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Publication numberUS3339802 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1967
Filing dateMar 16, 1965
Priority dateMar 16, 1965
Publication numberUS 3339802 A, US 3339802A, US-A-3339802, US3339802 A, US3339802A
InventorsNorman Weiner, Siegel Jerome J
Original AssigneeAlberto Culver Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pressurized dispensing device
US 3339802 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. WEINER ETAL PRESSURIZED DISPENSING DEVICE Sept. 5, 1967 4 Sheets-Sheet l Filed March 16, 1965 Sept. 5, 1967 N. wl-:INER ETAL PRESSURIZED DISPENSING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 16, 1965 Sept 5, 1957 v N. WEINER ETAL 3,339,802

PRESSURIZED DISPENSING DEVICE WTF Filed March 1e, 1965 4 sheets-sheet :s

f l T659 7 IA 1 J C O gri 21525 l l l 225! f Sept. 5, 1961 fN.WE.NE Em. 3,339,802

PRESSURIZED DISPENSING DEVICE Filed March 16, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United Statesl Patent O M 3,339,802 PRESSURIZED DISPENSING DEVICE Norman Weiner, Skokie, and Jerome J. Siegel, Lincoln- Wood, Ill., assignors to Alberto-Culver Company, Melrose Park, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Mar. 16, 1965, Ser. No. 440,249 8 Claims. (Cl. 222-82) This invention relates to a pressurized dispensing device and method which are particularly adapted for mixing ingredients just prior to spray application.

Although the invention is suitable for a wide variety of uses, it is believed desirable to illustrate the invention in terms of a specific application. The specific use -to which the invention linds advantageous application is the dyeing of hair using oxidation-type dyes. The' dyeing procedure involves the mixing just prior to use of at least two ingredients, the dye intermediate and the oxidizing material. The oxidation reaction reaches completion within about one hour, so that it is necessary to -use the mixed ingredients shortly after mixing. This stems from the fact that the intermediate, prior to oxidation, is of a molecular size capable of penetrating the hair pores. When oxidized, the molecular size is increased to the extent that the dye molecule remains rmly in place to give a semi-permanent color to the hair. Should oxidation proceed to substantial completion prior to application, the dye molecular size is such as to prevent the desired penetnation.

In general terms, the problem solved by the invention involves the mixing of reactive ingredients under conditions where they may be dispensed under pressure shortly after mixing. This can be advantageously carried out in an internally pressurized device commonly referred to as an aerosol container. Prior to the actual mixing, it is necessary for the ingredients to be maintained separate but within the same container. To solve this problem simply and economically, we package at least one of the ingredients in a freely movable, rupturable enclosure within the pressurized device. The invention further contemplates the employment of a selectively actuatable puncturing element to achieve mixing, and a principal object of this invention is to provide a means and method for selectively activating the enclosure-puncturing element.

In one aspect of the invention, we provide a rigid, internally pressurized container equipped with an outwardly projecting dispensing valve. A wide variety of container shapes may be employed for this purpose, although for most purposes the widely-used cylindrical can is preferred. One end of the cylindrical can is equipped with the dispensing valve which can conveniently be fingermanipulable to dispense the contents in spray form. Depending upon the type `of selectively activatable puncturing element employed, the dispensing valve may have its seat portion eithe-r shielded from or exposed to the interior of the pressurized container.

The interior of the container contains as essential ingredients the pressure iluid, i.e., propellant, and at least one other material con-lined against dispersion within the interior of the container. The method of confinement of the -additional material is Iadvantageously in the form of a sealed enclosure -or bag which is freely movable within the interior of the container. Thus, the enclosure for the additional material may be a tube, bag or envelope, and is constructed of a puncturable material. Included among the puncturable materials useful in the practice of the invention are a wide variety of plastics such as polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, vinylidene chloride, polypropylene, ethylene terephthalate, and vinyl acetate. Also useful are cellulosic products such as treated or untreat-` ed paper, cellophane, as well as metal foils, and laminates of the foregoing.

