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Publication numberUS3342739 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1967
Filing dateJun 1, 1964
Priority dateJun 1, 1964
Publication numberUS 3342739 A, US 3342739A, US-A-3342739, US3342739 A, US3342739A
InventorsGeorge Corey Garland, Joseph Kenney Edward
Original AssigneeColgate Palmolive Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Detergent composition
US 3342739 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,342,739 DETERGENT COMPOSITION Garland George Corey, Milltown, and Edward Joseph Kenney, llernardsville, N.J., assignors to Colgate- Palrnolive Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware N0 Drawing. Filed June 1, 1964, Ser. No. 371,815 11 Claims. (Cl. 252--152) This invention relates to a detergent composition, and more particularly to a liquid detergent composition particularly suitable for hard surface cleaning as hereinafter described.

Presently, general purpose detergents used for cleaning hard surfaces, e.g. floors, walls, etc., are available in both powder and liquid form adapted to be dissolved in water and applied as solutions. Solid powders generally comprise mixtures of synthetic detergents or soap and alkali and exhibit the well-known disadvantages of powder products, e.g. dustiness, caking, harshness to the skin and difiiculties in measuring and dissolving. Similarly, liquid detergcnts'comprise mixtures of soap or synthetic detergent and alkali solubilized in water or mixtures of soap and hydrocarbon solu-bilized in Water and exhibit the disadvantages associated with these liquid products, e.g. harshness to the skin, temperature instability and a thin, watery appearance. Further, both classes of product generally tend to exhibit wide variations in foaming rability, e.g. thick, copious, long lasting foams which leave streaks and are difficult to rinse away and no-foam compositions which are often unsatisfactory because the average housewife associates foaming with cleaning.

Recognition of the foregoing disadvantages of the present liquid and powder general purpose detergents indicates that there is a definite need for a general purpose detergent composition which possesses desirable cleaning and foaming characteristics at use concentrations and at the same time is mild to the skin. Such characteristics are a significant feature of the invention which is described and claimed herein.

Generally, the new compositions of the invention consist essentially of about one part of la polyethenoxy organic nonionic detergent, about 0.4 to about 3 parts of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide condensate containing an average of about one to about four ethylene oxide groups and above 0.05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, the pH of a mixture of the above ingredients in a concentration of about 7-30% by. weight in water being from 6.9 to about 7.5.

More particularly, it has been found that a liquid detergent composition having superior qualities can be formulated which consists essentially of about 70-93% by weight of water and from about 7-30% by weight of a mixture of (a) about one part of a nonionic detergent selected from the class consisting of polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols containing from about 3 to 10 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and about to 12 ethylene oxide groups and polyethenoxy ethers of higher aliphatic alcohols containing about to 20 carbon atoms in the aliphatic group and 1 to 10 ethylene oxide groups, (b) about 0.4 to about 3 parts of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide containing an average of one to about four ethylene oxide groups and selected from the class consisting of monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolarnides of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group and (c) about 0.05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, the pH of said composition being from the range of about 6.9 to about 7.5.

Patented Sept. 19, 1967 This detergent composition is characterized by many desirable properties. The described composition results in a liquid detergent product which is clear within the 40 F. F. temperature range, has a substantially neutral pH which is mild to the skin, has a desirable foam balance, e.g. high flash foam during dilution which falls to a low residual foam at use concentration to minimize rinsing and streaking problems, exhibits excellent detergency particularly with respect to waxed floors where cleaning is accomplished without significantly disturbing the wax surface so that a rebuifable surface results and exhibits a desirable viscosity of about to about 1000 centipoises as measured with a Brookfield Viscometer, Model HAP, using a #1 spindle at 10 rpm. These and other desirable features will be apparent as the invention is described.

