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Publication numberUS3342419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1967
Filing dateJan 4, 1965
Priority dateJan 4, 1965
Publication numberUS 3342419 A, US 3342419A, US-A-3342419, US3342419 A, US3342419A
InventorsWeese Wilfred W
Original AssigneeHarry Swartz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing shower head
US 3342419 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 19, 1967 w. w. WEESE DISPENSING SHOWER HEAD 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 4, I 1965 INVENTOR WILFRED W WEESE ATTORNEYS Sept. 19, 1967 w. w. WEESE DISPENSING SHOWER HEAD 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 4, 1965 FIGG ' FIGIO INVENTOR WILFRED W WEESE BY mzmw ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,342,419 DISPENSING SHOWER HEAD Wilfred W. Weese, New York, N.Y., assignorto Harry Swartz, New York, N.Y. Filed Jan. 4, 1965, Ser. No.-422,946 14 Claims. (Cl. 239-313) This invention relates to a shower head, and more particularly, to apparatus for dispensing a treatment .solution from a shower head.

Various attempts have been made to provide means for introducing treatment materials, such as shampoo, cosmetic and medicinal preparations into the spray from a shower head. Devices previously proposed have been awkward to use and do not provide for adequate mixing of the treatment material with the Water spray.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide an improved shower head.

It is another object of this invention to provide safe and etficient means for introducing treatment fluid into the shower spray.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an improved shower head dispensing device.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide means for conveniently transferring a treatment fluid from a container to a shower head.

These objects are accomplished in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention by a shower head having a chamber for receiving treatment fluid. A piston is mounted for reciprocation in the chamber, and a supply conduit communicates between the exterior of the shower head and the interior of the chamber. A fitting on the outside of the shower head is adapted to receive from a container pressurized fluid under suflicient pressure to displace the piston. An outlet conduit communicates between the interior of the chamber and the interior of the shower head and a spring urges the piston toward the outlet conduit, thereby dispensing the treatment fluid into the water stream which flows through the shower head. The rate of flow of treatment fluid through the outlet conduit may be adjusted by a valve, and the spray from the shower head may be changed to provide a converging or diverging spray pattern. The fitting on the exterior of the shower head is adapted to receive a hollow coupling on the valve stem of a conventional pressurized container. When the valve stem is displaced, fluid flows from the container into the chamber. A cap on the valve stem rigidly engages the container to prevent accidental displacement of the valve stem, but the cap is readily released to allow operation of the valve stem.

This preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the shower head and a container having the coupling and cap of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of the shower head, adjusted for a converging spray pattern;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the shower head showing the piston partially displaced from its position in FIG. 2 and adjusted for a diverging spray pattern;

FIG. 4 is a detail sectional view of the treatment fluid chamber with the piston at the end of its travel;

FIG. 5 is a detail perspective view of the metering ring for adjusting the rate of flow of treatment fluid;

FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view of the valve of a pressurized container and showing the locking cap and coupling of this invention;

FIG. 7 is a detail view of the valve of the pressurized container as in FIG. 6, but with the locking cap in the released position;

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view of the valve and locking cap along the line 8-8 in FIG, 6;

r 3,342,419 Patented Sept. 19, 1967 FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the locking cap of this invention; and

FIG. 10 is a side elevational view of the locking cap.

Referring to FIG. 1, the apparatus of this invention includes a shower head 2 which may be mounted on the end of a flexible pipe 4. A coupling 6 on a valve stem of a conventional pressurized container 8 cooperates with a fitting 10' on the shower head for transferring treatment fluid from the container 8 into the shower head 2. A locking cap 12 engages the valve stem and prevents accidental discharge of the contents from the container 8.

The shower head '2 is secured to the flexible pipe 4 by a coupling 14, as shown in FIG. 2. The shower 'head 2 includes a hollow body '16 in which a cylinder 18 is mounted. The cylinder 18 has a tubular extension 20 which is threadedly secured in the coupling 14. The tubular extension 20 has a radial flange 22, and the end portion of the body 16 is clamped between the flange 22 and thecoupling 14.

