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Publication numberUS3339307 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1967
Filing dateApr 30, 1964
Priority dateApr 30, 1964
Publication numberUS 3339307 A, US 3339307A, US-A-3339307, US3339307 A, US3339307A
InventorsFrancis B Floyd, Aubrey E Richardson
Original AssigneeFrancis B Floyd, Aubrey E Richardson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remotely controlled racing car game
US 3339307 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Sep t.5, 1967 v F. B. FLOYD ETAL' 3,339,307

REMOTELY CONTROLLED RACING CAR GAME Filed April 30, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 'l as 34 as 23 26 33 35 a4 v l I v I 29 3/ E0 3/ 29 30 J/ ZQ IINVENTORS. FRANC/S B. nor 0 AUBREY E. R/CHARDSON A T TORNEY Sept 1967 F. B. FLOYD ETAL REMOTELY CONTROLLED RACING CAR GAME 5 Sheets-Sheet- 2 Filed April 30, 1964 INVENTORS. FRANCIS B. FLOYD AUBREY E. RICHARDSON A 7' TOR/VEV Sept. 5, 1967 F. B. FLOYD ETAL 3,339,307

REMOTELY CONTROLLED RACING CAR GAME Filed April 30, '1964 5 Sheets-Sheet J 330 INVENTORS.

FRANCIS B. FLOYD BY AUBREY 5. R/CHARDSON v ATTORNEY Sept. 5, 1967 F. B. FLOYD ETAL ,307

REMOTELY CONTROLLED RACING CAR GAME Filed April :50, 1964 5 Sheets-Sheet 337 aasqa I96 208/ I lwia 207-, f 1 206 l9 0 207 204 34/ I99 200 257 1 V93 1 a Y/ 202 /a0 n i 30 115! 1 1/ j INVENTORS.

FRANCIS B. FLOYD AUBREY E. RICHARDSON R LJCL,

A 7' TOR/VEY United States Patent 3,339,307 REMOTELY CONTROLLED RACING CAR GAME Francis B. Floyd, 5039 E. 6th St., Kansas City, Mo. 64124, and Aubrey E. Richardson, 9820 Aberdeen Road, Overland Park, Kans. 66206 Filed Apr. 30, 1964, Ser. No. 363,962 4 Claims. (Cl. 46--244) Our invention relates to amusement apparatus and more particularly to a remotely controlled racing car game.

It is a purpose of our invention to provide means for controlling the operation of a vehicle, preferably a miniature vehicle, over an operating surface from a point remote from the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably a racing car or similar toy vehicle and the controlling means are preferably in the form of operating devices such as are ordinarily used for controlling rthe operation of an automobile. That is, the operating devices comprise a foot pedal that serves in a similar manner to an accelerator pedal of an automobile, a lever that is operable in a similar manner to a gear shift lever of an automobile, a steering wheel, a foot pedal that operates in a similar manner to a clutch pedal, and a foot pedal that simulates a brake pedal. These various operator controlled devices, are provided for operating controlling means that are located at a point remote from the vehicle, which vehicle operates over an operating surface that is similar in appearance to a race track. While an operating surface is provided that has similarities to a race track, in that it is of an elliptical shape, the apparatus forming the subject matter of our invention can be used to operate a vehicle over a suitably constructed surface of any shape.

It is a purpose of our invention to provide means for con-trolling the movements of a vehicle over such a surface, which may be of any desired width with respect to the width of the vehicle, and which will control the operation of the Vehicle so that it can be driven over the surface in any desired direction with respect to the length of the surface over which it operates. Our invention utilizes means for controlling the steering of the vehicle solely by the controlling means under the control of the operator of the operating devices at the point remote from this surface. In practice in order to provide a compact apparatus that is operable from a point at which the movements of the vehicle over the surface can be readily observed, the operating devices are near the operating surface but are spaced a substantial distance therefrom so that the operating devices are remote from the vehicle in that they are entirely separate from the vehicle and the surface over which the vehicle operates.

More specifically our invention comprises means for remotely controlling the speed and the direction of a vehicle in respect to a surface over which it operates comprising means for producing oscillating currents of two different frequencies, means for independently controlling the amplitude of each of said currents, common means for amplifying both of the independently controlled currents, means on the vehicle responsive to one of the frequencies controlling the speed of the vehicle, means on the vehicle responsive to the other of said frequencies controlling the steering of the vehicle, and means for transmitting said amplified currents to said frequency responsive means.

It is a further purpose of our invention to provide a foot pedal, which serves as an accelerator pedal, for operating one of the independent controlling means for controlling the amplitude of one of the currents from one of the means for producing an oscillating current, and to provide a steering wheel for operating another of the controlling means. In order to provide more flexibility of the control of the speed of the vehicle, additional means is provided for controlling the amplitude of the current that controls the speed of the vehicle, which means is under control of the lever that is similar in operation to the gear shift lever of an automobile. By providing these devices for controlling the operation of the vehicle by the operator of the apparatus, the illusion is created for the operator of the apparatus, that he is actually operating a vehicle over the surface or track over which the vehicle travels.

It is a further purpose of our invention to provide an operating surface for the Vehicle which comprises conducting strips that are on the surface and means insulating adjacent conducting strips from each other, the conducting strips being alternately connected with the output terminals of the amplifying means, and to provide means for supplying direct current for operating the vehicle to the same from a direct current source through said conducting strips, and suitable contact members carried by the vehicle engaging said conducting strips, the opposite terminals of the source of direct current being also connected with the alternate conducting strips, so that two adjacent conducting strips are connected with the opposite terminals of said source.

Inasmuch as the vehicle of our invention is free to travel anywhere over the surface made up of these conducting and insulating strips, a set of contact members is provided on the vehicle, that are adapted to engage with the conducting strips, which are arranged so that at least a pair thereof will always be in engagement with a pair of conducting strips of opposite polarity.

It is a further purpose of our invention to provide rectifying means associated with said con-tact members and interposed between said contact members and a pair of conductors on the vehicle which are so constructed and arranged that only positive electrical impulses will be transmitted to one of said conductors on said vehicle and only negative electrical impulses will be transmitted to the other conductor on said vehicle, said conductors being part of a receiving circuit on said vehicle.

It is also a purpose of our invention to provide means for driving the vehicle and means for steering the vehicle on said vehicle, comprising a motor for driving the vehicle and a motor for steering the vehicle, responsive to the speed of said last mentioned motor, and means for controlling the speed of each of said motors independently, comprising a receiving circuit on the vehicle including means tuned to each of the frequencies of said oscillating means, each including a winding connected at one end thereof with the base of a transistor which is in one of the motor operating circuits, said transistor being so located in said operating circuit of said motor that the conductively of the transistor controls the current supply to the motor, the arrangement being such that said end of said winding becomes more negative as the amplitude is increased of the particular oscillating current to which the circuit, in which the winding is located, is tuned.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will appear as a description of the drawings proceeds. We desire to have it understood, however, that we do not intend to limit ourselves to the particular details shown or described except as defined by the claims.

In the drawings.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of our improved remotely controlled racing car apparatus.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a bottom plan view of the vehicle used in carrying out our invention.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation thereof the outer shell portion thereof being omitted except for a fragmentaryportion thereof shown in vertical section.

FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the vehicle, partly in horizontal section through the shell portion thereof.

FIG. 6 is a detail sectional view of one of the contact members carried by the vehicle on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 7 is a diagram of the circuit connections used in our improved apparatus.

FIG. 8 is a view partly in plan and partly in horizontal section and partly broken away of the operating means for the control for the vehicle.

FIG. 9 is a view in elevation of the steering wheel and operating means controlled thereby, the mounting thereof being shown in section.

FIG. 10 is a section taken on the line 1010 of FIG. 8 on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 11 is a section taken on the line 1111 of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a view in elevation of the brake and clutch pedal mechanism, the mounting means therefor being shown partly in section and partly broken away.

FIG. 13 is a section taken on the line 1313 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary section taken on the line 1414 of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale, and

FIG. 15 is a section taken on line 1515 of FIG. 1 on an enlarged scale.

