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Publication numberUS3338433 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1967
Filing dateSep 28, 1964
Priority dateSep 28, 1964
Publication numberUS 3338433 A, US 3338433A, US-A-3338433, US3338433 A, US3338433A
InventorsBrabant Donald R, Mattson Frank K, Owen Warren H
Original AssigneeMartin Marietta Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable support arrangement
US 3338433 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1967 Filed Sept. 28, 1964 F. K. MATTSON ETAL ADJUSTABLE SUPPORT ARRANGEMENT 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.

Awewroes FRANK K- MATTSON WARREN H. OWEN DQNALD E. BEABANT Aug. 29, 1967 F. K. MATTSON ETAL 3,338,433

ADJUSTABLE SUPPORT ARRANGEMENT Filed Sept. 28, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2Q

FIG. 2

FRANK W. MATTSON WARREN H.OWEN DONALD r2. BRABANT Aug. 29, 1967 F. K. MATTSON ETAL 3,338,433

ADJUSTABLE SUPPORT ARRANGEMENT Filed Sept. 28, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

FRANK K. MATTSON WARREN H-OWEN DONALD 2.5]2ABANT I v BY United States Patent 3,338,433 ADJUSTABLE SUPPORT ARRANGEMENT Frank K. Mattson and Warren H. Owen, Orange County, Fla., and Donald R. Brabant, Riverside County, Calif., assignors to Martin-Marietta Corporation, Middle River, Md., a corporation of Maryland Filed Sept. 28, 1964, Ser. No. 399,697 12 Claims. (Cl. 214-16.4)

This invention relates to novel concepts that can be effectively employed in conjunction with the ground handling of missiles or the like, and more particularly to a stackable missile stand arrangement that minimizes mis sile storage problems, this invention including an improved cradle arrangement simplifying the removal of missile sections from containers, their assembly, and the subsequent transfer of an assembled missile from a transportation truck to a storage stand, and vice versa.

In the past, various attempts have been made to simplify and improve upon ground handling concepts for missiles. Certain devices have simplified some handling problems as well as storage problems and at the same time provided various safety features. However, in each known instance the storage of missiles has been a complex matter, requiring much space on the floor or depot area, and making the placement of a missile in a storage stand or the removing of a missile therefrom a time consuming, basically expensive proposition.

It is known to utilize standard rail type stands in which parallel, substantially horizontal rails are utilized upon the upper portion of the stand, upon which a missile is supported. By virtue of the fact that the transportation trucks used therewith have similarly spaced rails, it is a relatively simple matter for a missile to be moved from a transportation truck to a storage stand or vice versa.

It is also known to utilize stackable stands of the types taught in the Gilbert Patent No. 3,095,212 and Richtmyer Patent No. 2,632,567. However, each of these stands is necessarily loaded from the side, such as by a lift truck or the like. Therefore, when two or more stands are stacked in a common array, in order to remove a missile that is not at the top of the array it is necessary in such arrangements to remove all the stands and missiles above the selected missile, which of course requires a fork lift truck, an overhead crane, or the like.

It is a principal object of this invention to provide a novel, rail type storage stand which is easily loaded or unloaded from the end of the stand, obviating the need for any disassembly of a stack of missiles inasmuch as even the missile on the bottom of a stacked array can be easily removed.

Our new stand configuration advantageously involves use of legs placed outboard of the principal rails employed, inasmuch as the outboard position of the legs advantageously makes it possible to stack the stands in arrays comprising three or more missiles while at the same time assuring that any missile of the array may be quickly removed without disturbing the other missiles of the array. Because of this leg arrangement, the legs of the lowermost storage stand directly support the legs of the higher stand or stands of the array without there being any flow of forces through other members of the various stands. Also, this arrangement amounts to an effective conservation of space. In this manner three or possibly more stands may be disposed in a vertical stacked array, with this arrangement advantageously making it possible for any missilein the stack to be removed without disturbing the placement of the other stands or the missiles contained thereon.

Another object of our invention involves the provision "ice of novel missile-supporting cradles utilized fore and aft, each of which has rolling means adapted to contact the rails of the stand and transport a missile therealong. These cradles advantageously have height adjustment and roll movement as well as providing -for lateral adjustments, thereby greatly simplifying the missile assembly and subsequent assembled missile handling problems.

