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Publication numberUS3344729 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1967
Filing dateJun 22, 1964
Priority dateJun 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3344729 A, US 3344729A, US-A-3344729, US3344729 A, US3344729A
InventorsSamuel Kitrosser
Original AssigneeItek Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photographic sheet material processing apparatus
US 3344729 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. KITROSSER PHOTOGRAPI-IIC SHEET MATERIAL PROCESSING APPARATUS Filed June 22, 1964 2 heets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. SAMUEL KITROSSER 1967 s. KITROSSER 3, 9

PHOTOGRAPHIC SHEET-MATERIAL PROCESSING APPARATUS Filed June 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 //VVE'/V7'0R. SA MUEL Kl TROSSER FIG. 3, By E &

ATTORNEY.

United States Patent ware Filed June 22, 1964, Ser. No. 376,979 23 Claims. (Cl. 9589) This invention relates to methods and apparatus for the fluid treatment of material, and more particularly, deals with methods and apparatus for processing photographic material.

The invention accordingly comprises a straight line, self-threading, daylight operated machine capable of continuous processing and drying photographic materials, such as film or paper, either in rolls or in sheets.

Prior art self-threading, beltless photographic processing apparatus depend mainly on transport mechanisms employing rollers that have hard and unyielding surfaces. The transport of material through these processing apparatus is made possible, for example, by either the clearance space between the rollers, the diameter differences of the rollers or the staggered array pattern. Other processing apparatus, utilizing pairs of resilient rollers that are arranged in configurations do not allow for forced circulation of processing solutions through the processing apparatus. In this type of processing apparatus, the material is usually transported along a curved path, necessitating mechanisms, such as mechanical guides, for conveyance of the material and it is known to fail in removal of solutions from the surface of the material between processing stages.

Recent improvements in photographic materials have produced films capable of rapid processing at temperatures as high as 130 F. in 12 seconds. A further example is commercially available film that is completely processed in 25 seconds at 100 F. Materials manufactured for the microfilming and graphic arts industry also employ improved accelerated processing techniques. Advances have been also made in photographic processing chemistry, providing rapid acting developing agents, such as pyrazolone derivatives known commercially as phenidone. Photographic additives have been developed to prevent excessive swelling of the emulsion layers. These advances create the needfor reliable processing methods and apparatus which allow precise, rapid, high temperature and kinetically efiicient application of processing solutions, coupled with a proper transport system for the pbotographic material. In addition duplitized films, such as films used in radiography require substantially the same processing on both its surfaces.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved data processing apparatus that conveys in a straight line through its processing stations single or multiple strips of material, single cut sheets or multiple sheets of material, and processes both sides of the material equally.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved data processing apparatus that transports photographic film without damage to its surface.

Another object is to provide an improved data processing apparatus in which excess solution is removed and prevented from creating droplets on the material.

Another object is to provide an improved data processing apparatus in which the material is supported so as to allow processing solution or air to flow simultaneously on both sides of the material at high velocities.

Another object is to provide an improved data processing apparatus in which the material is subjected to an agitated, rapid liquid flow and not a direct jet or spray during processing.

Another object is to provide an improved data processing apparatus that employs few component parts, is easy to service, and simple to operate.

Other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The features of the invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of the data processing apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the processing solution applicator taken along lines 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of the new processing solution applicator taken along lines 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the processing solution applicator taken along lines 4--4 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged partial sectional of the inlet port of the processing solution applicator.

An embodiment of the data processing apparatus of the present invention is shown in FIG. 1 for processing a roll of photographic material 20, such as film or paper, bearing a latent data image which is to be processed to a visible image. Generally, the data processing apparatus comprise a film magazine 102 for storing unprocessed material, a first processing station 104, a second processing station 106 and a drying station 108. It should be borne in mind that while two processing stations are illustrated, it is apparent that additional, identical stations may be added to increase the number of steps of operation performed on material 20. Conversely, it is apparent that the number of processing stations may be reduced to one without departing from the concepts of the invention.

While not a part of the invention, and therefore, not shown, the data processing apparatus may be part of a unitary data processing system that includes a processing solution supply means. The processing solution supply means may incorporate a processing solution replenishment system to maintain the chemical activity of the processing solution within certain predetermined limits. Additionally, a processing solution temperature control system may also be incorporated to provide more 'accurate processing control.

