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Publication numberUS3339971 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1967
Filing dateOct 21, 1965
Priority dateOct 21, 1965
Also published asDE1529517A1, DE1529517B2, DE1529517C3
Publication numberUS 3339971 A, US 3339971A, US-A-3339971, US3339971 A, US3339971A
InventorsPeter S Fletcher
Original AssigneePeter S Fletcher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Recliner-rocker chair
US 3339971 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 5, 1 967 P. s. FLETCHER RECLINER- ROCKER CHAIR 5 sheets-sheet 1 Filed Oct- 21, 1965 INVENTOR. P575? 5, FL7CHR ATTORNEY Sept. 5, 1967 P. s. FLETCHER RECLINER-ROCKER CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 21, 1965 INVENTOR P575 5. FLETCHER Sept. 5, 1967 P. s. FLETCHER RECLINERROCKER CHAIR Filed Oct. 21, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 p 5, 1967 P. s. FLETCHER 3,339,911

RECLINER-ROGKER CHAIR Filed Oct. 21, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet \NVENTOR dim v ATTORNEY 3,339,971 RECLlNER-ROCKER CHAIR Peter S. Fletcher, 200 NW. 15th St., Delray Beach, Fla. 33444 Filed Oct. 21, 1965, Ser. No. 499,303 18 Claims. (Cl. 297-85) The present invention relates to improvements in reclining chairs, and in particular to a multiple position reclining chair-which also has a rocker structure. Since this chair is a dual function chair which can perform both as a regular reclining chair and as a regular rocking chair, it may be referred to as a recliner-rocker.

Rocker chairs in themselves are old and well-known and have been sold and used in large quantities for many years. Reclining chairs of various types and particularly multiple position or TV reclining chairs are also wellknown, although being of more recent vintage. Various attempts have been made to combine the advantageous features of rocker chairs and reclining chairs, thereby producing a chair which will both rock and recline, so that a single chair may be used for these purposes instead of two separate chairs. Such attempts have been only partially successful since the rocking movement and the reclining movement are normally antagonistic to each other and one or the-other movement was required to be compromised to the advantage of the other.

It would be desirable to provide a chair which would perform all the functions of the commercial, multiple position reclining chairs as well as the rocker chairs. This would permit movement from a normal, upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting or TV position and then to a fully reclined position in which the seat and back-rest are respectively inclined and reclined at a .greater angle so as to support the oceupants body in a position of complete relaxation, the legs being supported in an outstretched condition in front of the seat in both the intermediate and fully reclined positions.

The provision of a recliner-rocker type chair of this type cannot be accomplished by the mere mounting of a reclining chair on a rocker base. In such an assembly there would be no coordination between the rocking and reclining functions, and the operation of the chair in certain positions will produce an uncontrollable instability which will prevent even the results achieved by the individual components used alone. Specifically, if the occupant wished to rock in the upright sitting position, the

. rocking movement would shift his weight rearwardly and the chair would tend to open up and recline during such rocking movement. This would cause the leg-rest to alter-' nately extend and retract in an undesirable manner as the chair was rocked back and forth. Similarly, if the occupant wished merely to recline, he could not prevent some rocking movement. For example, in moving to the fullyreclined position, the rearward shift of the occupants weight would cause the rocker member to turn rearwardly on the base resulting in a reclined position in which the chair is tilted much further back than in the normal fullyreclined position of a reclining chair alone, and the position may be so severe as to cause the chair to topple over rearwardly.

It is the principal object of the present invention to provide a recliner-rocker chair which can perform perfectly all of the functions of a multiple position reclining chair and all of the functions of a rocker chair, eliminating the aforementioned difiiculties.

Another object of the invention is to provide a reclinerrocker chair of the type described which includes locking mechanism to lock the chair parts against reclining when it is desired to rock the chair and to lock the rocker assembly of the chair when it is desired to recline.

United States Patent Still another object of the invention is the provision of a recliner-rocker chair of the type described in which the aforementioned locking mechanism is either automatically actuated at the proper time or may be selectively actuated by the occupant by merely shifting his weight in the chair.

A further object of the invention is to provide a chair having features which cannot be found in either a rocker chair or reclining chair alone, namely the ability of the chair to be locked automatically against rocking movement when in the intermediate or TV position or to be selectively unlocked for rocking in this position. Also, the chair mechanism is such that it cannot be moved to the fully-reclined position until it is first locked against rocking, so as to assure that the fully-reclined position is stable, the chair being prevented from becoming unbalanced in this position and possibly tipping over due to the rocker assembly.

In accordance with an illustrative embodiment demonstrating objects and features of the present invention there is provided a recliner-rocker chair which comprises a base, a chair arm frame mounted for rocking movement on the base, and body-supporting means including a seat and back-rest mounted on the chair frame by linkage means for reclining movement relative to said frame from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then to a fully reclined position. The chair also has a leg-rest mounted on the seat by a plurality of interconnected links, which linkage is extensible to move the leg-rest from a retracted position beneath the seat to an extended position forwardly of the seat in response to movement of the seat and back-rest to the intermediate, tilted sitting position. To permit the body-supporting structure to be rocked in the upright sitting position without extension of the leg-rest, releasable locking means are provided for locking the seat and back-rest against reclining movement out of the upright sitting position. This releasable locking means includes retainer means normally located in a holding position in which it interconnects a plurality of links of the control linkage to prevent extension of the latter and retainer release means which operate in response to movement of the chair frame to a selected rocking position to move the retainer means out of the holding position and release the control linkage means for extension.

The chair also includes a rocker locking assembly which automatically locks the chair arm frame against rocking movement when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and in the fully-reclined position. This rocker locking assembly comprises hook means secured to the base, a hook link pivotally mounted on said rocker member and normally biased out of engagement with said hook means, and actuating means selectively operable when the chair is in the intermediate position for moving the hook link into locking engagement with the hook means so that the rocker member is releasably locked to the base when the body-supporting structure is moved from the intermediate position to the fully-reclined position.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent during the course of the following description when taken in connection with the acompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, with parts broken away and sectioned, showing the recliner-rocker chair of the present invention and illustrating the control linkage at one side of the chair which mounts the seat, back-rest on the chair arm frame; and also showing the reclining lock mechanism. The rocker lock mechanism is eliminated in this view for clarity. The chair is shown in the normal upright sitting position;

FIG. 1A is a schematic diagram of the chair control linkage in the upright sitting position of FIG. 1;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 1, but showing the chair parts in an intermediate, tilted sitting position with the leg-rest in elevated, leg-supporting position; and with the reclining lock mechanism removed for clarity of illustration;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view similar to FIG. 2 but showing the chair in a fully reclined position wherein the back-rest and seat have been angularly displaced relative to each other, with the leg-rest disposed in an elevated, leg-supporting position;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged partial perspective view of the pivot pin mounting the carrier link on the chair arm frame;

