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Publication numberUS3339724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1967
Filing dateDec 1, 1964
Priority dateDec 1, 1964
Publication numberUS 3339724 A, US 3339724A, US-A-3339724, US3339724 A, US3339724A
InventorsHickin Robert J
Original AssigneePackaging Corp America
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging
US 3339724 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. J. HICKIN Sept. 5, 1967 PACKAGING 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 1, 1964 R. J. HICKIN PACKAGING 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 1, 1964 5 w a w Q @QSE? VQCP a :j 3%? @w .M T w W g W WM 7. Ema e l mm 2 NMMJ I my United States Patent 3,339,724 PACKAGING Robert J. Hickin, Seville, Ohio, assignor, by mesne asments, to Packaging Corporation of America, a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 1, 1964, Ser. No. 415,043 19 Claims. (Cl. 206-65) This invention relates to new packages and more particularly to the combination of a folded carton type support frame with one or more frail or insubstantial receptacles supported therein, as well as the provision of novel folded carton type support frames, blanks for forming such supports, and methods of erecting such blanks.

There are of course many and varied requirements for packages and packaging techniques, particularly in packing relatively small units or quantities of consumer commodities. This is exemplified by the millions of individual packages of myriad different food products which are sold and consumed each year. The very magnitude of the number of units involved bespeaks the urgent requirements that the cost of such packages per unit be minimized. This involves both the cost of the materials of these packages, and the facility by which they can be converted to a completed, saleable package with the commodity enclosed. Examples of other requirements which arise in this art are integrity of the package, protection of and maintenance of purity of the packaged product, visibility of the packaged product, flexibility of the package system to single or multiple packaged units, capacity of the package to serve as a container for the product during consumption as Well as during transportation and storage, receptivity of the package unit to application of printed material such as instructions, advertising or information required by various statutes, uniformity of the package and its components, and many other requirements including requirements specific to particular products.

Foldable sheet materials such as fiberboard meet many of the aforementioned requirements and are normally inexpensive as compared to many other materials utilized in this industry. For instance, on a weight basis, paperboard of printable quality currently sells for about onefourth the cost of plastics suitable for forming into receptacles for food products. However, plastics, foils, rubber or other materials possess superior qualities for packaging many commodities. For instance, fiberboard is not readily suitable for directly packaging many products such as liquid or semiliquid materials, matter containing oil or grease, or for use by a consumer as a dish or serving piece for products which may require the addition of fluids at the time of consumption. Also fiberboard is nontransparent. Plastics or other materials meeting these shortcomings of fiberboard often are not readily printable, and are relatively expensive to fabricate in sufficient weight and strength to withstand handling and shipping or use as a serving piece.

It is the general object of this invention to provide new packages capable of meeting many if not all of the abovementioned requirements.

It is another object of this invention to provide an economical package obtaining the combined advantages of two types of packaging materials and techniques, and particularly the conjoined advantages of folded carton type containers and fluid impervious receptacles.

3,339,724 Patented Sept. 5, 1967 ICC It is another object of this invention to provide an economical package including removable modular receptacles.

It is another object of this invention to provide improved packages having great flexibility in adaptation to various products and uses.

It is another object of this invention to provide economical packages with a high degree of visibility of the packaged product.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved package meeting the foregoing objects and which may be assembled with the packaged product enclosed in a simple and economical manner.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel support frame of foldable material for packaging articles or receptacles, particularly for protecting frail or insubstantial articles or receptacles.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel support frame of foldable material which is simple to form, utilizing substantially the prevailing technology and mechanization of the industry.

It is another object of the invention to provide a strong support frame of foldable material which is economical to fabricate and which is of regular and uniform configuration to facilitate mechanical handling, cartoning, stacking and the like.

It is another object of this invention to provide a novel support frame meeting the aforementioned objects and adapted to support a plurality of removable receptacles and providing a high degree of visibility of the packaged product.