A preferred embodiment is represented by a composition particularly suitable for the cleaning of waxed tiled floors consisting essentially of about 70-93% by weight of water and from about 730% by weight of a mixture of (a) about one part of a nonionic detergent selected from the class consisting of polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols containing from about 8 to 10 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and about 5 to 12 ethylene oxide groups and polyethenoxy ethers of higher aliphatic alcohols containing about 10 to 20 carbon atoms in the aliphatic group and about 3 to 10 moles of ethylene oxide, (b) about 0.1 to about 0.7 part of a water soluble salt of an organic reaction product having in its molecular structure an anionic solubilizing group selected from the group consisting of S0 and S0 and an alkyl or aralkyl radical having about 8 to 18 carbon atoms in the alkyl group, (c) about 0.4 to about 3 parts of a mixture of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide containing an average of one to about four ethylene oxide groups and a nonethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide, said alkylolamides being selected from the class of monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids having about 10-14 carbon atoms in the fatty acyl group, the ratio of ethoxylated to non-ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamides being from about 99:1 to about 25:75 and (d) about 0.05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10 to about 14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, said composition having a pH from the range of about 6.9 to about 7.5 and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within the range of about 125 to about 1000 centipoises.

The nonionic organic detergents which may be employed in the composition of the invention include the polyethenoxy ethers of a non nitrogen containing hydro phobic organic compound having at least eight carbon atoms in its molecular structure such as alkyl phenols and higher aliphatic alcohols.

The suitable polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols are generally condensates of ethylene oxide with alkyl phenols. The phenols are generally monoalkylated and the total number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain may vary from about 3 to 10 carbon atoms. The alkyl chain may be either branch chained, e.g. derived from polypropylene, or straight chained, e.g. ethylene derived and kerosene derived. The degree or proportion of hydrophilic ethenoxy groups will vary with the specific hydrophobic group, but generally will be suificient to confer the desired water solubility and detersive properties. Ususally at least about 5 and up to about 12 ethylene oxide groups can be present. As used herein the terms groups and moles are used interchangeably with respect to ethylene oxide. Suitable compounds include polyoxyethylene nonylphenol, polyoxyethylene octylphenol, and polyoxyethylene decyl phenol.

Other suitable polyethenoxy organic nonionic detergents are the polyethenoxy ethers of higher aliphatic alcohols of more than eight carbon atoms. Suitable fatty alcohols having the desired hydrophobic character, preferably 10 to 20 carbon in their molecular structure are lauryl, tridecyl, myristyl, cetyl alcohols and mixtures thereof condensed with an appropriate amount of ethylene oxide such as at least one, and preferably about 3 to 10 moles. The aliphatic group may be either straight chained, e.g. fatty derived and ethylene derived, or branch chained, e.g. oxo-alcohols.

The foregoing nonionic detergents may also be used in combination with each other. In addition, the nonionic detergents, or admixtures thereof, may be further combined with a suitable anionic detergent.

Among the suitable anionic detergents for use in conjunction with the described nonionic detergents are the water soluble salts of an organic reaction product having in its molecular structure an anionic solubilizing group selected from the group consisting of S and S0 and an alkyl or aralkyl radical having about 8 to 18 carbon atoms in the alkyl group. Suitable anionic detergents include the water soluble higher alkyl mononuclear aryl sulfonate salts and the water soluble alkali metal salts of the sulfuric esters of polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols and higher aliphatic alcohols.

The water soluble higher alkyl mononuclear aryl sulfonate salt detergent having about 8 to 15 carbon atoms in the alkyl group which it is preferred to use is alkyl benzene sulfonate, though other similar detergents having a mononuclear aryl nucleus, such as alkyl toluene and alkyl Xylene sulfonates, may be used. The alkyl substituents may be branched such as nonyl, dodecyl and pentadecyl groups including mixtures thereof which are derived from polymers of lower mono-olefins, e.g. propylene. The alkyl group may be straight-chained in structure such as the n-decyl, keryl and dodecyl groups. Preferred examples of this class are the alkyl benzene sulfonates having an average of about 12 to 15 carbons in the alkyl group. These sulfonate detergents are used in the form of their water-soluble alkali metal or hydroxyalkyl ammonium salts such as the sodium or potassium or triethanolamine salts. It is understood that there may be small amounts of inorganic salts such as sodium sulfate in the sulfonated detergent resulting from the method of manufacture. In general, these inorganic sulfate salts should be maintained at as low a concentration as practicable.

The alkali metal salts of aliphatic primary and secondary alcohol sulfates such as sodium lauryl alcohol sulfate are also satisfactory anionic detergents.

The sodium, potassium or hydroxyalkylammonium salts of the sulfuric acid esters of the polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenol and higher aliphatic alcohols are also effective in conjunction with the nonionic detergent. The preferred alkyl phenols contain about 6 to 12 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and the preferred alcohols contain about to 20 carbon atoms in the aliphatic group. The number of ethylene oxide groups will vary with the specific hydrophobic group and usually will average from at least 1 to about 10 groups.