At the opposite end of the body 16, external screw threads 24 are provide and a ring 26 is threadedly secured on the body 16. A plurality of pins 28 are secured in the ring 26 and extend into an annular groove 30 in the body 16. By rotating the ring 26, it may be displaced axially relative 'to the body 16 until the pins 28 engage the shoulder at one end of the groove 30', or the threads 24 at the opposite end of the groove 30. A flexible spray element 32 of substantial thickness has a band 34 secured along its periphery. The band 34 is also secured to the ring 26. A sleeve 36 is bonded in a central opening in the spray element 32. The spray element 32 may be formed of rubber or other flexible material.

A cylinder cover 38 is mounted in the end of the cylinder 18 and held in place by a snap ring 40. The cover 38 includes a cylindrical boss 42 and a tubular portion 44- extending outwardly from the boss 42. The sleeve 36 is mounted on the tubular portion 44 with one end abutting against the boss 42 and the opposite end abutting against an annular ring 46. The ring 46 is secured on the tubular portion 44 by a snap ring 48. There is a sufliciently close fit between the sleeve 36 and the tubular portion 44 to prevent leakage therebetween, but the sleeve 36 is free to turn relative to the tubular 'portion'4'4. If desired, an O-ring or other sealing means maybe inserted between the sleeve 36 and the tubular portion 44.

The spray element 32 is of substantial thickness and has a plurality of nozzle openings 50. The length of the nozzle openings may be extended by providing projections 52 on the outer surface of the spray element 32. Since the nozzle openings 50 are relatively long, .the stream issuing from the nozzle remains in a relatively narrow stream for a substantial distance away from the spray element 32. The direction of the stream issuing from each nozzle 50 may be adjusted by turning the ring 26 relative to the body 16. When the ring 26 is adjusted to the position shown in FIG. 2, the streams issuing from the nozzles 50' form a convering pattern, and when the ring .26 is adjusted to the position shown in FIG. 3., 'a divergent spray pattern is obtained. While the ring 26 is being rotated with respect to the body 16, the spray element 32 and the band 34 rotate with the ring 26, and the sleeve 36 rotates relative to the tubular portion 44.

Water flows into the interior of the body 16 from the tubular extension 20 through ports 54. A check valve 56 prevents the reverse flow of water from the body 16, back through the ports 54. The check valve 56 is in the form of a flexible, resilient band, preferably formed of rubber. Water pressure in the tubular extension 20 urges the valve 56 away from the ports-54 and the water flows into the at one end than at the other, so that the thin end of the band deflects to a greater extent under the pressure of the water flowing through the ports 54, thereby deflecting the stream downwardly into the body 16.

The cylinder 18 has a rod 58 mounted for reciprocating movement in one end of the cylinder 18 and the opposite end of the rod 58 is mounted in the tubular portion 44 of the cover 38. A collar 60 is secured on the rod 58 by a pin 62 adjacent one end of the cylinder 18 and a collar 64 is secured on the opposite end of the rod 58 by a pin 66. A valve element 68 is secured on the intermediate portion of the rod 58 by a pin 70. A piston 72 in the cylinder 18 is guided by the rod 58, but it is a floating piston and moves longitudinally relative to the rod 58, between the collar 60 and the valve element 68. A counterbore 74in the cover 38 forms a valve seat for the valve member 68. At the bottom of the counterbore 74, a Washer 76 frictionally grips the rod 58 to provide resistance to longitudinal displacement of the rod. The washer is held in place by a snap ring 78. A plurality of ports 80 are provided in the boss 42 and a valve in the form of a metering ring 82 is slidably mounted on the boss 42. A spring 84 in the cylinder urges the piston 72 towards the outlet ports 80 and a plurality of vent openings 86 in the cylinder 18 allow water to flow into and out of the space behind the piston.

As shown in FIG. 5, the metering ring 82 has a slot 83 to permit radial expansion of the ring. The free internal diameter of the ring 82 is slightly less than the external diameter of the boss 42, and the friction between them resists displacement of the ring relative to the boss. The metering ring 82 has a sloping portion 90 and the length of the ring 82 at the end of the sloping portion adjacent the slot 88 is less than the distance between the end wall 38 and the ports 80, so that one or more of the ports 80 may be uncovered. By turning the ring 82 relative to the boss 42, the rate of flow through the ports 80 may be adjusted.