FIG. 5 is a partial cross-sectional view through the center front portion of the chair of FIG. 1, showing the rocker lock mechanism when the chair is in the upright sitting position;

FIG. 6 is a partial front elevational view showing the rocker lock mechanism when the chair is in the upright sitting position of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a partial side elevational view showing the rocker lock mechanism when the chair is in the unlocked intermediate or TV position;

FIG. 8 is a partial side elevational view similar to FIG. 7, but showing the rocker lock mechanism when the chair is in the locked intermediate or TV position;

FIG. 9 is a partial side elevational view similar to FIG. 8 but showing the rocker lock mechanism when the chair is in the fully reclined position.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary perspective View showing a portion of the steel angle bar forming part of the rocker lock assembly and a portion of the carrier link of the chair control linkage, and illustrating the manner in which these two parts are connected;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged side elevational view, partly broken away and shown in section, of a modified form of the rocker lock assembly, shown in the upright sitting position;

FIG. 12 is a partial side elevational view showing the modified rocker lock assembly of FIG. 11 in the unlocked intermediate or TV position;

FIG. 13 is a partial side elevational view similar to FIG. 12 but showing the modified rocker lock assembly in the locked intermediate TV position;

FIG. 14A is an enlarged side elevational view of the locking link of the reclining lock means forming part of the chair shown in FIGS. 1-10;

FIG. 14B is an enlarged rear end elevational view of the locking link shown in FIG. 14A;

FIG. 14C is an enlarged bottom view of the locking link shown in FIG. 14A; and

FIG. 14D is an enlarged perspective view of the locking link of FIG. 14A and its associated parts, with portions broken away to reveal constructional details.

Referring in detail to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. 1, it will be seen that the rocker chair comprises a base 10, a chair frame 12 mounted on base 10 and bodysupporting means 16 mounted on frame 12.

The chair frame 12 comprises a pair of side frames 18 and 20, the upper portions of which constitute the arms of the chair. The side frames 18 and 20 are spaced from each other and are interconnected by cross bars or braces 22, 24 and 26. Secured to the cross bars 22 and 24 are a pair of spaced rocker members 28, each having a lower arcuate surface 30. The arcuate rocker surfaces 30'rest upon and engage the flat upper surface 32 of base 10.

At either side of the chair of the rocker members 28 and base 10 carry respective L-shaped brackets 34 and 36 between which are mounted a pair of tension springs 38 and 40. The ends of the springs 38 and 40 are secured to the brackets 34 and 36, and the springs serve as means to connect the rocker member 28 with the base 10, to provide a force against which the chair frame may be rocked, and to bring the chair frame to a level position of equilibrium, as shown in FIG. 1.

The body-supporting means 16 includes a back-rest 42 and a seat 44 mounted on the chair frame 12 for reclining and inclining movement respectively through a first movement phase from the normal sitting position illustrated in FIG. 1 to an intermediate, tilted sitting position illustrated in FIG. 2, and through a second movement phase from said intermediate, tilted sitting position through a succession of reclining positions to a fully-reclined position illustrated in FIG. 3.

A leg-rest 46 is disposed beneath the seat 44 and mounted for movement between the stored, retracted position beneath seat 44, shown in FIG. 1, and the extended leg-supporting position forwardly of seat 44 shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. As will be presently described, the movement of the leg-rest 46 is coordinated with that of the body-supporting means 16 in such a manner that when the body-supporting means moves through the first motion phase, the leg-rest is actuated to bring it to the extended leg-supporting position. During the second motion phase, however, the leg-rest is no longer actuated so that it remains in the extended leg-supporting position, substantially immovable relative to the forward portion of the seat.

A hardware fixture in the nature of a linkage mechanism is provided at each side of the chair and includes a mounting bracket 48 affixed to the back-rest 42, a mounting bracket 50 afiixed to the seat 44, and a mounting bracket 52 afiixed to the leg-rest 46. The seat mounting bracket 50 includes a rearwardly-extending rigid hanger ar-m 50a which is connected to the back-rest 42 through its mounting bracket 48 at a seat pivot 54.

The back-rest 42 is provided with a rear guiding link 56 which is pivotally mounted at 60 on the chair frame 12 and is pivotally connected at 62 to the central portion of back-rest mounting bracket 48. An intermediate link 58 constituting a first movement holding link, is connected by pivot 64 to a forwardly projecting extension 48a of bracket 48, and is mounted upon a second movement linkage which is stationary during the first motion phase. This second movement linkage comprises a carrier link 66 ex- I tending longitudinally beneath the seat and back-rest, and a pair of links 68 and 70. The carrier link 66 is pivotally mounted at its rear end on the chair frame 12 by a stud pin 72 which spaces the link 66 inwardly from the chair frame 12 as shown in FIG. 4. Near its forward end the link 66 rests upon a stop pin 74. The second movement link 68 is mounted by pivot 76 upon the chair frame 12, the other end of said link 68 being connected by pivot 78 to the free end of the holding link 58. The connecting link 70 is pivoted at 80 to the carrier link 66, and its lower end is pivotally connected at 82 to an intermediate portion of link 68.

The seat 44 is guided for movement during the first motion phase by a front guiding link 84 which constitutes one arm of a bell-crank lever. The front guiding link 84 has a pivotal mount 86 at its lower end on a bracket 88 secured to the forward end of the carrier link 66. The other end of the link 84 is connected by pivot 90 to the forward portion of seat mounting bracket 50.

The leg-rest 46 is mounted for movement from the retracted position of FIG. 1 to the extended and elevated leg-supporting positions illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 by a leg-rest mounting linkage designated generally by the reference numeral 92. Said leg-rest mounting linkage 92 includes a first pair of links 94, 96 having a pivotal interconnection 98 at their adjacent ends, a second pair of links 100, 102 having a pivotal connection 104 at their adjacent ends, and a third pair of links 106, 108 having a pivotal connection 110 at their adjacent ends. The link 94 constitutes an angular extension of the front guiding link 84, forming the bell-crank lever therewith and having the pivotal mount 90 on seat 44. The link 96 of the first link pair crosses over the link of the second link pair and is connected thereto by pivot 112 at the crossingover point. The forward end of the link 96 of the first link pair has a pivotal connection 114 to the link 106 of the third link pair. The link 106 crosses over the link 102 of the second link pair and has a pivotal connection 116 thereto. The link 108 of the third link pair has a pivotal connection 118 at its forward end to an intermediate point on the leg-rest 46. The link 100 of the second link pairhas a pivotal connection 120 at its upper end to the forward end of the seat mounting bracket 50, while the link 102 of the second link pair has a pivotal connection 122 at its forward end to the upper end of the leg-rest 46.