To achieve the mixing, we provide at least one puncturl 3,339,802 Patented Sept. 5, 1967 ing element rigidly secured to the inte-rior of the pressurized container. The puncturing element may be secured either to the container per se or to the valving apparatus when the latter projects interiorly of the container.

Further, we provide means for normally protecting the puncturing element against inadvertent rupturing engagement with the material-containing enclosure. According to the invention, the protecting means is selectively activatable to an inoperative or non-protective condition relative to the puncturing element. The invention further contemplates ythat the activation of the protecting means to inoperative condition will be in response to an external signal.

It is therefore another object of the invention to provide a pressurized device of the character described wherein a rigid container is equipped with a finger-manipulable valve projecting from the container, the container confining a propellant fluid and an additional material further confined Within a freely movable, rupturable enclosure, the container supporting Within itself a puncture element and further carrying protecting means for the puncture element, the protecting means being selectively movable out of protecting relation relative to the puncture element.

In one aspect of the invention where the protecting means is constructed of semirigid materials and therefore partially collapsible to expose the puncturing element, the activating signal may constitute a vigorous shaking action which impinges the material-containing enclosure smartly against the protecting means to partially collapse the same and simultaneously puncture the enclosure.

A further object of the invention is to provide a structure of the character alre-ady described and which more specifically includes a collapsible member disposed adjacent the puncture element, the collapsible member having suflicient rigidity to resist collapse upon -gravity impingement of the enclosure thereon but collapsible to expose the puncture element upon vigorous shaking of the container.

In another aspect of the invention, the protecting means is selectively upset or removed from its protective position by means of a signal delivered to the interior of the container through the dispensing valve. The dispensing valve for this purpose may be translated, i.e., moved axially or rocked or rotated, so as to change the normal relationship between the protecting means and the puncturing element.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a container of the character hereinbefore described in which one of the puncture element and protecting means is carried by a valve projecting both exteriorly and interiorly of the container, the other being carried by the container in a portion thereof spaced from but adjacent to the valve, relative movement between the puncture element and the protecting means being achieved by one of axial movement, rotational movement, and rocking movement, of the valve.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a method useful in the dispensing of ingredients normally isolated until shortly before dispensing, which includes a manipulating and internally pressurized dispensing container to rupture 'an enclosure freely movable therein t0 mix a plurality of ingredients within the container and thereafter dispensing the mixed ingredients.

Other objects and advantages of the invention may be seen in the details of construction and operation set down in this specification.

The invention is explained in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which- FIG. 1 is a fragmentary sectional view of a container constructed according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken alon the sight line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the knife and puncturing element of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of a container constructed according to a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the sight line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along the sight line 6-6 applied to FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional View of a container constructed to another modified form of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the sight line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary sectional view of the topwork of a container constructed according to still another form of the invention;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along the sight line 10-10 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary sectional view of the topwork of a container constructed according to yet another form of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view of FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary sectional view of the topwork of a container constructed according to a further form of the invention;

FIG. 14 is an enlarged sectional View of the parts shown in the circle A on FIG. 13;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary sectional view of the topwork of -a container constructed according to a still further form of the invention;

FIG. 16 is a sectional view along the sight line 16--16 of FIG. 15; and

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of the protecting means of FIGS. 15 and 16.

Referring now to FIG. 1, numeral 10 designated generally a container which is of the aerosol type previously mentioned. The container 10 includes the usual rigid body and a valve generally designated 11. The valve in turn includes a stern 12 equipped with the usual ports 12A and an enlargement 13. Cooperating with the stem 12 in dening the valve 11 is a body 14 constructed of resilient material such as rubber and providing a seat as in 15 and an annular groove as in 16.

The top of the container 10 is closed by a cover 17 providing a valve supporting lip 18 received in the abovementioned annular groove 16. The cover 17 is supported on the container 10 by means of the rolled edge 19 provided on the periphery of the cover 17.