Referring in detail to the drawings, our remotely controlled racing car game is shown in FIG. 1 as being provided with a casing 20, within which is provided an operating surface 21 for a vehicle 22, said operating surface 21 being bounded by a peripheral barrier 23 and being provided with an inner barrier 24, said peripheral barrier having straight side portions 25 and curved end portions 26 and the barrier 24 having a pair of side portions 27 and end portions 28, said side portions 27 being parallel to the straight sides 25 of the peripheral barrier and being transversely spaced therefrom and the ends 28 of the barrier 24 being spaced from the curved ends 26 of the barrier 23 so as to provide an elliptical track or runway between the barriers, having similarity to a race track.

The operating surface 21 is made up of alternating conducting strips 29 and 30, the adjacent strips 29 and 30 being spaced from and insulated from each other by the insulating strips 31 (see FIG. 2). Said conducting and insulating strips are mounted on a horizontal supporting wall 32 of wood or similar electrical insulating material. It will be noted that a multiplicity of the alternating conducting strips 29 and 30 extend lengthwise of the operating surface 21 continuously from end to end thereof. Said conducting strips 29 and 30 and the insulating strips 31 are secured to the supporting surface 32 in any suitable manner, as by means of adhesive.

The barriers 23 and 24 are preferably made of sponge rubber, the barrier 23 being shown in FIGS. 2 and 15 and the barrier 24 in FIG. 14. The strip of sponge rubber that forms the barrier 23 is thicker at the curved ends 26 thereof than along the straight side portions 25 thereof, as will be evident upon reference to FIGS. 2 and 15. The purpose of this is to provide a greater cushioning action for the sponge rubber barrier at the curved ends of the track than at the sides thereof, as it is more likely that a solid blow of the vehicle 22 will be applied to the curved end portions of the barrier than the straight side portions thereof. The sponge rubber cushioning barrier may be mounted in any desired manner, but is shown in the drawings as being mounted on the strips of conducting material 29 that are mounted on the support 32 and as being provided with a metal strip 33 for holding the same in engagement with the conducting strips 29 and 30 and with a wooden backing strip 34 and a spacing member 35 for mounting the same in the casing 20, the parts being secured together by any suitable securing means, Such as an adhesive.

Mounted externally of the casing 20 at a point remote from the vehicle 22 are suitable operating means for the controlling device for controlling the speed and the direction of travel of the vehicle 22. These controlling devices are preferably arranged and constructed in such a way as to simulate the controlling mechanism of an automobile and comprise a steering wheel 36, a lever 37, operating similarly to a gear shift lever, and a plurality of foot pedals. The foot pedals comprise a pedal 38, which controls the speed of the vehicle and thus is similar in action to an accelerator pedal of an automobile. The pedal 39 is arranged in a similar manner to a brake pedal and serves a purpose similar to a brake in controlling the operation of the vehicle 22. A pedal 40 is also provided, which serves as a controlling pedal for the movement of the lever 37 in its movements, in simulation of that of a gear shift lever of an automobile, the pedal 40 thus serving in a similar manner to a clutch pedal of an automobile. All these operating devices are mounted in a position convenient to a seat 41, which is also similar to an automobile drivers seat. The housing 20 is also provided with a plurality of openings 42, which are provided with suitable indicia and suitable illuminating means for a purpose to be described below.

Referring to FIGS. 3 to 6 inclusive, the vehicle 22 is shown as being provided with a bottom wall 43, which is preferably of electrical insulated material such as a suitable plastic, upon which are mounted the motors 44 and 45. Said motors are of the variable speed type and are each provided with a permanent field magnet. The motor 44 is provided with a shaft 46 having a pinion 47 mounted thereon to rotate therewith, which meshes with a gear 48 on a countershaft 49 mounted in suitable bearings on the bottom member 43, said countershaft being provided with a pinion 50 that meshes with a gear 51, that is mounted on the live rear axle 52 mounted in suitable bearings on the under side of the bottom member 43 and having the rear wheels 53 mounted thereon to rotate therewith. The pinions 47 and 50 and the gears 48 and 51 thus serve as a reduction gearing between the motor shaft 46 and the rear axle 52.

The motor 45 is similarly provided with a pinion 54 meshing with the gear 55 on a countershaft 56, which has a pinion 57 mounted thereon, that meshes with the gear 58 on a shaft 59 that runs lengthwise of the vehicle, said shaft being mounted in suitable bearings 60 and 61 provided on the vehicle body.

A collar 62 is mounted on the shaft 59 to rotate therewith, suitable stop collars 63 and 64 being provided on opposite sides of the collar 62. The collar 62 is thus fixed in posiiton on the shaft 59 lengthwise thereof. A collar 65 is provided on a sleeve 66 that is longitudinally slidably mounted on the shaft 59. Springs 67 are mounted on the collars 62 and 65, being fixed to said collars at the ends thereof and bowing out slightly when not under stress, being shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 of the drawings in an intermediate position. Mounted on each of the springs 67 is a weight 68. Also mounted on the sleeve 66 and secured in fixed position to the collar 65 is a disk 69. It will be evident that as the speed of the motor 45 is varied, the rate of rotation of the shaft 59 will vary and the weights 68 will be pulled out radially away from the shaft 59 by centrifugal force as the speed of the shaft 59 increases. Such movements of the weights 68 bowing the springs 67 to a greater or lesser extent, dependent upon the speed of the shaft 59, causing movement of the sleeve 66 and the disk 69 lengthwise of the shaft 59, in a similar manner to the action of a centrifugal governor.

Mounted on suitable pivots 70, provided on bearing members 71 on the bottom member 43, are arms 73 provided with suitable axles on which the front wheels 74 of the vehicle are mounted for free rotation. Also mounted on the pivots 70 to turn therewith are the arms 75 extending forwardly therefrom, said arms 73 and 75 and pivots 70 forming a bell crank lever. A link 76 is pivotally connectedwith the levers 75 at 77 and is provided with a lateral extension 78' having a pin 79 projecting downwardly therefrom. A lever 80, which is provided with a longitudinal slot 81 extending inwardly from one end thereof, thus providing a bifurcated portion for said lever 80, has the pin 79 extending into said slot 81, said pin being slidable in the slot in said lever 80.

Said lever 80 is fixed to a vertically extending shaft 82 to turn therewith. A bracket 83 is provided on the bottom member 43 and a bearing sleeve 84 is mounted on said bracket 83, said shaft '82 being mounted in said bearing sleeve. The hub 85 of a bracket-member 86 is keyed to said shaft 82 so that said shaft and said bracket member 86 move together. Mounted on said bracket member 86 is a pair of fingers 87 that are inclined toward each other, as will be obvious from FIG. 5, and engage with opposite faces of the disk 69. It will be obvious that movements of the disk 69 lengthwise of the shaft 59 will turn the vertical shaft 82 either clockwise or counterclockwise, dependent upon the movements of the disk 69. The movement of said shaft 82 will turn the wheels 74 in opposite directions, dependent upon the direction of rotation of said shaft through the operating mechanism in an obvious manner. As the movement of the disk 69 is dependent upon the speed of the motor 45, variation of the speed of said motor will adjust the steering mechanism for the front wheels 74.

The bottom member 43 is provided with suitable openings 88 to accommodate the rear wheels 53 and 89 to accommodate the front wheels 74. Mounted on the bottom member 43 in any suitable manner is the body shell 90, which is preferably made of suitable plastic material that is of an electrical insulating character. Rearwardly of the rear wheels 53 is mounted a group of contact members that cooperate with the conducting strips 29 and 30 to conduct electrical currents to the motors on he vehicle and to other electrical apparatus on the vehicle for controlling the operation of said motors, to be described below. Said contact members comprise a central contact member 91 and contact members 92, 93 and 94, which are spaced uniformly from the contact member 91, and from each other, so that the contact member 91 lies in the center of an imaginary circle, on which the contact members 92, 93 and 94 are arranged at 120 to each other. Preferably a pair of the contact members 91 and 93 are arranged on the axial center line of the vehicle. The size and arrangement of the contact members 91, 92, 93 and 94, and their spacing relative to the width of the conducting strips 29 and 30 are such that a pair of said contact members will always be in engagement with at least one contact strip 29 and one contact strip '30.

