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Publication numberUS3341204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1967
Filing dateSep 3, 1963
Priority dateSep 3, 1963
Publication numberUS 3341204 A, US 3341204A, US-A-3341204, US3341204 A, US3341204A
InventorsMcdannold Ronald E
Original AssigneeBill D Reed, Charles A Sparling Jr, Donald F Pettigrew, Ralph E Veazie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for reading archery targets
US 3341204 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 12; 1967 R. E. M DANNOLD 3,341,204

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR READING ARCHERY TARGETS Filed Sept. 5, 1963 3 Sheets-$heet 1 FIG I RONALD E. MC DANNOLD INVENTOR www ATTORNEYS p 12, 1967 R. E. MCDANNOLD 3,341,204

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR READING ARCHERY TARGETS Filed Sept. 5, 1963 3 She tS-$heet 2 Q7 5 5/44 20 as I 11 I II RONALD E. MC DANNOLD INVENTOR.

Wa s M4 ATTORNEYS Sept. 12, 1967 v R. E. M DANNOLD 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Sept. 5,1963

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ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofifice 3,341,204 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR READING ARCHERY TARGETS Ronald E. McDannold, Bellevue, Wash., assignor of twenty percent to Donald F. Pettigrew and fifteen percent to Charles A. Sparling, Jr., both of Bellevue, Wash., five percent to Bill D. Reed and twenty percent to Ralph E. Veazie, both of Seattle, Wash.

Filed Sept. 3, 1963, Ser. No. 306,067 5 Claims. (Cl. 273-102.2)

This invention relates to a new and useful concept in an archery target reading device and more particularly to a method and apparatus for automatically registering the target score which a particular arrow hit has made and transferring the score to a display board easily readable both by the shooter and by the spectators.

With the popularization of archery as a sport and with the advent of indoor ranges in the last few years, those intimately connected with the industry, as well as th shooters themselves, have come to realize the need for means to automatically score the hits by the arrows in the targets. Normally the location of the arrow in the target is readily discernible. However, precise location and thus the scoring of the arrow itself Often depends upon close scrutiny of the arrow after it has hit the target. A close look may involve running the target backstop up to the firing line so that the score achieved may be determined accurately. Hence, the present problem of scoring, Whether for casual or for competitive shooting, is timeconsuming and generally inconvenient.

This invention seeks to overcome this recognized problem by the provision of a simple method and apparatus for scoring. In essence, this invention comprises an apparatus and method utilizing a target of unique design and simple electrical circuitry to immediately transfer electrical impulses from the target to a remote scoring board readily observable by both the shooter and the gallery. The target consists primarily of two electrically conductive surfaces separated by non-conductive material. The front surface of the target, as well as the back surface from which it is insulated, combine with the arrow passing through the target to complete temporary electrical impulse to the remotely located scoring board. The front, or exposed, conductive surface of the target in effect forms a ground side for the circuit. The rear surface of the target which is also conductive is formed of concentrica.l ly isolated or separated rings, each of which acts to form a separate circuit with appropriate scoring indicia on the scoring board.

The method and apparatus of this invention are readily adaptable to any type of scoring target and there are numerous kinds used in the sport of archery for scoring purposes. In essence, the method and apparatus involve making an electrical contact through the target backstop with each of the separate rings on the back side of the target. The impact of the arrow and its passage through the target provide the impulse needed to energize a circuit for lighting an appropriate scoring number or indicator.

Accordingly, it is a feature of this invention to provide a method and apparatus for scoring hits on an archery target which is simple in design, easy to manufacture and inexpensive to produce.

Another feature of this invention is to provide a target which is unique in its concept and also which, in and of itself, is of simple design, easy to manufacture, and inexpensive to produce.

Still another feature of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for scoring hits in archery targets which permit instantaneous and accuiate transfer of an electrical impulse to a remote point for immediately registering the score of a particular hit on the target.

Patented Sept. 12, 1967 Yet another feature of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for scoring hits on an archery target which is easy to adapt to any known type of archery backstop and which has great flexibility of design.

A further feature of this invention is to provide a method and apparatus for scoring hits in an archery target which permit of convenient maintenance and which can be fitted to any existing installation whether indoors or outdoors.

An even further feature of this invention is to furnish a method and apparatus for scoring hits in archery targets which has been shown to be effective even though the target has been used many, many times and which will register score from an arrow passing through a previously made hole.

