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Publication numberUS3341876 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1967
Filing dateJun 14, 1965
Priority dateJun 14, 1965
Publication numberUS 3341876 A, US 3341876A, US-A-3341876, US3341876 A, US3341876A
InventorsCampbell James W
Original AssigneeCampbell James W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination mop and bucket
US 3341876 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 19, 1967 J. w. CAMPBELL 3,341,876

COMBINATION MOP AND BUCKET Filed June 14, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet l C 1NVEN'T0R/ 7 JAMES W CAMPBELL 14770RWEX p 1967 J. wv CAMPBELL 3,341,876

COMBINATION MOP AND BUCKET Filed June 14, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. JMVEfi' W CAMPEELL ATTORNEX United States Patent M 3,341,876 QGMIEINATION M0? AND BUCKET .Iames W. Campbell, 151 Lincoln Ave., Rockville Centre, REY. 11570 Filed June 14, 1965, Ser. No. 463,699 16 Claims. (Cl. 15-1) This invention relates generally to mops and buckets and more particularly to the combination thereof having cooperating elements which provide means to squeeze water from the mop directly into the bucket.

While several embodiments of the present invention will be described and illustrated hereinafter, each have all or at least some of the following characteristics:

(1) The bucket is stable in design and is unlikely to tip over in use.

(2) The bucket is provided with integral baffie means which inhibit sloshing of the liquid as the bucket is moved along the floor and which in addition serves as a structural stiffening or buttressin member.

(3) The bucket may be made of an inexpensive rigid or semi-rigid plastic such as polypropylene.

(4) A plurality of buckets are nestable for shipping storage and display in the store.

(5) An integral fulcrum is provided on the bucket.

(6) The mop is provided with a lever extension arranged to mate with the bucket fulcrum whereby the mop may be compressed against a portion of the bucket to squeeze out the water.

The foregoing is only a very generalized description of some of the features of the present invention. They afford many advantages absent from prior art devices. It will be apparent from the detailed description of the construction of the mop and bucket, as well as from the drawing, that the water is squeezed out of the mop without the need for the user to bend. The mop portion need not be handled directly and the water is squeezed directly into the tub. The squeezing force is substantially perpendicular to the largest plane surface of the mop so that a maximum quantity of water is expelled. The integral baffle stiifens the bucket and provides a convenient and eflicient location for the fulcrum and for the anvil against which the mop is squeezed.

While the aforementioned advantages are of particular importance to the user, still other advantages accrue to the manufacturer and to the merchandiser, The present invention lends itself to low cost molding in a semi-rigid plastic such as polypropylene. Labor costs are kept low because assembly is kept at a minimum. The bucket is designed such that it may be stored, shipped and displayed in a nested configuration. Moving parts which are costly to manufacture and assemble and which are likely to wear out or otherwise become inoperative with extended use are not required to achieve an efiicient squeezing action.

The desirability of these features and advantages have been known for some time but have not been incorporated in the prior art devices. The buckets were, in general, very easy to tip over and did not have baffle means to prevent sloshing. Accordingly they had to be lifted and carried from one work area to another. They could not be pulled. Usually the mop head had to be handled to wring it out and where remote squeezing means were provided, the water was not directed back into the tub. Whatever attempts were made to include all, or at least most, of the Patented Sept. 19, 1967 desired features resulted in awkward, complex and costly structure that tended to limit its salability.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a low cost bucket with an integral squeezing means that is inherently stable and unlikely to tip over when it contains water.

A further object is to provide means of a relatively simple nature to inhibit the wave motion encountered when the prior art buckets were moved along the floor.

Another object is to provide the aforementioned bucket with a configuration such that a quantity of buckets may be nested one within the other.

An additional object is to provide a bucket of the aforementioned type that may be economically molded in a semi-rigid plastic.

Yet another object is to provide a stiffened molded bucket capable of withstanding the high leverage forces attendant with compressing the mop.

A further object is to provide integral buttressing means in combination with the bafiie means in order to impart suflicient rigidity to permit a plastic molded member to withstand the excessive forces attendant with a leverage wringing motion.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide improved cooperating elements on both the bucket and mop whereby the mop may be squeezed against a portion of the bucket by simply pivoting the mop handle.