When using anionic detergents in admixture with the nonionic detergents, it is preferred to maintain nonionic-anionic ratios in the 90:10 to 60:40 range. The presence of at least 10% anionic based on total nonionic-anionic weight basis is required to connote any advantage, and more than 40% anionic on the combined detergent basis results in too much residual foam and therefore rinsing problems. Thus, compositions containing one part of nonionic detergent and about 0.1 to about 0.7 part of anionic detergent are preferred.

The ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamides which may be employed in the composition of the invention include the ethoxylated monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids containing about 10 to 14 carbon atoms in the acyl group wherein the average number of ethylene oxide groups varies from 4- about one to about four. A preferred compound is the diethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide.

The ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamides may be used alone or in combination with non-ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamides. However, at least about 25% by weight of the sum total of fatty acid alkylolamide and ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide should consist of ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide. Non-ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamides suitable for use in combination with the ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamides are the monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids having about 10 to 14 carbon atoms in the fatty acyl group. Examples are lauric, capric, myristic and coconut monoethanolamide, diethanolamide and isopropanolamide.

Free fatty acids suitable for use in this composition are the fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof. Examples are coconut, lauric, capric, and myristic acids.

The solids content of the liquid product is variable and usually the total amount of water is at least about 70%. It is understood that the amount of water and other ingredients will be suitably proportioned to provide solubilizing effects so as to form a homogeneous, clear liquid.

Various other ingredients may be added or substituted if desired. The compositions can beneficially contain chelating agents, either organic or inorganic compounds, capable of complexing with iron, calcium, magnesium and the like. Generally, the Water soluble salts of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid are preferred. Inorganic sequestering agents include citric acid, alkali metal polyphosphate and the like. Normally, such agents are employed in small amounts, generally about 0.2-0.5 percent by weight in compositions prepared in liquid medium. Dyes, perfumes and the like can also be utilized in small amounts where desired.

In the formulation of the products of the present invention, there are a number of factors which are of consideration as described. As indicated, the ratios of the detergent to the ethoxylated alkylolamide and fatty acid are an important consideration because the properties of the finished product are effected by the foregoing ratios. For example, evaluation of the composition of this invention in dilute solution for use in cleaning waxed floor tiles reveals the importance of the ratio of nonionic organic detergent to ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide as set forth in the following table. In this test, 4" x 4" vinyl tiles were waxed with a commercial floor wax containing a fluorescent brightener, Tinopal RES 200, therein, and one half of the tile was Washed with a 2% product concentration in water at 70 F., rinsed and allowed to dry. The tiles were then evaluated for wax removal by visually comparing with the unwashed portion of the tile using an ultraviolet light source. The product composition contained 14.5% of a mixture of nonylphenol containing 9.5 moles of ethylene oxide and diethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide in varying ratios, 0.5% of coconut fatty acid and water.

TABLE I Ratio of ethoxylated fatty acid Percent wax alkylolamide to nonionic detergent: removal All nonionic +50 .45/1 10 1/ 1 5 2 2/ 1 +25 The foregoing results clearly show that minimum wax removal is obtained using compositions having an ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide to nonionic detergent ratio within the claimed 0.43 range and a fatty acid to nonionic detergent ratio within the claimed 0.05-0.3 range.

