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Publication numberUS3342402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1967
Filing dateMay 17, 1965
Priority dateMay 17, 1965
Also published asDE1983378U
Publication numberUS 3342402 A, US 3342402A, US-A-3342402, US3342402 A, US3342402A
InventorsKardon Emanuel S
Original AssigneeAmerican Bag & Paper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag
US 3342402 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 19, 1967 E. KARDON 3,342,402

Y BAG ile May 17, 1965 r I 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F I G. I.

F I G. 3.

INVENTOR EMANUEL S. KARDON ATTQR P 1967 EfSgKARDON 3,342,402

BAG

Filed May 17, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 5.

FIG. 7.

INVENTOR EMANUEL S. KARDON ATTORNEYS United States Patent Filed May 17, 1965, Ser. No. 456,141 Claims. (Cl. 22960) This invention relates to bags and a method of bag making and, more specifically, to the construction of the bottom of a bag of the automatic or self-opening type.

It is the general object of this invention to provide a bag of the indicated type with an insert which is positioned Within the bottom folds of the bottom construction. Many materials which are sold in bags require that there be accompanied with the bag a brochure of instructions or the like or an envelope containing additional material, such as a packet of seeds. In the past, these inserts have generally been located inside the bag so that it is necessary to open the top of the bag in order to obtain access to the insert. This prior arrangement involves several disadvantages. For example, sometimes the insert is covered completely by the ingredients of the bag and is diflicult to find. Moreover, there is no way of determining if the bag does not contain this essential insert without opening the bag. In accordance with applicants bag construction, there is provided an insert which is in view and is easily accessible.

The objects and features of the invention will become apparent from a consideration of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a tube from which the bag embodying the present invention may be made;

FIGURE 2 is another view of the bag shown in FIG- URE 1 illustrating a step in the method of formation of the bottom of the bag;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view illustrating a subsequent step in the formation of the bag bottom;

FIGURE 4 is a plan view illustrating a further step in the formation of the bag bottom;

FIGURE 5 is a plan view illustrating a still further step in the formation of the bag bottom involving the insertion of the insert within the bottom folds;

FIGURE 6 is a plan view illustrating an alternate method of incorporating the insert within the bottom folds of the bag; and

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view illustrating the completed bag bottom containing the insert therein.

The bag shown in the drawings illustrating the present invention is similar to that disclosed in US. Patent No. 2,496,796 to E. S. Kardon, the essential difference being the provision of the insert as described below. The bag comprises an outer sheet 10, which may be made of paper or another suitable material, and an inner lining 12, which may be made of an impervious, heat-sealable material so that the bag may be sealed against outside air and moisture by heat sealing the lining in a manner to be described hereinafter. In the preferred embodiment, inner lining 12 is made of a separate sheet of heat-seal able material so that the overlapping faces of the lining may be caused to adhere to each other upon the application of heat thereto. However, it is to be noted that the sealing may be effected by the application of an adhesive at the desired places to cause the lining faces to adhere to each other at such places.

The bag of this invention is made from an intucked, fiat bag tube such as the one shown in FIGURE 1 and which may be made by one of the automatic bag making machines well known in the art. As shown in FIGURE 2, a pair of spaced parallel slits 20 are formed at the bottom of the other side 15 of the tube. Slits 20 extend longitudinally from the bottom edge of the tube and are spaced equidistantly from the longitudinal edges of side 15. Slits 20 extend through both the outer sheet 10 and the liner 12 to provide a double ply tab portion 22.

The bottom end of the tube is then formed into a diamond fold as shown in FIGURE 3 with the tab portion 22 located at one end and providing upwardly extending flaps 24 in the center of the fold. The outer faces of flaps 24 are comprised of a portion of the outer sheet 10 which has a two ply thickness of each sealable lining 12 therebetween. Flaps 24 are united by a vertical fold 26 which is at the apex of the inner triangle 30 of the diamond fold whereby there will be no opening in this area when the bottom of the bag is sealed as will be described hereafter.