Another object is to provide mop squeezing means which does not require the user to touch the wet mop, which may be utilized without bending over and which directs the water directly into the bucket.

Yet another object is to provide low cost, structurally rigid squeezing means that is made from a minimum number of parts.

These and other features, objects and advantages of the invention will, in part, be pointed out with particularity and will, in part, become obvious from the following more detailed description of the invention, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing which forms an integral part thereof.

In the various figures of the drawing like reference characters designate like parts.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is an exploded pictorial view of the combination mop and bucket with cooperating mop squeezing elements on each;

FIG. 2 is an exploded sectional side elevation view of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the bucket;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational vieW of the p;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the mop taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIGS. 6A, 6B and 6C sequentially illustrate in side elevation the two squeezing steps required. FIG. 6D illustrates an undesirable effect avoided by the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of an alternative embodiment of the bucket portion of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a sectional side elevation view taken along line 88 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a transverse section taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary sectional elevation view illustrating the nesting relationship of several buckets.

FIG. 11 is a pictorial view of still another alternative embodiment of the bucket portion of the present invention;

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of the embodiment shown in FIG. 11; and

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary, sectional plan view taken along line 1313 of FIG. 11.

Referring now to the drawing, bucket 10, which may be inexpensively molded from a semi-rigid plastic such as polypropylene, will be described first. The bucket is comprised of side walls 12, end walls 14, and a base wall 16. At a point intermediate the end walls, a transverse baffle and buttressing member 18 is provided. It has been found that a baffle placed at approximately the one-third mark of the bucket length will provide good wave-breakin g characteristics. That is, the baffle separates the bucket into compartments one-third and two-thirds the full volume. A baffle placed near the mid-point as illustrated will also be effective as anti-sloshing means. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the baffle member 18 is integrally formed during molding. The central portion of the baffle member is almost the height of the side walls and has a flat, downwardly sloping top surface 20. The sides of the bafile member are slightly spaced from side walls 12 to define channels 22 therebetween. It will be seen particularly in FIG. 2, that the baffle member is formed by extending the bottom wall upwardly to the two different heights mentioned. This construction provides the additional buttressing feature previously mentioned.

Anvil 24 which may be perforated, ribbed, or smooth surfaced, is secured to top surface by means of rivets 26 or other suitable fasteners. For example, threaded inserts may be co-mol-ded and screws used to secure the anvil. The anvil is provided with an integral, transverse fulcrum 28 comprising an upward extension 30 and a forwardly extending memebr 32 integral with extension 30 and spaced from surface 20. Preferably a lip 34 extending downwardly from member 32 is also included.

As an alternative construction, the anvil may be omitted and the fulcrum only will be secured to the sloping top of the baffle member. In this case, the mop is squeezed directly against the baflle member and the water will still run directly into the bucket.

Mop is comprised of an elongated handle 42 secured to the top of a plate 44 having a transverse, upwardly extending lever member 46 integral therewith. A water absorbent mop portion 48 of rectangular configuration is secured to the underside of plate 44. One form of construction is to provide a pair of threaded studs 50 extending from the top of mop portion 48. The studs pass through suitable apertures in plate 44 so that the mop may be removably secured thereto by means of fasteners such as wing nuts 52. It will be seen that the mop portion is readily replaceable when it becomes worn or unusable for any reason. Other conventional attachment arrangements may be employed.

To understand the cooperative relationship between the mop and the bucket, reference may be had to sequential FIGS. 6A-6C. The water laden mop is brought over the bucket such that the mop lever approaches the bucket anvil (FIG. 6A).' Lever member 46 first abuts upward extension 30 (FIG. 6B). Then, upon an angular motion of handle 42 (counterclockwiseFIG. 6B), lever member 46 slides along forwardly extending member 32 until stopped by lip 34. The spacing between member 32 and the top of anvil 24 is such that the mop portion 48 is compressed (FIG. 6C). It is helpful if member 32 and anvil 24 are slightly divergent. Thus the squeezing action will increase as the handle pivots.

FIG. 6C particularly illustrates that the compressive force applied to the mop is substantially at right angles "to the large planar mop surface. A greater quantity of water may be squeezed from the mop than if the shearing action illustrated in FIG. 6D was employed. The superior squeezing action is achieved by the fulcrum throat which is defined by members 30, 32 and 34. Thus 4 the mop lever may slide a small distance relative to the mop fulcrum while pressure is concurrently being applied. By way of contrast, the shearing effect occurs when there is no play between the lever and fulcrum and the mop is pivoted on one of its longitudinal edges.

