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Publication numberUS3342179 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1967
Filing dateJun 18, 1965
Priority dateJun 18, 1965
Also published asDE1541102A1, DE1541102B2
Publication numberUS 3342179 A, US 3342179A, US-A-3342179, US3342179 A, US3342179A
InventorsNorbert W Ellmann
Original AssigneeAbbott Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Blood collection and sampling apparatus having separable coupling means
US 3342179 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 19, 1967 N. w. ELLMANN 3,342,179

BLOOD COLLECTION AND SAMPLING APPARATUS HAVING SEPARABLE COUPLING MEANS Filed June 18, 1965 A TTORNE) United States Patent ()fiice 3,342,179 Patented Sept. 19, 1967 BLOOD COLLECTION AND SAMPLING APPA- RATUS HAVING SEPARABLE COUPLING MEANS Norbert W. Ellmann, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filed June 18, 1965, Ser. No. 465,024 6 Claims. (Cl. 128-214.2)

This invention is directed to an apparatus for the collection and sampling of blood drawn from a donor. More specifically, the apparatus of the invention provides an in-line needle construction whereby a needle mounted in a housing secured to the blood collection tubing can readily be exposed for collection of a blood sample by the camming action of opposed faces of the housing which are defined by a rupturable line of weakness.

Co-pending patent application Ser. No. 267,752, filed Mar. 25, 1963, now patent No. 3,217,710, issued Nov. 16, 1965, shows a blood collection apparatus provided with an in-line needle, the in-line needle being molded in a rupturable plastic hub member which is located in the collection tubing. The hub member is separable to expose said needle, whereby the exposed needle can be inserted into a pilot tube for the collection of a sample of the donors blood, for cross-matching purposes. In the fabrication of the in-line needle assembly as shown in said co-pending application, the hub assembly is molded directly over the in-line needle per se. Consequently, when the hub portion is ruptured and the upper segment thereof is removed in order to expose the needle, it can often occur that the tight fit of the hub on the needle renders it difiicult to remove the upper portion from the needle. This is, of course, undesirable since it is essential to the economy of blood collection that the collection be susceptible of taking place in a relatively short period of time, because of the necessity of close observation by a trained technician.

The instant invention overcomes the aforementioned deficiencies of the prior art devices, by providing a line of weakness about the periphery of the hollow body mem her in which the in-line needle is mounted. The line of weakness is located at a skew angle relative to the longitudinal axis of said body member, whereby a twisting force applied to the upper and lower section of said body member in opposed direction severs said body member at said score line. This provides opposed cam faces which act upon each other to relatively separate the upper and lower body sections to displace the upper body section from the needle, which is fixedly mounted in the lower body section, thereby facilitating removal of the upper body section and concomitant exposure of the inline needle. The ruptured score line also provides a tamper indication. A self-lubricating plastic sleeve may be anchored in the upper body section releasably enveloping the in-line needle and extending beyond said line of weakness, to provide a leak-proof seal at the line of weakness and to facilitate removal of said upper body section.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an in-line needle assembly construction which enables easy separation of the inline needle housing to expose said in-line needle for collection of a blood sample.

Another object of this invention is to provide an in-line needle assembly having a housing including means adapted to facilitate relative displacement of adjacent sections of said body member to expose the penetrating end of the in-line needle.

A further object of this invention is to provide an in-line needle assembly comprising a frangible plastic housing having a line of weakness in skew relation to the longitudinal axis of the housing, whereby relative rotation in opposite directions of the housing sections on either side of said line of weakness, severs said housing at said line of weakness, the exposed edges at said severed line of weakness providing cam faces which act upon each other to longitudinally displace the housing sections with respect to each other, thereby facilitating removal of the housing section covering the pointed end of said needle.

A concomitant object of this invention is to provide an in-line needle assembly comprising a needle housing having a scoredine in skew relation to the longitudinal axis thereof, and dividing said body member into upper and lower sections, an in-line needle located in said housing having a lower end anchored in said lower section and a pointed end extending into said upper section, and a sleeve fixedly mounted in said upper section, enveloping the in-line needle and extending beyond said line of weakness into said lower section, whereby relative rotation of said upper and lower sections with respect to each other breaks said housing at said score line and longitudinally separates said housing sections to facilitate removal of said upper section from said needle point section.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent as the same become better understood by reference to the following detaileddescription when considered in connection with the attached drawings.

Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic view showing the blood collection and sampling apparatus employing the in-line needle assembly of this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view of the in-line needle assembly of this invention taken along line 2--2 of FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 33 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a side elevational view, partly in section, showing the in-line needle assembly with the upper and lower sections of the housing rotated with respect to each other and with the opposed camming faces acting against each other;

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational view of the apparatus of FIGURE 1, after the device has been severed at its line of weakness and the housing sections separated; and

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified embodiment of the invention.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, there is shown a blood collecting and sampling apparatus generally indicated at 9 which includes a blood collecting container 10 in which blood from a donor is accumulated. The container 10 is provided with a lower end strap 11. through which a supporting member (not shown) can extend to support the container below a donor whereby blood is collected in the container by gravity flow. A lower end portion 12 of the container 10 is provided with a centrally disposed passage 13 to which a flexible tube 14 is connected for communication with the interior of the container 10. A ball closure 15 in the passage 13 prevents tan anti-coagulant, normally contained in the container 10, from escaping into tube 14. The ball 15 is displaced into the container 10 prior to the collection of blood, so that blood can flow thereinto.

The container 10 is seen to be provided with fitments 17 and 13 for the later administration of blood. The blood collecting container 10 preferably takes the form of a bag composed of plasticized polyvinylchloride; however, the invention is not dependent upon any particular type of blood collecting container.

The in-line needle assembly 18 includes a housing generally indicated at 20 having a passage 29 therethrough in which the in-line needle 40 is disposed. The housing 20 includes an upper section 22 and a lower section 21 severably interconnected by a neck portion having a frangible score line or line of weakness 24 formed therein. The flared end 41 of in-line needle or cannula 40 is seen to be anchored in lower section 21 (FIG. 2) and to have a pointed piercing end section extending beyond score line 24 into upper section 22. Although the end 41 of the cannula is shown to be flared for purposes of keying, any suitable means, such as projections or the like extending radially outwardly from the end of the cannula suitable for locking the cannula to lower section 21 of housing 20, can be utilized.

Intermediate neck section 23 of housing 20 is seen to be of considerably smaller diameter than upper and lower body sections 21 and 22, to facilitate severance of the housing at the score line when finger pressure is applied in opposite directions to the pairs of integral wing members 27, 28 and 30, 31, which are formed on the respective lower and upper housing 21 and 22. Upper and lower sections 21 and 22 have respective tapered end members 26 and 25 over which the end of tubing length 14 and 14 are respectively secured, :as by friction-fit, heat-sealing or solvent sealing. The other end of tube 14 is connected to an intravenous needle assembly 35 of conventional construction. A sterility-maintaining hood 3a is provided which removably fits over cannula 37. Tubes 14, 14', in-line needle assembly 18 and intravenous needle assembly 35 comprise the collection conduit for the channeling of blood from the venous system of a donor to the blood collecting container Passage 29 has an enlarged eccentric cut-out or ledge formed at the upper end thereof in upper housing section 22. An accentric shoulder 52 of sleeve member 50 is mounted in cut-out 53, locking the sleeve 50 in the upper housing section (FIG. 3). Body section 51 of sleeve 50 extends from the collar 52, beyond the score line 24 into the lower body section 21. The sleeve is mounted over the in-line needle 40, tightly and releasably enveloping the same.

It will be observed that score line 24 is located in skew relation to the longitudinal axis of the passage 29, the score line being substantially planar and extending around the entire periphery of the neck section 23 of housing 26 and terminating at its horizontal extremities in horizontal edge portions 33 and 34 (FIG. 2). When ruptured, the score line presents opposed camming faces 55 and 56.