Similarly, it is necessary to properly select and correlate the other factors to provide the product hereafter claimed as described in the following examples. The following examples are given additionally to illustrate the nature of the invention and it will be understood that the invention is not limited thereto. All parts or per- 6 Compositions of the type illustrated in Example II also demonstrate the significance of the fatty acid component in the present inventions and the unobvious technical properties resulting thereby. While the use of coconut centages are by weight unless otherwise indicated and 5 fatty acids results in the desired foaming properties in the components employed are substantially completely the compositions of our invention, replacement of 0.5% dry or anhydrous unless specifically denoted to be othercoconut fatty acids with 0.5 oleic fatty acids in said wise. composition yields a composition with a high residual The composition of Example I is illustrative of the foam volume. The observed results in the cylinder foam present invention. 10 tests indicated a flash foam volume of 75 ml. which re- Example I mained stable during the five minute observation period. Addition of an anionic detergent to the type of compogfg j' O1 exthoxamer (95 E0) i sition illustrated by Example I I yields a particularly pre- Diethoxyiated coconut monoethanolamide 3.75 fened i i p Such addltlon i i the m Coconut fatty acids 1'25 of the mltial flash foam =of the compositionsof the In- Ethylenediamine tetgaactic acid trisodium vent1on without a deleterious effect on the residual foam Salt (41% Sum) 025 v lum Further, dthte cleansing etfic1ency of the m xed amomc-nomomc e ergen sys em in our compos1t1ons fig g fg g j and 50% NaOH to ad Ba] is superior to compositions of the type illustrated by n Example II. This composition is a clear liquid at room temperature, Example III illustrates a preferred composition. maintains clarity over the 40 F.-120 F. temperature I range and recovers satisfactorily from freezing. Viscosity Example is 125 cps. as measured with a Brookfield viscometer Ingredlents: Percent using a number 1 spindle at 10 r.p.m. Further, a flash Nonyl P ethOXaIner foam test using 100 ml. of a 2% product concentracocfmut qlethanolamlde tion in tap water at 70 F. in a 500 m1. graduated cylin- Sqdwm trldecyl'benzene sulf'flnate der inverted ten times yields an immediate foam volume Dlethoxylated Coconut monoethanolamide of 100 ml. which falls to 1-2 ml. in 5 minutes. Coconut fatty acids Use of coconut diethanolamide in combination with HydfoXyethylefie diamlne tTiacetiC acid, ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide is illustrated in Exsodium salt ample II. Such substitutions are usually economically ad- Water, Perfume, 2 4 to adjust vantageous also. to PH Example II This composition is a clear solution at: room tempera- Ingredients: Percent tom and has a Brookfield viscosity Within the range of Nonyl phenol ethoxamer (9.5 EtO) 3-0 about 350:150 cps. Cylinder foam tests of 2% product Diethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide 2.0 solutions yield an initial flash foam volume of 100 ml. Coconut diethanolamide 4-0 which falls to 0 ml. within five minutes. Freeze-thaw cycle Coconut fatty acids ()5 testing indicates excellent recovery from freezing. Water, perfume, color and H 80 to adjust 40 Additional compositions illustrative of the invention pH Bal. are given in Examples IV-XI.

Examples I V-XI Ingredients IV v VI VII VIII IX X XI Nonyl phenol ethoxamer (9.5 EtO) Myristyl alcohol ethoxamer (8.5 131130). Coconut diethanolamide Lauriemyristic isopropanolamide Sodium tridecylbenzene sulfonate Nonyl phenol ethoxamer (5 EtO) sulfate (sodium salt) Diethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide Coconut fatty acids I Ethylene diamine tetraac acid, trisodium salt (41% soln.) Water, perfume, color and 66 36.11280 or NaOH to adjust pH to 6.9-7i.-.

The composition in Example II is a clear, homogeneous liquid detergent at room temperature having a pH of 7.2. Brookfield viscosity was 230 cps. and the initial foam height was 75 ml. in the cylinder foam test which fell to 1 ml. within five minutes.

The significance of the ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide concentration is clearly demonstrated in compositions of the foregoing nature. Elimination of the diethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide and an increase in the coconut diethanolamide concentration in the composition of Example II yields a product of the thin, watery type, (Brookfield viscosity approximately 35 cps.) and results in a residual foam of 25 ml. A definite quantity of ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide is required to provide the desired viscosity and foaming characteristics. Such results make it very apparent that fatty acid alkylolamides are not equivalents of the ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamides in compositions of our invention.

The above products are clear at room temperature and maintain clarity over the 40-120 F. temperature range. Viscosities of the mild, about 6.9 to about 7.5 pH products fall Within the range of about 125 to about 1,000 c.p.s. as measured on the Brookfield viscometer. All of the compositions exhibit satisfactory cleaning power when the compositions are diluted to 2% with Water.

The new compositions of this invention are prepared in any suitable manner such as by mixing the active constituents together in the presence of approximately 30% of the water and agitating or stirring until a substantially homogeneous mixture results. The active components are preferably added in molten or liquid form and the temperature of the admixture should be sufiicient to promote attainment of a homogeneous mixture. Reasonably elevated temperatures such as up to C. may be employed as required, although 40 50 C. is normally satisfactory. The remainder of the water (cold) is then added along with any desired adjuvants. The liquid compositions as made may be slightly too alkaline or too acidic to yield a neutral product having a high viscosity, e.g. about 125-1000 centipoises is desired, and minor amounts of sulfuric acid or caustic will then be required to adjust the pH to the range of about 6.9 to about 7.5.