It will thus be seen that the leg-rest mounting linkage 92 is of the lazy-tong type wherein a turning movement of the link 94 in a direction to move the pivotal connection 98 toward pivot 120 is effective to extend such lazytong linkage to move the leg-rest 46 to the extended position of FIG. 2. Specifically, during the first motion phase, the front guiding link 84 turns in a clockwise direction, as Viewed in FIGS. 1 and 2, about its relatively stationary pivotal mount 86 in response to the rearward movement of the seat 44 to actuate the leg-rest mounting linkage by bringing about a corresponding clockwise turning movement of link 94 about its'pivotal mount 90 on the seat.

A detailed explanation of the operation of the chair in the reclining movement is as follows:

When the occupant in the chair leans against the backrest 42, the body-supporting means 16 is displaced rearwardly and downwardly relative to the chair frame 12 with substantially no angular displacement between the back-rest 42 and seat 44. During this first motion phase, the rear guiding link 56 turns rearwardly, guiding the back-rest 42 rearwardly with a slight amount of downward movement. The seat 44 is drawn rearwardly with the back-rest through its rear pivotal connection 54 there.- with, and the forward portion of the seat is guided by front guiding link 84. The holding link 58 also turns as the rear guide link 56 turns and acts in such :a manner that the angle between the seat and back-rest is maintained substantially unchanged. The carrier link 66 remains stationary resting upon the stop pin 74, the links 68 and 70 likewise remaining stationary.

The rearward movement of seat 44 during the first motion phase imparts a turning movement to the bellcrank lever 84, 94 about stationary pivot 86, expanding the lazy-tong mounting linkage 92 and moving the legrest 46 to its extended, leg-supporting position of FIG. 2 in 'which it is spaced forwardly of the seat 44 and is substantially :at the level of the forward end thereof.

The end of the first motion phase is'established when the rear guiding link 56 engage the stop pin 72, which acts as a stop to prevent the seat and back-rest from moving rearwardly relative to the arm frame. When this occurs, the body-supporting means 16 is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2, with the leg-rest fully extended, and the chair is in position to support the occupant comfortably in a sitting position with outstretched legs, suitable for reading, viewing television, etc. The leg-rest 46 is maintained extended owing to the lowered position of seat 44.

If the occupant of the chair desires a more fully reclined position for complete relaxation, he now merely :applies further rearward pressure against the back-rest 42 and the body-supporting means moves in a second motion phase. During such movement, back-rest 42 pivots about its pivotal mount 62 on the stationary rear guide link 56, raising link 58, which in turn raises link 70 through link 68. Link 70 in turn pushes upwardly on the intermediate portion of carrier link 66. The carrier link 66 turns'upwardly about its pivotal mount 72 on the chair frame 12, its forward end rising from the stop 74 and raising the forward end of the seat 44 through front guiding link 84.

A comparison of FIGS. 2 and 3 will show that the seat 44 has inclined during the second motion phase and the backrest 42 has appreciably reclined, increasing the included angle between seat and back-seat, so that in the position of FIG. 3, the body-supporting means is fully reclined for maximum relaxation of the occupant. The leg-rest 46 has maintained substantially the same position relative to the forward end of the seat that it assumed in the position of FIG. 2 since there is no appreciable movement of the seat relative to the front guide link 84. The end of the second motion phase is established by a holding action of the rocker lock assembly as will be described hereinafter.

When the chair occupant desires to restore the chair to the upright sitting position of FIG. l,- he shifts his weight forwardly and applies downward pressure of his legsupon the leg-rest such that the back-rest, seat and leg-rest move through a reverse sequence, with the chair first moving into the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2 and then returning to the upright sitting position of FIG. 1.

It will beaappreciated that when the body-supporting means is in the fully-reclined position of FIG. 3, if the chair frame 12 were now rocked on the base 10 by means of rocker member 28, the center of gravity of the occupant and the body-supporting means would be shifted too far rearwardly and the chair would tend to topple over. On the other hand, if the reclining mechanism were free to operate when the chair is rocked in the upright sitting position of FIG. 1, the leg-rest would tend to extend and retract successively in coordination with the rocking movement. Consequently, an important feature of this invention resides in means for automatically locking the rocking assembly against movement when the body-supporting means is in the fully-reclined position, and means for automatically but releasably locking the reclining mechanism against actuation when the chair is in the upright sitting position so that the rocking assembly may be actuated. For convenience, these locking arrangements are illustrated in FIGS. 5-14 and will be described separately. For clarity of illustration, the rocker locking arrangements are not shown in FIGS. l-3, nor is the reclining mechanism shown in FIGS. 5-14. It will be understood that while the hardware fixtures constituting the reclining mechanisms are located at the opposite sides of the chair, the rocker locking mechanisms are located centrally in the chair to avoid interference with such fixtures.

It is additionally desirable to locate the locking mechanisms centrally in the chair because such location obviates a problem of coordination which would occur if a similar locking mechanism were located on each side of the chair. The rocker cams of the chair tend to slide slightly upon the base and this movement would be sufficient to cause skewing and misalignment of a pair of locking mechanisms located on the sides of the chair. Such misalignment, of course, cannot occur where a single locking mechanism is located centrally in the chair.

Reclining lock assembly The chair illustrated herein may be blocked against reclining movement out of the upright sitting position of FIG. 1 by locking means such as that shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A and in more detail in FIGS. 14A, 14B, 14C and 14D.

FIGS. 1, 1A, 2 and 3 show a locking link mounted within the leg-rest mounting linkage 92 and having an integral depending striker link 132 which engages the b-ase'10 when the chair is rocked forwardly. The link 130, shown in detail in FIGS. 14A-l4D has at its rear end portion a pivot hole 134 journalled on an elongated pin or rivet 136, with a compression spring 138 located beneath the head of rivet 136 to take up the slack between the head of the rivet 136 and the link 130 so that the latter is held normal to the axis of the rivet 136. At its forward end portion, the link 130 has a struck-out angular lug 140 forming an opening 142. Above the pivot hole 134, link 130 is provided with a cut-out which en- 7 gages a stop pin 148 on link 94 to limit the rotary travel of link 130 about its pivot at 146. As shown FIG. 1, the end 146 of rivet 136 is secured to an intermediate portion of the leg-rest mounting link 94, to pivotally mount the link 130 on said link 94.