It is another object of this invention to provide unitary blanks of foldable material for economically forming improved support frames for receptacles.

It is another object of this invention to provide methods for conveniently and economically forming such blanks into erected support frames.

Further and additional objects and advantages will appear, particularly to those skilled in the art, from the description, accompanying drawings and appended claims.

In carrying out this invention in one illustrative form, a unitary, flat, foldable blank similar to a blank for forming a seal-end carton is provided with a receptacle opening in one panel and strut flaps struck from said opening and from a portion of another panel to be disposed opposite said opening in an erected carton. The flaps are foldably joined to the respective panels along lines to be disposed opposite one another when the blank is erected. The flat blank is formed into a collapsed tubular blank by first positioning both of said flaps to extend generally parallel to the plane of the flat blank and in the same direction from their respective fold lines then folding said blank to place the end portions of said flaps in registry with one another and securing such end portions together pursuant to forming a collapsed tubular blank. When the resulting tubular blank is erected, the secured flaps form a support strut extending between said panels adjacent a portion of the periphery of said opening. End flaps provided on the blank are then secured together in their areas of overlap to provide a rigid support frame. A frail or insubstantial receptacle is disposed in said opening and is supported on the circumjacent portion of the panel. The receptacle is retained in the frame by suitable retaining means.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference should now be had to the drawings wherein certain embodiments are illustrated by way of examples of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a package employing teachings of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 22 of FIG. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a collapsed tubular blank for forming the support frame of the package in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the receptacle of the package of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another embodiment of a support frame employing teachings of this invention, for use in a package as in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 2 but illustrating another embodiment of a package employing teachings of this invention, including two receptacles in back-to-back relation;

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a foldable blank employing teachings of this invention for forming the support frame of a package as in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate two intermediate steps in forming the blank of FIG. 7 into a collapsed tubular blank as in FIG. 3 in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 10 is a side elevation view of another embodiment of a package employing teachings of this invention, including six individual receptacles;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the support frame of the package in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a plan view of a foldable blank employing teachings of this invention for forming the support frame of FIG. 11, and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevation view of a modified form of support frame employing teachings of this invention, for use in a package as in FIG. 10.

Referring now to the drawings, the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 includes a package 20 comprising a support frame 22 formed of foldable sheet material such as paperboard, a semirigid receptacle 24 supported in the frame 22, and a transparent overwrap 26. The frame 22 resembles a seal-end folded carton, which represents one of the features of this invention in that the frame may be readily formed with comparatively simple changes in existing technology and apparatus for forming seal-end cartons. One important structural feature of the frame 22 is that it retains the structural angle portions of a folded carton along all corners of the hollow prism defined by the frame. This assures structural strentgh of the frame, though substantial portions of the various walls may be removed or omitted as indicated below.

The frame 22 includes two primary wall panels 28 and 30 foldably joined to side wall panels 32 and 34 along fold lines 36, 38 and 40. Panel 34 is adhered to a glue flap 42 which is foldably joined to panel 28 along fold line 44. With reference also to the frame blank 22a illustrated in FIG. 7, end flaps 46a and 46b, 48a and 48b, 50a, and 50b, and 52a and 5211 are foldably joined to opposite ends of panels 28, 32, 30 and 34, respectively, along fold lines 54 and 56. When the blank 22a is erected to form a frame 22, the end flaps are folded to their end closure positions and secured to one another, as by gluing in the overlapping areas, to form sections of an end wall as seen in FIG. 1. The end flaps need not close the ends of the tubular frame defined by panels 28, 30, 32 and 34, and may be designed to provide a large open area therebetween to save material in forming the blanks, and to provide greater visibility of the packaged product if the receptacle 24 is transparent. The end flaps 4652 form right angles with the respective primary and side panels in the erected frame 22 to provide a rigid frame structure.

The frame 22 is particularly adapted for use in package 20 in that panel 28, which will normally be the top panel, is formed with an opening 58 therethrough communicating with the enclosure defined by the frame 22 to receive the body portion 60 of receptacle 24 (see FIG. 4).