One of the contact members is shown in detail in FIG. 6. It comprises a threaded tubular member 95, which extends through an opening 96 in the bottom member 43, and is provided with threads 97, with which a nut 98 engages and with threads 99 with which a nut 100 engages. The nut 100' serves to clamp the end of a conductor 101between the bottom member 43 and the nut 100 and the nuts 98 and 100 cooperate to clamp the tubular member 95 to the bottom member 43. Slidably mounted in the longitudinal bore of the tubular member 95 is a tubular member'102, which is threaded at one end thereof, as at 105, and has a stop nut 106 mounted thereon, said stop nut 106 limiting downward movement of the tubular member 102. Mounted on the other end of the tubular member 102 is a ball 107, held in fixed position on the bottom end of said tubular member 102 by necking in the end of the tubular member as shown at 108. Said tubular member 102 is provided with a flange 109, upon which a disc-like weight 110 rests. Mounted between the weight 110 and the lower .end of the tubular member 105 is a light coil spring 111, the spring 111 holding the weight 110 in engagement with the flange 109. The tension on the spring 111 can be varied by adjusting the position of the sleeve 95 by means of the nuts 98 and 100 so as to move the sleeve slightly upwardly or downwardly, as may be found desirable. The weight in cooperation with the spring 111, serves as yieldable means for holding the balls 107 of the contact members in engagement with the conducting strips 29 and 30 on the operating surface for the vehicle 22. The weight 110 provides the principal means for maintaining the contact between the ball 107 and one of the conducting strips. The purpose in providing a weight for this purpose is that considerable variation in the position of the bottom 43 of the vehicle relative to the operating surface can be compensated for by movements of the contact member up and down, relative to the bottom 43 of the vehicle, without providing a heavy spring that would cause the ball 107 to bear with too much force on the conducting strips, causing unnecessary wear.

The speed of the motor 45 and thus the steering of the vehicle is controlled by means of the steering wheel 36, which is remote from the vehicle 22, while the speed of the motor 44 is controlled by certain switching devices that are controlled by means of the foot pedal 38 and the lever 37. The brake pedal 39 and the clutch pedal 40 also serve to control the operation of the motor 44. The control is through certain electrical apparatus, which is shown diagrammatically in FIG. 7.

Line wires 112 and 113 extend from a suitable source of 110 volt alternating current, such as the ordinary house current. The line wire 113 leads to a conductor114 through a switching member 115, which moves with the armature of a relay 116, and is in circuit closing position when the winding of the relay 116 is energized, being biased toward the dotted line position thereof shown in FIG. 7. Connected with the conductors 112 and 114 by means of the conductors 117 and 118 is an oscillator 119, said oscillator being tuned to a frequency of five kilocycles. Also connected with the conductors 112 and 114 by the conductors 120' and 121 is an oscillator 122, which is tuned to a frequency of fourteen kilocycles. Said oscillators are each provided with amplifying means interposed between the resonant circuit producing the oscillating current and the output terminals of the oscillator. The conductors 112 and 114 are also connected with a mixer pre-amplifier 123 by means of the conductors 124 and 125 and with an amplifier 126 by means of the conductors 127 and 128. leading to the mixer pre-amplifier from the oscillator 119 is a conductor 129. Also a conductor 130 extends from the oscillator to a volume control, which is shown as comprising a resistance 131, with which a movable contact 132 engages, to interpose a variable resistance between the conductor 130 and a conductor 133 leading to the mixer pre-a-mplifier 123. The volume control comprising said variable resistance, varies the amplitude of the oscillating current fed to the mixer pre-amplifier 123 by the oscillator 119.

A conductor 134 leads from the oscillator 122 to the mixer pre-amplifier and a conductor 135 extends from the oscillator 122 to a stationary contact with which a movable contact 136 of a switching member engages. Said switching member 136 is biased so as to be normally in a circuit closing position to connect the conductor 135 with a conductor 137, but is adapted to be moved to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 7 by means of the foot pedal 39 in a manner to be described below. A pair of branch conductors 138 and 139 are connected with the conductor 137, the conductor 138 leading through the branches 140*, 141 and 142 to the movable contacts 143, 144 and 145 of switching members that have stationary contacts 146, 147 and 148 respectively with which said switching members are adapted to engage. The conductor 149 extends from the stationary contact 148 to one end of a resistance 150, from the other end of which a conductor 151 extends to one end of a resistance 152 and a conductor 153 extends from the stationary contact 146 to the conductor 151. A resistance 154 is connected serially with the resistance 152 by a conductor 155 and 7 a conductor 156 extends from the stationary contact 147 to the conductor 155. From the other end of fixed resistance 154 a conductor 157 extends to a volume control, which comprises a resistance 158, with which a movable contact 159 engages and from which the conductor 160 extends to the mixer pre-amplifier 123.

It will accordingly be seen that a variable amount of resistance can be put in the circuit leading from the oscillator 122 to the mixer pre-amplifier 123, including the three fixed resistances 150, 152 and 154 and the variable resistance comprising the resistance 158 and movable contact 159. The volume control that includes the resistance 158 is adjusted to adjust the position of the movable contact member 159 by means of the foot pedal 38, indicated in dotted line in FIG. 7. Three different ranges of speed of the vehicle 22 can be obtained, depending upon which of the switches 143, 144 and 145 are closed. Suitable means for closing only one of said switches at a time is provided, which will be described below. When the switch 145 is closed, all the resistances 150, 152 and 154 will be serially included in the circuit and also the portion of the resistance 158 will be included therein that is between the conductor 157 and the movable contact 159. Thus the amplitude of the current supplied by the oscillator 122 to the mixer pre-amplifier is variable by the resistance selectively inserted in the circuits by means of the volume control and the switching members 143, 144 and 145.

Extending from the mixer pre-amplifier to the amplifier 126 are the conductors 161 and 162, said amplifier 126 serving to amplify the oscillating current produced by the oscillators 119 and 120, modified by means of the amplitude controlling means above described, fed to the mixer pre-amplifier 123. Extending from the secondary winding of the output transformer of the amplifier 126 are the conductors 163 and 164. The conductor 164 is connected with the negative ends of the secondary of said amplifier and the conductor 165, that extends through the branch conductors 166, 167 and 168 to the conducting strips 29. While only three of said conducting strips 29 are shown in the circuit diagram of FIG. 7, it is to be understood that a multiplicity of said conducting strips 29 is connected with the conductor 165 so that said conducting strips 29 are all connected with said conductor 165 in parallel with each other.

A direct current power supply 169 is provided, which is supplied with alternating current from the conductors 112 and 114 through the conductors 170 and 171. The conductor 163 is connected with the negative terminal of the power supply 169, which preferably is a 24 volt direct current power supply, and extends to the opposite end of the secondary winding of the output transformer of the amplifier 126 from that connected with the conductor 164 so as to be connected through said secondary winding of said transformer with the conductor 164. The positive terminal of the power supply 169 is connected by means of the conductor 172 with the conducting strips 30, all of said conducting strips 30 being connected to said conductor 172 in a suitable manner, as by means of the conductors 173, 174, 175 and 176. The conducting strips 29 are thus connected with the negative terminal of the power supply 169 and the condutcing strips 30 with the positive terminal of the power supply 169 and the conducting strips 29 are connected with the negative terminal of the amplifier 126 and through the power supply 169 the conducting strips 30 are connected with the positive terminal of the amplifier 126.

While any one of the contact members 91, 92, 93 and 94 can be in contact with any one of the conducting strips 29 or 30, in FIG. 7 the contacts 91, 92 and 93 are shown in engagement with the conducting strip 30, while the contact 94 is shown in engagement with the conducting strip 29. The conductors 179, 176 and 178 are thus connected, in the position of the contacts 91, 92 and 93 shown, with the positive terminal of the power supply 169 and the conductor 177 is connected with the negative terminal of said power supply 169 and with the negative terminal of the amplifier 126 by means of the contact 94. As the vehicle 22 may take various angular positions with respect to the length of the conducting strips 29 and 30, during its travel over the track, various ones of said contacts 91, 92, 93 and 94 may be engaged with the conducting strips. However, the arrangement is such that either two of said contacts will be in engagement with one of said conducting strips and the other two with the next adjacent conducting strip, or three of said contacts will be in engagement with one of said conducting strips and one of said contacts with a conducting strip adjacent thereto. It is immaterial which of the contacts is in engagement with which of the conducting strips 29 and 30, as means are provided in the receiving circuit on the vehicle, of which the contacts 91, 92, 93 and 94, and the conductors 176, 177, 178 and 179 are a part, so that there will be one lead extending to the receiving circuit from said contacts, which will only receive negative direct current and negative current impulses from the amplifier 126, and a lead that will only receive positive direct current and positive current impulses from the amplifier 126, as will be explained below.

