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Publication numberUS3343869 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1967
Filing dateMay 17, 1965
Priority dateMay 17, 1965
Publication numberUS 3343869 A, US 3343869A, US-A-3343869, US3343869 A, US3343869A
InventorsReuben Scheinwald
Original AssigneeReuben Scheinwald
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf club receptacle with collapsible chair
US 3343869 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 26, 1967 R. SCHEINWALD 3,343,869

GOLF CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR Filed May 17, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR REUBEN SCHEINWALD 46 Bum 41. 5.- ,1 M

' ATTORNEYS Sept. 26, 1967 R. SCHEINWALD GOLF CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR Filed May' 17, 1965 5 Sheefs-Sheet 2 INVENTOR REUBEN SCHEINWALD ATTORNEYfi' Sept. 26, 1967 R. SCHEINWALD GOLF CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR Filed May 17, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR REUBEN SCHElNWALD BY 41W, M

ATTORNEYS P 26, 19(57 R. SCHEINWALD 3,343,869

GOLF CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR Filed May 17, 1965 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR A; 164 REUBEN SCHEINWALD ATTORNEYS Sept. 26, 1967 GOLF Filed May 17, 1965 FIG. [4

lam-

R. SCHEINWALD CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR 5 Sheets-Sheet 5,

FIGII REUBEN SCHElNWALD ATTORNEYS United States Patent M 3,343,869 GOLF CLUB RECEPTACLE WITH COLLAPSIBLE CHAIR Reuben Scheinwald, 1117 N. 13th Court, Hollywood, Fla. 33020 Filed May 17, 1965, Ser. No. 456,287 11 Claims. (Cl. 297-217) This invention generally relates to golf club bags or receptacles of the type which may be carried on a conventional golf cart and more particularly, the present invention is directed to a portable golf club receptacle equipped with novel chair and shelter attachments.

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide a golf club receptacle incorporating a novel collapsible chair that may be readily folded and unfolded and yet is extremely comfortable in use.

A further object of the present invention is to provide, for use with a golf club receptacle, a novel shelter attachment which may also be employed as an umbrella. Included herein is such a combination shelter and umbrella attachment which may be effectively mounted to the receptacle for use in one of several positions as desired and subsequently folded into a compact unit for storage in the receptacle.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a novel golf club receptacle, which although equipped with the aforementioned chair and shelter attachments, is highly durable and relatively compact so as to be adaptable in use to conventional golf carts.

The above and other objects are achieved by a receptacle includin elongated opposite side and end walls defining an elongated compartment of sufficient dimension for holding golf clubs in the usual upright position. On one side wall of the receptacle there is fixed a support structure for the collapsible chair. The chair support structure is spaced from the receptacle side wall so as to leave space in which one or more storage bags may be attached to the receptacle side wall. On the opposite side wall of the receptacle 2. second compartment is formed for storing the combination shelter and umbrella attachment when not in use.

The collapsible chair includes a seat pivoted to the support structure for movement between a folded or collapsed position against the support structure and an extended position generally at right angles to the receptacle. The seat includes a peripheral frame and a flexible web attached to the frame to span the area enclosed by the frame.

In order to reduce the width of the seat to permit it to conform to the Width of the receptacle side wall when in folded position, the opposite side portions of the seat are made foldable beneath the main portion of the seat. In one embodiment of the invention this is effected by pivotally connecting opposite side portions of the frame to the intermediate frame portions.

Four support legs are provided for the seat, each pivotally connected at four corners of the seat when the seat is of rectangular configuration such as in the illustrated embodiment. The support legs are pivoted in such a manner to the seat frame so they may be folded into retracted position with the front and rear legs on each side of the seat extending in parallel relationship along the underside of the seat. For this purpose the rear legs are spaced from each other a distance less than the front legs to facilitate folding and unfolding of the legs and avoid interference between the legs. If desired, the legs may be provided with extensions for selectively increasing their length to suit various conditions such as the size of the golf cart on which the receptacle is carried.