These, together with other features and advantages which will become subsequently apparent, reside in the details of the apparatus construction and the details of the method as more fully hereinafter described and claimed. Reference will be had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this disclosure, wherein like numbers refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is an environmental view in perspective showing the firing line of a typical archery lane and in which the movable target backstop means in one lane has been moved up to the firing line for reading and for retrieval of arrows;

FIGURE 2 is a partial cross-section view in elevation of the backstop taken along the line 22 of FIGURE 1, and showing the general layout of the target, the backstop and the associated scoring device;

FIGURE 3 is a partial cross-section view in elevation with part of the backstop broken away showing more clearly and in greater detail the precise nature of the target, the contact pins and other elements of the apparatus;

FIGURE 4 is a diagrammatic view of the rear face of the target principle involved in this invention;

FIGURE 5 is a partial rear view in perspective showing generally the nature of the elements at the rear of the target backstop; and

FIGURE 6 is an electrical schematic diagram showing the principles of the scoring circuitry involved in this method and apparatus.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, it will be seen that a typical indoor archery range has a series of lanes, each of which is provided with a movable target carrier means 10. The carrier means 10 normally runs on either floor or ceiling mounted tracks and is designed to move to various positions in the lane. The target means 10 has an arrow backstop 12, and from one to four targets 14. After a round of arrows have been shot into the target the carrier 10 is moved up to the firing line by control buttons installed on the console 16 to the rear of the shooters position. The arrows are then retrieved. For purposes of illustration the automatic scoring board asso ciated with this mechanism and method has been shown to be installed near the firing line of the lane in an overhead location. After the arrows are retrieved a button on the console 16 is depressed in order that the target carrier 10 may be moved to an appropriate position any where from 20 feet to 30 yards back into the lane. The time taken between ends or rounds is shortened considerably by this invention because of the fact that the scoring is done at the time the arrow passes through the target and into the backstop; thus no time is wasted as the arrows are retrieved in determining scores.

FIGURES 2 through 5 show in greater detail the method and apparatus as it is applied to the target backstop. The backstop 12 is made of many tightly and densely bound layers of cardboard or corrugated paper to permit the arrows to embed themselves and to be firmly held. As can be seen, the target 14 is attached to the front side or face of the backstop 12. Target 14 is comprised of two separated, conductive surfaces of which the front or outer surface 20 is in the form of an unbroken or continuous conductive sheet or surface. The front surface 20 has the target painted or printed thereon. In the preferred form outer surface 20 comprises the ground side of the circuit for actuating the scoring mechanism. The center layer 22 of the target 14 is formed of a nonconductive material of paper cardboard, corrugated box board or some other suitably inexpensive nonconductive material. The center nonconductive layer 22 is faced on the backside thereof with the inner target surface 24. The rear surface is comprised of concentric conductive ring surfaces 24, 24A, and 24B. The rear conductive rings 24 are separated by concentric voids or spaces 26 which align with and which are of the same dimensions as the lines between the target rings printed on the front surface 20. Obviously, the same principle applies whether the target is of the three or five ring type or any other special type of design. The rear surface of the target is separated into as many separate scoring ring areas as are called for by the front surface of the target. The target is held on backstop 12 by indexing pins 28 which may have retaining clips 30 to hold the target firmly on the backstop. Note that the indexing pins 28 form a connection with the front conductive surface 20. Said pins 28 extend through the backstop out of the rear side of the carrier and backstop 12.

Individual electrical contacts are made with each of the scoring rings 24 by ring contact pins or rods 32 which are inserted entirely through backstop 12. The ring contact pins 32 are, for purposes of illustration, shown to be mounted on a bracket structure 34. Obviously, the bracket 34 could be held on the rear of backstop by the indexing pins or by other means. Holes are drilled or otherwise formed through the backstop 12 so that the ring contact pins 32 may be easily extended therethrough. There are as many pins 32 provided for each target as there are scoring rings on the target since each ring will form a separate scoring circuit. As can be seen, holes with appropriate insulation grommets 36 are formed in bracket 34 through which the pins 32 are inserted and by which they are held. In order to insure that the front or head ends of pins 32 make good contact with their respective rings 24, the outer or head ends 38 of the pins 32 will be provided with slightly enlarged head surfaces or merely be bent from the material from which the pins is made.

In this manner, the pins 32 are isolated from each other and from the indexing and ground pin 28. In like manner, if the indexing pin is as shown then it too must be insulated from the bracket by insulation grommet 40. The head end of the indexing and ground pin 28 may be threaded to receive nut 42 for securing bracket 34 to the rear of the target.

The scoring display means 18, shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, is merely illustrative of the manner in which scores may be displayed. A series of lamps 46 may be placed on the scoring board with the lamps or lights 46 in one direction representing the number of arrows, as for instance five arrows to an end, while the lamps in the other direction represent score value achieved by a particular arrow. Since most targets are either three or five ring the number of lamps required is not great.

