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Publication numberUS3343199 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1967
Filing dateJan 18, 1965
Priority dateJan 18, 1965
Publication numberUS 3343199 A, US 3343199A, US-A-3343199, US3343199 A, US3343199A
InventorsNolte Louis C
Original AssigneeNolte Louis C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning device
US 3343199 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 26, 1967 c. NOLTE 3,34

CLEANING DEVICE Filed Jan. 18. 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 64 INVENTOR.

LOU/S C. NOLTE F/G.-Z WW I ATTORNEY Sept. 26, 1967 L. c. NOLTE CLEANING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 18. 1965 q' u 0- I42 INVENTOR. LOUIS c. NOLTE ATTORNEY Sept. 26, 1967 L c. NOLTE 31,343,199

CLEANING DEVICE v Filed Jan. 18. 1965 4 f 5 LOU/S C. NOLTE BY: a

A TTORNE Y Sept. 26, 1967 Filed Jan. 18, 1965 L c. NOLTE CLEANING DEVICE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

LOUIS C. NOLTE ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 26, 1967 This application is a continuation-in-part of patent application Ser. No. 65,083, filed Oct. 26, 1960, now Patent No. 3,180,071.

This invention relates genarlly to a cleaning device and more particularly to a cleaning fluid discharge device in a wet and dry suction cleaner.

Combined wet and dry pickup suction cleaners are used for a wide variety of cleaning operations. However, those machines previously used had certain disadvantages, particularly when they were used for wet pick up operations. For one thing, prior suction cleaners could not economically store the cleaning fluid inside the machine, and then spray the cleaning fluid on a surface to be cleaned, and finally draw the cleaning fluid back into the tank after use.

In addition, prior suction cleaners were not provided with means for pumping the dirty cleaning fluid out of the cleaner, particularly when the sewer drains into which the cleaning fluid was to be discharged was in a sink or a tub at an elevation higher than the suction cleaner. In such cases the operator had to bodily lift the machine, and dump the cleaning fluid into the sink or tub. This Was diflicult and sometimes impossible for the operator because the machine was very heavy when it was full of liquid. In addition, such machines were readily damaged because the operator often dropped the machines in the process of lifting them to dump out the cleaning solution.

What is needed therefore and comprises the principal object of this invention is to provide a combined wet and dry pick up suction cleaner which has means for forcibly applying or spraying the cleaning solution onto surfaces to be cleaned and which has means for rapidly pumping the cleaning fluid out of the machine and into sewer drains which for some reason may be inaccessible to the machine, or which are at a higher elevation than the liquid outlet in the suction cleaner.

This and other objects of this invention will become more apparent when understood in the light of the accompanying specifications and drawings herein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the suction cleaner constructed according to the principals of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1, and showing the construction of the combined suction cleaner when used for dry pick up operation.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the suction cleaner shown in FIG. 2 but wtih the collector can removed to disclose to mechanism in the base of the housing.

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the collector can showing details of its base.

FIG. 5 is an elevational sectional view of the suction cleaner set up for a wet pick up operation.

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the base of the housing of the suction cleaner.

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 77 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 8 is an elevational sectional view of the suction cleaner set up for spraying or applying cleaning solution or for pumping cleaning solution out of the collector can after use.

FIG. 9 shows a modification of the suction cleaner embodying principals of this invention.

FIG. 10 is a portion of the modified suction cleaner shown in FIG. 9, adapted for use with the collector cans and tools of conventional suction cleaners.

FIG. 11 shows a tool used with the suction cleaner of this invention adjusted to pick up cleaning solution.

FIG. 12 is the tool shown in FIG. 11 but adjusted for spraying or applying cleaning solution onto a surface to be cleaned.

FIG. 13 is a view of the valve structure used with the tool shown in FIG. 12, but adjusted for use when the suction cleaner is used to pick up liquids.

FIG. 14 is a view of the valve structure in the tool shown in FIG. 13 but adjusted for use when the suction cleaner is used to spray or apply cleaning solution onto a surface to be cleaned.

Referring now to FIG. 1 of the drawing, a suction cleaning indicated generally by the referenced numeral 10 comprises a housing 12. The housing is mounted on a pair of rotatably mounted rear wheels 14 and a pair of front casters 16 so that the suction cleaner can be easily turned and moved in a manner well known in the art, see FIG. 2.

The housing is formed in two parts. One part of the housing comprises a collector can 18 and the other part comprises a motor or base housing 20 where part of the suction cleaner mechanism is mounted. The collector can 18 is removably mounted on the base housing 20 by means of clips 22. With this arrangement, if repairs are necessary the mechanism of the suction cleaner mounted in base housing 20 can be shipped in a compact and economical package back to the factory, without shipping the bulky collector can.

