 2. This flange turns with free clearance in an opening of a wall of the housing 77 so that it does not engage the wall of this housing. The same is true of the opening of the wall through which the hollow drive shaft 57 extends, the latter shaft extending through the right wall of the housing 77 with sufcient clearance to guarantee free rotation without any possible rubbing of the rotary parts with the stationary housing parts.

During operation of the centrifuge of FIG. 2, the turning moment which is transmitted by the pulley S6 to the drive shaft 57 is in turn transmitted through the channel 61 and the rubber rings 62 and 63 to the ring 64 from which the drive is transmitted through the hollow frustoconical member 51 and the fingers 53 to the drum 41, so that this drum necessarily turns at the same speed as the shaft 57. Simultaneously, the drum 41 is axially vibrated as a result of the crank or eccentric drive 72. In this way the rubber rings 62, 63 and 66, 67 are compressed and the vring 45 at the left end of the drum 41 is stressed simply by being pushed and pulled. The rubber rings of the structure of the invention moreover form from the drum 41 and the machine frame 49 which is carried by the rubber bodies 76 a two-mass system which Vibrates in such a way that the vibration of the frame 49 opposes that of the drum 41, and in this way the vibratory forces balance each other. This is also true of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

When a charge of material which is to be centrifuged is introduced through the pipe 50 into the perforated drum, this material will progress under the action of the vibratory motion along the inner surface of the perforated drum from left to right, as viewed in FIG. 2, and simultaneously any liquid in the material is centrifugally extracted therefrom. The centrifuged material discharges from the drum at the discharge opening formed by its free right edge, as viewed in FIG. 2, and then falls into a bin which is not illustrated in FIG. 2 and which is situated at an elevationlower than the centrifuge. The centrifugally separated liquid, however, is received by the inner surface of the housing 77 and flows out of the latter through the opening 7 8 formed inthe oor of the housing -77.

It is apparent that, in the embodiment of FIG. 1, the pair of rings 15 and, in the embodiment of FIG. 2, the pair of rings 62 and 63 form in each of these embodiments an axially compressed annular spring means, and it is through this axially compressed annular spring means that the rotary drive is transmitted in its ent-irety to the rotary drum, while at the same time this :axially compressed spring means forms the sole support means for the rotary drum in the region of the driven end thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. In a vibratory centrifuge adapted to remove liquids from granular material, a hollow cylindrical member, a hollow stationary shaft extending coaxially into said cylindrical member, bearing means carried by said shaft and supporting said cylindrical member for rotary movement about the common axis of said shaft and cylindrical member, said cylindrical member having at one end an outwardly directed annular flange located in a -plane normal to the axis of said cylindrical member, an elongated perforated rotary drum adapted to receive the granular material from which liquid is to be removed, said drum being substantially coaxial with said cylindrical member, a pair of yieldable resilient rings respectively engaging opposed faces of said ange and being substantially coaxial with said cylindrical member, connecting means connecting said drum to said rings and compressing the latter against said flange so that said drum has limited tiltability in all directions with respect to the point of intersection between the axis of said cylindrical member and the plane in which said iiange is located and so that rotary movement of said cylindrical member is transmitted to said drum through said rings and said connecting means, and reciprocating means operatively connected to said drum for reciprocating the latter back and forth substantially along its axis, said reciprocating means extending through said hollow shaft.

2. In a centrifuge as recited in claim 1, said hollow shaft having one open end directed away from said drum and an opposite open end directed toward said drum, said reciprocating means including a rotary crank located adjacent said one end of said hollow shaft, an elongated connecting rod -pivotally connected at one end to said crank and extending through and beyond sfaid hollow shaft, and said connecting means being connected to said connecting rod at the end thereof which is adjacent said opposite end of said hollow shaft, so that reciprocating movement is transmitted through said connecting means to said drum.