In the preferred embodiment the chair is provided with 3,343,869 Patented Sept. 25, 1967 leg reinforcement which includes diagonal braces extending between intermediate locations on the legs and intermediate locations on the sides of the seat frame. Horizontal bracing is provided at the bottom of the legs between both of the front legs and between the rear legs and the front legs. The horizontal bracing is provided by three pivotally connected struts which are entirely removable from the legs when not in use. However, the diagonal bracing, while foldable in collapsing the chair, is permanently secured to the chair.

To enhance comfort of the chair, a pair of cushion arm rests are provided on opposite sides of the chair. Pivotally attached to opposite sides of the seat frame are supports to which the arm rests are in turn pivoted so that arm rests and their supports are movable between extended positions for use and collapsed positions for storage. The arm rest supports define apertures which receive the arm rests in their collapsed position. Additionally, lateral abutment stops are fixed to the arm rest supports to engage the underside of the arm rests to hold them in proper horizontal position during use.

Additional comfort is provided by a back rest located above the seat to support the back of a person in the usual manner of a back rest. In one form of the invention the back rest includes side frames pivotally connected to the support structure on the side wall of the receptacle for movement between an extended position extending laterally of the receptacle and a retracted position extending inwardly with the longitudinal edges of the back rest frames almost abutting each other. Across the back rest frames and interconnected thereto is a soft flexible webbing which spreads to support the back of the user when the back rest frames are extended outwardly.

To ensure the back rest will remain in its extended position for use, the back rest frames are provided with flexible ties which may be fastened together rearwardly of the back rest webbing to thereby maintain the back rest in the spread position.

Combination shelter and umbrella attachment The combination shelter and umbrella attachment includes a large size umbrella structure including the usual canopy and supporting ribs; and a foldable skirt or curtain attached to the edges of the canopy to hang downwardly to define an enclosure when the canopy is spread and the curtain is completely unfolded. The skirt may be formed from any suitable lightweight waterproof material and preferably includes transparent portions providing visibility through the skirt. Additionally, the skirt is formed with a longitudinal separable seam permitting access into the interior of the skirt. Any suitable fastener such as a slide fastener is employed to retain the seam closed. To stabilize the shelter against billowing and lateral movement when in use, weights are attached to the bottom of the skirt and chordal stays are fixed to the inside of the shelter; the stays being entirely removable in folding the skirt.

Folding and unfolding of the skirt is uniquely accomplished in an orderly and simple fashion by a system of hooks and eyelets secured to various portions of the skirt and canopy. In the fully folded position of the skirt, it rests on the canopy and in this condition, the structure may be employed as an umbrella. The umbrella and shelter attachment is completely collapsed by retracting the canopy support ribs against the umbrella support stern in the usual manner, after which the attachment may be placed in the second compartment for storage.

T 0 support the umbrella and shelter attachment in use, a clamp is mounted by a bracket to a rigid portion of the wall which forms the second compartment. This clamp includes a pair of jaws which are operable by a manual pressure screw to engage or release the stem of the shelter and umbrella attachment which stem is received between the jaws. The clamp member is mounted to the bracket so that it may be adjusted about a horizontal axis into the desired position. Another manual pressure screw is employed to releasably secure the clamp to the bracket in the adjusted position.