As seen in FIG. 2, the collector can 18 is provided with a two-ply generally circular base 24. The upper ply 26 of the base is dished to prevent the base from sagging when the collector can is full of dirt or liquid. This is important for reasons to become apparent below. The lower ply 28 is designed so at least a part thereof serves as a diaphragm. The collector can 18 is also provided with legs 19. With this arrangement the collector can 18 when removed from the base housing 20 can be placed on a supporting surface without permitting the diaphragm portion of the base 24 from coming in contact with the supporting surface and being damaged.

The upper portion of the collector can 18 is provided with a circular lid 30, dished as shown in FIG. 2 to provide strength. The lid is provided with a centrally dis posed opening 32 in which a swivelly mounted elbow 34 is mounted by any suitable means. Elbow 34 serves as the inlet conduit for the suction cleaner. A conical deflector 36 is removably mounted on the lower end of elbow 34 inside the collector can 18 for reasons to be described below. Clips 38 are mounted on the upper end of the collector can to removably hold the lid 30 in an air tight engagement with collector can 18.

The lid 30 is also provided with a small opening in which a bolt 40 is threadably mounted. A knob 42 is attached to the upper end of the bolt 40 and a pressure plate 44 is attached to the lower end of the bolt. In this way, by rotating the knob 42 the pressure plate 44 can be raised and lowered inside the collector can 18 for reasons to be described below.

The base 24 of the collector can is provided with an opening in which a sleeve 46 is mounted, see FIG. 2. The external periphery of the upper end of the sleeve 46 is threaded. A secondary filter 48 is mounted on a sleeve support 50 having internal threads. With this arrangement the secondary filter 48 can be removably mounted on the upper end of sleeve 46.

The external periphery of the lower end of sleeve 46 is also threaded. An internally threaded cage sleeve 52 is threadably mounted onto the lower end of sleeve 46. One end of a coil spring 54 engages the bottom of cage 52 and the other end of coil spring 54 engages a semi- 3 spherical valve member 55 and holds valve member 55 in yielding engagement with the lower end of sleeve 46 in a valve closed position for reasons to become apparent below.

An electric motor 56 driving an exhaust fan (not shown) is mounted in the motor or base housing as shown in the drawing. The motor driven fan is designed to exhaust the air from the base housing through an opening (not shown) in base plate 58.

An exhaust housing 60 is secured to the lower surface of base plate 58. This exhaust housing is provided with a single tubular outlet conduit 62. A conduit 64 is connected at one end to outlet 62. The opposite end of conduit 64 is connected to a hose receiving pipe 66-mounted as shown in the base housing 20, see FIGS. 2 and 5. An air de-. flector 67 is removably mounted on the upper end of the hose receiving pipe 66 to prevent air forced by motor 56 through the conduit 66 from blowing on to the operator of the suction cleaner. With this arrangement all the air exhausted from the base housing 20 is forced through conduit 64 into the hosereceiving pipe 66, and from there into the ambient air, see FIG. 2.

A support plate 68 is pivotally mounted at one end on wall 70 of base housing 20, see FIG. 7. An electric switch 72 is mounted on the free end of support plate 68. The switch 72 is provided with an operating plunger 74. The switch is so constructed that it is actuated and alternately closes and opens each time the operating plunger 74 is pressed. As seen in FIG. 7, the operating plunger 74 is positioned closely adjacent base 24 of the collector can 18.

An actuating rod 76 is connected at one end to support plate 68 and at the other end to base plate 58. In addition, a coil spring 78 is also'connected between support plate 68and base plate 58 to bias the support plate 68 and the operating plunger 74 of switch 72 away from base 24, see FIG. 7.

A two arm lever 80 is pivotally mounted on base plate 58 at pivot 82. One end portion 84 of lever 80 is connected to the actuating rod 76, as shown in FIG. 7. The other end portion 86 of lever 80 is connected to the lower end of a vertically disposed push rod 88 mounted between base plate 58 and the upper horizontal wall 90 of base housing 20, see FIGS. 5, 6 and 8.

The upper end 92 of push rod 88 is enlarged and.