3. In a centrifuge adapted particularly for removing liquid from granular material, a hollow cylindrical member, a hollow shaft extending into and being coaxial with said cylindrical member, bearing means supporting said cylindrical member for free rotary movement on said shaft about the common axis of said shaft and cylindrical member, drive means oper-atively connected to said cylindrical member for rotating the latter about its axis, said cylindrical member having atone end an outwardly directed annular flange located in a plane normal to the axis of said cylindrical member, an outer annular channel having inwardly directed side walls receiving said flange of said cylindrical member between said side walls, an inner channel substantially coaxial with said outer channel and having outwardly directed side walls, one of said side walls of said outer channel having a frustoconical extension extending toward said inner channel and carrying at its smaller end an inwardly directed annular flange located in substantially the same plane as said outwardly directed annular flange and received between the outwardly directed side walls of said inner channel, a pair of outer yieldable resilient rings respectively engaging opposed faces of said outwardly directed ange and compressed between the latter and the inwardly directed side walls of said outer channel, a pair of inner yieldable resilient rings located within and engaging the side Walls of said inner channel and also engaging said inwardly directed annular flange and being compressed between the latter and said side walls of said inner channel, reciprocating means extending through said hollow shaft and operatively connected to said inner channel for reciprocating the latter substantially along the axis of said cylindrical member, an elongated rotary perforated drum substantially coaxial with said cylindrical member and having ing one end adjacent to said outer channel, and connecting means fixed to said outer channel and to said drum for transmitting rotation of said outer channel to said drum as well as for transmitting reciprocation of said inner channel to said drum, whereby said drum has rotation transmitted thereto by said outer rings, reciprocation transmitted thereto by said inner rings, and has limited tiltability in all directions about the point of intersection between the axis of said cylindrical member and the plane in which said outwardly and inwardly directed flanges are located.

4. In a centrifuge as recited in claim 3, said connecting means including a hollow frustoconical member open at only one end and fixed at its open end substantially coaxially to said outer channel, so that the wall of said outer channel which terminates in said inner flange extending into said inner channel serves to substantially close said hollow frustoconical member of said connecting for substantially unrestrained tilting movement with the remainder of said drum about said point of intersection.

6. In a centrifuge as recited in claim S, said drum having a substantially cylindrical portion extending from said open end thereof toward said plane in which said anges are located and having a substantially frustoconical portion of the same inclination as said hollow frustoconical member of said connecting means surrounding the latter and substantially uniformly spaced therefrom, said hollow frustoconical member of said connecting means having elongated projections fixed thereto, and said projections forming part of said connecting means and being fixed to said drum at the junction between its cylindrical and frustoconical portions.

OTHER REFERENCES German printed application 1,157,551, November 1963.

SAMIH N. ZAHARNA, Primary Examiner.

REUBEN FRIEDMAN, Examiner.

I. L. DECESARE, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3133879 *Apr 4, 1960May 19, 1964Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz AgAxially oscillating, horizontal centrifuge
GB977926A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4108778 *Mar 21, 1977Aug 22, 1978Lambert Steven JSelf-cleaning filter and vortexer
US4137176 *Oct 11, 1977Jan 30, 1979Reclamet, Inc.Chip discharge for continuous chip wringer
US4639320 *Feb 19, 1986Jan 27, 1987United Coal CompanyMethod for extracting water from solid fines or the like
US4640770 *Feb 19, 1986Feb 3, 1987United Coal CompanyApparatus for extracting water from solid fines or the like
CN103635260A *Jun 28, 2012Mar 12, 2014申克加工澳大利亚有限公司Vibratory centrifuge mounting arrangement
CN103635260B *Jun 28, 2012Mar 23, 2016申克加工澳大利亚有限公司振荡离心机安装布置
WO2013000016A1 *Jun 28, 2012Jan 3, 2013Schenck Process Australia Pty LimitedVibratory centrifuge mounting arrangement
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/370, 210/380.3, 210/377, 210/385
International ClassificationB04B3/06, B04B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB04B3/06
European ClassificationB04B3/06