Other objects and features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description in conjunction with the attached drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf club receptacle embodying the present invention shown on a conventional golf cart;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, fragmental, perspective view showing the seat of a chair incorporated in the receptacle of FIG. 1; the seat being in partially collapsed position;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2 but showing the support legs and bracing of the chair in fully extended positions;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmental, perspective view illustrating the chair in unfolded position except for its back and arm rests;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmental, perspective View showing the chair in fully unfolded position ready for use;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmental, perspective view of the receptacle showing a clamp employed to support a shelter attachment;

FIG. 7 is an exploded, perspective view of the clamp in FIG. 6 shown with a fragment of its mounting bracket;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the combination shelter and umbrella attachment in folded condition and mounted in the clamp on the receptacle which is shown in fragment;

FIG. 9 is an enlarged, perspective view of the combination shelter and umbrella attachment illustrated in fully unfolded condition for use as a shelter;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged, perspective View of a lower portion of the attachment as shown in FIG. 9 but further illustrating an opening into the shelter and internal support stays;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged, fragmental, longitudinal, crosssectional view of the combination shelter and umbrella attachment when in fully unfolded condition for use; and

FIGS. 12, 13 and 14 are views similar to FIG. 11 but illustrating sequential steps in folding the shelter attach ment.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows a golf club receptacle embodying the present invention generally designated 10 attached in the usual way on a conventional golf cart 12 for transportation in typical manner. Receptacle 16 includes a bottom wall (not shown) and elongated opposite side walls 14, 16 and end walls 18, 2!) defining a compartment 22 dimensioned to receive golf clubs 24 in the usual upright manner as shown in FIG. 1. Compartment 22 is large enough to accommodate conventional plastic tubes 26 which receive and segregate the golf clubs in orderly fashion. If desired, a partition 28 may be provided in compartment 22 dividing the compartment into front and rear sections. Partition 28 may be equipped with a pocket 30 for carrying a score card while a tee holder 32 may also be attached to partition 28, if desired.

On front side wall 14 of,the receptacle a collapsible chair generally designated 44] is attached by suitable support structure shown as a pair of rails 42 extending along the opposite edges of wall 14 from which rails 42 are spaced by inverted generally U-shaped cross bars 46 that are suitably fixed to wall 14. In the space between support rails 42 and front side wall 14, one or more pockets such as 47 and 49 may be attached to side wall 14 for storing golf balls and other articles.

Referring to FIGS. 2 to 5, chair 40 as shown includes a rectangular seat 56 comprised of a frame formed of rigid rectilinear elements 52, 54, 56 and 58 and a flexible web 60 suitably attached to the frame so as to cover the enclosed area. In collapsing the chair the opposite sides 62 and 64 of the seat are foldable beneath the main portion 66 of the seat. This is accomplished by pivotably connecting side frame elements 52, 54 of the seat to the intermediate front and rear frame elements 56, 58 such as by hinges 68 and 70. In turn, the seat as a whole, is pivotable between an extended position generally at right angles to the receptacle as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 and a retracted position generally parallel to front side wall 14 of the receptacle as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. This folding of the seat is obtained through hinges 72 connected to rear frame piece 54 of the seat and an intermediate cross bar 74 fixed to the support rails 42.

Front and rear support legs 76 and 78 are provided for the chair; each leg pivotably connected such as by hinges 8i) and 82 to the opposite corners of the seat frame. Support leg hinges 80 and 82 are arranged such that front and rear legs 76 and 78 are folded into parallel retracted positions against the underside of the seat as shown by the right hand portion of FIG. 2. To prevent interference between the front and rear legs during folding and unfolding, rear legs 78 are spaced inwardly from front legs to 6a slight distance such that the front and rear support legs lie in side-by-side relationship when retracted. Moreover, the hinged ends of front legs 76 are formed with inwardly projecting arms 77 dimensioned to overlie and engage rear legs 78 to maintain them in retracted position as illustrated by the right hand portion of FIG. 2. While front legs 76 are illustrated as planar strips and back legs 73 as right angle channel members, other shapes may be employed to equal advantage. Moreover, support legs 76, 78 may be provided with extensions (not shown) for increasing their length in order to adapt the chair, for example, to a particular golf cart.