This in turn causes end portion 84 of lever 80 to pivot upwardly forcing actuating rod 76 in an upward direction. This upward movement pivots support plate 68 up- Wardly so that the operating plunger 74 of switch 72 is pressed and actuates switch 72. When foot pressure is removed fromthe upper end 92 of push rod 88, coil spring 78 biases the support plate 68 back so that the switch 72 moves away from base 24. In this way pressure is removed fromthe operating plunger 74. As a result, if the terminals of electric switch 72 are connected to the power lines of the motor 56, the motor can be manually started or stopped by exerting foot pressure on end 92 of push rod 88 to first actuate switch 72 to start the motor. After foot pressure is removed from end 92 of push rod 88 long enough .to permit the operating plunger 74 to reset, the motor can be stopped by again exerting foot pressure on end portion 92 of push rod 88 to again actuate the switch and cause the motor to stop.

As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, a firstinlet opening 94 is fo med in the base plate 58. This opening may be closed off by a pivotally mounted valve plate 96, see FIG. 7. Valve plate 96 is biased to a closed position by means of a spring 78, as shown. The valve plate 96 is provided with an attached actuating lip 98 in operating engagement with the end portion 84 of lever 80, see FIG.'7. Dimensions of lip 98, and the positions of pivot 100 of the valve plate 96 are chosen so that when foot presmovement initially engages lip 98 of valve plate 96 to first pivot the valve plate 96 to an open position, thereby permitting. air to enter housing 20 through opening 94. This opening movement of valve plate 96 occurs before the upward movement of actuating rod 76 moves far enough to actuate switch 72 to start the motor. When foot pressure on the end portion 92 of push rod 88 is removed, the spring 78 biases. the valve plate 96 to a closed position where it closes off opening 94. This arrangement serves as a time delay to delay the buildup of a vacuum in the base housing 20 for reasons to become apparent below.

To operate the suction cleaner for dry pickup, a filter bag 101 is removably attached to the lower end 102 of the elbow 34 inside the collector can 18, see FIG. 2. This filter bag 101 is placed inside of plastic perforate basket 103. The basket 103 standson legs 104 on base 24 of the collector can.

In operation to this point, when foot pressure is exerted on end 92 of push rod 88, first, valve plate 96 opens, and then the switch 72 is forced upwardly depressing plunger 74 to close switch 72 to start the motor. When foot pressure on end portion 92 of the push rod 88 is removed, the plunger 74 resets and valve plate 96 closes.

Operation of, motor 56 after valve plate 96 closes evacuates the base housing 20 and the resulting suction pulls valve member 55 away from its seat at the lower end of sleeve 46. This establishes. air communication between the collector can 18 and the base housing 20. This suction then appears at the inlet to the collector can 18 at elbow 34 so that dirt is drawninto the filter bag 101. When the filter bag 101 is filled, or if the filter bag ruptures causing the secondary filter 48 to clog, the air flow through the sleeve 46 decreases or is cut off, as explained in co-pending patent application No. 65,083 filed Oct. 26, 1960. When this happens, the portion of ply 28 of the base 24 of the collector can, serving as a diaphragm is drawn into the base housing, thereby exerting pressure against plunger 74 of switch 72 to actuate the switch and stop the motor.

It is important to note that when using the switch 72, which alternately starts and stops the motor 56 each time it is pressed, time must be provided for the plunger 74 to reset after the switch is actuated. By providing the above described time delay mechanism, wherein valve plate 96 opens before switch 72 is actuated, operation of the motor does not immediately build up a vacuum in the base housing 20. This is because air enters the base housing 20.through opening 94 when the valve plate 96 is open, as seen in FIG. 7. Without this arrangement the vacuum would build up so rapidly in base housing 20' that the diaphragm part of the base 24 of the collectors can 18 'would be drawn into engagement with the operating plunger 74 and would stay in engagement with the plunger. This would prevent plunger 74 from" resetting so that in effect switch 72 would become in operative and fixed in a switch closed position. The brief time delay provided by the opening movement of the valve plate 96 is suflicient to permit the plunger 74 of switch 72 to reset and the valve member 55 to open before the valve plate 96 closes. Thus operation of the suction cleaner is assured.

For wet pick up operation the filter bag 101, basket 103, and secondary filter 48, along with sleeve .50 are removed. In their place a stand pipe 106 having a threaded lower end is screwed onto the upper end of sleeve 46, see FIG. 3.

A float sleeve 108 is slidably mounted on the stand pipe 106. A cylindrical float 110, tubular in shape, is concentric with and rigidly secured to the outer surface of the float sleeve 108. A generally conical coil spring 111 is provided. The lower smaller end 112 of the coil spring is secured or anchored to the end 114 of the stand pipe 106 by any suitable means. The upper or larger end 113 of the coil spring is secured to a hemispherical valve member 116. With this arrangement the vertical axis of the valve member 116 always coincides with the longitudinal axis of the stand pipe 106. Although valve member 116 is generally hemispherical in shape, the shape is not critical and other valve shapes are possible. For example, the valve could be conical or a truncated cone in shape. In addition, it is not essential for coil spring 111 to be conical.