While the bottom of the bag is being folded into the position shown in FIGURE 3, heat is applied at right angles to flaps 24 as is shown by the arrows in FIGURE 3. The heat is applied in an amount necessary to cause the opposing faces of the portion of lining 12 within flaps 24 to adhere to each other and thereby seal the entire length thereof. Flaps 24 are then folded to the position shown in FIGURE 4 and lie flush with the plane of the formed portion of the bag bottom.

While the bag bottom is in the condition shown in FIGURE 4 of the drawings, heat is applied across the protruding tab portion 28 of the bag bottom along the transverse line 32-32 which is located between the tab portion 28 and the fold or crease line 19, upon which the final fold of the bottom portion will be made.

The bottom of the bag is provided with a small glue deposit 33 in a region such that when the insert is positioned within the bottom flap, the insert will overlie the glue deposit. This deposit 33 is shown in FIGURE 4.

The triangular tab portion 30 of the diamond folded bottom is now bent over along the fold or crease line 21 and the insert 40 is positioned between the triangular portion 30 and the rectangular bottom of the bag between the crease lines 19 and 21. The insert 40 will be fixed in position by adhesive contact with the glue deposit 33 on the bottom portion. The portion 28 with the tab 22 extending therefrom is folded over along the crease line 19 to complete the formation of the bottom. Prior to this last step, a portion of the outer bottom face of the folded triangular portion 30' has adhesive applied thereto in a region 42 such that when the portion 30 and tab 22 are folded over they will have the adhesive therebetween and be held in position. It is important that the adhesive be limited to this region so that only the bottom folds are secured together and not to the rectangular bottom portion or the insert. Thus, the tab portion 22 is caused to adhere to the bottom of the bag by the application of this suitable adhesive between the contiguous faces of the tab portion 22 and the triangular portion 30 of the bag bottom structure.

The completed bag construction is shown in FIGURE 7. It will be apparent that the bag will have an appropriate notation at some prominent location referring to the insert Within the bottom flaps of the bag.

It will be seen that a bag constructed as described above will have the bottom effectively closed and sealed to prevent any sifting of finely powdered contents through the bottom and to prevent any passage of air or vapor through the bottom which might tend to deteriorate the contents of the bag when it is in a filled condition.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an alternate procedure for placing the insert in the bag bottom construction. In this alternate procedure the bag bottom is formed essentially as described above with the triangular portion 30 being folded along the crease 21 and the tab portion 22 being folded along the crease 19 and secured into the folded condition by the adhesive 42. The insert 40 is then inserted by movement thereof in the direction of the arrow shown in FIGURE 6 into the space between the bottom flaps and the rectangular bottom portion of the bag. In this procedure it is essential that the insert 40 be inserted from the open end of the bottom structure opposite to that adjacent the edge 3-9 of the flaps 24. This is desirable because the edge 39 tends to interfere with the insertion of the insert 40 from the opposite direction. However, when inserted as shown in FIGURE 6, there is no such interference. It is to be noted that the insert will be held in position in the bag bottom even without the provision of the spot of glue as described above. This is because of the rather substantial frictional contact between the bottom folds and the bottom of the bag, and because the contents of the bag provide a substantial force downwardly to hold the insert in position. When no adhesive for securing the insert is used, it is desirable that the insert be substantially the same size as the bag bottom so that it extends within the regions of the folds 19 and 21.

It is to be understood that the invention is to be applicable to unlined bags as well as lined bags. In the case of unlined bags it will be understood. that suitable adhesives will be applied at the appropriate places to cause appropriate abutting faces to adhere. Accordingly, it is not desired to be limited except as required by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A bag comprising a tubular member collapsible to a flattened condition for forming a pair of oppositely disposed walls, a diamond fold at the bottom of the bag forming at its ends a pair of bottom fold portions, said bottom fold portions being folded over along parallel spaced fold lines forming side edges of the bag bottom, the portion of the diamond fold between said fold lines being rectangular, said bottom fold portions being constructed to overlap one another in the folded condition thereof, the outer bottom fold portion being secured to the inner bottom fold portion, which is adjacent the rectangular bottom portion, by adhesive located only in a region where said bottom fold portions overlap and between the opposed faces of the overlapping regions, and an insert member positioned between the rectangular bottom portion and the portions of said bottom fold portions overlapping the same, said insert member and said rectangular bottom portion and said bottom fold portions being unsecured together and being in cooperative frictional engagement for retaining said insert member in the bag bottom while permitting removal of said insert member from its frictionally retained position in the bag without any substantial destruction of the insert memher or the bag.