One side of the target, as for instance the outside conductive surface 20, is connected through index pin 28 and lead 52 to one side of the power source 54. Arrow 50 is made conductive on its tip end for a distance of about three-quarters of an inch. The rest of the shaft to the rear of the conductive tip 51 must be nonconductive. When the arrow pierces the target the circuit is completed between the front and rear faces or faces 20 and 24 of the target for a period of time sufiicient to provide an electrical impulse and to change the state of bistable 56, sometimes termed a flip-flop. The ring contact pin 32 is connected to bistable 56 by lead 58. The output impulse of bistable 56 is transferred by lead 60 to gate 62, and through line 64 to amplifier 66. The amplified bistable impulse travels from amplifier 66, by lead 68, to the scoring lamp 46. Line 72 completes the circuit by connecting lamp 46 to the other side of the power supply. Well known and gates are included in the circuit for a particular reason. In the event an arrow splits rings, that is pierces two rings, two circuits will be completed. In archery a shooter who splits rings obtains the score of the higher value ring. It is therefore necessary to allow the circuitry to automatically register the higher score, in such an event.

Assuming that an arrow does split rings, as for instance ring 24 and 24A, representing the scoring values 3 and 4 respectively, two circuits are completed and means must be provided for selecting the higher value. A circuit through ring 24A is completed through lead 76, flip-flop 78, lead 80, gate 82, lead 84, amplifier 86, lead 88, scoring lamp 46, thence to the other side of the power supply through lead 72. The gate receiving pulses from both the 3 value circuit and 4 value circuit would inhibit the 3 value circuit gate 62 from permitting the impulse from the number 24 ring from passing to amplifier 66 and scoring lamp 46. At the same time, however, the impulse from the number 24A ring would be permitted to pass through the 4 value circuit gate 82, and to be completed through scoring lamp 46 to register a score of 4. The same logic is used to complete circuitry to all rings. Those skilled in electronic circuitry will obviously be able to design other circuits to serve the same function. The important point is that provision be made in the circuitry for selecting the higher value score in the event of a split ring shot.

It is felt that the method and apparatus shown will do much to standardize scoring in the sport of archery. The apparatus, and modifications thereof, and the method are easily adaptable to those target scoring systems which now exist and to any others which may evolve. It is felt further that this system of scoring will eliminate the human error now present in scoring the sport and also in increasing spectator interest. While the arrow 50 has been described as being conductive on its tip 51, it will be recognized that more sophisticated circuitry could eliminate the need for any special treatment of arrows. Furthermore, this scoring system could be adapted for darts, firearms, pellet guns, or other types of projectiles. Should it be desired to refine the circuitry to the extent of having a large lighted location display target that such could be accomplished with the addition of pins for each segment into which the target is divided. The scoring circuits could be refined to the extent of displaying a series of scores for a number of shooters and provision could be made for totalizing.

It will be appreciated that the automatic scoring feature may do away with printing scoring rings on the outer surface of the target and that only an aiming spot will be provided. The concentric rings on the rear face of the target, however, will obviously have to conform to official target specifications.

It is not known exactly why this method and apparatus are so reliable. Targets have had over two hundred rounds fired into them before showing decrease in reliability. One explanation might be that in the target there is a capacitor effect instead of a direct short between the front and rear conductive surfaces. It will also be understood that the scoring device may be manually reset after each arrow has hit the target or that means may be provided in the circuits for automatically resetting. Those familiar with the sport of archery will realize that this automatic scoring method and apparatus will have as much if not greater value to outdoor ranges where the target butts or backstops cannot be moved to the firing line for retrieval of arrows.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of this invention. Numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art. For this reason it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact apparatus and method shown and described. Accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents, fall ing within the scope of the invention, may be resorted to.

What is claimed is:

1. A scoring device for projectile targets, comprising: (a) a target having a front conductive surface and a rear conductive surface, said rear surface being segmented and electrically separated into scoring areas according to predetermined specifications, said front and rear surfaces being separated by a layer of nonconductive material, (b) a plurality of electrical contact means each of which contacts a single one of said areas, (c) an electrical circuit means for each of said areas including a scoring light means connected to its respective contact means with said light means being connected to one side of a power supply and said front conductive surface being connected to the other side of said power supply, and said front and rear surfaces combining with a projectile passing through said target to complete a circuit through one of said circuit means, and (d) selector means connected to the circuit means of any two adjacent scoring areas for automatically selecting and energizing the higher value scoring circuit means and preventing energization of the lower value scoring circuit means in the event said projectile contacts two of said scoring areas.

2. A scoring device for projectile targets, comprising: (a) a relatively flat, thin, laminated target means adapted to be detachably secured to the front side of a backstop means, said target having a front single electrically conductive surface and a rear electrically conductive surface, said rear surface being electrically segmented into scoring areas according to predetermined specifications, said front and rear surfaces being separated by a lamination of electrically nonconductive material, (b) an electrical contact means for each of said areas and adapted to be mounted in said backstop, each said electrical contact means making electrical contact with its respective scoring area, (c) an electrical circuit means for each of said scoring areas and its respective contact means including a scoring light means and electrical power source, said circuit means also including an electrical connection from said front conductive surface to said power source, and said front and rear surfaces combining with each other where a projectile passes through said target to provide an electrical impulse to energize one of said circuit means, and (d) selector means interconnected to the circuit means of any two adjacent scoring areas for automatically selecting and energizing the circuit means of the higher value scoring area and preventing energization of the circuit means of the lower value scoring area in the event said projectile contacts two of said scoring areas.