In FIG. 7, FIG. 8 and FIG. 9, an alternative and in some respects, simpler, molded bucket is shown. Bucket 60 is comprised of side walls 62, end walls 64 and a base 66. Side walls 62 are each provided with an inwardly extending ledge or seat 68. For assembly purposes, threaded inserts may be co-molded with the bucket although it is obvious that other fastening means may also be employed.

A one-piece, combination baffle member and anvil '72 is used with this embodiment. While the construction is different, the functions of component 72 are the same as described hereinbefore. Combination member 72, which may be a metal stamping, is comprised of a downwardly extending transverse baffle 74 slightly narrower than the width of the bucket. Member 72 also includes an inclined, transverse perforated anvil 76 having a fulcrum member 78 and lateral extensions 79 arranged to be seated on ledge 68. Screws 80 are illustrated to indicate means to fasten the combination member 72 to ledges 68 of the bucket. It is to be understood that the combination member may be located anywhere along the ledges, the location being limited only by the position of the fastening means. Thus the position of the combination member may be made variable simply by providing a plurality of sets of fastening means.

FIG. 10 fragmentarily illustrates an important feature of the present invention. Since the baffle member shown in the first embodiment is hollow, the buckets may be nested for shipping, display or storage. The buckets of the second embodiment may similarly be nested merely by removing the combination bafiie and anvil. As a matter of fact, it would probably be most economical to ship, display and sell the second embodiment knocked down in the order to avoid the labor costs involved in assembly.

FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 illustrate still another embodiment of the bucket portion of the present invention. Of all the embodiments illustrated, this last mentioned one is perhaps the least preferred. While the FIG. 11 embodiment may not have the stability and wave-breaking characteristics inherent in the other designs, it is within the scope of the invention, it will function in the desired manner, and will produce good results.

Integrally molded bucket is comprised of a base wall 102, spacedly opposed side walls 104, an end wall 106 and an integrally formed baffle and buttressing member 108 which is in spaced opposition to end wall 106 and which is in effect the fourth upstanding wall of the bucket. As may be seen in FIG. 12, bafile member 108 includes a substantially vertical wall portion 110 and a downwardly sloping top portion 112 to which the anvil 114 is suitably secured. An integral fulcrum 116 is provided together with channels 118 (FIG. 13) on either side of the baffle so that this embodiment may also be nested. Alternatively, only the fulcrum may be used. Buttresses or gussets 120 are included to provide the strength and rigidity to overcome the forces incurred during the compression of the Water absorbent portion of the mop.

The embodiments hereinabove described are low in cost both for the manufacturer and the consumer. The design permits the molded plastic buckets to be nested during shipping and display. By means of the baffle and buttressing member, the likelihood of water sloshing around in the bucket is substantially reduced and the structural rigidity of the bucket is greatly increased. In combination with the nontippable feature, the baffle member assures that water will not be accidentally spilled on the floor.

Of great practical importance is the mop squeezing feature. Without the use of complex and costly mech anism, the present invention provides very effective means 5 for expelling water from the mop. The fulcrum and lever construction, which includes a fulcrum throat, assures that the squeezing action will be approximately at right angles to the large planar surface of the mop.

The construction of the present invention also insures that the water will be squeezed directly into the bucket. This is done by a simple pivotal motion of the handle without bending or having the hands contact the mop. It should also be noted that the instant design permits economy of motion. That is, the squeezing motion is in the same general direction as the mopping motion so that more efiicient movement is effected.

It should be noted that the buttress member serves a multitude of functions including providing water passages and Wave bafliing. The buttress member also provides added strength which is especially advantageous for highly leveraged mop wringing when a semi-rigid plastic is employed. The additional strength is made possible by virtue of the combination of structural planes and angular formations. The aforementioned functions are achieved without necessitating complex molding operations or interfering with nesting ability of the units.