Opening 58 substantially conforms to the outline of body portion 60 subjacent an outwardly extending flange 62 provided around the periphery of the open end of the receptacle. The opening 58 is centrally disposed in panel 28 and comprises a substantial portion of the area within the periphery of this panel. However, the panel 28 includes a continuous peripheral portion to provide the angular corner structure aforenoted for structural strength.

To provide added support for the panel 28, a pair of supporting strut members 64 and 66 (FIG. 2) extend between panels 28 and 30 at opposite peripheral edges of opening 58. Each of these struts is formed of a pair of flaps struck from within the peripheries of panels 28 and 30 and secured together, as will be further described below with respect to blank 22a and the forming of frame 22 from this blank.

The frame 22 is normally somewhat deeper (the distance between primary panels 28 and 30) than the depth of body portion 60 as measured normal to the plane of rim 62 whereby the receptacle 24 is suspended in the frame 22 by engagement of rim 62 on the panel 28 circumjacent opening 58. The receptacle 24 may move inwardly somewhat in response to compressive loads applied to the open end thereof due to the inherent, though limited flexibility of the frame. The receptacle is thus suspended and cushioned by the frame against the detrimental effects of shocks or other load forces which may be applied to the package in the packaging, handling, stacking and shipping attendant to merchandising the packaged product.

Receptacle 24 may be of any shape suitable to the commodity to be packaged and consistent with being placed in the frame 22 in which it is to be supported. The receptacle may be formed of any material suitable to the commodity to be packaged. In an advantageous package as illustrated the receptacle is formed of relatively thin material impervious to fluids, such as metal foil or a suitable plastic, for instance polyethylene, and is provided with reinforcing ribs 68 to provide a self-sustaining, semirigid unit which will retain its shape and integrity when removed from the frame, even if filled with a liquid commodity. Since frame 22 supports and protects the receptacle 24, the receptacle may be of very lightweight, frail or insubstantial, and economical construction, i.e. too frail, or of insufficient substance and strength to withstand the usual rigors of handling, shipment and storage encountered in distribution and merchandising.

The receptacle 24 may be provided with a closure over its open end, one convenient means being a stripable plastic film or sheet member 70 (FIG. 2) adhered or heat sealed to the flange 62. Such a closure is suitable for maintaining sanitary protection of foodstuffs, and for retaining solids, liquids or viscous materials, but is conveniently removable by the consumer on a one-use, disposable basis for which package 20 is well suited. Other types of closures also may be used, such as a recess in the top of receptacle 24, and a lid having a friction fit in the recess.

Receptacle 24 is formed with a pair of outwardly protruding dimples 72 on opposite sides which are adapted to have snap engagement beneath the panel 28 at the periphery of opening 58. This snap engagement is facilitated by providing slits 74 (see FIG. 7) at the base fold lines of struts 64 and 66, and positioning the dimples to engage in these slits. The struts 64 and 66 provide direct support for the panel 28 in these two areas against deflection inwardly of the receptacle that might otherwise occur when engaging the dimples. Alternatively, dimples may be provided on all four sides of the receptacle to obviate any need of specific orientation between the frame 22 and receptacle 24 when effecting assembly of the package.

Overwrap 26 may be utilized to retain the receptacle in the frame and may carry printed material such as advertising, instructions or other information. In packaging certain dry commodities, the overwrap .serves as the cover for the receptacle, and may also be the cover for use with flowable materials by being sealed to the flange 62. As a further modification, the flange 62, the overwrap 26, or cover sheet 70 may be adhered or heat sealed to an appropriate coating on panel 28 to retain the receptacle in the frame. If an overwrap 26 is not used, or where the overwrap is transparent, advertising, information and instructions may be printed directly on the panels of frame 22.