Reinforcement for support legs 76, 78 is provided in the illustrated embodiment by bracing which includes a pair of diagonal braces 80 pivotally connected, such as by hinges 82, to the side frame elements 56 and 58 of the seat with the free ends of braces 80 engageable on abutments 84 fixed to front legs 76 intermediate the ends thereof. A second pair of diagonal braces 86 are pivotally connected, such as by pivot pins 87, to intermediate portions of rear legs 78 such that the free ends of braces 86 are respectively engageable against the barrels of hinges 82 of diagonal braces 80 (see FIG. 3). In retracted position, diagonal braces 80 and 86 extend beneath opposite side portions 64 of the seat as illustrated in FIG. 2 wherein right hand brace 80 is shown underlying front legs 76 while brace 86 lies between front and rear legs 76 and 78.

Additional bracing is preferably employed at the bottom of support legs 76, 78 in the form of horizontal cross bracing which includes front brace 88 and side braces 90 pivotally connected to opposite ends of front brace 88 so as to be attachable and detachable as a unit. Front cross brace 88 has longitudinal slots 92 in its opposite ends which receive front support legs 76 to prevent inward lateral movement of the support legs. Positioning and maintaining front brace 88 against movement off the ends of front legs 76 are stops 94 fixed at the bottom of front legs 76. Slide braces 96 extend between the front and rear legs and are formed at their free ends with lateral projections 96 engageable behind rear legs 78 (see FIG. 3) to prevent movement of the front and rear legs away from each other.

Added comfort is provided by arm rest assemblies generally designated 100 on the opposite sides of the seat. Each arm rest assembly includes an arm rest support 102 pivotally connected such as by hinges 104 to one of the side elements of the seat frame for movement between an extended position normal to the plane of the seat as shown in FIG. 5 and a retracted position against the seat as shown by the left-hand arm rest support in FIG. 4. Arm rest supports 102 are comprised of end portions 106 projecting at right angles from an elongated intermediate portion 108 and pivotally connected to the seat frame by hinges 114 to thus define an aperture 110. Pivotally connected by hinges 112 to intermediate portions 108 of the arm rest supports are cushioned arm rests 116 which are movable 270 about arm rest portions 168 between operative positions extending laterally from the arm rest supports as shown in FIG. 5 and retracted, partially inverted postions in arm rest apertures 110 as shown by the righthand arm rest assembly in FIG. 4.

In order to maintain arm rests 116 in their outer horizontal positions for use, a pair of abutments 118 are fixed to each of the intermediate portions 103 of the arm rest supports to project laterally outwardly and be engageable by arm rests 116 to thus provide the desired support.

For supporting the back of a person using the chair a rest 120 is provided above the seat in overlying relation to the front side wall 14 of the receptacle. In the illustrated embodiment, back rest 120 is comprised of a flexible webbing 121 attached to opposite side frames 122 pivotally connected such as by hinges 124 to support rails 42 for movement between laterally outwardly extended positions shown in FIG. 5 and inward, retracted positions shown in FIG. 4. When back rest frames are in their extended positions the webbing 121 will be spread to comfortably support the back of the user when the frames 122 are pivoted inwardly the opposite side portions 126 of the webbing will be folded against the main portion of the webbing. To ensure the back rest 120 will remain in the spread position shown in FIG. 5, flexible ties 128 may be attached to back rest frames 122 so that they may be fastened together behind the back rest.

To fold the chair into collapsed position after use, arm rests 116 are pivoted inwardly about arm rest supports 198 and through apertures 110 in the arm rest supports as illustrated by the right-hand arm rest in FIG. 4. Arm rest supports 1G6, 168 are then pivoted inwardly against the seat as shown by the left-hand arm rest in FIG. 4. Back rest ties 128 are then unfastened and sides 126 of the back rest folded inwardly into the position shown in FIG. 4.