There has been disclosed heretofore the best embodiments of the invention presently contemplated and it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made by those skilled in the art \mthout departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A mop and bucket combination comprising:

(a) a molded, nestable bucket having a base wall, spacedly opposed side walls and spacedly opposed end walls, said side walls and said end walls being integral with and upwardly depending from said base wall;

(b) a substantially vertically disposed baffle member secured to said bucket intermediate said end walls, the upper end of said bafile member extending only partially across said bucket in a plane substantially parallel to said end walls, the ends of said baflle member being spaced from said bucket side walls to define channels and two compartments in communication with each other by means of said channels, said bafile member having a vertical dimension substan tially equal to the height of said side and end walls;

() a fulcrum secured to the top of said baffie member and integral therewith;

(d) a mop having a handle and a water absorbent member; and

(e) a lever member secured to said mop intermediate said handle and said water absorbent portion, said lever member being adapted to releasably engage said fulcrum whereby an arcuate movement of said handle will compress said water absorbent member against the top of said baffle member to thereby express the water from said mop into said bucket.

2. A device in accordance with claim 1 wherein said bucket is a molded plastic and said baflle member is molded integrally with said base wall.

3. The device in accordance with claim 1 including an anvil member secured to the top of said baflle member.

4. The bucket member in accordance with claim 1 wherein said baffie member is hollow whereby a plurality of said bucket members are adapted to nest one within the other.

5. The bucket member in accordance with claim 1 wherein said fulcrum is comprised of a rigid plate having a first upwardly transverse portion extending from an anvil and a second forwardly extending portion integral with said first portion along a transverse edge.

6. The bucket member in accordance with claim 5 wherein said second portion of said fulcrum is divergent from said anvil.

7. The bucket member in accordance with claim 5 wherein said fulcrum includes a transverse downwardly extending lip integral with the transverse end of said 3 second portion opposite the juncture of said first and second portions, said lip being spaced from and substantially parallel to said first portion to define a throat portion therebetween for said lever member.

8. The bucket member in accordance with claim 1 wherein the position of said bafile member divides said bucket into compartments approximately /3 and /s the volume of said entire bucket.

9. The mop of claim 1 wherein said lever member is a rigid plate having a transverse, upwardly extending portion integral therewith.

10. The mop of claim 1 including fastening means adapted to removably secure said water absorbent member to the underside of said transverse lever member.

11. The mop of claim 10 wherein said fastening means comprises at least one threaded stud depending upwardly from said water absorbent member, said lever member being apertured to receive said stud, there being further provided at least one nut adapted to threadably engage said stud whereby said water absorbent member is removably secured to said lever member.

12. A mop and bucket combination comprising:

(a) a molded, nestable bucket having a base wall, spacedly opposed side walls and spacedly opposed end walls, said side walls and said end walls being integral with and upwardly depending from said base wall, said side walls each including an inwardly depending ledge portion extending at least partially the length thereof;

(b) a one-piece member comprising a bafiie portion and a fulcmm portion, said member being disposed substantially vertically in said bucket intermediate said end walls, said bafile portion extending only partially across said bucket in a plane substantially parallel to said end walls, the ends of said bafiie portion being spaced from said bucket side walls to define channels and two compartments in communication with each other by means of said channels, said bafile portion having -a vertical dimension substantially equal to the height of said side and end walls, said fulcrum portion being integral with the top of said bafile portion;

(c) an anvil member secured to the top of said baflle portion adjacent said fulcrum portion;

(d) a mop having a handle and a water absorbent member; and

(e) a lever member secured to said mop intermediate said handle and said water absorbent portion, said lever member being adapted to releasably engage said fulcrum portion whereby an arcuate movement of said handle will comprise said water absorbent member against said anvil to thereby express the water from said mop into said bucket.

13. The device of claim 12 wherein said combination member comprises a substantially vertical plate extending, in the assembled condition, to close proximity with said base wall, a substantially flat plate extending angularly from said vertical plate and transversely between said ledge portions forming said anvil member, and having lateral extensions adapted to be secured to said ledge portions, a first upwardly extending transverse portion integral with one transverse edge of said flat plate and a second forwardly extending portion integral with said first portion along a transverse edge.

14. The device of claim 13 wherein said second portion is slightly divergent from said flat plate.

15. The device of claim 13 wherein said fulcrum portion includes a transverse downwardly extending lip integral with the transverse end of said second portion opposite the juncture of said first and second portions, said lip being spaced from and substantially parallel to said first portion, to define a throat portion therebetween for said lever member.