Two principal aspects of the novel cradle are missilecontacting portions in the form of adjustable rollers that directly engage and support the missile body; and the fact that the cradles are normally employed in pairs without benefit of connecting structure. These features result in considerable freedom of handling missiles or missile body sections of various diameters and lengths, thereby achieving great versatility which will in turn yield substantial savings in equipment for the user. Additionally, the novel cradle design allows for storage of one or more missiles on the same pair of cradles consistent with stand and cradle design. As an example, one large missile, two medium size, or three smaller sized missiles may be stored on one pair of cradles.

Another object of our invention is to provide a novel hoisting adapter which attaches to our stackable missile stand and expands its versatility.

This lifting arrangement can be in the form of either of two basic configurations that allow complete freedom of movement of any cradled object along the length of the rails. A preferred configuration may involve and A-frame type configuration with the legs strategically positioned outboard of the rails and supported from lower edge portions of the rails. However, if preferred, the hoisting adapter may involve a configuration that is supported by upper portions of the legs of the stand. In either case the upper or active portion of the rails is not encumbered, thereby permitting free movement of cradles which in turn greatly facilitates the missile assembly and handling problem.

Other objects, features and advantages will be apparent from a study of the enclosed figures and drawings herein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a storage stand in accordance with this invention, illustrating the use of fore and aft cradles thereon for supporting a missile as indicated in dashed lines;

FIGURE 2 illustrates a vertical array of stands stacked in accordance with this invention, revealing the placement of legs of outboard of the rails to simplify missile movement into and out of the stands, this view also revealing the use therewith of an adjustable height truck, the rails of which may be caused to match with the rails of any stack of the array;

FIGURE 20 is an enlargement of the detail associated with the locking of stands together;

FIGURE 3 is a front view of a cradle, in accordance with this invention, with certain portions removed to reveal internal construction;

FIGURE 4 is a view of a pair of stands disposed in a typical end to end relation, with a missile lifting arrangement disposed upon one of the stands so that the lifting of various missiles or missile assemblies may be brought about; and

FIGURE 4a is a fragmentary view, to a somewhat larger scale, of a detail associated with the missile lifting arrangement of FIGURE 4. 1

Turning to FIGURE 1, the storage stand 10 there shown utilizes a pair of rails 11 and 12 disposed in substantially horizontal, parallel array, these being supported by legs 13-, 14, 15 and 16. In accordance with this invention, these legs are disposed outboard of the rails in order to make possible the stacking of the stands in the 1' manner described hereinafter. Legs 13, 14, 15 and 16 are 3 preferably adjustable, with the lower portion arranged to telescope inside the upper portion. A series of holes in the legs then allows for height adjustments in the stand as necessary.

As should be apparent, various subordinate crossmembers 17 and 18 may be utilized for securing the rails in the desired substantially parallel relation, with lateral and longitudinal cross bracing members 19 and 20 utilized with each of the legs to prevent the legs from being moved out of the desired perpendicular attitude with respect to the plane of rails 11 and 12. As will be noted, each of the legs has a somewhat enlarged upper end 21, as well as enlarged lower portion 22. This construction considerably simplifies the stacking of one stand on another, for inasmuch as the legs of each stand of an array of stands desirably are in alignment, the enlarged upper and lower portions on each leg make alignment problems less critical. A quick release arrangement may be utilized to secure adjacent stands together, this preferably being accomplished by the use of quick release pins 23 extending through aligned holes located in a pair of adjacent pads 21 and 22; note FIGURE 2a. It should also be noted that a nut can be disposed on the threads of a pin 23 if desired to secure adjacent stands together in a more permanent arrangement. It should also be noted that a fine adjustment pad and/or a castered wheel may be inserted and locked into the lower ends of the stand supports by the use of pin fasteners.

Appearing on the rails 11 and 12 are fore and aft cradle members 30, the use of which forms one principal part of our invention. Advantageously, these missile supporting means are independently movable along the rails, greatly simplifying missile handling by enabling effective loading and unloading of stacked stands from the ends thereof. Significant details of the cradles will be set forth hereinafter.

The stacked array of stands is to be seen in FIGURE 2, wherein three stands have been disposed in a vertical arrangement, with the legs of the two upper stands being in alignment with each other and with the lower stand so that the weight of the missiles contained in the upper stands will be supported by the respective rails, thereafter borne by the legs connected to such rails, and then directly and ultimately by the legs of the lower stand.