The numeral 20 designates an eccentric mounting ring which is also seen to be received Within the annular groove 16 and the ring 20 in turn supports a protecting means in the form of a depending tube 21. A comparison of FIGS. 1 and 2 reveals that the lower portion of the tube is attached to the upper portion of the tube by a pair of bonds 22 which may be selectively ruptured or cut in order to expose puncture elements 25.

The tube 21 is retained in place on the eccentric ring 20 by means of a retainer 23 yand the depending puncture elements 25 are secured to the enlargement 13 by means of a suitable bracket 24. Additionally, the bracket 24 provides a laterally or radially extending knife 26 (compare FIG. 3) and in FIG. 2 the dotted line 26 defines the envelope of the tip of the knife and the same is rotated by rotating the stern 12.

One of the ingredients isolated until just prior to use is designated 28 and is seen to be sealed within a rupturable enclosure 27. The other ingredient or ingredients such as the propellant, are designated 29 and are seen to be merely confined by the container. Again, it will be appreciated that more than Ione enclosure 27 may be provided if desired.

In the operation of the device, when application of lthe contents of container 10 is indicated, the stem 12 is rotated to simultaneously rotate the knife 26 through the path designated 26 and thereby severing the bonds 22. This causes the lower portion of the protector 21 to drop into the container exposing the puncturing elements 25. Thereafter, vigorous shaking of the container 10 causes the enclosure 27 to impinge against the puncturing ele# ments 25 and results in mixing of the various ingredients.

As a further illustration of the practice of the invention, a specific example is set down.

Example As a speciiic example of an embodiment of the invention, the container 10 has a diameter 1%, with the cover 17 having a diameter of 1". The enclosure 27 contains 2 oz. of methyl diamine phenylamine. 2 oz. of 20 volume peroxide (4% H2O2 in Water) was provided in the container 10, along with sufficient Freon propellant to expel the ingredients. It will also be noted that the enclosure 27 contains a sphere such as a marble 30 which aids in removing the contents of the enclosure subsequent to puncture. The agitation of the container utilized for mixing causes the marble to move Within the enclosure and help expel the contents for mixing with the hydrogen peroxide.

Normally, however, in the dispensing of oxidation dyes for hair dyeing, a considerable number of different dye intermediates will be provided within the enclosure 27. This is necessary to develop the eye pleasing shades required by users of the dye.

In FIG. 4, a modified form of the invention is shown in Whi-ch the numeral designates generally the container and 111 the valve associated with the top of the container. The numeral 112 designates the stem equipped with the usual enlargement 113 and the numeral 114 designates the resilient body of the valve which coacts with the enlargement through the seat 115 in sealing the contents of the container 110 against discharge. The body 112 is equipped with an annular groove 116 and the lip portion 118 of the cover 117 is received Within the groove 116 to support the valve body 114 and thus, the entire valve 111 at the top of the container 110. The cover 117 is maintained in place on the container rolled edge 119 cooperating with the top of the container 110.

Depending from the enlargement 113 is a plurality of puncturing elements 125 which are protected in the ordinary handling or manipulation of the container 10 by means of a sleeve-like protecting means 121 carried by the body 114 through the support afforded the lip-like flange by the annular groove 116.

As before, the isolated ingredients 128 is carried in an envelope of puncturable material 127 and the other ingredient or ingredients designated 129. Further, the envelope 127 may contain one or more Weights or balls 130 to aid in discharging the contents of the envelope 127 when the same is punctured by the puncturing elements 125.

It Will be noted that the protecting means 121 is collapsible by virtue of the accordion-like pleats provided adjacent the upper portion thereof and in one aspect, the enclosure 127 may be ruptured by vigorously shaking the container so as to impinge the enclosure 127 smartly against the puncturing elements by partially collapsing the tubular protecting means 121. For this purpose, to the protecting means 121 is advantageously semirigid and further rigidity can be given the construction by providing a ring insert as at 132 which is urged outwardly by the action of a coiled spring 133. The insert 132 is equipped with a plurality of openings 134 (see particularly FIG. 6) for the exposure of the puncturing elements 125.