In operation, when. the suction cleaner is being used for wet pick up, the [rising liquid level causes the float 110 to rise, carrying float sleeve 108 upwardly. When the level of liquid rises high enough, the upper end 118 of the float sleeve 108 engages the valve membr 116 cutting off the flow of air through the stand pipe 106. When this happens continued operation of motor 56 evacuates the base housing 20 so that the diaphragm portion of base 24 of the collector can 18 in lower ply 28 is drawn down further into the base housing 20 as shown by the dash lines in FIG. 5. This movement causes this diaphragm portion of base 24 to engage operating plunger 74 of switch 72, thereby actuating the switch to cut off the motor and prevent the suction cleaner from over filling. As stated above, the upper ply 26 of base 24 is dished to provide enough strength to base 24 to prevent it from sagging under the weight of the water, and thereby making the switch 72 inoperative before the liquid level reaches a predetermined height.

The suction cleaner described to this point operates generally in the same Way as the suction cleaner described in patent application No. 65,083 of which this is a continuation in part. As described above, however, this suction cleaner is additionally provided with means for spraying cleaning fluid and for forcibly pumping out and evacuating the liquid in the collector can 18 after use. To do this, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 8, the base plate 58 of base housing 20 is provided with a second opening 120. This opening can he closed off by a second valve plate 122. Valve plate 122 is pivotally mounted on base plate 58 on support 124 as shown in FIG. 8. The lip 126 is positioned so it is engaged by end portion 128 of a pivotally mounted lever 130. The opposite end portion 132 of lever 130 is in operative engagement with the lower end of a second vertically disposed push rod 134 mounted between base plate 58 and the upper horizontal wall 90 of base housing 20.

The upper end 136 of push rod 134 is enlarged, see FIG. 3, to serve as a foot pedal. In addition, a collar 138 is formed on push rod 136 and a coil spring 140 on push rod 134 bears between collar 138 and the base plate 58 to bias the push rod upwardly. In addition, a second coil spring 142, see FIG. 5, is mounted on lip 126 of valve plate 124 to bias the valve plate 122 to a position where it closes ofi opening 120. With this arrangement foot pressure on the upper end 136 of push rod 134 moves valve plate 122 to an open position shown in FIG. 8. When foot pressure is removed from portion 136 of the push rod 134, the valve plate 122 moves back to its closed position as shown in FIG. 5, closing off opening 120. When the suction cleaner is to be used for spraying a cleaning fluid, or for pumping out the cleaning fluid in the collector can 18, after use, the valve plate is moved to the open position shown in FIG. 8 to permit the entry of air into the base housing 20.

As shown in FIG. 8, the head or upper end of push rod 136 is spaced from collar 138 defining a narrow groove 140 therebetween. This groove is designed to engage the edges of opening 142 in wall 90' through which the push rod 134 extends, to releasably hold the push rod down and the valve plate 122 in the open position shown in FIG. 8.

A conventional outlet drain 144 is mounted in the lower portion of collector can 18. This drain is provided with a conventional valve 146 to open or close the drain as desired. A drain outlet hose 148 is secured to the out- 6 let drain 144 as shown in FIG. 8. With this arrangement the container can 18 can be emptied, although slowly, by force of gravity where sewer drains are at a point lower than base 24. However, when the drain outlet is in a sink, at a level higher than the container can, this an rangement is ineflectual.

In order to pump out the liquid in the container can 18 more rapidly than it would drain out by the force of gravity, or in order to pump the liquid in the container can into a sewer outlet which is higher than the container can 18, or to [forcibly spray the liquid in the container can on to a surface to be cleaned, a hose 150 is connected between the hose receiving pipe 66 and elbow 34. In addition, knob 42 is rotated until pressure plate 44 engages the upper surface of valve member 116 and forces it down into engagement with the upper end 114 of stand pipe 106, see FIG. 8. This in effect closes the stand pipe 106 and breaks air communication between the container can 18 and base housing 20 through the stand pipe.

With this arrangement, operation of motor 56 draws air into base housing 20* through opening and pumps the air out of housing 20 through conduit 64 and hose into container can 18, thus pressurizing the can. This increased pressure forces or pumps the liquid in the container can 18 out of the container can with enough force so that liquid can be discharged into a sewer outlet at a level higher than container can 18. It is important to note that the conical deflector 36 spreads out and expands the air entering elbow 34 so that the force of the incoming pressurizing air does not interfere with the action of the float 110.