Generally, before application to a surface for cleaning, the compositions of the invention are diluted with water to provide a cleaning solution of desired concentration to effect good cleaning of the surface to which they are applied. The total concentration of the liquid medium plus active constituents is not critical, but is limited by economic practicalities. However, in diluted solutions, product concentrations of .75 to 6 percent by weight and preferably from 1.5 to 3 percent by weight are excellent for routine cleaning of hard surfaces such as walls, floors, tiles, etc.

Compositions of this invention were evaluated in dilute Water solutions for use in commercial floor cleaning operations, a commercial hard surface cleaning operation, and achieved cleaning with only minimal wax removal, thereby leaving a re-buffable surface after washing. This clearly illustrates another useful advantage for composi tions of the invention.

In review, the new compositions of this invention present many advantages. The compositions can be used to clean a Wide variety of surfaces Without fear of damage to the surface. Further, the neutral cleaning solutions present no danger of detergent or alkali burn to the user. No rinsing is required after Washing because of low residual foam; yet, sufficient initial foam is apparent to prevent use of wasteful product concentrations which may occur when using low foam products. Viscosity characteristics of the liquid compositions offer a welcome departure from the usual thin, watery liquids and result in aesthetic and consumer appeal.

Although the present invention has been described with reference to particular embodiments and examples, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that variations and modifications to this invention can be made and equivalents can be substituted therefor without departing from the principles and true spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A clear hard surface cleaning composition characterized by high flash foam during dilution and low residual foam at use concentration consisting essentially of about one part of a polyethenoxy organic nonionic detergent, about 0.4 to about 3 parts of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide condensate containing about -14 carbon atoms in the acyl group and including two ethylene oxide groups and about .05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, the pH of a mixture of said ingredients in a concentration of about 7 to about 30% by weight in water being from about 6.9 to about 7.5, said ingredients in water at said concentration being a clear solution, characterized by high flash foam during dilution and low residual foam at use concentration and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within the range of about 125 to about 1000 centipoises.

2. A clear hard surface cleaning composition characterized by high flash foam during dilution and low residual foam at use concentration particularly suitable for the cleaning of waxed tiled floors consisting essentially of water and about 7 to about 30% by weight of a mixture of about one part of a condensate of ethylene oxide and a non-nitrogen containing hydrophobic organic compound having at least 8 carbon atoms in its molecular structure, about 0.4 to about 3 parts of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide condensate containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group and including two ethylene oxide groups and about .05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, the pH of said composition being from the range fit of about 6.9 to about 7.5 and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within the range of about to about 1000 centipoises.

3. A clear hard surface cleaning composition particularly suitable for the cleaning of waxed tiled floors consisting essentially of about 70-93% by weight of water and about 7-30% by Weight of a mixture of (a) about one part of a nonionic detergent selected from the class consisting of polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols containing from about 3 to 10 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and about 5 to 12 ethylene oxide groups and polyethenoxy ethers of higher aliphatic alcohols con-taining about 10 to 20 carbon atoms in the aliphatic group and 1 to 10 ethylene oxide groups, (b) about 0.4 to about 3 parts of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide including two ethylene oxide groups and selected from the class consisting of monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids containing about 10 to 14 carbon atoms in the acyl group and (c) about 0.05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, the pH of said composition being from the range of about 6.9 to about 7.5 and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within the range of about 125 to about 1000 centipoises.

4. The composition of claim 3 wherein the ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide is di-eth-oxylated coconut monoethanolamide.

5. The composition of claim 3 wherein a higher fatty acid alkylolamide selected from the class consisting of monoethariolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group is substituted for a portion of the ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide, the ratio of ethoxylated to nonethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide being from about 99:1 to about 25:75.