Magazine 102 and processing stations 104 and 106 are enclosed in a light-tight housing 110'. Magazine 102 is provided with a removable, light-tight cover 112 to permit access to magazine 102 for mounting the roll of un-' station 104. Wall 114a is provided with an entry passage 116a. A wall 11412 separates the first processing station from the second processing station and a passage 116 h provides communication therebetWeen. Similarly, lighttight housing 110 is provided with an end wall portion 114a that has a passage 1160 between second processing station 104 and drying station 108. The horizontal center lines of passages 116a, 1161; and 1160 define a substantially straight line.

Each processing station 104 and 106 is identical and is provided with a pair of feed rollers 44 and 44a, respectively, and a pair of exit rollers 44 and 44'a, respectively. Also each processing station 104 and 106 is provided with a processing solution applicator 200 and 200a, respectively. In turn, each processing solution applicator 200 and 20011, is coupled to the processing solution supply system by conduit 36 and 36a, respectively. Return of the processing solution from each of the processing stations 104 and 106 is provided by conduits 38 and 38a, respectively. Direction of flow of processing solution into and out of the processing station is indicated by the arrows.

Drying station 108 is provided with a pair of feed rollers 44b and a pair of exit rollers 44b. Disposed between roller pairs 44b and 4472 are dual air chambers 120a and 12%. Each air chamber 120a and 12012 is coupled to a source, not shown, of heated air at a predetermined temperature. The heated air is forced into chambers 120a and 1-20!) by fan 202 in the direction of the arrows. Each air chamber 120a and 12012 is provided with a slot 122a and 122b, respectively, for directing the heated air against the upper and lower surfaces of the material passing therebetween. The nip of each of the pairs of rollers, 44, 44', 44a, 44'a, 44b and 44'b are disposed in the processing plane previously described with reference to passages 116a, and 116b, and 1160. The rollers are driven in the direction of the arrows associated with each individual roller. It will now be apparent that material is transported through the various stations in the processing plane from left to right in FIG. 1. This plane is preferably horizontal as shown in FIG. 1.

In the present data processing apparatus, advantage is made of improvements in elastomeric materials, such as synthetic rubbers, in the construction of transporting rollers. This type of rollers offers the advantages of liquid tight seal, nonscratching surface and mechanical squeegeeing of the surface of the film.

Each roller is precisely made and accurately positioned with respect to its mate. The rollers are synchronously driven to avoid uneven pull on material 20. The width of each roller determines the maximum width of material that may be treated by apparatus. In the event cut film or short strips are to be processed, the length of the material must be at least equal to the center to center distance between a pair of feed rollers and a pair of delivery rollers. Forexample, the distance between the nips of feed roller 44 and nips of exit roller 44 is the shortest length of material which can be treated by the data processing apparatus.

Each processing station 104 and 106 is provided with a processing solution applicator, indicated generally by arrows 200 and 200a, respectively. With reference to FIGS. 2 to 5, there is shown processing solution applicator 200, which is typical of the processing solution applicators of the invention. A processing channel is formed in applicator 200 by two configured plates 212 and 214 providing applicator means. The channel includes an input section, a narrow first processing portion generally indicated at 207 providing inlet channel means. A plenum portion 224 and 226 and a final processing portion generally indicated at 213 provides applicator means. The input section is formed by the funnel shaped flanges 206 and 208. First processing portion 207 is formed by a relative'ly narrow throat section in which members 212 and 214 are substantially parallel to one another. Members 212 and 214 diverge from each other after first processing portion 207 to form plenum portions 224, and 226. The width of the channel in the plenum portions 224 and 226 varies from a maximum as the channel emerges from the first processing portion to a minimum at the entrance to final processing portion 213. Members 212 and 214 are substantially parallel in the final processing portion 213 or can be slightly tapered in order to control the flow. As shown in FIG. 4, members 212 and 214 diverge and the channel emerges from first processing portion 207 into plenum portions 224 and 226, members 212 and 214 have inlet ports 220 and 222, respectively.

Coupled to the outer surface of members 212 and 214 are generally U-shaped walls 216 and 218, respectively. Walls 216 and 218 form chambers 225a and 225, respectively, along plenum portions 224 and 226, respectively. As shown in FIG. 4, lip portions of walls 226 and 218 are in liquid tight seal with members 212 and 214, respectively, at first processing portion 207 and final processing portion 213. Fluid communication means, provided in the form of inlet ports 220 and 222, provide .communi* cation between cavities 225a and 225, respectively. Communication between chambers 225a and 225 is provided by a pair of tubes 204, as best may be seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, located at the ends of the processing solution applicator. Wall 218 is provided with an aperture 210 (FIGS. 2 and 4) providing means for attaching inlet pipe 36 (FIG. 1) to processing solution applicator 220.