In order to more efliciently use the suction cleaner 10, a combined spray applicator and cleaning tool 152 may be provided, see FIGS. 11 and 12. The tool comprises a conventional wand 154. The lower end of the wand 154 is detachably connected to a generally V-shaped member 156. Member 156 is provided with a suction outlet 157 at its apex 159, and the wings 158 of the V-shaped member are provided with spray holes 160. A valve plate 162 is rotatively mounted on the apex 159 of member 156. This plate is rotatable between an inlet open position as shown in FIG. 13 and an inlet closed position as shown in FIG. 14. In order to use the suction cleaner to spray cleaning fluid on a surface to be cleaned, the valve plate is rotated to an inlet closed position as shown in FIGS. 12 and 14. Then the upper end of wand 154 is connected to the outlet hose 148, and the suction cleaner, after being filled with a cleaning solution, is connected as shown in FIG. 8. When the motor is started, cleaning solution will be forced through the tool and out of the spray holes 160 as shown in FIG. 12. After the surface to be cleaned is wetted with the cleaning solution, valve plate 162 is opened. Next hose 148 is disconnected from wand 154. Then hose 150 is removed and valve plate 122 is closed. After this knob 42 is rotated in a direction which permits valve member 116 to unseat from the upper end 152 of stand pipe 106, so that the spring 111 forces the valve member 116 to the position shown in FIG. 5. Then the wand 154 is connected to the inlet elbow 34 by a suitable hose (not shown) and the motor is started. With this arrangement, as the tool is pushed over the floor, the cleaning solution on the floor is forced through the suction inlet 157 at its apex 159. This sucks the cleaning solution into the machine. If desired, a rubber squeegee, not shown, may be secured to the lower surfaces of the V-shaped member 158 to more completely dry the surface to be cleaned. After the cleaning solution has been drawn into the machine, the machine is again connected as shown in FIG. 8 and the now dirty cleaning solution can be forcibly pumped out of the housing through the outlet hose 148, as explained above.

Many wet pick-up suction cleaners now in use are designed with the motor on top of the collector can. The tools and the collector cans sold with these suction cleaners represent a substantial investment and it may be desirable to incorporate the features of this invention into such equipment in order. to avoid wasting existing cans and tools and to more economically use existing manufacturing tools. To do this. the modified suction cleaner 170 shown in FIG. 9 contains a generally conventional container can 172. This container can is provided with a conventional outlet drain 174 and a'valve 176, like drain 144 and valve 146 shown in FIG. 8. As described more fully in the co-pending application No. 65,083, the motor 178 driving an exhaust fan is mounted in a housing 180, which as shown in FIG. 9, also serves as a lid for the container can 172. This lid with the motor therein is detachable from the container can by a suitable means. In this embodiment, the exhaust fan exhausts air inside the housing 180 through an outlet tube 182. A partition or wall 184, at least a part of which is a diaphragm, is attached to housing 180 to separate the interior of the housing from the interior of the collector can 172. In this way, housing 180 serves as a suction compartment. An alternate action switch 181 is mounted in housing 180 and is connected to the power lines of motor 178. This switch has an operating plunger 183 which is perpendicular and in close proximity to wall or partition 184. This plunger is arranged so that when it is pressed, the switch 181 is actuated to start or stop the motor. In addition, a manual reset knob 185 and a linkage mechanism 187 are attached to switch 181 whereby the switch can be operated manually by pressing knob 185. The partition or wall 184 is provided with anopening through which tube 186 extends down into the collector can to a point below inlet conduit 188, see FIG. 9.

A first cage 190 is mounted over the upper end of tube 186 in the suction compartment. A ball valve 192 is mounted in this cage with, a coil'spring 194 to bias the ball valve to a tube closed position. A'second cage 196 i secured to the lower end of tube 186 in the container can 172. A spherical float valve 197 is mounted in this cage as shown. Tube 186 is severable into two sections at junction 198 by any suitable means, and a safety filter (not shown) is removably mounted in tube 186 at this junction.

To this point the modified suction cleaner operates for Wet and dry pick up in the same manner as explained in the co-pending patent application No. 65,083, of which this is a continuation in part. However, in order to modify the suction cleaner 170 so it can forcibly pump liquid out of the container, as explained in the description of the suction cleaner 10, shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, means are provided for positively closing tube 186. In particular, as explained above in connection with the embodiment shown in FIG. 1, a bolt 202 is threadably mounted in the motor housing 180, as shown in FIG. 9. A knob 203 is attached to the top of the bolt for rotating it and a valve engaging member 205 is secured to the bottom of the bolt. By rotation of knob 203 the valve engaging member 205 can be moved downwardly into cage 190 and on into enga-ge-.

ment with ball valve 192.to force the balllvalve into engagement with the tube 186, to positively close the tube and prevent the passage of air therethrough.