Referring to FIGS. 8, 10, 11 and 13, a frame is shown in FIG. 8 having the longitudinally extending members 180, between which are mounted a pair of cross members 181 angular in cross section secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by fastening elements 182. A top plate 183 is mounted on the frame members and is provided with an opening 184 therein, through which the shift lever 37 extends. Said shift lever is provided with the usual knob 185 on the upper end thereof and extends downwardly through the opening, being mounted in a bracket 186 by means of a ball and socket joint 187, which permits the lever to be tilted in any direction about said ball and socket joint. Below said ball and socket joint 187 a plate 188 of insulating material is secured to said lever 37 by means of a metal plate 189. The portion 190 of said lever 37 extending downwardly beyond said insulating plate 188 is cylindrical in character and extends between the cross members 181.

Extending toward each other from the cross members 181 are the lugs 191, and mounted on a plate 192 on a lever 193 are a pair of transversely spaced upstanding lugs 194. The lever 193 is adapted to be moved between the full and dotted line positions thereof shown in FIG. 13 in a manner to be described below. When the lever is in the full line position shown in FIG. 13 the lugs 191 and lugs 194 will cooperate to block passage of the cylindrical end portion 190 of the lever past the same. Thus, when the lever is in an upright position as shown in FIG. 11, the lower end portion 190 thereof will be held from passage to any of the dotted line positions thereof shown in FIG. 11 by the cooperation of said lugs 191 and 194. However, when the lever 193 has dropped to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 13 the lower end portion 190 of the lever 37 is free to move angularly into any one of the dotted line positions shown therefor in FIG. 11, but cannot move straight forward or back because of the lugs 191.

Mounted on the insulating plate 188, shown in dotted outline in FIG. 7, are the movable contact members 143, 144 and 145 and a movable contact member 195. Said contact members will extend in a horizontal direction, outwardly from the insulating block 188, being insulated from each other thereby, when the insulating member 188 is in the position shown in full lines in FIGS. 8, 10 and 13. Mounted on suitable brackets 196, which are secured to the wooden longitudinal frame members 180, are the stationary contact members 146, 147, 148 and 197, which are adapted to cooperate with the movable contact members 143, 144, 145 and 195 upon tilting of the insulating member 188 in the proper direction by means of the lever 37. Thus when the lever 37 is tilted toward the operator and toward the left the contact member 145 will engage with the contact member 148, provided that the lever 193 is in its dotted line position. Similarly, under similar circumstances, the tilting of the lever 37 forwardly or away from the operator and toward the right will engage the contact member 143 with the contact member 146 and movement toward the operator and toward the right will engage the contact member 144 with the contact member 147, while movement of the lever 37 forwardly or away from the operator and toward the left will engage the contact member 195 with the contact member 197. The positions of the lever 37 as above described, will correspond, respectively,

to the low gear, second gear, high gear and reverse position of the gear shift lever of an automobile. It will also be noted that when the lever 193 is in the full line position shown in the drawings and the downward extension 190 of the lever 37 is in any one of the dotted line positions shown in FIG. 11, it can not move out of such dotted line position unless the lever 193 is dropped to its dotted line position.

The lever 193 is mounted on a pivot member 198, which extends between the brackets 199 mounted on the longitudinal frame members 180, having spacing sleeves 200 mounted between said brackets 199 and the bearing 201 provided on said lever 193 for holding said lever in proper position between the frame members 180. A bottom wall 202 extends between the frame members 180 and a coil spring 203 extends between said bottom wall 202 and an ear 204 on the lever 193, which tends to hold the lever in its full line position. A pair of brackets 255 mounted on the frame members 180 have a bar 256 fixed thereto and extending between the same, on which a pair of spaced upstanding guide plates 257 are mounted in fixed position, said lever 193 operating between said guide plates 257.

Means is provided for moving said lever 193 to its dotted line position, comprising a crank 205, which has a transverse portion 206 engaging the downwardly bent end portion 207 of the lever 193 and adapted to move it from the full line positon thereof shown in FIG. 13 to the dotted line position thereof shown in FIG. 13. Said crank is provided on a shaft 208, which is mounted in a bearing 209 having a base 210 mounted on one of the frame members 180. Said shaft 208 is also mounted in a bearing 211 mounted on a frame member 212 and is held from endwise movement in said bearing by means of a cotter pin 213. Said shaft 208 has mounted thereon to turn therewith the hub portion 214 of a lever 215 that is provided with an upwardly directed portion 216 terminating in the foot pedal 40. A spring 217 extends between the lever 215 and a portion of the housing 20, said spring tending to hold the foot pedal 40 in the raised position thereof. Depression of the foot pedal 40 will move the lever 215 to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 12, swinging the shaft 208 clockwise as viewed in FIGS. 12 and 13, thus swinging the crank 205 clockwise and raising the transverse end portion 206 thereof and along with it the end 207 of the lever 193 to move it to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 13. Thus the pedal 40 acts in a similar manner to an automobile clutch pedal, in that it has to be operated each time that the lever 37 is to be moved from one position to another through the full line position thereof shown in FIGS. 10, 11 and 13, or to move it into the full line position thereof, which is the position in which all of the movable contacts of the switching means provided on the insulating member 188 are in open circuit position.

Referring to FIG. 7, it will be noted that a conductor 218 extends from the conductor 164 to the movable contact member 195 and that a conductor 219 extends from the stationary contact 197 to a conducting strip 220. Such conducting strips 220 are mounted on the barriers 23 and 24, extending the full length thereof, the barrier 24 being shown as being mounted between a top plate 33 and the conducting strips 29 and 30 and being secured to the member 32 by a suitable securing element 221. The strips 220 extend continuously around the central barrier 24 and around the peripheral barrier 23 and are all connected with conductor 219. A contact member 222 is mounted on the shell of the vehicle 22 and is adapted to engage with the contact 220, being indicated at 222 diagrammatically in FIG. 7. The contact strip 222 extends entirely around the body of vehicle 221.

In order to provide for completion of the circuit between the oscillator and the mixer pre-amplifier when the lever 37 is moved to the position to engage the movable contact with the stationary contact 197, a relay 223 is provided, the winding of which is connected with the conductor 219 by means of a conductor 224 at one end thereof, while the other end thereof is connected with the conductor 172 by means of the conductor 225. As the conductor 218 is connected with the negative terminal of the power supply 169 through the conductors 164 and 163 and with the positive terminal of said power supply through the conductor 172, the relay will be energized whenever the contact 195 is engaged with the contact 197. The contact member 226 moves with the armature of the relay 223, being normally biased toward open circuit condition as shown in FIG. 7, but being moved to the dotted line position thereof upon energization of said relay 223 to move into engagement with a stationary contact 227, from which a conductor 228 extends to the conductor 156. Accordingly, when the relay 223 is energized, the circuit will be completed to the mixer pre-amplifier 123 from the oscillator 122 through the conductor 135, the movable contact member 136, the conductor 137, the conductor 139, the movable contact member 226, the conductor 228, the conductor 156, the resistance 154, the portion of the resistance 158 between said resistance 154 and the movable contact 159, and the conductor 160.

The receiving circuit on the vehicle 22 comprises conductors 229, 230, 231 and 232 connected, respectively, with the conductors 176, 177, 178 and 179. Interposed between the conductors 233 and 234 and said conductors 229, 230, 231 and 232 are the diodes 235 and 236, said diodes being so positioned in the circuit that only negative current and negative current impulses can pass from the conductors 229, 230, 231 and 232 and thus from the contacts 91, 92, 93 and 94, to the conductor 233, and only positive current and current impulses can pass to the conductor 234 from said contacts 91, 92, 93 and 94, through the conductors 229, 230, 231 and 232 to the conductor 234. In the position shown, the contact 94 being in engagement with the conducting strip 29, the circuit will be from said conducting strip 29 through the conductor 177 and conductor 230 to the conductor 233, and from the conducting strip 30 through the conductors 176, 178 and 179 and the conductors 229, 231 and 232 to the conductor 234. It will accordingly be seen that no matter what ones of the contacts 91, 92, 93 and 94 are in engagement with the conducting strips 29 and 30, a circuit will be established between a contact strip 29 and the conductor 233 and between a contact strip 30 and the conductor 234.