A high degree of product visibility is obtained providing any cover sheet 70 and/ or overwrap 26 that is being used is of transparent material. This provides a full view of the material through the top of receptacle 24. In addition, if the receptacle is of transparent material, the product is visible through the openings in panel 30 and the area between the end flaps.

Further details of the structure of frame 22 may be appreciated by consideration of the foldable blank of FIG. 7 and an advantageous method of forming the frame as illustrated in part in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, with FIG. 3. Blank 22a: includes panels 28, 30, 32 and 34 foldably joined in a series, with glue flap 42 foldably joined to panel 28 as for forming a conventional tubular carton blank. A pair of strut flaps 76a and 76b are struck from the blank in forming opening 58, these flaps being foldably joined to the panel 28 at the peripheral edge of the opening as at 78a and 78b, respectively. Another pair of strut flaps 80a and 8012 are struck from panel 38 and remain joined to this panel along fold lines 82a and 82b disposed to be directly opposite fold lines 78a and 78b when blank 22a is erected to form frame 22.

In an illustrative method of forming a tubular blank as in FIG. 3 from flat foldable blank 22a, the blank is moved through a gluing machine in a direction lateral to fold lines 54 and 56, e.g. downwardly in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9. The flaps 76b and 80a are first raised slightly, as by being kicked or pushed from beneath the blank, and are then folded 180 to the positions illustrated in FIG. 8. They then pass beneath ironing rollers to give them a partial set in this position and glue is applied to their now outwardly exposed surfaces as well as to the underside of glue flap 42. The blank is then folded about line 36 to place flaps 78a and 78b in registry with flaps 88a and 80b as illustrated in FIG. 9. The blank is also folded along score line 40 to place the distal edge of panel 34 over glue flap 42, and the blank is placed under compression to effect adhesive attachment between the aforenoted registered flap portions to form a collapsed tubular blank as in FIG. 3. This is the form in which a blank normally will be provided to a carton-forming or packaging assembly line. The support frame 22 is formed from the tubular blank of FIG. 3 in the normal manner of forming a seal-end carton, i.e. by erecting the tubular blank then folding and adhering the end flaps in their end closure positions.

Flaps 76a and 80b also may be raised and folded prior to gluing to efiect a prebreaking of the fold lines, and then returned to their position coplanar with the respective panels. Other fold lines may also be prebroken as desired. The glue may be applied to the respective flaps in any suitable manner. For instance, continuous, untimed glue applicators may be positioned to register with the flaps 78b and 80a, when in a partially folded, upstanding position with respect to the plane of the blank, or the flaps may be slightly depressed and glue applied from beneath the blank, or the adhesive may be applied to the flaps in the position of FIG. 8 with a timed printing-type glue applicator, all as will be apparent to those skilled in this art. Alternatively, the adhesive may be applied to the upwardly exposed surface of flaps 78a and 88b as they are raised for prebreaking the folds, or while they are in the plane of the blank. The important teps are obtaining the application of glue to the appropriate flap surface areas and positioning the flaps 78b and 80a as in FIG. 8 prior to folding of the blank along line 36 to form the tubular blank.

The embodiment of a carton-type support frame 90, illustrated in FIG. 5, is similar to frame 22 as is indicated by application of the same identifying numerals to corresponding parts. In addition a cover panel 84 is foldably joined to the free edge of side panel 34, along fold line 86. Cover 84 is provided with a pair of locking tabs 88 which engage in a pair of slit 91 at the fold line between panels 28 and 32 to retain the cover in a closed position. The cover 84 may be utilized to retain a receptacle 24 in frame 22. Alternative or additional means may be included for retaining cover 84 in a closed position, such as an overwrap, banding material, or adhering the edge portions 84a and 84b to the panel 28. In the latter event, cutscored tear lines may also be provided as at 92a and 92b to facilitate opening the cover. FIG. 5 also illustrates a retainer tab 93 which may be provided for retaining receptacles in support frames embodying thi invention. Tab 93 is struck from panel 28 and from a larger guide tab 94 foldably joined to panel 28 at the peripheral edge of opening 58. Tab 93 extends outward from opening 58 a suflicient distance to accommodate flange 62 thereunder, and tab 94- serves to guide the flange beneath tab 93 when placing a receptacle 24 in the support frame.