It should be noted from FIG. 4, that the processing solution applicators have an axis of symmetry along the center line of the channel. This axis of symmetry, as best may be seen in FIG. 1, is made to coincide with a straight line passing through the nip of the roller pairs.

It will now be seen that when processing solution is first fed, under pressure, into inlet pipe 36, cavity 225 is filled. The pressure of the solution forces the solution into upper cavity 225a through communicating tubes 204 (FIG. 3). Since the combined flow opposition or resistance of the orifices of tubes 204 is smaller than the resistance of port 222, the resulting lower resistance presented by tubes 204 will allow upper cavity 225a to be filled before rnuch solution flows out of ports 220 and 222. Once cavities 225 and 225a are filled, the solution is then forced out through inlet ports 220 and 222 into the channel formed between members 212 and 214.

It should be noted that inlet ports 220 and 222 form a jet stream which extends substantially along the entire length of the processing solution applicator transverse to the direction of travel of the material, to provide the necessary processing solution to the material. However, it has been demonstrated that the stream of solution should not be a jet or spray applied directly to the material. Instead, as shown in FIG. 5, the input port 222 is disposed in plate 214 at an angle that is chosen in such a manner that the stream of solution is made to first strike intercept means in the form of straight portion 221 of plate 214 immediately above the material so that the solution will be simultaneously directed into plenum 226 inlet channel 207 (FIGS. 4 and 5). Similarly disposed is inlet port 220 on the other side of the channel so that the solution will be directed into plenum 224 below the material. By so doing, a system is provided such that when the processing solution is flowing, the solution flows through inlet ports 220 and 222 and out towards the leading edge of funnel portions 206 and 208 through first processing portion 207 and simultaneously out through final processing portion 213 and the trailing edges of plates 212 and 214. The flow of processing solution out of funnel portions 206 and 208 creates a prewetting section opposite the exit side of the nip of input roller pair 44 (FIG. 1). The flow thus created serves a dual purpose: first, the flow initially soaks the material with fresh solution; and secondly, the flow provides the incoming material with a liquid bearing to prevent the material from curling and entangling in the channel formed by plates 212 and 214. To prevent fluid build up in the entrance side of delivery for rollers 44 and 44a, wiper blade 47 contacts the upper roller of each roller pair 44 and 44a.'Fluid leaves the lower rollers of each said'pair by gravity. The wiper blade 47 extends along the wetted length of their respective rollers.

The processing solution is agitated as it contacts the material surface, thus, increasing processing speed. Effective agitation of the processing solution is achieved by the relative movement of the solution in the channel and the material through the channel. This relative movement produces a shear effect in the solution and provides a uniform and vigorous turbulence over the surface of the material. This shear effect is enhanced because of the rapid rate of circulation of the solution and the resulting tubulence reduces processing time considerably.

The disposition of the passages, the nip of the roller pairs and the processing channel of the processing solution applicators in the common processing plane provides a straight line processing apparatus. Further, the nip of the roller pairs is juxtaposed with the passage and the processing solution applicator. As best can be seen in FIG. 1, the nip of entrance roller pair 44 is disposed substantially close to passage 116a and at the same time is disposed substantially close to the flare portions 206 and 208. Similarly, the nip of exit roller pair 44' is substantially close to the flat portions of plates 212 and 214 at the exit portion of solution applicator 200 and, at the same time, is substantially close to passage 116k. Without further description, it will be obvious that the nip of roller pair 44a is disposed substantially close to passage 116b. What has been described with reference to first processing station 102 is equally applicable to second processing station 104. It should be noted that drying station 108 is similarly constructed as far as the disposition of the.nip of delivery roller pair 44b with reference to exit roller pair. 44a and the drying apparatus itself and the disposition of the nip of delivery roller pair 44'b with reference to the drying apparatus.

The preferred disposition of the elements of the data processing apparatus provides the desirable capability of self-threading. That is, with the leading edge of material inserted at the nip of delivery roller pair 44, the material will be automatically threaded through first processing station 104 second processing station 106, and drying apparatus 108.