Although such transportation equipment is not a part of this invention, it is understood that the stacked array of stands will be serviced insofar as missile storage is concerned by the use of a truck 24 which is shown in dashed lines in FIGURE 2. This adjustable height truck utilizes rails 25 and 26 whose ends can be matched with the ends of the rails of any of the three stands for missile transfer purposes. Male and female type fittings may be used on the ends of rails 11 and 12, as shown at 27 and 28 in FIGURE 1, and by the use of complementary fittings on the ends of the rails 25 and 26, rail alignment can be simplified. As is therefore to be seen, a given missile can be transferred from the uppermost stand to the adjustable height truck and thereafter placed either on a launching device or alternatively in a different storage stand of the same or a different array of stands.

Turning to FIGURE 3,, the preferred configuration of cradle 30 is shown to a somewhat larger scale, and disposed in operative relation with respect to a pair of rails such as rails 11 and 12. These missile supporting means are of'sturdy construction and equipped with a roller at each end. The rollers, shown as 31 and 32, are spaced so as to substantially coincide with the spacing of the rails so as to be able to roll effectively therealong. More than one roller may be employed at each end of the cradle, as design capacity requirements may dictate.

At a substantially mid portion of the cradle is a Y- shaped yoke member 33 that may be utilized for directly supporting the missile. Each cradle is usually utilized in conjunction with a second or possibly even a third cradle so that the missile will be stably supported with respect to the rails.

As should be apparent, once a missile has been placed upon a pair of cradles disposed in fore and aft relation with respect to the missile, the missile can thereafter be rolled along the rails either for a short distance or alternatively for the distance necessary in order for a missile to be transferred from the storage stand to a transportation truck or vice versa. It should be noted that the cradle members, which may be identical, ordinarily stay with the missile placed thereon until the missile is loaded on a launcher, with the missile being stabilized in this position by rollers 47 and 48, whose length and material are such as to increase the friction coefiicient to prevent sliding of the cradle with respect to the missile, even when moving the missile to another location.

Additionally, the weight of the missile as it rests in the cradles makes the cradles stable in the vertical plane, without making necessary the use of supporting structure, or the joining of two cradles together as a unit. Our cradles are easily disposed on the rails of a stand soas to receive and stably support a missile or missile body section, and because of interconnecting portions being unnecessary, even a conventional bomb lift truck may be used for contacting and raising the missile without interference, for subsequent loading on a launcher.

Various adjustments within the scope of this invention are possible with regard to the cradles, such as by the use of yoke 33 whose height may be altered with respect to the base portion or cross beam of the cradle. For example, the stem 34 of the yoke member may be provided with screw threads 35 which may directly engage complimentary screw threads in the base portion of the base member, but preferably engage threads disposed in carriage 36 disposed in the base portion of the yoke member. Carriage 36 is of sturdy construction and of dimensions that will allow it to move between the right and left ends of the hollow base or crossbeam of the cradle member. The carriage is provided with a number of wheels or rollers 37 in order that it may be easily moved. Rotation of the stem 34 of the yoke member will of course bring about a height adjustment of the missile contacting portion 38 of the yoke member, but it is preferred that a suitable swivel joint be provided between the top member of the yoke and the stem 34, with a hand wheel 39 provided for rotating the stem so as to bring about height adjustments without it being necessary to rotate member 38.

Lateral adjustment of the carriage member will of course bring about a lateral shifting of the yoke member and any missile supported thereon. To this end, we provide a handle member 41 pivoted at 42, having at its lower end 43 a pin connection 44 to linkage member 45 that is connected by pin 46 to the carriage 36. As should be apparent, upon manipulation of the handle in the desired direction the carriage will be caused to move left or right in the cradle member as the case may be in order to bring about commensurate missile motion. An elongated slot 49 in the upper portion of the crossbeam allows carriage motion.

As will be apparent by appropriate design of the yoke, various missile configurations may be accommodated. For example, the rollers 47 and 48 may be easily removed and placed in other locations in the member 38 in order that missiles of different diameter may be accommodated.

Alternatively, the upper yoke member 38 instead of being of curved construction may be generally flat and designed to accommodate two or more missiles. In this instance, four or so rollers may be disposed on each yoke member, so that one missile can be contacted and supported by the rollers disposed on the left side of the yoke, for example, and the other missile contacted and supported by the rollers appearing on the right hand side of the yoke member.

A cradle roller brake 40 may be provided at each end of each cradle for preventing undesired movement of a cradle along the rails. As best seen in FIGURE 3, the brake includes a generally hook-shaped bracket 61 that is raised or lowered as a result of the turning of the knurled knob 62. As a consequence of rotating the knurled knob 62 in a clockwise direction, for example, the bracket 61 is raised, causing a portion of the bracket to be brought into firm contact with the underside of the upper portion of rail 12, thus producing braking action. Conversely, the brake is released by turning knob 62 in the counterclockwise direction.