In the operation of the apparatus of this invention, the cannula 37 is inserted into the vein of a blood donor and blood is transfused through the collecting tubing 19 into the blood collection container, after the ball has been removed from the end of tubing 14. When the container is filled with blood, length of tubing 14' is temporarily closed as by clamping with a hemostat; tubing length 14 then is sealed off, by knotting, crimping with a metal ferrule, electronic sealing or the like. The in-line needle housing 20 is then grasped as by placing the forefinger and thumb of the left hand on wings and 31 and the thumb and forefinger of the right hand on wings 27 and 28. Finger pressure is then applied to the wing members, to rotate the upper and lower body sections in opposing directions, as shown in FIGURE 4. Initial rotation of the respective upper and lower housing sections as described, severs these sections along the score line 24 and, as rotation is continued, the opposed cam surfaces 55 and 56, which are opposingly inclined, interact in camming relationship to each other to drive the upper and lower housing sections 21 and 22 apart along the longitudinal axis of passage 29. When the respective body sections have been rotated 180, the relative displacement of the housing sections by virtue of the camming action is completed, and these sections are then grasped in the hands of the technician and pulled apart to expose point 42 of in-line needle 40. The point of the in-line needle 40 is then inserted in the rubber stopper of an evacuated pilot tube (not shown), the hemostat which has clamped tubing 14' is removed, and blood from cannula 37 flows through tube 14' and in-line needle 40 into the pilot tube. This provides a sterile blood sample. The pilot tube is properly marked with the same identifying markings as container 10, for subsequent cross-matching purposes at the time that it is desired to administer the blood in container 10 into a patient.

In constructing in-line needle assembly 18, housing 20 is molded over needle 40. Consequently, because of the tight fit which is obtained during molding, the camming action effected by the opposing forces of cam faces 55 and 56 forces the housing sections 21 and 22 apart and loosens the cannula in upper section 22 for removal therefrom.

To further facilitate the removal of the in-line needle 49, sleeve 50 is inserted over the cannula, in tight-fitting relation, prior to the molding of the housing 20 thereover. This facilitates the removal of the upper housing section, since the sleeve St) is fabricated of a self-lubricating material having a low coefiicient of friction, such as nylon. The in-1ine needle 40 is therefore easily slidable out of sleeve 50. The sleeve 50 also serves to maintain the sterility of the in-line needle 40 and to prevent leakage of blood by providing a tight seal at the score line to prevent passage of blood or contaminants through the score line perforations.

The eccentric shoulder 52 of sleeve 50 serves to anchor the shoulder and consequently the upper end of the sleeve in upper housing section 22, so that the sleeve is displaced with upper housing section 22 when the upper and lower housing sections are severed by twisting. Additionally, this anchoring of the sleeve enables the sleeve to be removed from the in-line needle when the upper and lower body sections are pulled apart, as best shown in FIG. 5.

It will be appreciated that, although the line of weakness is shown in the drawings as being located at an angle of approximately 45 with respect to the longitudinal axis of passage 29, this angle can be varied without departing from this invention. For example, by increasing the angle of the score line with respect to the longitudinal axis of passage 29, the longitudinal displacement of the housing sections obtained by the interaction of cam faces 55 and 56 can be increased. By decreasing the angle of the score line the mechanical advantage obtained by the interacting cam faces can be increased.

Furthermore, although the score line 24 is shown in the preferred embodiment as being of a substantially planar configuration having horizontal edge portions 33 and 34, it is within the scope of this invention for the score line to have a completely planar configuration or to have a continuously curved shape such as shown by score line 24' of FIG. 7. So long as the score line is a substantially continuous curve or substantially straight line, convenient camming action of the cam faces is obtained. It will further be appreciated that although the neck 23 is shown in the drawing as being of circular cross-section, the cross-sectional shape of such neck and its dimensions may be varied without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

The housing 20 is preferably a unitary, molded member of rigid, frangible plastic material such as a polycarbonate (commercially available as Lexan) or an acetate butyrate styrene copolymer (commercially available as Crythat other forms of lines of weakness can be utilized, such as by necking down the plastic in the area which is desired to be broken.

The above-described embodiment of the invention is illustrative in character only, and it will be understood that modifications in form and detail in the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, the present invention is not to be considered as limited except as is consonant with the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a hollow frangible housing having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercomrnunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a line of weakness defined by said housing about the periphery thereof in skew relation to the longitudinal axis of said housing providing opposed cam faces and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper section and a lower section, a cannula mounted in said housing and having a first end fixedly mounted in said lower section and a pointed end removably extending into said upper section, whereby said cam faces interact to longitudinally separate said upper and lower sections when said sections are twisted in opposite directions relative to each other.

2. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a hollow plastic housing having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercomrnunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a substantially planar line of weakness defined by said housing about the periphery thereof in skew relation to the longitudinal axis of said housing and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper section and a lower section, a cannula mounted in said housing and having a first end fixedly mounted in said lower section and a pointed end removably extending into said upper section, whereby the edges of said line of weakness act as camming surfaces to facilitate separation of said upper and lower sections when said sections are twisted in opposite directions relative to each other.

3. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a hollow plastic housing having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercommunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a substantially planar score line defined by said housing about the periphery thereof in skew relation to the longitudinal axis of said housing and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper section and a lower section, a cannula mounted in said housing and having a first end fixedly mounted in said lower section and a pointed end removably extending into said upper section, a pair of opposed wing members mounted on each of said upper and lower sections, whereby the edges of said housing act as camming surfaces to longitudinally separate said upper and lower sections when said sections are twisted in opposite directions relative to each other by application of finger pressure to said wing members.

4. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a plastic housing defining a longitudinally extending passage and having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercomrnunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a peripherally extending line of weakness defined by said housing in skew relation to said passage and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper section and a lower section, a cannula in said passage having a first end fixedly mounted in said lower section and a point removably extending into said upper section, a pair of opposed wing members mounted in opposition on each of said upper and lower sections, whereby application of twisting finger pressure to said wing members to rotate said sections with respect to each other severs said housing at said score line and the severed score line faces act as camming surfaces to separate said body sections, thereby facilitating removal of said upper section to expose said cannula point for insertion into a pilot tube.

5. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a plastic housing defining a longitudinally extending passage and having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercomrnunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a peripherally extending substantially planar score line defined by said housing in skew relation to said passage and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper section and a lower section, a cannula in said passage having a first end fixedly mounted in said lower section and a point removably extending into said upper section, a sleeve surrounding a portion of said cannula and having one end fixedly secured to said upper section and a second end removably mounted in said lower section, a pair of opposed wing members mounted in opposition on each of said upper and lower sections, whereby application of twisting finger pressure to said wing members to rotate said sections with respect to each other severs said housing at said score line and the severed score line faces act as camming surfaces to separate said sections, thereby facilitating removal of said upper section to expose said cannula point for insertion into a pilot tube.

6. Blood collection apparatus comprising: a blood collection container, a hypodermic needle, a frangible plastic housing defining a longitudinally extending passage and having an upper end and a lower end, a first length of flexible tubing intercomrnunicating said container and said upper end, a second length of tubing intercommunicating said lower end and said hypodermic needle, a peripherally extending substantially planar score line defined by said housing in skew relation to said passage and conditioning said housing for separation into an upper r section and a lower section, a cannula in said passage having a flared end fixedly molded in said lower section and a pointed end removably extending into said upper section, a flexible sleeve mounted in said passage releasably encircling said cannula and having a first end anchored in said upper section and a removable second end extending beyond said score line into said lower section, a pair of opposed wing members mounted in opposition on each of said upper and lower sections, whereby application of twisting finger pressure to said wing members to rotate said sections with respect to each other severs said housing at said score line and the severed score line faces act as camming surfaces to separate said sections thereby facilitating removal of said upper section and said flexible sleeve to expose said cannula point for insertion into a pilot tube.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,073,307 1/1963 Stevens 128-221 3,127,892 4/ 1964 Bellamy et al 128-2142 3,217,710 11/1965 Beall et a1. 128-214.2

FOREIGN PATENTS 10,085 1898 Great Britain. 875,361 8/ 1961 Great Britain.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

DALTON R. TRULUCK, Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US3654924 *May 14, 1970Apr 11, 1972Abbott LabBlood collection assembly
US4136694 *Jun 10, 1977Jan 30, 1979Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Separable integral donor tube utilizing an integral plastic member with tube clamp
US4326518 *Apr 7, 1980Apr 27, 1982Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Separable integral donor connector with manual clamping means
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US7699828Oct 13, 2005Apr 20, 2010Fenwal, Inc.Container for receiving a blood sample
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WO1995012780A1 *Oct 28, 1994May 11, 1995Migada IncManually-severable coupling device, and medical infusion assembly including same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/408, 604/412, 285/4, 604/905
International ClassificationA61J1/14, A61M1/02, A61J1/12
Cooperative ClassificationA61J1/12, A61M39/14, Y10S604/905, A61M39/10, A61M5/158, A61M1/02
European ClassificationA61M1/02, A61M5/158