In this form of the invention, it will -be seen that no finger manipulation of the stem 112 is required to achieve mixing and thus, it is possible to support the puncturing elements 125 within the container independently of the valve 111. Advantageously, however, the'stem 112 is equipped with a cap 131 of conventional design.

Referring now to FIGS. 7 and 8, the numeral 210 designates a container of the general nature seen previously and identified as 110 or 10, as the case may be. The numeral 211 generally designates a Valve which includes a stem 212, an enlargement 213 on the stem 212, and a resilient body 214. The body 214 provides a seat 215 at the lower edge thereof coacting with the enlargement 213 to seal the contents of the container 210 against discharge. The body 214 is further equipped with an annular groove 216 in which the lip 218 of the cover 217 is received to support the valve 211. Numeral 219 designates the rolled edge of the cover 217 which secures the same rigidly in place on the container 210.

The numeral 220 indicates a liange or lip support portion of the protecting means 221 which is seen to be depending within the container from the annular groove 216 and in protecting relation to the puncture elements 225. The puncture elements 225 have an extended position designated by the numeral 225 and this is achieved by pressing downwardly on the stern 212 which is equipped with the cover 231. If desired, this may be amplified by the stem 212a carrying disc 213a temporarily held by spring lingers 21312. This causes the lower ends of the puncture elements 225 to extend through the protector ring 232 provided at the lower end of the protecting means 221 and through the openings 234. When the apparatus is in this condition, vigorous shaking of the container 210 causes the envelope 227 carrying the isolated ingredient 228 (isolated from the other ingredients 229) to impinge upon the exposed tips of the puncture elements 225 resulting in rupture and mixing.

Advantageously, the container 210 may be equipped interiorly with a guide generally designated 235 and which includes ribs 236 to insure that the enclosure 227 is directly properly against the puncture elements 225.

In FIGS. 9 and 10, the invention is depicted in a somewhat different form where again a stem is provided and designated 312 equipped with a lower enlargement 313. The numeral 314 designates the resilient body providing the seat 315 and the usual annular groove 316. The lip 318 of the cover (not shown) is again received within the annular groove 316. The lip portion 318 of the cover is equipped with depending puncture elements 325 and these are initially protected against penetrating an enclosure freely movable within a container providing the elements seen in FIG. 9 by a means of leaf spring protecting means 321. The means 321 are secured to the enlargement 313 and rotation of the stem 312 through a 90 arc changes the configuration of the leaf spring protective means 321 from that shown in heavy line to that shown in dotted line in FIGS. 9 and 10 and wherein the leaf spring protection means are designated 321a. This exposes the puncturing elements 325 for action against the enclosure in the fashion previously described relative to FIGS. 1-8.

In FIGS. ll and 12, still another form of the invention is illustrated wherein the numeral 412 designates a stem and 413 the enlargement associated therewith. The numeral 414 denotes the resilient body providing the seat 414 and further, the annular groove 416. The numeral 418 designates the lip portion of a cover (not shown) which is received within the annular groove 416. The numeral 420 designates a ange for protecting means 421, the inwardly turned llange 420 being received within a suitable groove provided in the cylindrical sidewall of the enlargement 413. The lower portion of the protector 421 is selectively removable to expose the puncture elements 425 and for this purpose, the protecting means or tube 421 is equipped with circumferential slots as at 422a defining bonds 422 (see also FIG. l2).