Turning to FIGURE 4, it will be noted that in accordance with our invention an A frame 50 may be utilized for the so-called decanning of missile sections and installing them on cradles. This member utilizes a number of legs 51, each of which terminates in a base assembly 52, the details of the latter being observable in considerable detail in FIGURE 4a. Each assembly 52 includes a hinge stop 53, an upper hinge 54, a lower hinge 55, and a screw member 56 whose threads can engage threads disposed in an appropriate hole disposed in the underside of the upper hinge. The hinge members are independently rotatably secured to the hinge stop 53 by pin 57.

As will be apparent, upon the upper hinge being in contact with the lower section of a rail 12, this hinge member can form a firm support for the respective leg. By swinging the lower hinge member around so as to somewhat encompass the lowermost portion of the rail, and then tightening the screw 56, the respective leg 51 can be firmly clamped to the rail.

To remove the A frame from the rails, each screw 56 is loosened, so as to allow each lower hinge member 55 to sWing away from the rail and permit the A frame to be raised. As the frame is raised, the upper hinges can also swing downwardly, thus not to come into undesirable contact with the upper right edge of the rail, as might well occur if the upper hinge member were instead rigid. The screws need not always be removed for often it may be desirable to merely move the A frame along the rails, which can be accomplished simply by loosening the four screw members 56. Preferably the threads of a screw member do not engage threads in the respective member 55, but rather screw 56 is captively yet rotatably disposed in a suitable aperture in this member. Note small clip ring 63 in FIGURE 4a.

As will be apparent, the legs of the A frame are configured with respect to the stand so as to allow the carriage members to pass along the rails without interference, thereby to allow free movement of a cradled object to a point therebeyond. This of course means that inasmuch asthe A frame does not encumber the upper portions of the rails, even the brakes 40 will pass easily by the A frame components.

From crossbar 64 of the A frame, chain hoist 58 may be suspended, which may be manual or electrical as may be desired. From hoist 58 a hook 59 depends, which is adapted to engage one or more straps or slings utilized in the lifting of missile sections for the placement of these sections on one or more cradles. Inasmuch as the cradles are usually identical in size and construction, the separate missile sections as supported by cradles can be moved along the rails and easily fitted together. As may be obvious, if this procedure results in too many cradles supporting the completed missile, the missile can be lifted by the hoist and the desired number of cradles employed in an optimum spacing.

As should now be obvious to those skilled in the art, this invention provides a highly advantageous missile handling concept that greatly simplifies the storage of missiles, and includes as its advantages the use of smaller floor area requirements as well as greater handling ease. The cradle portions of our invention are ideally suited for missile assembly purposes by virtue of not only permitting the usual vertical adjustment, but also by enabling the effective length of the missile suspension arrangement on the stand to be easily varied merely by changing the distance between the pair of cradles as they reside on the rails. Furthermore, by virtue of the permissible movements of the carriage in each cradle, lateral movement of either or both ends of the missile may be easily made, and because of the use of rollers on top of the cradles, rotative movements of the missile may be easily brought about as desirable. In addition, merely by changing the position of the rollers on the yoke member, a pair of cradles may be made to accommodate missiles of different diameters.

While we have described our preferred embodiments, it is to be noted that other arrangements may be within the scope of this invention. For example, we may use cradles without yokes in the event that large rectangular boxes or the like are to be stored, with such boxes being easily loaded and unloaded from the stands as previously described. Further, it should be noted that we are not to be limited to single vertical arrays, for manifestly two or more stands placed side by side may each receive thereon one or more stands. As will be obvious, by securing the stands of the same tier together, greater stability will be afforded.

Other missile hoist means in accordance with this invention than the aforementioned A frame configuration may take the form of a hoist means principally comprising elongated, bow-shaped members extending the length of the stand and supported by the upper portions of the legs of the stand, with the bow-shaped members crossing each other if desired, and forming a firm support for a monorail disposed above and generally parallel to the rails of the stand. The lifting device used in this embodiment preferably would be movable along the monorail substantially equidistant from the pair of rails so as to enable an item to be picked up from any location along the stand.