The seat is then pivoted against the back rest as shown in FIG. 3 and horizontal cross braces 88 and 90 are entirely removed from support legs 76 and 78 thus permitting the free ends of diagonal braces 80 and 86 to be disengaged from the front and rear legs respectively. Next, support legs 76 and 78 are retracted along with diagonal braces 89 and 86 along the underside of opposite side portions 64 of the seat as shown by the righthand side of FIG. 2. Finally, with the seat retracted against the lock rest, opposite side portions 64 of the seat are folded inwardly beneath the main portion and tied in this position such as by a strap 129 as shown in FIG. 1. It will be seen that, in this fully collapsed and secured position, the chair does not obstruct movement and manipulation of the associated golf cart. When it is desired to unfold the seat for use, the above procedure is merely reversed.

Various materials and methods may be employed in constructing the receptacle and its chair. In one form for example, the rigid frame elements of the chair including the support legs, arm rest supports, seat and back rest frames, and the rail supports are made from aluminum while the webbing of the seat and back rest are made from leather. Additionally, the arm rests are fabricated from foam rubber covered with leather which is also employed to cover the side walls of the receptacle and the seat and back rest frames for decorative purposes.

Combination shelter and umbrella attachment In FIG. 8 a combination umbrella and shelter attachment, generally designated 146, constructed in accordance with the present invention, is shown mounted to the receptacle by a clamp assembly 142. Referring to FIGS. 8 to 11, the combination umbrella and shelter attachment basically comprises a large size umbrella'structure in cluding a typical canopy 144 and radial support ribs 146 for the canpoy pivoted to the top portion of a main stem 148; and a flexible skirt or curtain 150 attached to the peripheral edges of the canopy. As in conventional umbrella construction, the canopy is actuated and supported in open position additionally through means of auxiliary ribs 147 (see FIG. 11) which are pivotally connected both to canopy support ribs 146 respectively and to a sleeve (not shown) which is slida'bly positioned about stern 14-8. Any other suitable structure for supporting and actuating the canopy may be employed if desired.

Skirt 151 in the preferred embodiment is formed of suitable lightweight, waterproof material such as nylon and is dimensioned to form an octagonal enclosure corresponding to the eight sections of the shown canopy, which enclosure depends from the canopy 144 a distance of about six to seven feet. Access into the enclosure is provided by a separable seam 152 formed by a. pair of adjoining longitudinal edges 154, 156 which extend throughout the length of the skirt. Longitudinal skirt edges 154, 156 are releasably attached together by any suitable means such as the shown slide fastener 158. Additionally in the preferred embodiment, skirt 150 is formed with one or more transparent portions 160 of any suitable plastic material for providing visibility through the shelter.

In accordance with the invention, the canopy and skirt are provided with a unique system of hooks and eyelets for efficiently folding the skirt into a neat, compact unit located on top of the canopy. Referring to FIGS. 9 to 13, this system in the shown embodiment includes a first set of eight hooks 162 attached to the inside of the skirt at the upper end thereof adjacent the ends of canopy support ribs 146 as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11. Three sets of eight eyelets are attached to the skirt for engagement with hooks 162 to fold the skirt into a position shown in FIG. 13. One set of eyelets 164 are formed from flexible strips attached such as by sewing to the internal sides of the skirt adjacent the lower edge thereof in positions vertically aligned with hooks 162. A second set of eyelets 166, in this instance formed of metal, are attached to external peripheral portions of the skirt intermediate the ends thereof and aligned with hooks 162 and eyelets 164. A third set of eyelets 168 are attached at peripherally spaced internal portions of the skirt intermediate eyelets 164 and 166.

When skirt 151 is ultimately folded, it rests on top of canopy 144- and for this purpose a second set of hooks 170 are attached on the canopy directly over support ribs 146 intermediate the ends thereof. Hooks 170 are adapted to receive another set of eyelets 172 attached to the outside of the skirt in line with and intermediate eyelets 166 and hooks 162.