In operation, when it is desired to forcibly pump the liquid out of the container can 172, a hose 208 is connected between the inlet conduit 188 and the outlet tube 182. The knob 203 is rotated to cause the valve engaging member 205 to move into engagement with ball valve 192 and thereby force the ball valve into engagement with tube 186 to positively close the. tube and cut off air communication between housing 180 and the contalner can 172. Next, closure 206 is opened. Then the motor 178 is started to draw air into housing 180. From there the air is forced by operation of motor 178 through hose 208 into container can 172, thus pressurizing the can. When valve 176 is opened the liquid in the container can is pumped out of drain 174. It is contemplated that housing 180 with the motor 178 mounted therein along with 8 the wall or partition 184 and tube 186 may be made and sold separately as a unit, as shown in FIG. 10. Such a.

The invention may be embodied in other forms without.

departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof as set forth in the claims, and the present embodiment is therefore to be considered as illustrative and not restrictive and it is intended to include all changes which come within the scope and range of the claims.

I claim:

1. A suction cleaner of the class described comprising a housing, said housing including a collector can and a motor housing, a motor driven exhaust fan mounted in said motor housing, said collector can removably mounted on said motor housing whereby the base of said collector canserves as a partition separating said collector can from said motor housing, at least a part of the base of said collector can comprising a diaphragm, said collector can having an inlet conduit and a valve controlled outlet drain secured thereto, an outlet conduit in said motor housing, said baseof said collector can having a tube extending therethrough to provide air communication between said collector can and said motor housing, a valve in said motor housing for closing the part of said tube in said motor housing, means biasing said valve to a tube closed position, a stand pipe adapted to be removably connected to said tube, a float valve associated with said stand pipe for closing said stand pipe when the liquid level. in said collector can reaches a pre-determined level whereby when said float valve closes said stand pipe the evacuation of said motor housing by continued operation of said motor driven exhaust fan draws the part of said base comprising a diaphragm a distance into said motor housing, an alternate action switch connected to the power lines of the motor driven exhaust fan, said alternate action switch mounted on'a support and having an operating plunger facing and in close proximity to said diaphragm part of the base of the collector can, said support movable toward and away from the base of said collector can whereby each time said support is moved toward said base of said collector can, said operating plunger is pressed to activate said switch to start or stop the motor driven exhaust fan, operator controlled means for controlling the movement of said support whereby the suction cleaner can be stopped or started, said plunger of said alternate action switch positioned so when said part of the base of the collector can serving as a diaphragm is drawn further into said motor housing the diaphragm presses said opearting plunger with enough force to cause said alternate action switch to stop saidmotor whereby the motor driven exhaust fan is automatically stopped when the liquid in said collector can reaches a predetermined level, a valve for closing said tube, externally controlled means for engaging said valve and causing it to positively close said tube, an inlet opening in said motor housing, a closure for said inlet opening movable between an inlet open position and an inlet closed position, a hose adapted to be removably connected between said outlet conduit in said motor housing and said inlet conduit in said collector can whereby operation of said motor driven exhaust fan while said valve positively closes said tube and said closure in said motor housing is in an inlet open position draws air into said motor housing through said inlet opening and forces said air through said hose to said collector can to pressurize said collector can whereby liquid in said collector can may be forcibly pumped out of said collector can through said valve controlled outlet drain independently of the level of the liquid in the collector can.

2. The suction cleaner described in claim 1, including a time delay means for delaying the build up of a vacuum in said motor housing when said motor driven fan is started to permit said operating plunger of said alternate action switch to reset for the next switch actuation.

3. The suction cleaner described in claim 2 wherein said time delay means for delaying the build up of a vacuum in said motor housing comprises a second opening in said motor housing, a second closure for said opening movable between an open position and a closed position, said operator controlled means connected to said second closure in such a waythat said closure momentarily moves to an open position when said alternate action switch is actuated by said operator controlled means to permit air to momentarily enter the motor housing through said second opening long enough to prevent the build up of a vacuum in the motor housing until said operating plunger has reset.