Treatment fluid is supplied to the cylinder 18 from the fitting through a tube 92 having one end mounted in the cylinder 18 and the opposite end mounted in a bore 94 extending through the body 16. The cylinder 18 has a passage 96 communicating between the tube 92 and the interior of the cylinder 18. In order to allow the fluid from the passage 96 to flow into the cylinder 18 between the piston and the end wall 38 a notch 98 is provided in the peripheral edge of the piston 72, as shown in FIG. 2. The fitting 10 is secured in the bore 94 and has a longitu dinal passage 100 and a plurality of radial passages 102. The exterior of the fitting 10 is substantially cylindrical adjacent the radial passages 102. A shoulder in the bore 100 forms a seat 104 for a ball 106. The ball 106 is urged toward the seat 104 by a spring 108, thereby forming a check valve preventing the escape of fluid from the cyl inder 18 through the fitting 10.

The fitting 10 cooperates with the coupling 6, as shown in FIG. 1, for supplying treatment fluid from a pressurized container 8 to the interior of the cylinder 18. AS shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the coupling 6 is in the form of a hollow torus 110 having aligned circular openings 112 on opposite sides. The torus 110 is preferably formed of a resilient material, and the openings 112 have a slight 1y smaller diameter than that of the fitting 10 adjacent the radial passages 102, so that the openings 112 dilate and form a tight sealing relation with the fitting when the coupling 6 is applied over the fitting, as shown in FIG. 2. The radial passages 102 are substantially aligned with the hollow interior portion of the torus 110.

The coupling 6 is mounted on the end of a valve stem 114 of a conventional pressurized container 8. The conventional valve assembly includes a valve cup 116 which is rolled and welded to the wall of the container to form a rim 118. A resilient valve seat 120 is mounted in the valve cup 116 for supporting the valve stem 114. The valve stem 114 has a radial flange 122 which engages the end of the valve seat 120 and has a valve head 124 enclosing the end of the stem 114. A plurality of ports 126 are provided in the valve steam 114 adjacent the valve head 124. The valve is operated by swinging the upper end of the stem 114, thereby causing the stem to pivot on its flange 122. Since the valve seat is formed of a resilient material, the swinging movement of the stem causes the valve head 124 to become separated from the valve seat 120 at one side of the stem 114. Fluid under pressure flows from the interior of the container 8 through a tube 128 and into the valve stem 114. Therefore, when the valve stem 114 is displaced from its upright position, the valve opens and pressurized fluid flows through the stem and into the coupling 110. The resiliency of the valve seat 120 causes the stem to return to its upright position when the deflecting force is removed.

In order to prevent accidental discharge of the contents of the container 8, a locking cap is provided. The cap 12 includes a hub portion 130 and a web portion 132, as shown in FIGS. 6 to 10. The stem 114 has screw threads 134 formed thereon and the hub 130 is internally threaded to cooperate with the threads 134. By turning the hub 130, the cap 12 is displaced longitudinally relative to the stem 114.

The valve cup 116 has an annular groove 136 formed in its interior surface and, as shown in FIG. 6, the web 132 extends outwardly from the hub 130 sufliciently for its peripheral edge to engage in the groove 136, when the hub is at the lower end of the threaded portion 134. The web 132 is sufliciently resilient to pass over the rim 118 and to spring outwardly into the groove 136. A flange 138 projects outwardly from the web portion 132 adjacent th peripheral edge of the web. The shape of the flange 138 makes the edge of the web 132 more rigid and prevents the web 132 from being displaced too deeply into the cup 116.

The cap 12 has a lock for preventing rotation of the cap relative to the stem. A pair of slots 140 extend through the flange 138 and the web 132 and terminate adjacent the hub 130, as shown in FIG. 8. The slots 140 separate a wedge portion 142 from the remainder of the cap 12. The wedge portion 142 is hinged on the web 132 between the ends of the slots 140. To facilitate swinging of the wedge portion 142 into the groove 136, after the cap 12 has peen displaced to the position shown in FIG. 6, the peripheral edge of the web 132 is chamfered, as shown in FIG. 7. A colored spot 144 or other indicator may be provided on the wedge portion 142.