The pivot 116, interconnecting the links 102 and 106 of the leg-rest linkage is in the form of a stub shaft projecting inwardly from the link 102 and aligned with the slot 142 in the link 130 when the chair is in the upright sitting position of FIG. 1. Tension of the spring 138 between the head 136a of rivet 136 and the link 130 urges said link 130 outwardly against link 94 on which it is mounted, and the link 130 is thus normally held in a plane parallel to the rest of the links of the leg-rest mounting linkage 92. The stub shaft 116 is therefore normally located within the slot 142 in the upright sitting position of FIG. 1, and the chair is thus normally locked against reclining movement due to the fact that the leg-rest linkage is blocked against expansion by locking link 130 and the seat and back-rest linkage is therefore also blocked against rearward movement. The chair frame 12 can therefore be rocked upon the base runner 10 without any reclining movement of the seat, back-rest or leg-rest inadvertently taking place.

To unlock the reclining mechanism, the occupant simply rocks the chair all the way forward so that the striker link 132 engages the top surface of base 10. An upward force is therefore applied to the locking link 130, and as its free end pivots upwardly, the inclined leg 140a of the struck-out lug 140 engages the stub shaft 116, camming the locking link 130 toward the center of the chair against the tension of spring 138, so that the stub shaft 116 disengages the slot 142, the spring 138 realigning the link 130 and the locking link 130 consequently resting upon the top of stub shaft 116. The leg-rest linkage is thus unlocked so that the chair may be reclined in the manner previously described.

During extending movement of the leg-rest, the locking link 130 drops off the steel shaft 116 as the latter is carried forward by the expanding leg-rest linkage, as shown in FIG. 2.

When the chair is returned to the upright sitting position and the leg-rest retracted, the chair is automatically locked again against rearward movement. During such leg-rest retracting movement, the stub shaft 116 is carried rearwardly by the closing leg-rest linkage until it strikes the front portion 131 of link 130, this portion 131 being bent at an angle so that the-locking link 130 is cammed inwardly, the slot 142 of the locking link moving over the top of stub shaft 116 and receiving the latter in locked engagement.

Rocker-locking and control assembly Means are also provided to lock the chair against rocking movement while it is reclined in the fully reclined position, and also, if desired, in the intermediate, tilted sitting position.

The locking and control assembly, shown in FIGS. -11, comprises four basic sub-assemblies, namely a base bracket assembly 150, a hook link assembly 152, a second movement locking angle assembly 154, and an actuating assembly 156. The base bracket assembly 150 comprises a base bracket 158 secured, as by bolting, to the front cross rail a of base 10. The base bracket 158, shown most clearly in FIG. 7, has a bottom jaw 158a defining a slot 158b, a top forwardly-facing hook portion 1580, and a front control surface 158d. A finger link 160 is mounted by pivot 162 on base bracket 158 immediately above the slot 158b, a stop 164 on base bracket 158 limiting the downward pivoting movement of finger link 160 and normally maintaining said finger link in the position shown in FIGS. 5 and 7 in which the bottom forward end of finger link 160 extends partially within the mouth of slot 8 r The hook link assembly 152 comprises a pair of spaced hook links 166, shown best in FIGS. 6, 7 and 8, connected at their top ends by a hook pin 168, and at their bottom ends by a pin and roller assembly 170. Each hook link 166 is mounted intermediate its ends by pivot 172 to a mounting bracket 174 secured to the cross bar 22 of the rocker member 28. Immediately above pivot 172, each hook link 166 is formed with a cut-out 176 forming a sequencing hook. As shown in FIG. 5, a spring 178 is connected to a post 180 on one of the hook links 166 and to a post 182 on a corresponding part of mounting bracket 174. FIG. 6 shows a post 180 mounted on each hook link 166 and a pair of posts 182 on mounting bracket 174 for the mounting of a pair of springs 178, if desired, although a single spring 178 may be adv-antageously used. Spring 178 is preferably a helical spring and is bent into a U-shape as shown in FIG. 5, thus producing a comparatively constant spring force regardless of deflection. The spring 178, therefore, urges the bottoms of the hook links 166 forwardly or in -a clockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 5 with substantially constant force throughout the range of travel of said hook links.

While it is possible to construct the hook link assembly with a single book link and mounting bracket, it is preferred to provide a pair of spaced hook links which straddle the base bracket 158, as shown.

The second movement locking angle assembly 154 is located immediately above the hook link assembly 152. It includes a pair of angle brackets 88 rigidly connected at each side of the chair to the forward end of the carrier links 66, as previously described, and an angle iron 184 rigidly connected beneath the two brackets 88 and extending transversely across the chair as indicated in FIGS. 6 and 10. At the center of the angle iron 184, a secondmovement stop link 186 is rigidly secured, this link 186 depending between the two hook lines 166, as shown in FIG. 6. The stop link 186 has a control surface 186a on its forward edge (FIG. 9), and is formed with a stop hook 186b at its bottom end.

The actuating assembly 156 includes a seat bracket 188 secured to the lower surface of the front cross rail 44a of seat 44, as shown in FIG. 5, and a rod 190 connected by pivot 192 to bracket 188. The rod 190 extends within a tube 194 and is telescopically slidable therein. The tube 194 is connected by pivot 196 to one of the hook links 166, such that a rearward force exerted on said tube will tend to turn hook links 166 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIGS. 5, 7 and 8 thereby moving the roller rearwardly. A spring 198 serves as a resilient engaging means between rod 190 and tube 194.

The operation of the locking and control assembly is as follows:

When the reclining locking link is disengaged, and the occupant pushes rearwardly to actuate the reclining mechanism, the seat 44 moves rearwardly in the manner previously explained, carrying with it the seat bracket 188 and rod 190, the latter sliding telescopically within tube 194, thus compressing spring 198. At a predetermined point before the chair reaches the intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 2, the tension of compressed spring 198 overcomes the biasing force of spring 178 so that the tube 194 is urged rearwardly, turning the hook links 166 about pivot 172 in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIGS. 5 and 7, but only to such an extent that the roller engages the front control surface 158d of base bracket 158. Since the rearward movement of the seat during the first motion phase shifts the weight of the occupant rearwardly, the rocker member 28 will rock back slightly on the base 10 as compared to its normal position when the chair is in the upright sitting position. Due to this rearward tilting of rocker member 28 and chair frame 12 carried thereby the hook links 166 are carried upwardly a short distance, as shown in FIG. 7, and since they are also turned counterclockwise, as pre- 9 viously described, their lower roller 170 remains in contact with the front control surface 158d on the base bracket 158 above the finger link 160.

When the chair reaches the intermediate, tilted sitting position, with the rocker member 28 disposed at the inclination shown in FIG. 7, the locking assembly parts are correspondingly in the position shown. Thus, the rocker locking mechanism is primed for engagement, but the chair is still free to rock, and the chair frame and its attached rocker member 28 stabilize on the base 10 at a position rearwardly of the normal point of stabilization when the chair is in the upright sitting position. In this unlocked intermediate, tilted sitting position of FIG. 7, although the actuating spring 198 is fully compressed and the roller 170 is urged rearwardly, the occupant may rock the chair with his feet supported outstretched by the ex? tended leg-rest, the roller 170 merely rolling along the front control surface 158d of base plate 158 without obstructing the rocking motion.