4. A suction cleaner of the class described comprising a collector can, said collector can having an inlet conduit and a valve controlled outlet drain secured thereto, a combined motor housing and a lid, said combined motor housing and lid adapted to be removably mounted over the collector can, a part of said combined motor housing and lid serving as a partition to separate the interior of said combined motor housing and lid from the interior of said collector can when said combined motor housing and lid is mounted over the collector can, at least a part of said partition portion of said combined motor housing and lid comprising a diaphragm, said combined motor housing and lid having a vertically disposed tube extending therethrough to provide air communication to said collector can, a float valve secured to the lower part of said tube for closing off said tube when liquid collected in said collector can reaches a predetermined depth, a second valve connected to the upper part of the tube, means biasing said second valve to a tube closed position, a motor driven exhaust fan mounted in said combined motor housing and lid, an outlet conduit in said combined motor housing and lid whereby operation of said motor evacuates said combined motor housing and lid and overcomes the force exerted by said biasing means and holds said second valve to a tube open position as long as the flow of air through said tube is maintained at a predetermined volume, said motor driven fan having a power cut off, means in said combined motor housing and lid connected to said power cut off and associated with said diaphragm part of said partition so that whenever the flow of air through said tube falls below a predetermined volume and said float valve or said second valve closes, continued operation of said motor causes the part of said partition serving as a diaphragm to move a distance into said combined motor housing and lid suflicientto actuate the power cut off and stop said motor, an inlet opening in said combined motor housing and lid, a closure for said inlet opening movable between an inlet open position and an inlet closed position, a hose adapted to be removably connected between said outlet conduit in said combined motor housing and lid and said inlet conduit in said collector can, additional means mounted on said combined motor housing and lid and externally controlled for positively closing said valve and close said tube independently of the level of liquid in the collector can whereby operation of said motor with said closure in an open position and with said means positively closing said tube causes air to be drawn into said combined motor housing and lid through said inlet opening and forces this air through said hose to said collector can to pressurize said collector can whereby liquid in said collector can may be forcibly pumped out of said collector can through said outlet drain independently of the level of liquid in the collector can.

5. A suction cleaner of the class described comprising a housing, said housing comprising a collector can and a motor housing, said collector can removably mounted on said motor housing whereby the base of said collector can serves as a partition separating said collector can from said motor housing, at least a part of the base of said collector can comprising a diaphragm, said collector can having an inlet conduit and a valve controlled outlet drain secured thereto, said motor housing an outlet conduit secured thereto, a motor driven exhaust fan mounted in said motor housing, said base of said collector can having a tube extending therethrough both to provide air communication between said collector can and said motor housing and to serve as a stand pipe in the collector can, a float valve in said collector can for closing oil" said tube when the liquid in said collector can reaches a predetermined depth whereby when said float valve closes off said tube, the evacuation of said motor housing by continued operation of said motor driven exhaust fan draws the part of said base of said collector can comprising a diaphragm further into said motor housing, said motor driven exhaust fan having a power cut off, and means connected to said power cut ofl and associated with said diaphragm part of the base of the collector can so that when said part of the base of the collector can serving as a diaphragm is drawn further into said motor housing the power cut off is actuated whereby the motor driven exhaust fan is automatically stopped when the liquid in said collector can reaches a predetermined level, means for positively closing said tube independently of the level of liquid in the collector can, an inlet opening in said motor housing, a closure for said inlet opening movable between an inlet open and an inlet closed position, a hose adapted to be removably connected between said outlet conduit in said motor housing and said inlet conduit in said collector can whereby operation of said motor driven exhaust fan while said means positively closes said tube and said closure in said motor housing is in an inlet open position, draws air into said motor housing through said inlet opening and forces air through said hose to said collector can to pressurize said collector can whereby liquid in said collector can may be forcibly pumped out of said collector can through said outlet drain independently of the level of liquid in the collector can.

6. A suction cleaner of the class described comprising a housing, said housing comprising a collector can and a motor housing, said collector can removably mounted on said motor housing whereby the base of said collector can serves as a partition separating said collector can from said motor housing, an opening formed in said base providing air communication between said collector can and said motor housing, said collector can having a removable lid, an inlet conduit in said lid, a valve controlled outlet drain secured to said collector can, a motor drivenv exhaust fan mounted in said motor housing, said motor housing having an outlet conduit secured thereto whereby operation of said motor driven fan exhausts air from said motor housing and causes a suction at said inlet conduit, an externally operated valve for positively closing said opening in said base independently of the level of liquid in said collector can whereby operation of said motor while said valve is open produces a suction at said inlet conduit in said collector can, an inlet opening in said motor housing, a closure for said opening movable between an inlet open and an inlet closed position, a hose removably connected between said outlet conduit in said motor housing and said inlet conduit in said collector can whereby operation of said motor while said valve closes said opening in said base and said closure is in an inlet open position draws air into said motor housing through said inlet opening and forces said air through said hose to said collector can to pressurize said can whereby liquid in said collector can can be forcibly pumped out of said collector can through said outlet drain independently of the level of liquid in the collector can.