FIG. 6 illustrates a package 128 including a foldable support frame 122 similar to frame 22 and wherein corresponding parts are identified with corresponding numbers in the series. In this embodiment the bottom panel 130 is formed with an opening 158a corresponding to opening 158 in the top panel 128, and the panels 132 and 134 are 'Olf sufiicient width, relative to the depth of receptacles 24, that two receptacles may be supported in frame 122 in spaced relation as illustrated. One receptacle 24a extends inward of frame through opening 158 and is disposed with its flange supported on panel 128. The other receptacle 24b extends inward through opening 158a and is supported on panel 138. Thus two receptacles 24a and 24b are independently supported in ba'ck-to-back relation in one support frame 122.

It vvill be appreciated that two or more receptacles may also be placed in one support frame by extending the lateral dimensions of panels 28 and 30 of frame 22 and providing a plurality of openings 58 in panel 28. Similarly, four, six or more receptacles may be supported in a frame similar to frame 122 provided with two or more openings 158 and 158a in each panel 128 and 130. An embodiment of this latter type for six individual recelptacles 24 is illustrated by the package 220 shown in FIG. 10.

With reference to FIG. 10, as well as to FIGS. 11 and 12, the package 220 includes six receptacles 24 and a support frame 222. Frame 222 is similar to frames 22 and 122, corresponding elements being identified by corresponding numbers in the 200 series. Each panel 228 and 230 is formed with three spaced aligned openings 258 and 258a, respectively, defining panel strips 2.96 and 298 therebet-ween. Each opening 258 and strip 296 is in opposed alignment with a corresponding opening 258a or strip 298, respectively. The frame 222 is of sufficient depth to support a receptacle 24 in each of the openings 258 and 258a as seen in FIG. 10, with each receptacle spaced from each other receptacle in the package 220. However, the side flaps 246a and 246b-252a and 25212 are very narrow relative to the depth of the frame, e.g. on the order of A of the carton depth, to provide savings of material in forming the blank for the frame, see FIG. 12, and, in some instances, to enhance the visibility of the packaged product. A single support strut 266 is provided between each pair of opposed strips 296 and 298. These struts are formed of flaps 276a and 280a struck from the material corresponding to the respective openings 258 and 258a as seen in FIG. 12, and foldably joined to edges of the strips 296 and 298 along fold lines 278a and 282a which are in opposed alignment in theerected frame 222.

The frame 222 may be formed from a blank 222:: as in FIG. 12, in the same general manner as outlined above with respect to blank 22a, except that the two flaps 280a are raised and reverse-folded and have adhesive applied thereto prior to folding of panel 228 about fold line 236 in forming a tubular blank.

It will be appreciated that the blanks 22a and 222a are of a relatively open skeletal construction due to the provision of narrow end flaps and the removal of large areas of the top and bottom panels in forming the openings for the receptacles. Further, the present frame construction provides adequate support and rigidity with relatively low caliper foldable material, thereby permitting the use of comparatively thin, flimsy materials for the frame to further reduce the cost of the package. These factors may result in a very flimsy blank with very little body and 'which is difiicult to fold rapidly and mechanically. This is particularly true of blanks such as blank 222a having a long top panel 228, as measured laterally of the axis of fold. This difficulty may be overcome to a substantial degree by forming and folding the blanks in gangs, e.g. three blanks which remain joined along the distal edges of the side flaps during formation of the flat blanks into collapsed tubular blanks, The resulting collapsed tubular blanks also may be relatively flimsy, particularly when using lightweight foldable stock for the frames. Accordingly, when erecting the tubular blanks by means which apply force longitudinally of the blank, it is advantageous to first position the end flaps of the upper primary panel at a substantial angle to this panel and maintain such angle during the erecting steps, as more fully described in my copending application Ser. No. 415,042, filed Dec. 1, 1964 now United States Patent No. 3,312,155. This method of erection provides reinforcement for the long skeletal top panel to compensate for the loss of body occasioned by the panel construction and by the use of relatively thin, flexible materials.