In order to stabilize the shelter and prevent billowing when in use, a plurality of weights 174 are attached to the lower end of the skirt which is hemmed at 176 to receive and secure the Weights 174 as shown in FIG. 11. Additional stabilization of the skirt is provided by chordal stays 18f removably attached to the internal sides of the skirts so as to extend continuously in a horizontal plane offset towards the lower end of the skirt. In the shown form, stays 181 are formed by metallic rods formed with eyelets 182 on their opposite ends, which eyelets 182 are dimensioned to be received in hooks 184 attached to the inside of the skirt in positions just below internal eyelets 168 as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11.

Referring now to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8., clamp assembly 142 which supports the shelter attachment in use includes a mounting bracket 136 fixed such as by screws 187 to the frame of a second compartment 13% which is formed on the rear side 16 of the receptacle opposite the chair for receiving the shelter and umbrella attachment for storage. Compartment 189 is dimensioned to fully receive the combination shelter and umbrella attachment when folded and in the shown embodiment, compartment 189 tapers inwardly from its mouth or open end towards the bottom of the receptacle.

Clam assembly 142 further includes a clamp member 198 adjustably secured to bracket 186 by means of a screw 192 received in aligned passages 124 and 196 formed in the clamp member and bracket respectively. Screw 192 is formed with a pressure shoulder 197, and bracket passage 195 is provided with threads corresponding to those of screw 1'92 such that by advancing screw 192 in passage 196, shoulder 197 may be engaged against clamp member 190 to force it in firm engagement against bracket 186. The connection between clamp member 190 and bracket 186 is further enhanced by two sets of annularly arranged teeth 198 and 129 formed on the clamp member and bracket as shown in FIG. 7. Upon advancement of screw 192 teeth 199 will interlock to effectively secure clamp member 191 Interlocking teeth 198 and 129 further serve to positively define the various selectable angular positions of the clamp member relative to the bracket.

The opposite end of clamp member 190 is bifurcated to form a pair of jaws 20th and 282 for receiving and securing the stem of the shelter attachment in position against movement. Jaws 2G8 and 292 are formed with complementary semi-cylindrical grooves 206, 298 dimensioned to receive the opposite sides of the shelter stern.

To draw the jaws 200, 202 together to clamp the stern therebetween, a screw 210 similar to screw 192 is provided in aligned apertures formed in the jaws. The aperture (not shown) in jaw 202 is threaded so that upon advancement of screw 214) therein, shoulder 212 of screw 210 will engage against jaw 200 to force it towards the opposite jaw 202 for firm engagement of the stem of the shelter attachment. Manual operating handles 214 and 216 may be provided for screws 192 and 212 to facilitate actuation thereof.

In order to permit the shelter attachment to be completely stored in compartment 189 of the receptacle, an extension 220, preferably formed from aluminum, is provided for the main shelter stem 143. Referring to FIG. 8, extension 220 includes a fixed sleeve 222 dimensioned to receive and hold the bottom end of shelter stem 148, and a pair of rods 224 and 226 interconnected by a link (not shown) having opposite ends pivotally connected to rods 224 and 226 respectively. Stem holder sleeve 222 is fixed on one end of the rod 224 while rods 224 and 226 may be pivoted relative to each other. However, to maintain rods 224 and 226 in vertical alignment against relative movement a sleeve 228 is slidably mounted on rods 224 and 226. By sliding sleeve 228 completely onto either rod 224 or 226, the interconnecting link is released to permit rods 224 and 226 to be pivoted relative to each other.

Assuming that the combination shelter and umbrella attachment is in the unfolded position for use as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11 with extension stem 220 supported in clamp assembly 142, the shelter attachment is folded in the following manner: Initially the internal stays 180 are removed from hooks 184 after which internal eyelets 1&8 are engaged on hooks 162 respectively to fold skirt 150 into the position shown in FIG. 12. Eyelets 164 at the bottom of the skirt are then engaged on hooks 162 followed by engagement of eyelets 166 on hooks 162 to thereby fold the skirt into the position shown in FIG. 13. Skirt 150 is then swung upwardly on the top of the canopy and eyelets 172 engaged on books to thus fold the skirt 8 into the position illustrated in FIG. 14. In this position the shelter may be employed as an umbrella.