3. A method for reading and displaying the scores of shots in a target for projectiles, comprising: (a) mounting upon a target carrier means a target having a pair of electrically conductive surfaces electrically isolated from each other, one of said surfaces having a plurality of electrically segmented scoring areas, (b) passing a projectile having a conductive portion thereon through said target to create a temporary electrical actuating impulse be ee the other of said surfaces and one of said scoring areas, (0) transferring said actuating impulse to a scoring circuit and indicator for one of said scoring areas, and (d) automatically electrically selectively actuating only the higher scoring value circuit in the event said projectile creates more than one impulse by bridging two of said scoring areas.

4. A method for reading and displaying the scores of shots in a target for projectiles, comprising: (a) mounting two electrically conductive surfaces so that they are separated by electrically nonconductive material, (b) segmenting one of said surfaces into electrically separate scoring areas according to predetermined specifications so that said scoring areas are separated by a distance less than the diameter of a projectile, (c) passing a projectile through said target in order to create a temporary electrical actuating impulse between said other surface and one of said scoring areas, (d) transferring said actuating impulse to a scoring indicator to display the score achieved, and (c) automatically electrically selecting the higher scoring value impulse for transfer to said indicator and electrically preventing transfer of the lower scoring impulses in the event said projectile creates more than one impulse.

5. A scoring device for projectile targets, comprising: (a) a relatively flat, thin, target means adapted to be detachably secured to the front side of a backstop means, said target having a front, single, electrically conductive surface and a rear electrically conductive surface, said rear surface being electrically segmented into concentric scoring rings according to predetermined specifications, said front and rear surfaces being separated by a lamination of electrically nonconductive material, (b) an elongated electrical contact means for each of said rings, said contact means extending through said backstop and making electrical contact with its respective scoring ring, and (c) an electrical circuit means for each of said scoring rings and its respective contact means including a scoring indicator means and electrical power means, said circuit means also including an electrical connection from said front conductive surface to said power source, and said front surface and said scoring rings combining with each other when a projectile passes through said target to provide an electrical impulse to energize one of said circuit means, and (d) selector means interconnected to the circuit means of any of two adjacent scoring rings for automatically selecting and energizing the circuit means of the higher value scoring ring and preventing energization of the lower value scoring ring in the event said projectile contacts two of said scoring rings.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,506,475 5/1950 Traub 273-1022 2,789,822 4/1957 Faizi 273-1022 3,006,648 10/1961 Devitt et al 273-102.2 3,091,463 5/1963 Cohen et al. 273-102.2

FOREIGN PATENTS 559,147 6/1958 Canada.

ANTON O. OECHSLE, Primary Examiner.

DELBERT B. LOWE, F. BARRY SHAY, M. R. PAGE,

Assistant Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2506475 *Feb 27, 1946May 2, 1950Ellis TraubRenewable dart target
US2789822 *Feb 7, 1955Apr 23, 1957Faizi SalihTarget with electrical indicator
US3006648 *Feb 11, 1960Oct 31, 1961Roland D CiccaroneArchery range
US3091463 *Dec 22, 1958May 28, 1963Franklin Systems IncMissile scoring systems
CA559147A *Jun 24, 1958Salvatore GerosolinaElectric signal target
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3529828 *May 2, 1967Sep 22, 1970Polytronic LtdTarget and means for automatically indicating the position at which a projectile shot from a weapon hits the target
US3982759 *Mar 25, 1974Sep 28, 1976Grant Geoffrey FTennis court line monitoring apparatus
US4244583 *Feb 6, 1978Jan 13, 1981Wood Eugene LSelf scoring target for darts and similar projectiles
US4365805 *Dec 17, 1980Dec 28, 1982Carl LevineSystem for monitoring tennis court boundary lines
US5328190 *Aug 4, 1992Jul 12, 1994Dart International, Inc.Method and apparatus enabling archery practice
US5823779 *May 2, 1996Oct 20, 1998Advanced Interactive Systems, Inc.Electronically controlled weapons range with return fire
US5980254 *Apr 6, 1998Nov 9, 1999Advanced Interactive Systems, Inc.Electronically controlled weapons range with return fire
WO1994003246A1 *Aug 3, 1993Feb 17, 1994Dart International IncMethod and apparatus enabling archery practice
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/373
International ClassificationF41J5/00, F41J5/048
Cooperative ClassificationF41J5/048
European ClassificationF41J5/048