It will be appreciated that packages including a plurality of receptacles, such as package 220, will find myriad uses. One example is in packaging foodstuffs in individual serving quantities, such as pet foods, or prepared dry cereals. By providing transparent covers on the receptacles and a transparent overwrap 226, an attractive, uniform package is obtained with excellent exposure of the product for maximum sales appeal. The rigid frame provides uniformity of the package with good machine handling, packaging, stacking and strength char acteristics. Also, 'by providing semirigid shell type receptacles, for instance of molded plastic such as polyethylene, the individual receptacles may be removed one at a time and used as serving receptacles if desired.

The support frame 322 illustrated in FIG. 13 is of substantially the same construction as frame 222, but includes two struts between each pair of support strips 396 and 398. In this embodiment, two strut flaps are formed from the material removed for each receptacle opening as in blank 22a. This results in a strut at each transverse edge of the openings, i.e., two struts between adjacent pairs of openings, and one strut at each end of the frame as in frame 22.

While several embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and/or described herein, it will be obvious that other modifications of the embodiments shown may be made, particularly in light of the teachings provided by the disclosure of this invention, without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. For example, while various specific materials have been noted in describing the illustrated embodiments, other materials may be utilized. Also, folded support frames in accordance with the invention will serve purposes other than supporting and protecting receptacles as in the packages described and illustrated herein. By Way of example they may be utilized for packaging other types of receptacles or fragile articles. The support frames may be formed of nonunitary blanks, for instance, with separately inserted support struts, and the struts may extend from the supported panel to other elements of the frame. The frame also may be assembled by method steps other than those described herein.

It will thus be seen that packages have been provided which meet the requirements and objects outlined above. An improved package or packaging system has been provided which is economical and obtains the benefits of two types of packaging materials with the flexibility of modular or removable receptacles. The packaged products are rendered highly visible and provision is made for presentation of appropriate printed advertising and informational material. This invention also has included the provision of novel and inexpensive support frames of foldable material which are strong and provide packages of regular, uniform configuration to facilitate mechanical handling, cartoning, stacking and the like. The frames provide protection for frail or insubstantial articles or receptacles included as part of the packages. Further, novel blanks have been provided for forming the aforementioned frames, together with methods for conveniently and economically forming the blanks into erected support frames.

While particular embodiments of this invention are illustrated and described herein, it will be understood of course that the invention is not to be limited thereto since many modifications may be made, particularly by those skilled in the art, in light of the teachings provided by this invention and described herein. It is contemplated therefor by the appended claims to cover any such modifications which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A package comprising a unitary support frame of folded sheet material including a plurality of foldably connected wall sections defining a hollow, prismatic enclosure, a pair of said sections being foldably connected along each edge of such prismatic enclosure and disposed with one of said pair in each of the planes defining the respective edge to provide a rigid frame, one of said wall sections being formed with an opening -therethrough spaced inward from the periphery of said one wall section to receive a receptacle, an internal support member joined to said one wall section adjacenta peripheral portion of said opening and extending between said one wall section and another of said wall sections within said enclosure, and a receptacle including a body portion disposed within said cavity and an end portion supported on the portion of said frame circumjacent said opening.

2. A package as in claim 1 wherein said support frame is formed of a seal end carton-type blank of fiberboard material and said receptacle is a self-sustaining, semirigid unit formed of material impervious to fluids.