16. The device of claim 13 wherein said flat plate is perforated to provide means to drain the water squeezed 761,199 1/1934 France. from sald mop mto sa1d bucket. 1,365,255 2/1964 France References Cited 5 27,444 1910 Great Britain. 2212;: 22222 $11152?- 496,695 5/1893 McClung 15-261 XR 2,163,638 6/1939 Vaughn 15-260 XR E 2,220,401 11/1940 Fouke 15 260 CHARLES W F Prlmwy xammer- 2,400,084 5/1946 Fouke 15-260 10 D N M, Exam/Hen 2,663,042 12/1953 Richards et a1. 15 244

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3663982 *Dec 10, 1970May 23, 1972David M HaydenUtility caddy for roller painting
US3747154 *Oct 15, 1971Jul 24, 1973Geerpres Wringer IncWringer bucket
US4525892 *Dec 6, 1982Jul 2, 1985John VayasPail cover having mopwringer
US4625356 *Jun 10, 1985Dec 2, 1986Lever Brothers CompanyMop and squeeze combination
US4912786 *Nov 16, 1988Apr 3, 1990Wheelock Francis NFeet immersion tray
US5099541 *Jan 14, 1991Mar 31, 1992Tressler Doyle MBlackboard eraser apparatus
US5236340 *Mar 20, 1992Aug 17, 1993Hall David JContainers
US5405030 *Feb 23, 1994Apr 11, 1995Frazier; Sara J.Dual-compartment drinking cup
US5641087 *Oct 17, 1995Jun 24, 1997Steven P. Moffitt & John David Moffitt PartnershipPaint bucket for a mini roller
US5956795 *Feb 25, 1998Sep 28, 1999Hirse; GernotFloor cleaning mop and squeezing mechanism therefor
US6560815 *Aug 13, 1997May 13, 2003Decor Corporation Pty LtdMop squeezing
US7181801Nov 25, 2000Feb 27, 2007Ecolab Inc.Absorbent structure for cleaning surfaces
US7571831Sep 16, 2005Aug 11, 2009Rubbermaid Commercials Products LlcMop bucket system with wave reduction capability
US7959030Jun 14, 2011Bercom International, LlcRoller brush adaptable hand-held container having sidewall ramp portion
US8082620Dec 27, 2011Rubbermaid Commercial Products LlcMop bucket and wringer
US9149171 *Oct 4, 2013Oct 6, 2015Hsieh-Fa ChienLever-type mop and bucket for the same
US20060070202 *Sep 16, 2005Apr 6, 2006Rubbermaid Commercial Products LlcMop bucket system with wave reduction capability
US20070266518 *May 15, 2007Nov 22, 2007Rubbermaid Commercial Products LlcMop bucket and wringer
US20140250624 *Mar 10, 2014Sep 11, 2014Vale Mill (Rochdale) LimitedMop bucket
US20140345075 *Oct 4, 2013Nov 27, 2014Hsien-Chung LinLever-type mop and bucket for the same
USD627119 *Nov 9, 2010Bercom International, LlcHand-held container
USD673339Dec 25, 2012Bercom International, LlcPaint application container liner
USD678638Mar 19, 2013Bercom International, LlcPaint application container
USD690482Feb 19, 2013Sep 24, 2013Bercom International, LlcPaint application container
USD692198May 30, 2012Oct 22, 2013Bercom International, LlcPaint application container liner
USD697281Mar 21, 2011Jan 7, 2014Bercom International, LlcHand-held container
USD728884Apr 2, 2014May 5, 2015Bercom International, LlcLiner for paint roller bucket
CN104853664A *Dec 6, 2013Aug 19, 20153M创新有限公司A mop bucket with a planar platform
DE3818098C1 *May 27, 1988Jul 27, 1989Henkel Kgaa, 4000 Duesseldorf, DeTitle not available
DE19707613C1 *Feb 26, 1997May 28, 1998Gernot HirseCleaning equipment with mop
EP0122675A1 *Apr 11, 1984Oct 24, 1984Unilever N.V.Mop and squeeze combination
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/1, 220/555, 15/260
International ClassificationA47L13/58, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/58
European ClassificationA47L13/58