The web 132 is inserted in the valve cup 116 by turning the cap 12 relative to the stem 114, while the wedge portion 142 is swung upwardly relative to the web 132, as shown in FIG. 7. The diameter of the web 132 at its peripheral edge is slightly larger than the internal diameter of the groove 136. Since the portion of the web included in the wedge portion 142 is temporarily displaced, the peripheral edge of the web 132 may contact sufliciently'as it passes over the rim=118 for the web to enter the groove 136. As the web 132 contracts and becomes lodged in the groove 136, the outer portions of the web and flange 138 along the edge of each slot 140 move closer together. Therefore, when the wedge portion 142 is swung downwardly into the valve cap 116, as shown in FIG. 6, it urges apart the web and flange along the slots 140 and imposes a tangential force on the web 132, tending to expand it radially. The opposite edges of the wedge portion 142 may be chamfered, as shown in FIG. 10, to facilitate spreading apart the flange 138 when the wedge portion 142 is inserted in the valve cup 116. In this manner, the wedge portion 142 causes the web 132 to grip the valve cup 116 more tightly and the increased frictional force resists turning of the cap 12 relative to the valve cup 116. The cup 116 may be roughened to irfi'ease the frictiona1 resistance.

The container 8 is stored with the cap 12 in the position shown in FIG. 6. The hub 130 and the Web 132 prevent lateral displacement of the stem 114. In order to operate the valve, it is necessary to lift the wedgeportion 142 until it is raised out of the valve cup .116. Thehub 130 may then be rotated relative to the stem 114, until the peripheral edge of the web 132 is displaced out of the valve cup 116. The cap 12 then occupies the position shown in FIG. 7, and the valve stem 114 is free to swing on its flange 122 for opening the valve and discharging the contents of the container 8 into the coupling 6. The cap may be reapplied for holding the valve stem 114 in an upright position by turning the hub 130 while swinging the wedge portion 142 out of engagement with the valve cup 116. After the peripheral edge of the web 132 .is seated in the groove 136, the wedge portion .142 is swung down into the valve cup and into engagement with the groove 136. The wedge portion is chamfered as shown in FIGS. 7 and 10 to allow the wedge portion to be inserted into the rim 118 and to pass between the edges of the flange 138.

In operation, the cylinder 18 may be filled with pressurized treatment fluid from the container 8 by applying the coupling 6 over the fitting 10, as shown in FIG. 2. With the cap 12 in the position shown in FIG. .7, the valve stem 114 may be displaced to uncover the valve ports 126. The pressure in the container 8 propels the fluid through the valve stem 114, through the toms 110 and into the passages 102. The fluid pressure is sufficiently great to displace the ball 106 off of its seat 104. The fluid flows through the tube 92 and into the cylinder 18 between the cylinder cover 38 and the piston 72. The spring 84 urges the piston 72 against the valve member 68, and when the piston is in the position shown in FIG. 4, the valve member 68 prevents fluid from flowing into the counterbore 74. As the treatment fluid flows into the cylinder 18 from the container 8, the fluid pressure is sufliciently great to overcome the force of the spring 84 and to cause the piston 72 to be displaced toward the opposite end of the cylinder, until it reaches the position shown in FIG. 2. While the piston 72 is moving through the cylinder the valve member 68 remains in the position shown in FIG. 4, since the washer 76 resists longitudinal displacement of the rod 58.

While the cylinder is being filled, the collar 64 is positioned below the ring 46, as shown in FIG. 4, and when the piston 72 engages the collar 60, the rod 58 is displaced upwardly to the position shown in FIG. 2. Displacement of the rod 58 lifts the valve member 68 from the .seat in the counterbore 74 and lifts the collar 64 into the ring 46. This change in position of the collar 64 indicates that the cylinder is full. The coupling 6 is then removed from the fitting 10. The ball 106 prevents the treatment fluid from flowing out of the cylinder 18 through the tube 92.

Water is turned on and flows through the coupling 14 and into the interior of the body 16, through the ports 54. The valve 56 prevents the water from flowing back into the tubular portion 20. The ring 26 is adjusted to provide selectively a converging spray, shown in FIG. 2, or a diverging water spray, shown in FIG. 3. When the valve member 68 is raised from the seat by the piston 72, the treatment fluid in the cylinder .18 flows through the counterbore 74, through the ports 80, at a selected flow rate according to the position of the metering ring 82, and into the body 16 where the treatment fluid mixes with the water.