If the occupant wishes to lock the chair against rocking in the intermediate position, he merely rocks the chair frame 12 forwardly a greater distance than for normal rocking, as for example, by leaning forwardly. As the chair frame rocks forwardly, the hook links 166 are lowered thereby, and the roller 170 reaches the lower end of the front cam surface 158d of base bracket 158, then rides over the end of finger link 160, and is moved into slot 158b by the action of compressed spring 198, being retained by the bottom jaw 158a of base bracket 158. This locked intermediate position is shown in FIG. 9, the rocker member 28 now being rigidly coupled to the base 10 by hook links 166, so that the chair frame cannot rock on the base. It will be observed that in reaching this position, the rocker member 28 is held level on the base 10, having the same attitude which it assumed normally in the upright sitting position of FIGS. 1 and 5.

If the occupant in this locked intermediate position of FIG. 9 wishes to release the rocker locking mechanism so that he may rock as before, he simply retracts the legrest 46 slightly by applying downward pressure of his legs thereon and allowing the seat 44 to move slightly forwardly. Forward movement of the seat reduces the tension on spring 198 and enables springs 178 to urge the hook links 166 in a clockwise direction so as to move roller 170 out of engagement with base bracket slot 15811. In addition, the forward movement of the seat also shifts the weight of the occupant forwardly, relieving the pressure of the roller 170 against the upper surface of base bracket slot 158!) so that the roller 170 is free to swing forwardly out of engagement with the base bracket 158. When the chair is then again returned to the intermediate position by moving the seat rearwardly, the roller 170 will again engage-the cam surface 158d of base bracket 158, and the parts again assume the unlocked intermediate position shown in FIG. 7. From this position, the chair may, of course, be returned to the upright sitting, position of FIG. 5, in which position the rocker locking mechanism is completely disengaged and the chair may be rocked freely.

It will be appreciated that the finger link 160 acts to delay the engagement of the rocker locking assembly when the chair is rocked while in the intermediate position, so that the rocker will be locked only when it is so desired by the occupant. Specifically, the free end of finger link 160 tends to drop by its own weight, and the finger link is normally held in the position shown in FIG. 7, by the stop 164. In this position it partially overlaps the slot 15812 and its forward edge acts as a continuation of the base bracket front control surface 158d. Thus, to enter slot 15811, the roller 170 must not only pass over the upper forward corner of the slot 158b, but must also pass over the lower forward corner of the finger link 160. As a result, the occupant must rock the chair frame further forwardly than would otherwise be the case in order to engage the rocker locking means. On the other hand, it is easy for the rocker locking means to disengage; when the roller 170 is moved forwardly toward the open end of slot 158b, the finger link 160 pivots upwardly clear of said slot, and the roller may move forwardly and upwardly, as it is turned about pivot 172, until it is free of said slot 158b. The finger link 160 also serves to prevent premature engagement of the roller 170 in slot 154]; when the chair is moved from the upright sitting position of FIG. 5 to the intermediate position of FIG. 7. In summary, the finger link acts to regulate the engaging characteristics of the rocker lock and the range of rocking movement of the chair in'the intermediate position while at the same time its action allows easy and smooth disengagement of the roller 170.

It will also be observed that in the upright sitting position of FIG. 5, the angle iron 184 is located within the hooks 176 of hook links 166 and maintained therein by the angular disposition of said hook links. During the first phase of movement of the chair and any subsequent rocking movement in the intermediate position, the hooks 176 continue to retain the angle iron 184 by reason of the fact that roller 170 rides along the cam surface 158d of base bracket 158, said cam surface preventing the hook links 166 from turning in a counterclockwise direction as is necessary to release the angle iron 184. Even in the unlocked, intermediate position of FIG. 7, the books 176 still retain said angle iron. The hooks 176 therefore serve as sequencing means to prevent the premature movement of the chair in the second-motion phase, since the angle iron 184 is secured to the forward ends of the carrier links 66 which must move upwardly if the chair is to move in the second motion phase. It is only when the chair is in the locked, intermediate position of FIG. 8 that the roller 170 enters slot 158b, moving hook links 166 in a counterclockwise direction until hooks 176 move clear of angle iron 184 and free the reclining linkage for movement of the chair to the fully-reclined position. The base bracket top hook 158a prevents roller 170 from rising over the top of base bracket 158 which could cause jamming of the mechanism or possible disengagement of angle iron 184 from slot 176.

In the locked intermediate position of FIG. 8, the occupant may now cause the chair to move through the second motion phase to the fully-reclined position shown in FIGS. 3 and 9. Since the angle iron 184 is released by the hook links 166, thecarrier links 66 are free to turn upward about pivots 72, causing the chair to follow the second motion phase as previously described. As the chair reaches the fully reclined position, the hook 186 b on the second movement stop link 186 engages and grasps the hook pin 168 joining the top ends of the stationary hook links 166, and further rearward tilting movement of the seat and back-rest is prevented. During the second motion phase the rocker 28, of course, remains locked to the base 10 in a level position by engagement of the hook links 166 with base bracket 158, and the chair cannot rock back to increase its inclination.

It will be appreciated that since the front end of seat 44 rises during the second motion phase, the rod 190 slides outwardly of tube 194 and the spring-198 is decompressed. This would normally permit the tension of springs 178 to move hook links 166 in a clockwise direction so as to release roller from the base bracket slots 168b, were it not for the friction force which keeps the roller pressed against the upper surface of the slots 158. In addition, the mechanism is constructed to prevent such untimely release of the hook links. Specifically, the hook links 166 and angle iron 184 are so arranged that the rear edges of the hook links above the slots 176 engage the front edge of the angle iron if there is any tendency for the hook links to turn clockwise during the early part of the second motion phase. Further, after the angle iron has risen above the hook links during the last portion of the second motion phase, the pin 168 at the upper portions of hook links 166 will engage the forward control surface 186a of second movement stop link 186 to prevent any tendency of the hook links to turn clockwise. Thus, the hook link roller 170 is held in positive engagement with the base bracket slot 158b throughout the second motion phase and no accidental disengagement can take place. Conversely, in returning to the intermediate position, the angle iron 184 must be in position to be received within slot 176 and therefore locked against upward movement before the roller 170 may be moved from slot 158a to release the rocker for rocking movement.