Extending from the conductor 233 is a conductor 237, which is connected with one end of a winding 238 of an autotransformer, from the other end of which windin g the conductor 239 extends, and which is provided with a tap 240, which is provided with branches 241 and 242. Interposed between the conductor 241 and the conductor 234 is a condenser 243, which will permit the passage of oscillating current from the conductor 234 to the conductor 241, but will block passage of direct current from the conductor 234 to the conductor 241. A conductor 244 extends from the conductor 234 to a conductor 245, which is connected with the emitter 246 of a transistor 247 having a collector 248 and a base 249. The collector 248 is connected with a conductor 250, which is connected with one end of the armature winding of the motor 45, the other end of said winding being connected by a conductor 252 with the conductor 241. Thus the transistor 247 is in series with the armature winding of the motor 45 between the positive and negative terminals of a direct current circuit, including the conductors 234 and 233, and thus direct current is supplied to the motor 45 from the power supply 169 through the contact strips 30 and 29 in accordance with the conductivity of the transistor 247.

The conductor 239 is connected with a conductor 253 through the diode 254, the diode 254 being provided to make certain that only negative current impulses will pass to the conductor 253. The conductor 253 is connected with the primary winding 251 of a transformer having the secondary winding 258 at an intermediate point and a condenser 259 is bridged across the terminals of the winding 251, the position of the tap 253 and the capacity of the condenser 259 being chosen so that the circuit in which the winding 251 is located will be tuned to a frequency of five kilocycles. Said circuit will accordingly receive the amplified oscillating current produced by the oscillator 119 and the amplitude of said oscillating current is variable by means of the position of the movable contact 132 of the volume control having the resistance 131. The amplitude of the oscillating current will increase in the secondary winding 258 in accordance with the position of the contact member 132. The secondary winding 258 is connected with the conductor 244 by means of a conductor 260 and with the base 249 of the transistor 247 by means of a conductor 261. The end of the secondary winding 258 connected with the base 249 in the negative end thereof with respect to the emitter 246 and will become more negative as the amplitude of the oscillating current produced by the oscillator 119 increases. The conductivity of the transistor 247 will increase as the base 249 thereof becomes more negative. Accordingly the speed of the motor 45 will be varied in accordance with the position of the movable contact 132 of the volume control, the speed of said motor 45 increasing as the portion of the resistance 131 between the movable contact 132 and the conductor 130 decreases. The condenser 270 is bridged across the conductors 244 and 250 to filter the oscillating current out of the motor circuit.

The position of the contact 132 is controlled by means of the steering wheel 36, the volume control being indicated by the numeral 262 in FIG. 9. Said volume control is mounted on a portion of the housing 20 within a sub-housing 263, upon which a bearing member 264 for the steering shaft 265 connected with the steering wheel 36 is mounted. The volume control operates to cut out resistance when turned in a counter-clockwise direction, and means is provided for turning the operating member 266 of the volume control in response to the movements of the steering wheel 36 either clockwise or counterclockwise, as may be desired. Said means comprises a rubber tube 267 connecting the steering shaft 265 with the operating member 266 of the volume control 262, the tube 267 receiving and being fixed to the shafts 265 and 266. A flexible connection by means of the rubber tube 267 is provided so that violent movements of the steering wheel 36 by an operator will not damage the volume control 262. In order to prevent turning of the steering wheel 36 beyond the limits of movement of the volume control 262 in opposite directions, a stop finger 268 is provided on the steering shaft 265, which is adapted to engage with one or more stops 269 mounted on the sub-housing 263.

The speed of the motor 45 increases as the steering wheel 36 is turned counter-clockwise, as this reduces the amount of resistance 31 in the circuit for controlling the amplitude of the current produced by the oscillator 119, increasing the amplitude thereof. When the steering wheel 36 is turned clockwise the speed of the motor will be reduced in a similar manner. The adjustment of the parts is such that when the steering wheel 36 is in a position to steer the vehicle 22 straight ahead, the movable contact 132 is in an intermediate position. The springs 64 tend to move the disk 69 forwardly, or toward the left, as viewed in FIG. 5, and the weights 68 as the same move outwardly tend to move the disk 69 toward the right as viewed in FIG. 5 Movement of the disk 69 toward the right will turn the shaft 82 clockwise as viewed in FIG. 5, or counter-clockwise as viewed in FIG. 3. This will cause the steering arm to be moved counter-clockwise in FIG. 3 as the speed of the motor 45 increases, moving the pin 79 along with the link 76 in such a direction as to swing the bell crank levers made up of the arms 73 and 75 clockwise about their pivots 71 as viewed in FIG. 3, turning the wheel 74 shown uppermost in FIG. 3 outwardly and the other wheel 74 inwardly, which will steer the vehicle toward the left as viewed in FIG. 5. Thus turning of the steering wheel 36 counterclockwise, or to the left, will turn the wheels to the left, and turning of the stering wheel 36 clockwise, or to the right, will cause the wheels 74 to turn to the right, as the springs will move the weight inwardly and the disk 69 forwardly as the speed of the motor 45 decreases.

The receiving circuit on the vehicle 22 is provided with a conductor 271 extending from the conductor 244, said conductor 271 having a conductor 272 extending therefrom to the emitter 273 of a transistor 274 having a collector 275 and a base 276. From the collector a conductor 277 extends to a conductor 278, which is connected with a movable contact member 279, which is mounted to move with the armature of a relay 280 and is normally biased to engage a stationary contact 281. A conductor 282 extends from the contact 281, said conductor 282 being connected with a conductor 283, which connects with the conductor 284 that is connected with one end of the armature of the motor 44. The winding of a relay 285 has its opposite ends connected with the conductors 277 and 283. Connected with the other end of the armature of the motor 44 is a conductor 286, which is provided with branches 287 and 288, the branch 287 extending to a stationary contact 289, with which a movable contact 290 is biased to engage. Said movable contact 290 is mounted to move with the armature of a relay 291 and is moved to the dotted line position thereof shown when the winding of the relay 291 is energized. A conductor 292 extends from the movable contact member 290 and is connected with the conductor 242.

Accordingly, when the movable contact members 279 and 290 are in the position shown in full lines in FIG. 7 the circuit of the motor 44 will be completed from the conductor 234 through the conductors 244, 271 and 272 and through the transistor 274 to the conductor 277, the conductor 278 and contact 279, conductors 282, 283 and 284, to the armature of motor 44 and from the armature of said motor 44 through the conductors 286, 287, movable contact 290 and conductor 242, a portion of the winding 238 and the conductor 237 to the conductor 233, and thus the conductor 284 leads into the armature of the motor 44 from the positive terminal of the power supply 169 through the conducting strip 30 and the conductor 286 extending from the armature of the motor 44 is connected through a conducting strip 29 with the negative terminal of the power supply 169. The motor 44 is variable in speed in accordance with the conductivity of the circuit in which the transistor 274 is interposed.

Means similar to that provided for controlling the conductivity of the transistor 247 is provided for controlling the conductivity of the transistor 274. Said means includes a primary winding 293 of a transformer having a secondary winding 294 and having a conductor 295 connected therewith intermediate the ends thereof, which is in turn connected with the conductor 296 extending from 13 one end of the primary winding 251. A condenser 297 is bridged across the terminals of the winding 293. A conductor 298 extends from one terminal of the primary winding 293 and is connected with a conductor 299, which is connected with the conductor 242 through a resistance 300.

A conductor 301 leads from the conductor 271 to one end of the secondary winding 294 and a conductor 302 extends from the other end of the secondary winding 294 to the base 276 of the transistor 274. A condenser 303 is bridged across the conductors 299 and 271 and a condenser 304 is bridged across the conductors 271 and 277. The condenser 304 is provided for filtering out oscillating current to prevent its flow to the armature of the motor 44. The condenser 303 provides a path for the oscillating current from the conductor 299 to the conductor 271 and through the conductor 244 to the conductor 234. A path is also provided for the oscillating current through the resistance 300, the conductor 242 and the conductor 241 and condenser 243 to the conductor 234. The value of the condenser 297 and the position of the tap 295 is such that the circuit containing the primary winding 293 of the transformer is tuned to the frequency of the oscillator 122.