7. A suction cleaner of the class described comprising a housing, said housing including a collector can and a motor housing, a motor driven exhaust fan mounted in said motor housing, said collector can removably mounted on said motor housing whereby the base of said collector can serves as a partition separating said collector can from said motor housing, at least a part of the base of said collector can comprising a diaphragm, said collector can having an inlet conduit and a valve controlled outlet drain, an outlet conduit in said motor housing, said base of said collector scan having a tube extending therethrough to provide air communication between said collector can and said motor housing, a valve in said motor housing for closing the part of said tube in said motor housing, means biasing said valve to a tube closed position, a stand pipe adapted to be removably connected to said tube, a float sleeve slidably mounted on said stand pipe, a float member secured to said float sleeve, a valve member resiliently mounted on the upper end of said stand pipe and in upwardly spaced relation thereto, said valve member shaped so as the liquid level in said collector can rises said float lifts the upper end of said float sleeve into engagement with said valve member to cut off the flow of air through said stand pipe whereby when said valve member cuts oil the flow of air through said stand pipe, continued operation of said motor driven exhaust fan draws the portion of said base comprising a diaphragma distance into said motor housing, said collector can having a lid, a vertically disposed bolt threadably mounted in said lid, means on the upper end of said bolt for rotating said bolt, valve engaging means on the lower end of said bolt whereby rotation'of said bolt in one direction lowers said valve engaging means into engagement with said valve member and forces said valve member into engagement with the upper end of said stand pipe to positively close said stand pipe whereby the collector can may be pressurized independently of the level of the liquid in the collector can, an alternate switch connected to the power lines of the motor driven exhaust fan, said alternate action switch mounted on a support and having an operating plunger facing and in close proximity to said diaphragrnpart of the base of the collector can, said support movable toward and away from the base of said collector can whereby each time said support is moved toward said base of said collector can said operating plunger is pressed to actuate said switch to start or stop the motor driven exhaust fan, operator controlled means for controlling the movement of said support whereby the suction cleaner can be stopped or started, said plunger of said alternate action switch positioned so when said part of the base of the collector can serving as a diaphragm is drawn further into said motor housing, the diaphragm presses said operating plunger with enough force to cause said alternate action switch to stop said motor whereby the motor driven ex- 12 haust fan is automatically stopped when the liquid in said collector can reaches a predetermined level, a first inlet opening in-said motor housing, a first closure for said inlet opening movable between an inlet open position and an inletclosed position, a hose adapted to be removably connected between said outlet conduit in said motor housing and said inlet conduit in said collector can whereby operation of said motor driven exhaust fanvwhile said valve member is adjusted to positively close said stand pipe and said first closure in said'motor housing is in an inlet open position, draws air into said motor housing through said inlet opening and forces said air through said hose to said collector can to pressurize said collector can whereby liquid in said collector can may be forcibly pumped out of said collector can through said valve controlled outlet drain independently of the level of the liquid movable between an open position and a closed position, said operator controlled means connected to said second closure in such a way that said closure momentarily moves to an, open positon when said alternate action switch is actuated by said operator controlled means to permit air to momentarily enter the housing through said second opening long enough to prevent the build up of a vacuum there until said operation plunger has reset.

10. The suction cleaner described in claim 9 wherein said base of said collector can is two ply in thickness, the upper ply dished to provide strength to prevent the base from sagging under the weight of the liquid in the collector can, at least a part of the lower ply of the base comprising a diaphragm.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,533,395 12/1950 Paine 210-416 X 2,643,732 6/1953 Keen 15-321 X 2,731,103 1/ 1956 Ortega.

FOREIGN PATENTS 349,043 11/ 1960 Switzerland.

ROBERT W, MICHELL, Primary Examiner,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/319, 55/361, 15/353, 15/330, 55/434, 55/414, 55/472, 15/328, 15/352, 141/26, 55/431, 55/417, 15/321
International ClassificationA47L11/30, A47L7/00, A47L11/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L7/0042, A47L11/30, A47L11/4088, A47L7/0038, A47L11/4044, A47L7/0009, A47L7/0028, A47L11/4019
European ClassificationA47L7/00B8F, A47L7/00B8B, A47L11/40D2B, A47L7/00B2, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40N6, A47L7/00B10, A47L11/30