3. A package comprising a support frame of folded sheet material defining a cavity and formed with openings in opposite sides thereof communicating with said cavity, a pair of receptacles each including a body portion passable through one of said openings and of a depth less than one-half the dimension of said frame between said openings, each of said receptacles being formed with an open end and including an outwardly extending flange adjacent said end adapted to engage said frame circumjacent the respective opening, one of said receptacles supported in each of said openings with its body portion disposed in said cavity, and means for retaining said receptacles in said frame.

4. A package comprising a skeletal support frame formed of foldable sheet material including foldably interconnected wall sections defining a hollow prismatic enclosure, each of said sections being disposed at a substantial angle to the respective section to which it is foldably connected to provide a rigid frame, at least two of said wall sections being disposed in spaced opposed substantially parallel arrangement and each formed with a plurality of spaced openings therein opposite such openings in the other of said opposed sections, a support member extending between said opposed wall sections between each adjacent pair of such opposed openings, a receptacle disposed in each of said openings, each of said receptacles having a body portion disposed in said cavity and an outwardly extending flange, said flanges engaging the respective wall sections, to support said receptacles in said frame, and means for retaining said receptacles in their respective openings.

5. A package as in claim 4 including two support members between each adjacent pair of said opposed openings, each support member being formed of joined tabs struck from the respective opposed openings and foldably joined to the respective opposed Wall sections at the periphery of the respective openings.

6. A skeletal support frame for a plurality of receptacles and providing a high degree of visibility of such receptacles supported therein, said support frame being formed of foldable sheet material and comprising a series of foldably connected panels comprising two opposed side wall panels and elongated top and bottom wall panels, each of said top and bottom panels being formed with a plurality of spaced openings therein opposite such openings in the other of said top and bottom panels, a strut member joined to said top wall and said bottom wall between each adjacent pair of such opposed openings, an end flap foldably joined to each end edge of each of said top, bottom and side panels and secured in the plane of the respective end of said frame at a substantial angle to the respective panel to which it is connected, each of said end flaps being of a length substantially less than onehalf the dimension of said frame as measured parallel to the direction of extension of said flap whereby said end flaps define a substantial opening in each end of said frame.

7. A foldable rectangular blank of sheet material for forming a seal-end carton type support comprising first and second primary panels and first and second side panels foldably joined in a series, said primary panels being joined to opposite edges of said first side panel and the other of said side panels being foldably joined to the distal edge of one of said primary panels, said primary panels adapted to be disposed in opposed relation when said blank is formed into a support, said first primary panel being formed with an opening through the central area thereof, said opening being spaced inward from the periphery of said first primary panel, a first flap foldably joined to said first primary panel at the periphery of said opening, and a second flap foldably joined to said second primary panel along a fold line to be disposed in spaced registered relation with the fold line between said first flap and said first primary panel when said blank is formed into a support to form an internal strut between said primary panels, and an end flap extending from each lateral edge of each of said primary and side panels for forming the ends of such frame when said blank is formed into a support.

8. A foldable blank as in claim 7 wherein said second primary panel is formed with an opening therethrough spaced inward from the periphery thereof and disposed to be in registry with said opening in said first primary panel when said blank is formed into a support, each of said first and second flaps being struck from said opening in the respective panel.

9. A foldable blank as in claim 7 wherein said first primary panel is formed with a plurality of spaced openings therein, and including a first flap foldably joined to said first primary panel between each adjacent pair of said openings therein, and a second flap foldably joined to said second primary panel along a fold line to be disposed in spaced registered relation with the fold line between each of said first flaps and said first primary panel when said blank is formed into a support, for forming support struts.

10. A foldable blank as in claim 7 wherein said end flaps are of a length, measured laterally of the respective fold lines, substantially less than one-half the width of said side panels.

11. A foldable blank as in claim 7 wherein said first fi-ap is struck from said opening.

12. A foldable blank as in claim 7 wherein each of said first and second flaps is joined to the respective panel along a fold line parallel to the fold lines between the panels of said series of panels.