As the amplitude of the oscillating current produced by the oscillator 122 is increased the negative bias on the base 276 of the transistor 274 is increased in a similar manner to that described in connection with the transistor 247 and the conductivity of said transistor 274 is accordingly increased and the speed of the motor 44 increased as said conductivity increases. The amplitude of the current produced by the oscillator 122 will vary in accordance with the position of the shift lever 37, as the various positions thereof will put different amounts of resistance made up of the resistances 150, 152 and 154 into the circuit for controlling the amplitude of the oscillating current produced by the oscillator 122, and will also vary in accordance with the position of the contact 159 with respect to the resistance 158, which is dependent upon the position of the foot pedal 38, which serves a similar purpose to an accelerator pedal of an automobile.

The accelerator pedal 38 is mounted on a pivot ear 305 by means of the pivot member 306, said pivot ea-r being provided on the sub-housing portion 307. A link 308 is pivoted to the upper end of the pedal 38 and is pivotally connected with a crank 309 mounted on a shaft 310 to turn therewith. Said shaft 310 has mounted thereon the volume controls 311 and 312 so that the operating members of said volume controls 311 and 312 will turn in unison with the shaft 310. The volume control 311 comprises the resistance 1'58 and the movable contact 159 and depression of the foot pedal 38 will turn the shaft 310 counter-clockwise as viewed in FIG. 12. Such counter-clockwise movement of the shaft 310 will cause movement of the movable contact member 159 of the volume control 311 in a direction to reduce the amount of the resistance 158 that is in the amplitude controlling circuit for the oscillator 122 and thus increase the speed of the motor 44. The volume control 312 is mounted on a bracket 313 mounted on the frame member 212, and the volume control 311 is mounted on the volume control 312 "by a connecting sleeve 314, while the shaft 310 is provided with a collar 315 on the end thereof to maintain the crank 309 in engagement with said shaft 310.

. The volume control 312 comprises a resistance 316, with which a movable contact 317 engages. The conductor 114 and the line wire 112 lead to a tape play-back 318, which has the output circuit comprising the conductors 319 and 320 leading to a loud speaker 321. Said tape playback is provided with a variable speed motor, for driving the tape, the controlling circuit of which includes the conductors 322 and 323 connected with the movable contact 317 and one end of the resistance 316. Accordingly the portion of the resistance 316 between the conductor 323 and the movable contact 317 will control the speed of 14 the tape play-back motor. The tape play-back is preferably provided with a tape recording of the sound produced by an actual racing automobile in action, and it will accordingly be seen that the speed of the tape play-back and thus of the sound produced by the recording will vary in accordance with the position of the accelerator pedal 38 and thus be variable so that the speed at which the play-back plays the recording will increase as the speed of the vehicle 22 is increased by the depression of the foot pedal 38, and vice versa.

Means is provided for preventing the vehicle 22 from being stalled against a barrier by providing means for reversing the direction of travel of the vehicle, should.

this be necessary in order to disengage the same from one of the barriers. Said means includes the conducting strips 220 with which the contact member 222 on the vehicle is adapted to engage. From the contact member 222 a conductor 324 extends and branch conductors 325 and 326 extend from the conductor 324. The conductor 326 is connected with one end of each of the windings of the relays 280 and 291 and the branch conductor 325 leads to the stationary contact 327, with which the movable contact 328, which is mounted to move with the armature of the relay 285, is adapted to engage upon energization of the winding of said relay 285.

When the contact 222 engages one of the conducting strips 220 the circuit will not be completed unless the contact member has been moved into engagement with the contact 197 by tilting of the insulating plate 188 by mean-s of the shift lever 37 in the proper direction. This cannot be done without first moving the insulating member 188 into a neutral or horizontal position, in which all the contact members mounted thereon are moved to open circuit position. When the contact member 195 is engaged with the contact member 197 the negative terminal of the power supply 169 will be connected, through the conductor 218 and the conductors 164 and 163 with the conducting strips 220 through the conductor 219, and when the contact member 222 engages there- -with the circuit will extend from the negative terminal of said power supply through the conductor 324 to one end of each of the windings of the relays 280 and 291. A conductor 329 extends from the other end of each of the windings of the relays 280 and 291 to the conductor 271 and through the conductor 244 and the conductor 234 to one of the conducting strips 30 and to the positive terminal of the power supply 169. Thus the relays 280 and 291 will be energized and the movable contact members 279 and 290 will move to the dotted line positions thereof shown in FIG. 7.

This will break the circuit between the conductors 278 and 282 and make a circuit between the conductor 278 and the conductor 286 and between the conductor 284 and the conductor 292, through conductor 343 and contact 290, which will reverse the fiow of direct current through the armature winding of the motor 44 and thus reverse the motor. At the same time that the circuit through the conductor 282 from the conductor 278 is interrupted by movement of the contact member 279, which had short circuited winding of relay 285, the current flow will be through the winding of the relay 285 from the conductor 277 to the conductor 283 and the Winding of said relay will be energized, moving the contact member 328 to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 7.

The engagement of the contact member 328 with the contact member 327 will connect the conductor 325 with the conductor 330, which is connected with the movable contact 328 and thus with the conductor 242. The conductor 242 is connected with one of the conducting strips 29 connected with the negative terminal of the power supply 169 through the conductor 240, a portion of the winding 238, the conductor 237 and the conductor 233. The relays 280 and 291 will thus continue to be energized even though the contact member 222 leaves the conducting strip 220, as the conductor 329 leading to said relays is connected with the conductor 271 that is connected with the positive terminal of the power supply 169 through the conductor 234 and the conductor 326 leading to the other end of the windings of the relays 280 and 291 is connected with the negative terminal of the power supply 169 in the above described manner, by engagement of the contact member 328 with the stationary contact 327. This will maintain the circuit to the motor 44 to operate it in reverse as long as the contact member 195 remains in engagement with the contact member 197, as the relay 223 will continue to be energized and the circuit through the resistance 154 and the volume control having the resistance 154 and the volume control having the resistance 158 will be maintained and the transistor 274 will remain conductive.

However, upon movement of the insulating member 188 to the horizontal position, which is the neutral position of the shift lever 37, this circuit will be broken, the relay 223 will be de-energized, and the relay 285 will be de-energized so as to cause the contact member 328 to move back to the full line position shown in FIG. 7 because direct current fiow through transistor 274 will be halted. In order to again start the vehicle, it will then again be necessary to operate the shift lever to engage one of the contact members 143, 144 or 145 with its cooperating contact. Thus, by operation of the shift lever, the vehicle can be backed away from a barrier and then, as soon as desired, the control thereof can be again changed to move the vehicle in a forward direction, as de-energization of the holding circuit involving the contact member 328 will de-energize the windings of the relays 280 and 291 and cause the circuit to be re-established in the manner shown in full lines in FIG. 7 so that the motor 44 will be driven in a forward direction.

Should it be desired to halt the vehicle at any time, the brake pedal 39 can be used for this purpose. The brake pedal 39 controls the position of the switch 136 and is shown in FIG. 12 as operating a lever 331 on an upstanding portion 332 of which it is mounted, which lever 331 is normally held in such a position by means of the spring 333 that the brake pedal 39 is in a raised position. Said lever 331 is provided with a hub portion 334, which is keyed to the shaft 335 mounted in a bearing 336 on the frame member 212 and a bearing 337 on the frame member 180. The shaft 335 has a collar 338 mounted thereon to rotate therewith, from which an arm 339 extends. Mounted on a bracket 340 on the frame member 180 is a switch 341, which contains the movable contact member 136, which is normally biased toward circuit closing position, but which is provided with an operating member 342 that is adapted to be engaged by the arm 339 to open said switch, by moving the movable contact member 136 to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 7, by depression of the foot pedal 39.