However, if storage of the attachment is desired at this point, the shelter stem is withdrawn from extension 221 and canopy 144 folded in the usual manner. The canopy along with the skirt may then be further gathered and tied such as by a strap 230 (see FIG. 8) and subsequently inserted in compartment 189 along with the internal skirt stays 180, and the extension 220 which is released from clamp member 1% merely by loosening screw 216.

It will thus be seen that the present invention uniquely combines a chair and shelter attachment in a golf club receptacle to provide extreme comfort and protection from foul weather in a manner heretofore unattainable. Moreover, the present invention provides the aforementioned advantages without materially restricting the portability of the receptacle or the operability of the associated golf cart.

While the present invention has been described and illustrated in connection with specific embodiments, various modifications and adaptations of the invention may become readily apparent from the foregoing description but nevertheless will lie within the spirit and scope of the invention which is indicated in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A collapsible chair for use on a golf club receptacle adapted to be carried on a golf cart, the chair comprising in combination; a seat, foldable support legs pivotally connected to said seat for movement between extended positions for supporting the chair in use and retracted positions for collapsing the chair after use, said seat including a main portion and opposite side portions foldable between positions extending outwardly beyond said main portion and folded positions beneath said main portion, and a pair of arm rest supports connected to said opposite side portions of the seat respectively for movement between extended positions projecting upwardly from said side portions and folded positions closely overlying said side portions.

2. The chair defined in claim 1 wherein said arrn rest supports are pivotally connected to said side portions of said seat and define apertures with said seat and wherein said arm rest supports have arm rests pivotally connected thereto for movement through said apertures between extended positions for use and folded positions for collapsing the chair.

3. The chair defined in claim 1 further including a back rest extending upwardly from a rear portion of the seat, said back rest including a main portion and opposite side portions movable between extended positions projecting laterally outwardly from said main portion of the back rest and retracted positions against said main portion of the back rest.

4. The chair defined in claim 3 further including means pivotally mounting said seat for movement between an extended position projecting generally at right angles rela tive to said back rest and a retracted position against said back rest.

5. A collapsible chair for use on a golf club receptacle adapted to be carried on a golf cart, the chair comprising in combination; a seat, foldable support legs pivotally connected to said seat for movement between extended positions depending from the seat for supporting the seat in use and retracted positions for collapsing the seat, said seat including a main portion and opposite side portions foldable between extended positions laterally beyond said main portion and folded positions beneath said main portion, a pair of arm rest supports connected to said opposite side portions of the seat respectively for movement between extended positions projecting upwardly from said seat and folded positions closely overlying said seat, said arm rest supports defining apertures, arm rests pivotally connected to said arm rest supports for movement through said apertures between operative and collapsed positions, and abutment means on said arm rest supports for engaging said arm rests to support the same in the operative positions thereof.

6. A golf club receptacle adapted to be carried on a golf cart or the like comprising in combination; a bottom wall and opposite elongate side and end walls defining an elongated compartment dimensioned to receive golf clubs, support means on one of said side walls, a collapsible chair attached to said support means including a seat pivotally connected to said support means for movement between an extended position projecting generally at right angles from said one side wall and a folded position generally parallel to said one side wall, said seat including a main portion and opposite side portions movable between extended positions laterally beyond said main portion and folded positions against the underside of said main portion, a plurality of support legs pivotally connected to said seat for movement between extended positions depending from said seat to support the same in use and retracted positions against the underside of said seat for collapsing the chair after use, a back rest attached to said support means above the seat including a main portion and opposite side portions movable between positions extending laterally of said main portion of the back rest and folded positions against the main portion of the back rest, and strap means attached to said support means for maintaining said side portions of the seat beneath said main portion and said seat against said back rest when the chair is collapsed after use.