The treatment fluid continues to flow through the ports 80, as the piston moves toward the cylinder cover 38 under the force of the spring 84 (FIG. 3). The valve member 68 remains in the position shown shown in FIG. 3, since the washer 76 resists longitudinal displacement of the rod 58, but when the piston 72 reaches the cover 38, it engages the valve member 68 and moves the valve member 68 into the counterbore 74, as shown in FIG. 4. Movement of the valve member 68 causes a corresponding movement of the collar 64 on the lower end of the rod 58, and the collar 64 is displaced out of the retaining communicating with one side of said piston rod and being positioned ring 46. The collar 64 maybe brightly colored, or otherwise marked,-to indicate that the treatment fluid hasbeen exhausted.

The dispensing shower head of this invention is designed to use treatment fluids which are packaged inconventional pressurized containers. The treatment fluids may include shampoos and medicinal preparations. The apparatus is simple to operate and to adjust. The spray element formed by the spray element 32 is resistant to corrosion and self-cleaning due to the flexing action of the wall. Any sediment or solids on the interior surface of the wall will be washed away through the nozzles 50. The cap 12 for the pressurized container 8 assures that thecontents of the container will not be discharged accidentally.

While this invention'has been illustrated and described in one embodiment, it is recognized that variations and changes may be made therein, without departing from the invention as set forth in the claims.

I claim:

1. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, inlet means for conducting fluid to the interior of said body, wall means dividing the interior of said body into a first 'fluid chamber and a second fluid chamber, said inlet means communicating with said first and second chambers, means for discharging fluid from said first chamber, piston means in said second chamber, a filling conduit communicating between the exterior of said body and the interior of said second chamber, said inlet means piston and said filling conduit communicating with the opposite side of said piston, an outlet conduit communicating between said first chamber and said second chamber on said piston opposite side, valve means for controlling flow through said outlet conduit, and valve means for controlling flow through said filling conduit, whereby movement of said piston displaces fluid from said second chamber through said outlet conduit to said first chamber from which it passes out of said body through said discharge means.

2. A dispensing shower head according to claim 1 wherein said outlet conduit valve means includes a cylindrical boss on said second chamber, said boss having a radial port therein, said :outlet conduit communicating with said port, and a metering ring on said boss, said ring having a spiral edge and being mounted coaxially on said boss, whereby rotation of said ring progressively changes the flow area of said ports.

3. A dispensing shower head according to claim 1 wherein said piston means includes a piston having an opening therein, a piston rod extending through said piston opening, said piston being movable longitudinally relative to said piston rod, and abutment means on said piston rod, said abutment means being spaced apart on said on opposite sides of said piston, whereby said piston rod is displaced longitudinally by said piston when in engagement with said abutment means.

4. A dispensing shower head according to claim 3 wherein said outlet conduit valve means includes a valve element, said valve element being rigidly connected with said piston rod, whereby longitudinal movement of said piston rod displaces said valve element into closing relation with said outlet conduit.

5. A dispensing :shower head according to claim 3 wherein said abutment means includes a collar secured on said piston rod, said collar being positioned on said one .side of the piston, said piston rod including an eX- posed portion on the exterior-of said body, whereby movement of .said piston into engagement with said collar during filling of said second chamber is indicated by movement of said rod exposed portion.

6. A dispensing shower head according to claim 3 wherein said abutment means includes a collar secured on said piston rod, said collar being positioned on said one side of the piston, said abutment means also includes a ring secured on said piston rod, said ring being positioned on said opposite side of the piston, said outlet valve means includes a valve elementsecured on said piston rod, and means forming a valve seat in said second chamber in position to be engaged by said valve element, said valve seat being on the opposite side of the valve element from said piston, whereby movement of the piston along the rod in one direction into engagement with said collar displaces said valve element away from said valve seat while movement in the opposite direction into engagement with said ring displaces said valve element toward said valve seat.

7. A dispensing shower head according to claim 6 wherein said ring is integral with said valve element.

8. A dispensing shower head according to claim 6 including means for biasing said piston towardsaid valve seat.

9. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, means forming a first chamber and a second chamber in said body, means for spraying fluid'out of the body, said spraying means communicating with said first chamber, means for conducting fluid into said first chamber, said second chamber being substantially cylindrical, a movable piston in said second chamber, a filler conduit communicating between the exterior of said body and the second chamber on one side of said piston, an outlet conduit communicating between said first Chamber and said second chamber on said one side of the piston, valve means in said outlet conduit, means biasing the piston toward said outlet conduit, and one-Way valve means in said filler conduit preventing flow outwardly from said second chamber, whereby treatment fluid may be introduced into the second chamber and dispensed into the first chamber where it mixes with the fluid therein and is expelled through the spraying means.

10. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, means forming a first chamber and a second chamber in said body, means for spraying fluid out of the body, said spraying means communicating with said first chamber, means for conducting fluid into said first chamher, said second chamber being substantially cylindrical,

a movable piston in said second chamber, a filler conduit communicating between the exterior of said body and the second chamber on one side of said piston, one-way valve means in said filler conduit preventing flow outwardly from said second chamber, a rod extending axially through said second chamber, said rod being movable longitudinally relative to said piston and said chamber, an outlet conduit communicating with said first chamber and having a valve seat concentric with said rod and facing toward said piston, a valve member secured on said rod between said piston and said valve seat, abutment means secured on the rod on the opposite side of the piston from said valve member, said valve member and said abutment means being spaced apart a distance less than the length of said chamber, and means biasing the piston toward said valve seat, whereby the piston engages the abutment means to lift the valve member from the valve seat when the chamber is filled, and moves the valve member into engagement with the valve seat when the chamber is empty.

11. A dispensing shower head according to claim 10 including indicator means, said indicator means being operatively connected with said rod, whereby the filled and empty conditions of the second chamber are indicated.

12. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, means forming a first chamber and a second chamher in said body, means for spraying fluid out of the body, said spraying means communicating with said first cham her, means for conducting fluid into said first chamber, said second chamber being substantially cylindrical and having opposite end walls, a movable piston in said second chamber, a filler conduit communicating between the exterior of said body and the second chamber on one side of said piston, one-way valve means in said filler conduit preventing flow outwardly from said chamber, a rod extending through said end walls and through said chamber, said rod being movable longitudinally relative to said piston and said chamber, one end wall on said one side of said piston having a bore therein coaxial with said rod and forming a valve seat, a valve member secured, on said rod between said piston and said valve seat, abutment means secured on the rod on the opposite side of the piston fromsaid valve member, said valve memberand said abutment means being spaced apart a distance less than the length of said chamber, means biasing the piston toward said valve seat, said end wall having a cylindrical boss on the side opposite said valve seat, a ring mounted for rotation on said boss, said ring having a nonuniform axial length, and ports in said one end wall communicating between said bore and said boss, whereby the ring may be turned relative to the boss to adjust the rate of fluid flow through said ports.

13. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, means forming a first chamber and a second chamber in said body, means for spraying fluid out of the body, said spraying means communicating with said first chamber, means for conducting fluid into said first chamber, said second chamber being substantially cylindrical, a movable piston in said second chamber, a filler conduit communicating between the exterior of said body and the second chamber on one side of said piston, means forming a cylindrical boss in said first chamber, a ring mounted for rotation on said boss, said ring having a nonuniform axial length, outlet conduit means communicating between said second chamber and the exterior of said boss and terminating in ports adjacent said ring, means biasing the piston toward said outlet conduit, and one-way valve means in said filler conduit preventing flow outwardly from said second chamber, whereby the ring may be turned relative to the boss to adjust the rate of flow through the ports.

14. A dispensing shower head comprising a hollow body, means forming a first chamber and a second chamber in said body, means for spraying fluid out of the body, said spraying means communicating with said first chamber, means for conducting fluid into said first chamber, a tubular conduit extending through said body and into said second chamber, one-way valve means in said tubular conduit preventing flow outwardly from said second chamber, a fitting secured on the exterior of said body, said fitting having a cylindrical projection thereon, said projection having a radial port therein and means communicating between said radial port and said tubular conduit, whereby treatment fluid may be injected into the radial port and through the tubular conduit to the second chamber.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,028,214. 1/1936 Hennessy 2393 14 2,199,478 5/1940 Bruzaud 2393 15 2,689,767 9/ 1954 Dabringhaus 239-3 15 3,192,950 7/1965 Weese et al.- 2393 13 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,296,950- 5/ 1872 France.

EVERETT W. KIRBY, Primary Examiner,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification239/313, 239/546, 239/567, 239/602, 239/533.13, 239/318
International ClassificationE03C1/04, E03C1/046
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/046
European ClassificationE03C1/046