Carried by the lip portion 418 of the cover, are depending bias knives 426 which when the stem 412 is rotated to rotate the protecting tube 421 are moved into cutting position as designated 426. In this condition, the knives 426 extend within the slots 422a and further rotation of the stern 412 causes the sides of the knives 426 to engage the bonds 422 to sever the same and drop the lower portion of the protector 421. This exposes the ends of the puncture elements 425 for engagement with the freely mounted enclosure associated with the container carrying the parts shown in FIGS. 11 and l2.

Thus, in the operation of the embodiment of the invention seen in FIGS. 11 and 12, the knife or means for inactivating the protecting means is carried by the container and the valve is rotated in order to bring the knife and protecting means into engagement for deactivating the protecting means thereby exposing the puncture elements.

In FIGS. 13 and 14 a further form of the invention is shown wherein the numeral 512 again designates the stern equipped with a lower enlargement 513. The numeral 514 designates a valve body equipped with a lower seat 515 coacting with the enlargement 513 to seal the container associated with the topwork seen in FIG. 13. For this purpose, the valve body 514 is equipped with an annular groove 516 which receives the lip 518 of the container and cover. The lip 518 supports in rigid fashion at least one puncturing element 525 which is seen to be in retracted or protected condition and bearing against the under surface of the enlargement 513. This is made possible by the pivotal mounting as in 521 of the puncturing ele- -ment 525 the support portion of the protecting means 525a. The puncture element 525 is urged toward the extended or operative condition indicated in phantom by means of a spring 526 interconnected between the puncture element 525 and the lower part of the support 525a.

In operation, axial movement of the stem 512 or rocking movement of the same causes the puncture element 525 to move downward slightly and over center so that the spring 526 takes over and snaps the puncture element into puncturing configuration. This may be facilitated through using stem 51911 carrying enlargement 519. Thereafter, shaking of the container causes impingement of the previously described envelope on the puncture element 525 for mixing of the container contents.

A still further form of the invention is seen in FIGS. 15-17 and the stem is designated by the numeral 612, being equipped with the usual enlargement 613. The valve body constructed of resilient material is designated 614 and provides a lower seat 615. The body 614 is equipped with an annular groove 616 which receives a portion of the cover lip 618 for supporting the valve body and stem.

The numeral 620 designates integral lugs provided on a protector member 621 and the lugs or hook 620 are seen to be received also within the annular groove 616. For removing the protector tube 621, and thus to expose the puncture element 625, the enlargement 613 is equipped with a plurality of cams 626 extending radially outwardly from the enlargement 613. These are adapted to coact with cam portions 622 provided on the anterior of the member 621 and generally aligned with the hooks 620. The protector member 621 is slotted as at 621e partway along the length thereof in position between the hooks 620.

In operation, to activate the puncturing element 625, the stem 612 is rotated causing the cams 626 to ride first against the generally vertically disposed cam surfaces (622:1, FIG. 17) of the cam portions 622. This causes the hooks 620 to be moved outwardly thereafter further movement or twisting of the stem 612 causes the cam 626 to ride on top of the cam portion 622 to force the same downwardly, whereupon the protecting means 621 drops into the container associated with the topwork seen in FIG. 15 and exposes the puncturing element 625 for coaction with the usual enclosure.

A number of operational advantages accrue from the inventive structure outlined above. It will be appreciated that no orientation of the plastic bag, i.e., enclosure 27, is required in the initial assembly since the enclosure 27 is free. Among other things, this facilitates ready automatic disposition of the enclosure 27 in the interior of the container 10. Furthermore, and relative to the enclosure or enclosures 27, all of the active ingredients can be disposed in such bag-like enclosures, if indicated. This includes the propellant which can be advantageous in that long term metal to metal seal-s are not required. Still further, and relative to the manufacturing advantages, special coatings of the interior of the metal cans may be dispensed with due to the short period between mixing and dispensing. Standard cans may be used and in certain instances, the assembly of the rupture elements and rupturable bag may be inserted through the valve aperture. This is particularly attractive in requiring minimum capital investment for machinery on the part of the packager.