It will thus be apparent that the combination of parts as shown provide positive, foolproof control over the functions of the chair, which functions are selectively governed by the occupant with comparative ease or else are performed completely automatically. The chair may be rocked in the upright sitting position or may be reclined from such position; it may be locked against rocking in the intermediate position or may be unlocked and rocked in such position; and the chair cannot be brought to a reclined position until it is first locked from rocking in the intermediate position, so that it is impossble for the chair to tilt rearwardly on the rocker while it is in a reclined position.

It will be observed that the chair has two discrete and different intermediate tilted sitting positions. In the first of these the rocker member 28 is locked in the level position shown in FIGS. 2 and 8 and the occupants body is tilted only slightly while his legs are outstretched. This corresponds to the customary intermediate, tilted sitting position or TV position of conventional multiple position reclining chairs without the rocking feature. In the other intermediate position shown in FIG. 7, the rocker member 28 is unlocked and is tilted more rearwardly to an equilibrium position, so that the occupants body is inclined to a greater extent to a more relaxed position appropriate for slightly more sedentary occupation than watching television, reading, etc.

FIGS. 11 to 13 illustrate a modified form of rocker locking assembly similar to that previously described except that the actuating assembly is constructed for manual actuation. Since many of the chair parts and rocker locking assembly parts are identical to those previously described, like reference numerals are employed.

This modified structure includes a base bracket 158 similar to the base bracket 158 previously described, except that the top hook portion 1580 is differently shaped. The base bracket 158 has at its lower end a slot 158k,

but in this instance, the finger link 160 is omitted from the base bracket 158 above the slot 158b, since it is not required in the manual operation of the modified actuating assembly. One or two hook links 166' are again employed as previously described, and are shown having the pin and roller assembly 170 at their lower ends, although a cross bar or pin alone would serve in this instance. At their top ends, the hook links 166 are formed with flat top ends which are interconnected by a cross bar which serves the same purpose as the hook pin 168 of the previously described embodiment, namely to receive and retain the hook 186b of the second movement stop link 186 at the end of the second motion phase.

Instead of the coil springs 178, one or a pair of wire torsion springs 204 is used to urge the hook links 166 in a clockwise direction. Each spring 204 has a central loop 204a surrounding the pivot 172 which mounts the respective hook link 166 on the mounting bracket 174, an arm 204b anchored to the mounting bracket 174, and an arm 2040 grasping the forward edge of hook link 166' above pivot 172.

A telescopically arranged rod 206 and tube 208 are again employed, these being generally similar to the rod 190 and tube 194 previously described, except that the tube 208 is longer and has a closed bottom end containing a resilient member such as a small rubber cushion 210, as shown in FIG. 11. The rod has a perpendicular terminal extension 212 which extends within an enlarged circular opening 214 in a toggle link 216 to provide a loose pivotal connection therewith. The toggle link 216 is pivotally mounted intermediate its ends on a seat bracket 218 secured to the lower surface of the front cross rail 44a of seat 44. This pivotal mount is provided by an angular handle member 220 journalled in an opening 222 in seat bracket 218 and secured to the toggle link 216 in such a manner that manual turning movement of the handle member 220 will cause corresponding turning movement of toggle link 216. The toggle link 216 has an angular front edge surface 216a. The tube 208 is mounted by pivot 196 on one of the hook links 166' below pivot 172.

FIG. 11 shows the position of the modified locking assembly in the upright sitting position. The spring 204 is urging the hook link 166 in a clockwise direction so that its cut-out portion 176' engages and holds the angle iron 184 secured to the forward ends of carrier links 66. The lower ends of the hook links 166 are spaced forwardly of the front control surface 158d of base bracket 158'. Because of the position of the seat bracket 218 relative to the hook links 166, the toggle link 216 forms with rod 206 the obtuse angle shown in FIG. 11. It will be noted that in this embodiment, there is no spring between tube 208 and rod 206, so that the actuating assembly is not pre-loaded as in the previous embodiment. In this position the end of rod 206 within tube 208 is spaced above the rubber cushion 210.

When the seat 44 moves rearwardly in the first motion phase to the intermediate tilted sitting position, the seat bracket 218 is carried closer to the hook links 216, so that the rod 206 slides further within the tube 208. At the intermediate tilted sitting position, the rod reaches the bottom of tube 208, and its free end lightly engages the rubber cushion 210, but not sufficiently to exert significant rearward pressure upon tube 208.

FIG. 12 illustrates the position of the locking assembly parts when the chair reaches the intermediate, tilted sitting position. The rocker member 28 is slightly inclined, and is still unlocked from the base 10. Because of the rearward movement of the seat and its seat bracket 218, the angle between the toggle link 216 and the rod 206 has become more acute. The chair is free to rock, and spring 204 holds the roller 170 of hook links 166 forwardly of base bracket 158'. The chair cannot be brought to the fully tilted position from this unlocked intermediate position of FIG. 12 because the cut-out portion 176' of the hook links 166' engage and hold the angle iron 184 carried by the forward ends of carrier links 66.

If the occupant now wishes to move the chair parts to the fully reclined position, he leans forwardly, reaching beneath the forward end of the seat 44 and grasps handle 220.

This forward leaning of the occupant shifts the center of gravity so that the chair frame rocks forwardly and the lower end of the hook links 166 are brought into alignment with the slot 15812 at the bottom of base bracket 158'. Turning of the handle 220 in a clockwise direction moves toggle link 216 in the same direction so that it is axially-aligned with the rod 206, as shown in FIG. 13. Such movement of toggle link 216 produces a toggle action, moving rod 206 further within tube 208 until it fully compresses the rubber cushion 210 and exerts a rearward force against the bottom of tube 208. This rearward force upon tube 208 is transmitted to the hook link 166 at pivot 196, causing the hook links to turn about pivot 172 in a counter-clockwise direction against the biasing force of spring 204. This turning movement of hook links 166 releases the angle iron 184, and also moves roller 170' into the slot 158b of base bracket 158'. The rocker member 28 is therefore locked against rocking, and the seat and back-rest are free to move to the fully reclined position.

In the toggle position of link 216, shown in FIG. 13, the angular front edge portion 216a of toggle link 216 is v 13 in flush abutment with the base of seat bracket 218, acting as a stop to prevent the toggle link 216 from turning past the in-line toggle position.

When the occupant returns from the fully-reclined position to the intermediate position, he must manually move handle 220 to move the toggle link 216 out of in-line toggle position, before the chair can be rocked. Alternately, the seat and back-rest can be brought back to the upright sitting position, the leg rest automatically unlocking the toggle by virtue of the rearward contact of the back to the leg rest with the handle 220. (See FIG. 11.)