2. A bag according to claim 1 comprising adhesive means securing a small portion of said insert member to a portion of the bag bottom.

3. A bag according to claim 1 wherein said insert member is substantially rectangular and has a pair of side edges located proximate to said fold lines for said bottom fold portions and wherein the only engagement bet-ween said insert member and the bag is said frictional engagement.

4. A bag comprising a tubular member collapsible to a flattened condition for forming a pair of oppositely disposed walls, a bottom construction having a pair of bottom fold portions, means securing said bottom fold portions together, and an insert member positioned between said bottom fold portions and a portion of the bag bottom adjacent thereto, said insert member and said bottom portion and said bottom fold portions being in cooperative frictional engagement for retaining said insert member in the bag bottom while permitting removal of said insert member from its retained position in the bag without any substantial destruction of the insert member. I

5. A bag comprising a tubular member collapsible to a flattened condition for forming a pair of oppositely disposed walls, a bottom construction having a pair of overlapping bottom fold portions, said bottom fold portions being secured together adhesively in the overlapping region thereof, and an insert member positioned between said bottom fold portions and a portion of the bag bottom adjacent thereto, said insert member and said bag bottom portion and said bottom fold portions being in cooperative frictional engagement for retaining said insert member in the bag bottom while permitting removal of said insert from its retained position in the bag without tearing of the insert member or the bag.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,967,204 7/1934 Genz.

2,088,232 7/1937 Cumming 229-62 2,353,311 7/1944 Karlson 93 -35 2,353,402 7/1944 Haslacher 93 -35 2,460,888 2/1949 Happe 229 59 2,496,796 9/1950 Kardon 229 56 2,777,574 1/1957 Brody 229-56 2,867,372 1/1959 Fox 229-56 2,998,911 9/1961 Hahn et al 229-66 JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

DAVID M. BOCKENEK, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1967204 *Oct 4, 1932Jul 17, 1934William Genz FrederickContainer with shape-retaining slide
US2088232 *Jan 9, 1936Jul 27, 1937Colonial Laundries IncLaundry bag
US2353311 *May 26, 1941Jul 11, 1944Union Bag & Paper CorpBag and method of making same
US2353402 *Apr 8, 1942Jul 11, 1944Alfred B HaslacherMethod of making impervious bags
US2460888 *Dec 1, 1944Feb 8, 1949Walter J KoinzanOil filter
US2496796 *Oct 11, 1947Feb 7, 1950Kardon Emanuel SBag and method of making the same
US2777574 *Nov 17, 1954Jan 15, 1957Arthur BrodyPhonograph record holder
US2867372 *Oct 5, 1955Jan 6, 1959Scott & Sons Co O MBag structure with pocket
US2998911 *Dec 1, 1958Sep 5, 1961Union Bag Camp Paper CorpBag opening device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4976674 *Mar 6, 1990Dec 11, 1990American Packaging CorporationBag and method of making the same
US5011299 *Feb 20, 1990Apr 30, 1991American Packaging CorporationBag construction
US5472282 *May 2, 1994Dec 5, 1995H. G. Weber & Company, Inc.Quasi-heat seal SOS bag
US5518316 *May 25, 1994May 21, 1996H. G. Weber And Company, Inc.Heat sealed bag
US5520464 *May 25, 1994May 28, 1996H.G. Weber And Company, Inc.Heat seal SOS bag
US5568980 *Dec 9, 1994Oct 29, 1996H.G. Weber Co., Inc.Quasi-heat seal SOS bag
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/40, 383/126
International ClassificationB65D30/18, B65D30/10
Cooperative ClassificationB65D31/08
European ClassificationB65D31/08