Extending from the line wires 112 and 113 to the 12 volt direct current power supply 344 are the conductors 345 and 346. Connected with the positive terminal of the power supply 344 is the conductor 347 and connected with the negative terminal of said power supply is a conductor 348. A conductor 349 is adapted to be connected with the conductor 348 by means of a momentary switch having a movable contact 350 that is normally biased to an open position by suitable spring means 351. Said switch may be coin operated if desired. Also connected with the conductors 112 and 114 through the conductors 352 and 353 is a 12. volt power supply 354, from the positive terminal of which extends a conductor 355 and from the negative terminal of which extends a conductor 356. The conductor 355 has a tap 357 extending therefrom to a movable contact member 358, which is adjustable along a resistance 359, which is in series with a resistance 360, said resistances 359 and 360 being interposed between the conductor 355 and a conductor 361 connected with a base 362 of a transistor 363, which has an emitter 364 and a collector 365. The conductor 356 is connected with the collector 365 and the conductor 355 is connected with one end of the winding of a relay 366, the other end of said winding being connected with the emitter 364 by means of a conductor 367. Also connected with the conductor 356 through the conductor 368 is a photoelectric cell 369, said photoelectric cell being interposed between the conductors 368 and 361. The conductor 349 is connected with an arcuate stationary contact 370, from which the conductor 371 extends. Said conductor 371 is connected by means of the conductor 372 with one terminal of a lamp 373, which lamp is mounted in a suitable housing 374 on the barrier 23, and is provided with suitable means for throwing a beam across the track to the photoelectric cell 369 located in a suitable housing 375 transversely across the track from the housing 374, the arrangement being such that a beam from the lamp 373 will engage the photoelectric cell 369. Said lamp having its other terminal connected with the conductor 347 by a conductor 376, will be energized upon closing of the switch 350.

The conductor 371 extends to one end of the winding of the relay 116 and the conductors 377 and 378 are connected with the other end of said winding. The conductor 377 connects the last mentioned end of the winding of the relay 116 with the conductor 355 and the conductor 378 connects with one end of the winding of a relay 379, the other end of which is connected by means of a conductor 380 with a contact member 381, with which the rotary switching member 382 is adapted to engage. A relay 383 is connected by means of conductors 384 and 385 with the conductors 371 and 377. The conductor 384 extends to a movable contact 386, which is mounted to move with the armature of the relay 383 and is biased to have the dotted line position shown in FIG. 7, but upon the relay 383 being energized the movable contact 386 will engage with a stationary contact 387 from which the conductor 388 extends to a movable contact 389, which is normally biased to engage the stationary contact 390, from which the conductor 391 extends to the conductor 368, and thus the conductor 391 is connected with the conductor 356, extending to the power supply 354.

The movable contact member 382 is in position so as to connect the arcuate stationary contact 370 and the contact 381, when operation of the controlling apparatus for the vehicle is started, by closing the switch having the movable contact 350. When said switch is closed, the relay 116 will be energized and the movable contact will move into position to connect the conductor 114 with the line conductor 113. The circuit for energizing said relay being from the positive terminal of the power supply 344 through conductors 347, 355 and 377 to one end of the winding of the relay 116 and from the other end of said winding through the conductor 371 to contact 370 and from contact 370 to conductor 349, and to the negative terminal of said power supply. At the same time the relay 383 will be energized, moving the contact member 386 to circuit closing position, completing the circuit between the conductors 355 and 356 and the relays 116 and 383.

A conductor 392 extends from the conductor 376 to the stationary contact 393, with which the movable contact 394 engages, said movable contact being biased to normally engage said stationary contact 393 when the relay 366 is not energized. A conductor 395 extends from the movable contact member 394 to one end of a solenoid winding 396, the movable core of which is connected with a pivotally mounted member 397 having a pawl 398 mounted thereon and adapted to engage a ratchet wheel 399, which is connected with the movable contact member 382 so that said contact member rotates with said ratchet wheel 399. The plunger carrying the pawl 398 is urged in a downward direction by any suitable means, such as a spring, or by gravity, in a well known manner customary in step by step rotary switches, and is pulled upwardly by the energization of the solenoid 396. The solenoid 396 is also connected with the contact member 370 by a conductor 400 so that with the movable contact member 394 in circuit closing position the solenoid 396 will be energized, as the conductor 347 is connected through the conductor 376 and the conductor 373, movable contact 394 and conductor 395 with one end of said solenoid, and the conductor 348 is connected with the other end thereof upon closing of the switch 350 through conductor 349, the contact member 370 and the conductor 400.

The energization of the solenoid winding 396 will move the contact member 382 clockwise as viewed in FIG. 7 from a position in which it is engaged with the contact member 381 and the contact member 370 to a position in which it engages with a contact member 401 and the contact member 370. A series of contact members 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410 and 411 are provided in the path of a movable contact member 382 to engage successively therewith, to complete the circuit between each of said contact members and the contact member 370.

The switch having the movable contact 350 will only be closed momentarily, being immediately again reopened by the resilient means 351. However, the solenoid 396 will have been energized by such closing of the switch to advance the ratchet wheel 399 one tooth and the movable contact member one step, or in engagement with the contact 401. At the same time the relays 116 and 383 will be energized to close the circuit between the conductors 113 and 114 and to energize the relay 383, whereby the holding circuit is established for the relays 383 and 116. It will be noted that the conductor 380, which extends from the contact member 381, and the conductor 378 are connected with opposite ends of the winding of the relay 379, but it will not be energized to break the holding circuit by movement of the movable contact member 389 to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 7, because the movable contact member 382 has already left the contact The power supply 354 also has become effective when the contact member 115 has closed the circuit between the conductors 113 and 114 and this causes energization of the photoelectric cell 369. Also the lamp 373, which has become energized upon closing of the switch that is provided with the contact member 350, remains energized because it is connected with the conductor 356 through the conductors 372 and 371, contact 370, conductors 413 and 368 and with the conductor 355 through conductor 376. The beam from the lamp 373 will activate the photoelectric cell so as to cause the terminals thereof with which the conductor 361 is connected to become negative, increasing the negative bias of the base 362 of the transistor and causing the relay 366 to be energized because the conductivity of the transistor 363 will be increased thereby to cause direct current to flow from the power supply 354 through the conductor 355 to one end of said winding and from said winding through the conductor 367 and said transistor 363 and the conductor 356 to the negative terminal of the power supply 354. This will cause the contact member 394 to move to the dotted line position, breaking the circuit to the solenoid 396, which will cause the pawl 398 to drop downwardly one tooth of the ratchet wheel 399. This condition will exist as long as the lamp 373 is directing its beam on the photoelectric cell 369. However, as soon as the beam is interrupted by the vehicle 22 passing between the lamp 373 and the photoelectric cell 369 the contact member 394 will reutrn to the full line position shown in FIG. 7 and the solenoid 396 will be energized to advance the ratchet wheel 399 one tooth and the contact member 383 from one of the series of contacts with which it engages to the next one, such as from the contact 401 to the contact 402, the circuit for energizing the solenoid being from the conductor 355 through the conductors 376 and 392, movable contact 394 and conductor 395 to one end of the winding of solenoid 396 and from the other end of said winding through 18 the conductor 400, contact 370, conductors 413, 391 and 368 to the conductor 356. As soon as the vehicle 22 has passed from between the lamp 373 and the photoelectric cell 369 the winding of the relay 366 will again be energized and the pawl 398 will again drop down into engagement with the next tooth of the ratchet wheel 399.

Electric lamps 412 have one terminal of each thereof connected with a contact member 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 410 and 411 and the other terminal connected with the conductor 347. A circuit will thus be established through each of said lamps 412 in succession from the power suply 354 through conductors 355 and 347 and from one of said contacts through the contacts 382, 370 and conductors 413, 391, 368 and 356 to power supply 354. Accordingly each of the lamps 412 will be illuminated in succession as the contact member 382 is moved step by step into engagement with the series of contacts with which said lamps 412 are connected. When the lamp 412 connected with the contact member 401 is illuminated the first window 42 at the left end of the housing as viewed in FIG. 1 will be illuminated, and is preferably provided with indicia that indicates the starting of the vehicle around the track, such as the word start. The contact members from 402 to 411 are engaged successively, and are arranged to illuminate indicia in succeeding windows 42 from left to right in the row shown in FIG. 1, preferably bearing the numerals 1 to 10, indicating the beginning of each lap that the vehicle 22 is making in its travel around the track.

When the vehicle reaches the point on the track at which the beam from the lamp 373 is interrupted following the interruption that started the 10th lap, the contact member 382 will move into position so as to engage the contact 381 and the contact 370. This will cause the relay 379 to be energized as the circuit from the power supply 354 will then be established from conductor 355 through conductors 377 and 378 to one end of the winding thereof and through conductor 380, contacts 381, 382 and 370, and conductors 413, 391, 368 and 356 back to said power supply. Energization of relay 379 will break the circuit to conductor 356 extending from the relays 116 and 383 by movement of contact 389 to the dotted position shown in FIG. 7, halting all operations of the electrical apparatus connected with the conductors 112 and 114, including the power supply 354. To resume operation of the vehicle 22 the switch having the movable contact 350 will have to again be closed.