Other embodiments will be obvious, and it is to be understood that we are not to be limited to the configurations as set forth herein except as required by the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A storage stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails, in combination with cradle means directly supported by said rails, said cradle means having an uppersurface on which is disposed a load supporting means, thus enabling a load carried by said cradle means to be freely moved along said rails while being added to the stand or removed therefrom, legs for supporting said rails in substantially fixed relation, said legs being located in outboard relation to said rails so as to avoid interference with movement of said cradle means therealong, said legs having upper portions that form support surfaces, whereby a similar stand can be stacked thereabove, with its legs resting on said support surfaces.

2. A storage stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails along which cradle means are movable, legs for supporting said rails in substantially fixed relation, said legs being located in outboard relation to said rails so as to avoid interference with movement of said cradle means therealon-g, said legs having upper portions that form support surfaces, whereby a similar stand can be stacked thereabove, with its legs resting on said support surfaces, said cradle means being configurated to receive a missile thereon, and being provided with ad- 'justments for enabling the height and other relationships of the missile with the rails to be varied.

3. A storage stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails along which cradle means are movable, legs for supporting said rails in substantially fixed relation, said legs being located in outboard relation to said rails so as to avoid interference with movement of said cradle means therealon-g, said legs having upper portions that form support surfaces, whereby a similar stand can be stacked thereabove, with its legs resting on said support surfaces, hoist means provided for use therewith,

'7 said hoist means having legs arranged to be removably supported by said rails at outboard locations thereon, said legs of said hoist being configured to avoid interference with movement of cradle means therealong.

4. A stackable missile stand for the storage of missiles in a vertical array in order to conserve floor space, said stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails secured in spaced relation and supported by a plurality of legs, said legs being disposed outboard of said rails and having upper portions that form support surfaces, Which latter surfaces are arranged to be contacted by the legs of a stand stacked thereabove, movable missile supporting means dimensioned to be supported by said rails and capable of being moved therealong, said missile supporting means enabling a missile to be freely moved along said rails while being added to the stand or remove-d therefrom, with the positioning of said legs outboard of said rails enabling the effective stacking of stands without inhibiting the loading or unloading of a missile.

5. A stackable missile stand for the storage of missiles in a vertical array in order to conserve floor space, said stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails secured in substantially fixed relation and supported by a plurality of legs, said legs being disposed outboard of said rails and having upper portions adapted to be contacted by the legs of a stand stacked thereabove, movable missile supporting means dimensioned to be supported by said rails and capable of being rolled therealong, said missile supporting means enabling a missile to be freely moved along said rails While being added .to the stand or removed therefrom, with the positioning of said legs enabling the effective stacking of stands without inhibiting the loading or unloading of a missile, said missile supporting means involving at least one cradle in which laterally movable means are disposed, latter means being movable along substantially the length of said cradle so as to alter its distance with respect to each roller of the cradle, means supported by said laterally movable means for bringing about a height adjustment of the missile supported thereby, and means for enabling rotative movement of a missile disposed upon such supporting means.

6. A storage stand for a missile adapted to be utilized With other such stands to form a stacked array upon which a plurality of missiles may be disposed, said stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails above which a missile may be supported, a plurality of legs for supporting said rails, being disposed outboard of said rails so as not to interfere with the movement of a missile along said rails, said legs having upper portions forming sup-port surfaces, which surfaces are adapted to be contacted by the legs of a stand to be placed thereabove, and movable missile supporting means arranged to travel upon said rails and adapted to directly contact and support a missile, said means being disposed to travel along said rails for virtually their entire length without interference with the legs of either that stand or of any stand disposed thereabove, said movable missile supporting means making it possible for a stand to be loaded or unloaded from the end of the stand Without disturbing the other missiles or stands of the array.

7. A storage stand for a missile adapted to be utilized with other such stands to form a stacked array upon which a plurality of missiles may be disposed, said stand comprising a pair of spaced, substantially parallel rails above which a missile may be supported, a plurality of legs for supporting said rails, being disposed outboard of said rails so as not to interfere with the movement of a missile along said rails, said legs having upper portions adapted to :be contacted by the legs of a stand to be placed thereabove, and movable missile supporting means arranged to travel upon said rails and adapted to directly contact and support a missile, said means being disposed to travel along said rails for virtually their entire length without interference with the legs of either that stand or of any O at stand disposed thereabove, said movable missile supporting means making it possible for a stand to be loaded or unloaded from the end of the stand without disturbing the other missiles or stands of the array, said missile supporting means involving at least one cradle in which laterally movable means are disposed, latter means being movable along substantially the length of said cradle so as to alter its distance with respect to each roller of the cradle, means supported by said laterally movable means for bringing about a height adjustment of the missile supported thereby, and means for enabling rotative movement of a missile disposed upon such supporting means.