7. In combination with a golf club receptacle adapted to be carried on a golf cart or the like and having a bottom wall and elongate opposite side and end walls defining an elongated compartment for receiving golf clubs and a support means on one of said walls; a collapsible chair including a seat pivotally connected to said support means for movement between an extended position projecting generally at right angles from said one side wall of the receptacle and a folded position against said one side wall of the receptacle, said seat including a main portion and opposite side portions movable between extended positions laterally of the main portion of the seat and folded positions against the underside of the main portion of the seat, a plurality of support legs pivotally connected to the seat for movement between extended and retracted positions, a pair of arm rest supports pivotally connected to said opposite side portions of said seat for movement between extended positions projecting upwardly from said seat and folded positions against said side portions of the seat, said arm rest supports being apertured, and a pair of cushioned arm rests pivotally connected to said arm rests supports respectively for movement through said apertures in said 10 arm rest supports between extended positions projecting laterally of said arm rest supports for use and retracted positions located through said apertures for collapse.

8. A collapsible chair for use on a golf club receptacle; the chair comprising in combination, a seat, foldable support legs pivotally connected to said seat for movement between extended positions for supporting the chair in use and retracted positions for collapsing the chair after use, a pair of arm rest supports, and means pivotally connecting said arm rest supports to opposite sides of the seat respectively for movement between extended positions projecting upwardly from the seat and folded positions closely overlying the opposite sides of the seat.

9. The chair defined in claim 8 wherein said arm rest supports have apertures and wherein there is further provided a pair of arm rests pivotally connected to the arm rest supports respectively for movement through the apertures between extended positions for use and folded positions for collapsing the chair.

10. The chair defined in claim 9 wherein said arm rests include cushion portions positioned to engage the arms of an occupant of the chair.

11. The chair defined in claim 10 further including abutment means on said arm rest supports for engaging said arm rests to support the same in the extended operative positions thereof.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS D. 178,526 8/1956 Leach et al 280-47.19 X 855,770 6/ 1907 Gymer 297-14 1,774,909 9/1930 Wells 16 2,599,928 6/1952 Lyons 280-4725 X 2,673,589 3/1954 Kunkel 280-4719 2,726,875 12/1955 Murcott 297-217 X 2,766,813 10/1956 Kay 297-217 X 2,784,004 v3/1957 Hamrick 280-4719 X 2,918,297 12/ 1959 Peters 280-4726 X 2,944,593 7/1960 Zarnke 2972.7 X 2,957,700 10/ 1960 Beaurline 280-4719 3,014,732 12/1961 Schemenauer 297-217 3,151,621 10/1964 Jackson 13516 3,162,461 12/ 1964 Krell 280-4726 X FOREIGN PATENTS 16,167 7/ 1912 Denmark.

0 DAVID J. WILLIAMOWSKY, Primary Examiner.

JAMES T. MCCALL Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3938869 *Nov 14, 1974Feb 17, 1976Josey Robert MGolf bag supported beverage can holding assembly
US4846486 *Nov 20, 1987Jul 11, 1989Hobson Michael JCombined trolley and seat unit
US9060613 *Nov 22, 2011Jun 23, 2015Oscar CombsPersonal weather shelter
US20130127213 *May 23, 2013Oscar CombsPersonal weather shelter
WO2003039685A1 *Oct 26, 2002May 15, 2003Bierfreund Hans JuergenRain-protection device for a golfbag
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/16.1, 297/188.1, 280/47.25, D34/15
International ClassificationB62B5/00, A63B55/08, B62B5/08, A47C9/00, A47C9/10
Cooperative ClassificationB62B2202/404, B62B5/085, A63B55/08, A63B2055/081, A47C15/004, A63B2055/082
European ClassificationB62B5/08C, A63B55/08, A47C15/00P