13. A unitary frame of folded sheet material adapted to receive and support a receptacle, said frame comprising a plurality of foldably connected wall sections defining a hollow, prismatic enclosure, a pair of said sections being foldably connected along each edge of such prismatic enclosure and disposed with one of said pair in each of the planes defining the respective edge to provide a rigid frame, one of said wall sections being formed with an opening therethrough spaced inward from the periphery of said one wall section to receive the body portion of a receptacle, and an internal support member joined to said one wall section adjacent a peripheral portion of said opening and extending between said one wall section and another of said wall sections within said enclosure.

14. A unitary frame as in claim 13 including a second internal support member joined to said one wall section at a peripheral portion of said opening opposite said first mentioned support member and extending between said one wall section and another of said wall sections within said enclosure.

15. A unitary frame as in claim 14 wherein each of said support members is formed of a flap struck from said one wall section and a flap struck from the wall section opposite said one wall section.

16. A unitary frame as in claim 13 including a cover panel foldably joined to one of said wall sections and adapted to overlie said opening when in a closed position.

17. A unitary frame as in claim 14 including a bottom wall section opposite said one wall section, said bottom wall section being formed with an opening therethrough spaced inward from the periphery of said bottom wall and in registry with said opening in said one wall section, each of said support members being formed of a flap struck from said opening in said one wall section and a flap struck from said opening in said bottom wall section.

18. A method of forming a carton-like enclosure of foldable material and a transverse support member therewithin, comprising forming a flat foldable blank including first and second primary panels and first and second side panels foldably joined in a series, said primary panels being joined to opposite edges of said first side panel and the other of said side panels being foldably joined to the distal edge of one of said primary panels, providing an additional flap foldably joined to each of said primary panels along a line to be disposed generally opposite the corresponding fold line of such flap joined to the other of said primary panels when the blank is erected and parallel to the fold lines joining said primary panels to said first side panel and with said flap corresponding to said first primary panel extending toward said first side panel and said flap corresponding to said second primary panel extending from its fold line in a direction away from said first side panel, folding said second primary panel about its line of fold-able connections with said first side panel into juxtaposition with said first primary panel and said first side panel whereby at least end portions of said flaps are in registry, and securing said end portions together, and securing the distal edge of said second side panel to the distal edge of the other of said primary panels to form a collapsed tubular blank whereby said secured flaps will form a member extending between said primary panels when said collapsed tubular blank is erected.

19. A method as in claim 18 wherein said flaps are struck from portions of said primary panels to be disposed in opposed relation when said blank is erected References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 11/1919 Harman 229-28 2/ 195 6 Buttery 206-45 .33

Cote 206-4531 Cox 206-42 Dickhens 206-45334 Pfohl 1 206-78 Stone et a1. 229-40 Ves-conte 206-4531 THERON E. CONDON, Primary Examiner.

WILLIAM T. DIXSON, JR., Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3411696 *Oct 11, 1966Nov 19, 1968Reynolds Metals CoCarton and blanks for making same
US3785544 *May 15, 1972Jan 15, 1974Phillips Petroleum CoTray with strengthening member
US3868017 *Jun 4, 1973Feb 25, 1975Quaker Oats CoFood container
EP0268427A2 *Nov 12, 1987May 25, 1988General Foods LimitedSecondary packaging
EP0307833A2 *Sep 10, 1988Mar 22, 1989Ludwig Schokolade GmbhPackaging for food, and method for its manufacture
EP0450213A1 *Apr 4, 1990Oct 9, 1991Oscar Mayer Foods CorporationFood package
EP1332981A2 *Feb 4, 2003Aug 6, 2003DeSter. ACS Holding B.V.Soup vessel
WO1996035626A1 *May 10, 1996Nov 14, 1996United Biscuits LtdShrinkable microwave package
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/125.28, 206/776, 229/164.1
International ClassificationB65D77/04
Cooperative ClassificationB65D77/0433, B65D2577/043
European ClassificationB65D77/04C3