8. A cradle of a type adapted to be utilized in pairs on a rail type stand in order that missile assembly procedures may be easily brought about, said cradle comprising a frame member having spaced roller means positioned so as to substantially coincide with the spacing of the rails of the stand used therewith, missile contacting means adapted to be brought into contact with a missile body, and adjustment means for enabling adjustment of said missile contacting means With respect to said frame member, said adjustment means including means for moving said missile contacting portion in the height direction above said roller means as Well as means for moving said missile contacting means laterally along said frame member, said missile contacting means also including means for enabling the missile to be moved in rotation.

9. A stand for a missile adapted to be utilized for the assembly of missile components into a completed missile comprising a pair of spaced substantially parallel rails above which missile sections may be supported, a plurality of movable missile supporting means arranged to travel along said rails in relative freedom from each other so that a plurality of missile sections may be moved independently of each other on said stand, removable missile hoist means supported upon said stand, said hoist means having a lifting device located a distance above the plane of said rails, said hoist means being supported so as to avoid interference with movement of said missile supporting means along said rails, said hoist means being supported by said rails at locations outboard of said rails.

10. A stand for a missile adapted to be utilized for the assembly of missile components into a completed missile comprising a pair of spaced substantially parallel rails above which missile sections may be supported, a plurality of movable missile supporting means arranged to travel along said rails in relative freedom from each other so that a plurality of missile sections may be moved independently of each other on said stand, removable missile hoist means supported upon said stand, said hoist means having a lifting device located a distance above the plane of said rails, said hoist means being supported so as to avoid interference with movement of said missile supporting means along said rails, and legs provided for the support of said rails, said hoist means being supported directly from upper portions of said legs.

11. The stand as defined in claim 10 in which said hoist means includes a monorail along which a lifting device is movable, whereby a missile component may be lifted at any location along said stand.

12. A stand for a missile adapted to be utilized for the assembly of missile components into a completed missile comprising a pair of spaced substantially parallel rails above which missile sections may be supported, a plurality of movable missile supporting means arranged to travel along said rails in relative freedom from each other so that a plurality of missile sections may be moved independently of each other on said stand, removable missile hoist means supported upon said stand, said hoist means having a lifting device located a distance above the plane of said rails, said hoist means being supported so as to avoid interference with movement of said missile supporting means along said rails, and legs provided for supporting said rails, said legs being located outboard of 9 1 0 said rails and having upper portions to be contacted by 2,632,567 3/1953 Richtmyer 211-13 the lower portions of the legs of a stand to be placed there- 2,964,894 12/ 1960 Culver 214-1 X above, said legs, because of their outboard positioning 2,981,152 l/ 1961 Miller 214-1 X also avoiding interference with movements of said missile 3,162,088 12/ 1964 Landstrom 891.7 supporting means along said rails. 5 FOREIGN PATENTS References Cited 505,576 9/1954 Canada. UNITED STATES PATENTS 969 164 9/1910 J h 212 5 GERALD .M. FORILENZA, Primary Examiner.

o nstone 1,940,242 12/1933 Burgess 214 1o.s X 10 MARVIN CHAMPIONEWWM"

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3445013 *Dec 19, 1966May 20, 1969Outboard Marine CorpMethod and apparatus for loading multilevel railroad cars
US3948400 *Jul 22, 1974Apr 6, 1976The Binkley CompanyRoller pad for use in a module moving system
US4023694 *Aug 15, 1975May 17, 1977Hawkins Lloyd JTrailer frame with load bunks
US4054214 *May 10, 1976Oct 18, 1977Firma Mageba S.A.Plural vehicle parking device
US4538738 *Jun 20, 1983Sep 3, 1985Sea-Land CorporationRemovable garment rack for transport of hanging garments
US4863335 *Mar 25, 1988Sep 5, 1989Haines & Emerson, Inc.Automatic guided vehicle roll-handling system
US5575607 *Nov 2, 1994Nov 19, 1996United Technologies CorporationJet engine transport vehicle lift system and a build cell
DE2906457A1 *Feb 20, 1979Aug 21, 1980Steinbock GmbhEinrichtung zur bildung und handhabung von sammellasten
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/286, 414/281, 211/182
International ClassificationF41A9/00, F41A9/22
Cooperative ClassificationF41A9/22
European ClassificationF41A9/22