To begin operation of the vehicle 22, the operator of the apparatus closes the switch having the movable contact 350, which will cause the contact member 382 to move from engagement of the contact 381 to engagement with the contact 401 by operation of the solenoid actuated rotary switch and the contact members 115 and 386 will be moved to their full line position shown in FIG. 7 by operation of the relays 116 and 383. The operator then depresses the clutch pedal 40 and moves the shift level 37 backwardly and toward the left to complete the circuit through the contacts 145 and 148, if he desires to go through the three steps ordinarily gone through in starting a stick shift controlled automobile engine, and then follows with successive alternate operations of the clutch pedal and the shift level to successively connect the contact member 143 with the contact member 146 and the contact member 144 with the contact member 147. He then depresses the accelerator pedal 38 the desired amount to get the desired speed of operation of the motor 44 for propelling the vehicle at the desired speed. This will put the play-back in operation at the same time that the vehicle is put into operation, and will run it at a speed proportionate to the speed of the motor 44. At the same time the operator adjusts the steering wheel 36 as desired to get the desired direction of travel of the vehicle 22, the adjustment of the volume control having the resistance 131 and the movable contact 132 by means of the steering wheel 36, adjusting the speed of the motor 45 to adjust the steering mechanism of the vehicle thereby through the centrifugal force exerted on the weights 68 of the rotatable means driven by the motor 45. As the vehicle travels along the track it will pass between the mounting 374 for the lamp and the mounting 375 for the photoelectric cell, interrupting the beam to the photoelectric cell and operating the ratchet and pawl mechanism to advance the movable contact member 382 into engagement with the contact member 402, to indicate the beginning of lap 1, and successively with the contact members 403 and 411 inclusive, to indicate the beginning of laps 2 to inclusive provided by the indicia in the windows 42. Operation of the vehicle 22 and of the step by step movement of the contact member 382 will continue until the contact member 381 is engaged, which will open the circuit controlled by the relay 379 and halt the operation of the vehicle.

Should the vehicle become fouled by the barrier so that it will be held thereby from forward movement, the clutch pedal 40 can be operated and the shift lever 37 moved to the left and forwardly to close the switch having the movable contact member 195, which will reverse the operation of the motor 44 and drive the vehicle backward away from the barrier. Such movement can be halted by operation of the clutch pedal 40 and movement of the shift lever 37 back into the upright or neutral position and, if desired to halt the backing of the vehicle more rapidly, the brake pedal 39 can be depressed to open the switch 136. Forward movement of the vehicle can then be resumed in the same manner as was originally the case, when the switch having the contact member 350 was first closed.

What we claim is:

1. In an apparatus of the character described, a vehicle and a member having a surface over which said vehicle operates, means remote from the vehicle for independently producing two oscillating currents of different fixed frequencies, independently controlling the amplitude of each of said currents common amplifying means for said oscillating currents, a direct current source, said surface being provided with a plurality of conducting strips extending longitudinally thereof substantially in parallel transversely spaced relationship, means for insulating transversely adjacent conducting strips from each other including insulating strips mounted between said conducting strips, means for connecting alternating conducting strips with the output terminals of said amplifying means and with the opposed terminals of said direct current source, comprising a circuit having its terminals connected with said alternating strips and serially including the opposed terminals of said direct current source and the output terminals of said amplifying means, a pair of variable speed motors mounted on said vehicle, a plurality of current collecting members mounted on said vehicle yieldingly engaging said conducting strips, a receiving circuit having a pair of conductors mounted on said vehicle, rectifying means disposed between said current collecting members and said conductors to provide for only negative current flow to one of said conductors and only positive current flow to the other conductor from said collecting members, means on said vehicle connecting each of said motors with said conductors including a transistor serially connected with said motor and means for independently varying the conductivity of each of said transistors comprising means each tuned to one of said fixed frequencies and responsive to the amplitude of the oscillating current to which it is tuned included in said receiving circuit each comprising a primary and a secondary winding, means connecting the negative end of each of said secondary windings with the base of one of said transis tors, a driving connection between a pair of wheels of said vehicle and one of said motors, a steering mechanism for said vehicle and means for adjusting the position of said steering mechanism responsive to the speed of the other motor.

2. Means for remotely controlling the speed and direction of a vehicle with respect to a surface over which said vehicle operates comprising means for producing oscillating currents of two different fixed frequencies, means for independently controlling the amplitude of each of said currents, common means for amplifying both of said independently controlled currents, means on the vehicle responsive to one of said fixed frequencies controlling the speed of said vehicle, means on the vehicle responsive to the other of said fixed frequencies controlling the steering of said vehicle and means for transmitting said amplified currents to said frequency responsive means, the means for controlling the amplitude of the current of said one frequency comprising a plurality of resistances and switching means for selectively interposing said resistances between said one means for producing said oscillating current and said common amplifying means comprising a tiltable member, stationary contacts, contacts mounted on said tiltable member each adapted to cooperate with one of said stationary contacts, manually operated means for tilting said tiltable member and guiding means controlling the direction of tilt of said titltable member to engage only one of said contacts mounted thereon with its cooperating stationary contact at a time.

3. Means for remotely controlling the speed and direction of a vehicle with respect to a surface over which said vehicle operates comprising means for producing oscillating currents of two different fixed frequencies, means for independently controlling the amplitude of each of said currents, common means for amplifying both of said independently controlled currents, means on the vehicle responsive to one of said fixed frequencies controlling the speed of said vehicle, means on the vehicle responsive to the other of said fixed frequencies controlling the steering of said vehicle and means for transmitting said amplified currents to said frequency responsive means, the means for controlling the amplitude of the current of said one frequency comprising a plurality of resistances and switching means forselectively interposing said resistances between said one means for producing said oscillating current and said common amplifying means comprising a tiltable member, stationary contacts, contacts mounted on said tiltable member each adapted to cooperate with one of said stationary contacts, manually operated means for tilting said tiltable member and guiding means controlling the direction of tilt of said tiltable member to engage only one of said contacts mounted thereon with its cooperating stationary contact at a time, said contacts being so related and said guiding means being so arranged that said tiltable member must be moved through a position in which all said contacts are disengaged to move said titltable member from a position in which one of said contacts on said tiltable member is engaged with its stationary contact to a position in which another of said contacts on said tiltable member is engaged with its stationary contact.

4. Means for remotely controlling the speed and direction of a vehicle with respect to a surface over which said vehicle operates comprising means for producing oscillating currents of two different fixed frequencies, means for independently controlling the amplitude of each of said currents, common means for amplifying both of said independently controlled currents, means on the vehicle responsive to one of said fixed frequencies controlling the speed of said vehicle, means on the vehicle responsive to the other of said fixed frequencies controlling the steering of said vehicle and means for transmitting said amplified currents to said frequency responsive means, the means for controlling the amplitude of the current of said one frequency comprising a plurality of resistances and switching means for selectively interposing said resistance between said one means for producing said oscillating current and said common amplifying means comprising a tiltable member, stationary contacts, contacts mounted on said tiltable member each adapted 21 22 to cooperate with one of said stationary contacts, man- 3,154,864 11/1964 Jazbutis 3511 ually operated means for tilting said tiltable member, 3,205,618 9/1965 Heytow 46244 guiding means controlling the direction of tilt of said 3,231,988 2/1966 Freyde 3511 tiltable member to engage only one of said contacts FOREIGN PATENTS mounted thereon with its cooperating stationary contact 5 at a time, means for locking said tiltable member against 55,350 8/1951 Francemovement, and operator controlled means for releasing 8731812 4/1953 Germany- Sal locking means ANTON o. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

References Cited 10 RICHARD c. PINKHAM, DELBERT B. LOWE, UNITED STATES PATENTS Examiners.

2,993,299 7/1961 Din gee et a1. 46244 R. F. CUTTING, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3373524 *Dec 9, 1965Mar 19, 1968Louis BarreiroElectrically operated vehicle and module for a course for the vehicle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification446/455, 463/63, 434/63
International ClassificationA63H17/39, A63F9/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/14
European ClassificationA63F9/14