More generally, both the freely mounted bags and the rupture assembly are well adapted to mass manufacturing techniques, a further advantage accruing in use since the mixing and dispensing operation is readily accomplished by the average purchaser, there -being no particular skill or experience in the manipulation of the container required for use thereof.r

The nature of the rupture means does not increase package size thereby making the initial container suitable for normal shipping techniques including the maintenance of low shipping costs. In maintaining the rupture means interiorly of the container, an aesthetically pleasing package can be utilized as well as maximizing safety and convenience.

While in the foregoing specification, a detailed description of the invention has been set down for the purpose of illustration, many variations of the details herein given may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim:

1. A pressurized device, comprising a rigid container having a finger-manipulatable valve projecting from said container, propellant fiuid confined in said container, an additional material in said container confined within a freely moveable, rupturable enclosure, a puncture element rigidly supported by said valve within said container, protecting means comprising a jacket surrounding said puncture element and defining an edge between said puncture element and said rupturable enclosure for preventing accidental rupture thereof, and means associated with said valve for placing said puncture element relative to said protecting means for rupturing said enclosure responsive to manipulation of said valve.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which said protecting means includes a leaf spring biased into covering relation on said puncture element.

3. The structure of claim 2 in which said leaf spring is carried by said valve.

4. The structure of claim 2 in which said leaf spring is carried by said container portion.

5. The structure of claim 1 in which said protecting means includes a spider normally confining the end of said puncture element, said protecting means being movable out of confining relation by axial movement of said valve.

6. A pressurized device comprising: a rigid container equipped with a finger-manipulable valve projecting from said container; a propellant fiuid confined in said container and additional material in said container confined within a freely movable rupturable enclosure; a puncture element rigidly supported within said container; and protecting means including a collapsible member within said container and defining an edge normally disposed intermediate said puncture element and said rupturable enclosure of sufficient rigidity to resist collapse upon gravity impingement of said enclosure but collapsible to expose said puncture element upon vigorous shaking of said container.

7. The structure of claim 6 wherein said collapsible member is a tube equipped with an accordion-type pleat.

8. A pressurized device comprising: a rigid container equipped with a finger-manipulable valve projecting from said container; a propellant fiuid confined in said container; and additional material in said container confined in a freely movable, rupturable enclosure; a puncture element associated with said valve and rigidly supported within said container; and protecting means within said container defining an edge normally disposed between said puncture element and said rupturable enclosure, said protecting means including a tubular member supported in said `container about said puncture element and movable to an operative position responsive to rotation of said valve.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,159,490 5/1939 Ramsay 222-83 2,681,168 6/ 1954 McMillion 222-94 2,918,199 12/1959 Marraino 222-1 3,040,991 6/ 1962 Fedit 222-153 X 3,080,094 3/ 1963 Modderno 222-82 3,119,528 1/1964 Dunning 222-80 3,134,505 5/1964 Modderno 222-82 3,160,317 12/1964 Hambro 222-1 3,172,568 3/1965 Modderno 222-80 3,187,918 6/1965 Moore 222-83 3,240,391 3/1966 Garton Z22-80 RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
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US3402855 *May 16, 1967Sep 24, 1968Gillette CoMixing container
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US20110180545 *May 24, 2010Jul 28, 2011Club Seven S.R.L.Disposable shaker
US20120320703 *Jun 14, 2011Dec 20, 2012Dilek CumraliHand mixer
US20120320704 *Apr 10, 2012Dec 20, 2012Dilek CumraliHand mixer
EP0461020A1 *Jun 4, 1991Dec 11, 1991R O TFrangible cartridge for fire extinguishing additives in water extinguishers put under pressure by a compressed gas at the moment of use
EP2062616A1 *Oct 14, 2008May 27, 2009Henkel AG & Co. KGaADual component aerosol hair dye
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/82, 222/83, 222/94, 206/222
International ClassificationB65D83/14
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/687
European ClassificationB65D83/68B2