While preferred embodimentsof the invention have been shown and described herein, it is obvious that numerous omissions, changes and additions may be made in such embodiments without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage mean-s movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement relative to the latter from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then to a fully-reclined position, a leg-rest, a leg-rest mounting linkage including a plurality of interconnected leg-rest links mounting said leg-rest on said seat and extensible to move said leg-rest from a retracted position beneath the seat to an extended position forwardly of the seat in response to movement of said seat and back-rest from said upright sitting position to said intermediate, tilted sitting position, and releasable locking means for locking said seat and back-rest against reclining movement out of said upright sitting position, whereby the body-supporting structure may be rocked in the upright sitting position without extension of the leg-rest, said releasable locking means including latch means normally located in a holding position in which it interconnects a plurality of links of said leg-rest linkage to prevent extension of the latter, and latch release means engageable with the chair base when the chair arm frame is rocked forwardly a substantial distance from its upright sitting position to move said latch means out of said holding position and release said leg-rest linkage for extension.

2. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage means movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement relative to the latter from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then to a fully-reclined position, a leg-rest, a leg-rest mounting linkage including a plurality of interconnected leg-rest links mounting said leg-rest on'said seat and extensible to move said'leg-rest from a retracted position beneath the seat to an extended position forwardly of the seat in response to movement of said seat and back-rest from said upright sitting position to said intermediate, tilted sitting position, and releasable locking means for locking said seat and back-rest against reclining movement out of said upright sitting position, whereby the body-supporting structure may be rocked in the upright sitting position without extension of the leg-rest, said releasable locking means including a locking link mounted upon one of said leg-rest links and automatically engageable in locking relationship with at least one other leg-rest link when the chair is in the upright sitting position with the leg-rest retracted, whereby to lock said leg-rest linkage against extension, and a release member carried by said locking link and positioned to engage the chair base when the chair arm frame is rocked forwardly from its upright sitting position to move said locking link out of locking relationship with said other leg-rest link and thereby release said leg-rest linkage for expansion.

3. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage means movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm framefor movement relative to the latter from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then to a fullyreclined position, a leg-rest, a leg-rest mounting linkage including a plurality of leg-rest links interconnected in a lazy tong arrangement mounted at one end on said seat and mounting the leg-rest of the other end and extensible to move said leg-rest from a retracted position beneath the seat to an extended position forwardly of the seat in response to movement of said seat and back-rest from said upright sitting position to said intermediate, tilted sitting position, and releasable locking means for locking said seat and balck-rest against reclining movement out of said upright sitting position, whereby the body-supporting structure may be rocked in the upright sitting position without extension of the leg-rest, said releasable locking means including a locking link pivotally mounted on one of said leg-rest links and having a latching portion automatically engageable with at least one other vleg-rest link when the lazy tong linkage is retracted in the upright sitting position of the chair, whereby to lock said leg-rest linkage against extension, and a striker link depending from said locking link and positioned to engage said ohair base when the chair arm frame is rocked forwardly from its upright sitting position to turn said locking link about its pivotal mount on said leg-rest link and disengage said latching portion from said other leg-rest link, thereby releasing said leg-rest linkage for extension.

4. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 3 in which said locking link has a slot therein and said other leg-rest link has a projecting pin thereon positioned to enter said slot when said leg-rest linkage is in retracted position for coupling said locking link to said other legrest link.

5. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 4 in which the pivotal mount of said locking link on said one leg-rest link comprises an elongated pin having an enlarged head, and a spring located between said head and the body of said locking link and normally urging said locking link inwardly against said one link in a plane in which the projecting pin of said other leg-rest link extends through the slot in said locking link, said locking link also having an angular cam member located outwardly of said adjacent said slot and normally in engagement with the free end of said projecting pin extending through said slot, said cam member being positioned to slide along the free end of said projecting pin when said locking link is pivoted by engagement of said striker link with said chair base, to move said locking link laterally away from said one link to a plane in which said projecting pin isclear of the slot in said locking link.

6. A reclining chair according tov claim 5 in which said locking link has an angularly-bent front portion acting as a cam surface to engage the free end of said projecting pin, when the leg-rest linkage is brought to its retracted position, and move the locking link laterally away from said one link to a position in which the free end of said projecting pin can enter said slot.

7. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base for rocking movement of said rocker member and chair arm frame on said base, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage means movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement of said seat and back-rest relative to said frame in .a first motion phase from an'upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then through a second motion phase to a fully reclined position, and a rocker locking assemly for locking said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking movement when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and in the fully-reclined position, said rocker locking assembly comprising hook means secured to said base, a hook link pivotally mounted on said rocker member and having a locking portion located in alignment with said hook means when said rocker member is rocked forwardly with the chair in the intermediate,

tilted sitting position, biasing means urging said hook link to turn about its pivot means in a direction in which said locking portion is normally urged out of engagement with said hook means, and actuating means selectively operable when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position for moving said hook link against the force of said biasing means in a direction to bring the locking portion of said hook link into holding engagement with the hook means of said base bracket whereby to releasa'bly couple said rocker member rigidly with said base and lock said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking movement on said base when the seat and back-rest are moved through the second motion phase to the fully-reclined position.

8. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base for rocking movement of said rocker member and chair arm frame on said base, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage means movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement of said seat and back-rest relative to said frame in a first motion phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then through a second motion phase to a fully reclined position, and a rocker locking assembly for locking said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking moving when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and in the fully-reclined position, said rocker locking assembly comprising a base bracket secured to said base and having a jaw thereon, a hook link pivotally mounted on said rocker member adjacent said base bracket and having a locking portion positioned to move into alignment with the jaw of said base bracket when said chair frame and rocker member are rocked forwardly a predetermined distance on said 'base, biasing means urging said hook link to turn about its pivot means in a direction in which said locking portion is normally urged away from and out of engagement with said jaw, and an actuating assembly operatively connecting said hook link to the forward end of said seat for moving said hook link against the force of said biasing means in a direction to bring the locking portion of said hook link into holding engagement with the jaw of said base bracket when the seat and back-rest are in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined distance, whereby to releasably couple said rocker member rigidly with said base and lock said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking movement on said base when the seat and backrest are moved through the second motion phase to the fully-reclined position.

9. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 8 in which said actuating assembly includes a pair of slidably connected members, one of said members being pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat and the other of said members being pivotally mounted on said hook link, and means for causing said members to exert a rearward actuating force upon said hook link when the seat is moved rearwardly to the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined distance, whereby the hook link is turned in a direction to engage its locking portion with said base bracket jaw.

10. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 8 in which said actuating assembly includes a tube pivotally mounted on said hook link, a rod pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat and extending slidably within said tube, and a compression spring mounted between said rod and tube and adapted to apply rearward pressure upon said hook link when said seat is moved rearwardly in the first motion phase, sufficient to cause said hook link to turn in a direction to engage its locking portion with said base bracket jaw.

11. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 8 in which said actuating assembly includes a tube pivotally mounted on said hook link, a toggle link pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat, a rod pivotally mounted on said toggle link and extending slidably within said tube, and an operating handle secured to said toggle link for manual turning of the latter into an aligned toggle relationship with said rod and tube when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined said turning movement of the toggle link moving said rod fully within said tube and causing said tube to exert sufficient rearward force upon said hook link to turn the latter in a direction to engage the locking portion of said hook link with said base bracket jaw.

12. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base for rocking movement of said rocker member and chair arm frame on said base, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, linkage means movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement of said seat and back-rest relative to said frame in a first motion phase from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then through a second motion phase to a fully reclined position, said linkage means including a carrier link pivotally mounted at its rear and on said chair arm frame, a front guide link pivotally connecting the forward end of said carrier link to said seat, and means supporting said carrier link in a stationary position during said first motion phase, the front end portion of said carrier link being carried upwardly with the forward end of the seat during the second motion phase, and a rocker locking assembly for locking said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking movement when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and in the fully-reclined position, said rocker locking assembly comprising a base bracket secured to said base and having a jaw thereon, a hook link pivotally mounted on said rocker member adjacent said base bracket and havinga locking portion positioned to move into alignment with the jaw of said base bracket when said chair frame and rocker portion are rocked forwardly a predetermined distance on said base, biasing means urging said hook link to turn about its pivot means in a direction in which said locking portion is normally urged away from and out of engagement with said jaw, an actuating assembly operatively connecting said hook link to the forward end of said seat for moving said hook link against the force of said biasing means in a direction to bring the locking portion of said hook link into holding engagement with the jaw of said base bracket when the seat and back-rest are in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined distance, whereby to releasably couple said rocker member rigidly to said base and lock said rocker member and chair arm frame against rocking movement and a retaining member rigid with the forward end of said carrier link, said hook link having a sequencing hook portion normally engaging said retaining member under the biasing force of said biasing means and holding said retaining member and the forward end of said carrier link against upward movement to thereby prevent the premature movement of the bodysupporting structure in the second motion phase while the rocker member is unlocked, movement of said hook link in a direction to couple said rocker member rigidly to said base also moving said sequencing hook portion out of engagement with said retaining member to release said carrier link and free said body-supporting structure for mo eme t i sa d second oti n. p

13. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 12, in which said actuating assembly includes a pair of slidably connected members, one of said members being pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat and the other of said members being pivotally mounted on said hook link, and means for causing said members to exert a rearward actuating force upon said hook link when the seat is moved rearwardly to the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined distance, whereby the hook link is turned in a direction to engage its locking portion with said base bracket jaw and disengage said sequencing hook portion from said retaining member.

14. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 12, in which said actuating assembly includes a tube pivotally mounted on said hook link, a rod pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat and extending slidably within said tube, and a compression spring mounted between said rod and tube and adapted to apply rearward pressure upon said hook link when said seat is moved rearwardly in the first motion phase, sufficient to cause said hook link to turn in a direction to engage its locking portion with said base bracket jaw and disengage said sequencing hook portion from said retaining member.

15. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 14 in which a finger link is pivotally mounted on said base bracket immediately above the jaw thereof with the bottom edge portion of said finger link partially overlapping the upper portion of said jaw, and stop means limiting pivoting movement of said finger link to upward pivoting movement from its overlapping position.

16. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 12 in which said actuating assembly includes a tube pivotally mounted on said hook link, a toggle link pivotally mounted beneath the forward end of said seat, a rod pivotally mounted on said toggle link and extending slidably within said tube, and an operating handle secured to said toggle link for manual turning of the latter into an aligned toggle relationship with said rod and tube when the chair is in the intermediate, tilted sitting position and the rocker member is rocked forwardly said predetermined distance, said turning movement of the toggle link moving said rod fully within said tube and causing said tube to exert sufiicient rearward force upon said hook link to turn the latter in a direction to engage the locking portion of said hook link with said base bracket jaw and disengage said sequencing hook portion from said retaining member.

17. A recliner-rocker chair according to claim 12 in which a stop link is rigidly mounted on said retaining member, said stop link having a hook portion positioned 18 to engage and grasp a fixed portion of said hook link to stop upward movement of the forward end of the carrier link and further reclining movement of the body-supporting structure when the latter reaches the fully-reclined position.

18. A recliner-rocker chair comprising a base, a chair arm frame having a rocker member engaging said base to rock thereon, a body-supporting structure including a seat and back-rest, a leg-rest, control linkage means for said chair including a body-supporting structure linkage movably mounting said seat and back-rest on said chair arm frame for movement relative to the latter from an upright sitting position to an intermediate, tilted sitting position and then to a fully-reclined position, and a legrest mounting linkage comprising a plurality of interconnected leg-rest links mounting said leg-rest of said seat and extensible to move said leg-rest from a retracted position beneath the seat to an extended position forwardly of the seat in response to movement of said seat and back-rest from said upright sitting position to said intermediate, tilted sitting position, and releasable locking means for locking said seat and back-rest against reclining movement out of said upright sitting position, whereby the body-supporting structure may be rocked in the upright sitting position without extension of the le-grest, said releasable locking means including retainer means normally located in a holding position in which it interconnects a plurality of links of said control linkage means to prevent extension of the latter, and retainer release means operable in response to movement of the chair arm frame to a selected rocking position to move said retainer means out of said holding position and release said control linkage means for extension.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,746,519 5/1956 Krikorian 297-269 2,797,737 6/1957 Burton 297-269 2,817,388 12/1957 Knabusch et al 297-269 3,096,121 7/1963 Knabusch et al 297-269 3,099,487 7/1963 Knabusch et a1 297-269 3,131,965 5/1964 Mohler 297-89 3,163,464 12/ 1964 Martin et a1. 297- 3,235,307 2/ 1966 Knabush et a1 297-321 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,380,124 10/1964 France.

DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner. JAMES T. MCCALL, Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3537747 *Jul 31, 1968Nov 3, 1970Mohasco Ind IncRocking and reclining chair
US3622198 *Dec 11, 1969Nov 23, 1971Dual Mfg & EngRocker/recliner chair
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US3802735 *Nov 16, 1972Apr 9, 1974Dual Mfg & EngRocker/recliner chair
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Classifications
U.S. Classification297/85.00R, 297/259.2, 297/271.4, 297/DIG.700
International ClassificationA47C1/0355, A47C1/034, A47C3/03, A47C3/027
Cooperative ClassificationA47C3/03, Y10S297/07, A47C3/027, A47C1/0355
European ClassificationA47C1/0355, A47C3/03, A47C3/027