6. The composition of claim 5 wherein the higher fatty acid alkylolamide is coconut diethanolamide.

7. A clear hard surface cleaning composition characterized by high flash foam during dilution and low residual foam at use concentration particularly suitable for the cleaning of waxed tiled floors consisting essentially of about 70-93% by weight of water and from about 7-30% by weight of a mixture of (a) about one part of a nonionic detergent selected from the class consisting of polyethenoxy ethers of alkyl phenols containing from about 8 to 10 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and about 5 to 12 ethylene oxide groups and polyethenoxy ethers of higher aliphatic alcohols containing about 10 to 20 carbon atoms in the aliphatic group and about 3 to 10 ethylene oxide groups, (b) about 0.1 to about 0.7 part of a water soluble salt of an organic reaction product having in its molecular structure an anionic solubilizing group selected from the group consisting of S0 and S0 and a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl and aralkyl radical having about 8 to 18 carbon atoms in the alkyl group, (0) about 0.4 to about 3 parts of a mixture of an ethoxylated higher fatty acid alkylolamide including two ethylene oxide groups and a non-ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide, said alkylolamides being selected from the class consisting of monoethanolamides, diethanolamides and isopropanolamides of fatty acids having about 10-14 carbon atoms in the fatty acyl group, the ratio of ethoxylated to non-ethoxylated fatty acid alkylolamide being from about 99:1 to about 25:75 and (d) about 0.05 to about 0.3 part of fatty acids containing about 10-14 carbon atoms in the acyl group, said composition having a pH from the range of about 6.9 to about 7.5 and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within the range of about 125 to about 1000 centipoises.

8. The composition of claim 7 wherein the nonionic organic detergent is ethoxylated nonyl phenol containing an average of 9.5 moles of ethylene oxide.

9. The composition of claim 7 wherein the anionic organic detergent salt is sodium tridecylbenzenesulfonate.

10. A clear, liquid, hard surface cleansing composition characterized by high flash foam during dilution and low residual foam at use concentration particularly suitable for the cleaning of waxed tiled floors consisting essentially of about 70-93% by weight of water and from about 7 to about 30% by weight of a mixture of (a) one part of ethoxylatcd nonyl phenol containing an average of 9.5 moles of ethylene oxide, (b) about 0.7 part of sodium tridecylbenzene sulfonate, (c) about 1.4 parts of a mixture of di-ethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide and coconut diethanolamide, the ratio of di-ethoxylated coconut monoethanolamide to diethanolamide being about 35:65 and about 0.16 part of coconut fatty acids, said composition being from the pH range of about 6.9

11. The composition of claim 10 wherein the solids content amounts to about 9% References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,462,758 2/1949 Malkemus 252-161 2,831,815 4/1958 Klisch 252152 3,239,468 3/1966 Herrick a- 252-452 FOREIGN PATENTS 621,089 5/1961 Canada.

LEON D. ROSDOL, Primary Examiner.

to about 7.5 and exhibiting a desirable viscosity within 15 S. E. DARDEN, Assistant Examiner.

the range of about 125 to about 100 centipoises.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2462758 *Aug 10, 1945Feb 22, 1949Colgate Palmolive Peet CoSynthetic detergent compositions
US2831815 *Dec 17, 1952Apr 22, 1958Colgate Palmolive CoDetergent compositions
US3239468 *May 26, 1961Mar 8, 1966Colgate Palmolive CoHard surface cleaning compositions
CA621089A *May 30, 1961Stepan Chemical CoSulfonated detergent composition
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3862050 *Jun 30, 1971Jan 21, 1975Procter & GambleSodium alkyl ether sulfate c{hd 12{b -c{hd 14 {b soap blends for optimum sudsing in hard surface cleaners
US4225471 *Sep 25, 1978Sep 30, 1980Chemed CorporationCleaning composition containing mineral spirits alkanolamide, and oleyl dimethylamine oxide
US4692276 *Oct 3, 1985Sep 8, 1987Schramm Charles HNon-alkaline, foamable bathroom cleaner
US5700768 *Aug 24, 1995Dec 23, 1997Reckitt & Colman Inc.Floor cleaning compositions
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/214, 510/413, 510/423, 510/480
International ClassificationC11D1/52, C11D1/72, C11D17/00, C11D3/00, C11D3/20
Cooperative ClassificationC11D17/0008, C11D1/835, C11D1/526, C11D1/72, C11D3/0047, C11D3/2079
European ClassificationC11D1/835, C11D3/20E1, C11D17/00B, C11D3/00B9, C11D1/52K, C11D1/72