A further advantage of the preferred disposition of the rollers is the control of the solution stream as the solution leaves the processing solution applicators. For example, solution emerging from processing solution applicator either at the flared portions 206 and 208 or at the exit portion between plates 212 and 214, will, under gravity, naturally fall to the bottom of first processing station 104. Solution carried by material 20, betwen drive roller pair 44 is prevented from flowing along material 20 into magazine 102 by the barrier of the nip of roller pair 44. Excess solution fro-m the underside of material 20, upon reaching the bottom roller member of delivery roller pair 44, drops to the bottom of first processing station 104. Similarly, excess fluid on the top surface of material 20 will flow off the sides of material 20 to the bottom of first processing station 104.

. At the exit end of processing solution applicator 200, solution emerging from between the plates 212 and 214 will flow off the material to drop to the bottom of first processing station 104. Excess solution on material 20, is prevented from contaminating station 106 by the barrier of the nip of exit roller pair 44. The squeegee action of exit roller pair 44' removes excess solution on material 20 and forces the solution to drop to the bottom of first processing station 104. The solution that finds itself at the bottom of first processing station 104 flows out through pipe 38.-

A further advantage, derived from the disposition of the roller pairs, is that the material is held at least by one edge at all times during transport through the apparatus. Thus, large volumes of processing solutions, washing solutions or drying air can be applied in the short distance between roller pairs. Typical rates of liquid circulation are as high as ten gallons per minute and one hundred cubic feet of air per minute. The result is a most eflicient data processing apparatus. Furthermore, since the material is supported only by the processing liquids, between roller pairs in the processing station the entire film material format is processed in a uniform fashion.

6 Thus, if data (i.e., coding) is placed on the edge of the material it is simultaneously developed with remaining format.

Operation of the present data processing apparatus can best be understood by referring to FIG. 1. Let it be assumed that first processing station 104 is a combined developing and fixing stage using a single solution developer and fixer for exposed photographic film and the second processing station 106 is the washing stage. Thus, an appropriate single solution developer and fixer solution will be provided to processing solution applicator 200 through pipe 36 and an appropriate washing solution will be provided to processing solution applicator 200a through pipe 36a.

A strip of material 20 is inserted in magazine 102 on reel 20a by first removing cover 112. The leading edge of material 20 is inserted between the nip of delivery roller pair 44 which delivers material between flared portions 206 and 208 of processing solution applicator 200. Simultaneously, developing solution prewets material 20 in the first processing portion 207 of the processing channel.

As material 20 enters processing solution applicator 200 between flared portions 206 and 208, processing solution flowing in first from processing portion 207 acts to support material 20 on the solution. As material 20 proceeds along the processing channel, it enters the plenum portions 224 and 226 where the material is subjected to a highly turbulent flow of the solution. The solution continues to act as a bearing surface while delivery roller pair 44 transports material 20 through and along the processing channel. Upon entering final processing portion 213 material 20 is still being supported by solution which is now flowing in the direction of travel of material 20. Under the influence of delivery roller pair 44, material 20 leaves the exit portions of applicator 200 between the plates 212 and 214 while the leading edge of material 20 is self-threaded between the nip of exit roller pair 44'. Exit roller pair 44' acts to squeegee excess solution from material 20 and transports material 20 through passage 11612 to the nip of delivery roller pair 44a and the process is now repeated as with processing station 104, except in processing station 106 the solution is a washing solution. Since the actions of the various elements are the same, description of the operation is omitted. As material 20 is transported out of second processing stage 106 into drying stage 108 material 20 is continually transported by the action of the delivery and exit roller pairs 44b and 44'b, respectively. From between roller pair 44'b emerges a developed, fixed, washed and dried material 20.

As previously remarked with the new developments in processing chemistry, it is now possible that the material can be driven through the processing applicators at speeds of 5 feet a minute employing the improved chemicals at temperatures of F. and upwards.

While the description of operation of the data processing apparatus is described in terms of a two stage processing apparatus and one drying stage it should be remembered that the number of stages may be increased or the number of stages reduced to one stage of processing as the situation warrants. While there have been described what are at present considered to be the preferred embodiments of the invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made therein without departing from the invention, and it is, therefore, aimed in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fairly within the true scope and spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a photographic strip material fluid processing apparatus in which said strip material is transported substantially in a plane, the improvement comprising:

a pair of spaced symmetrical applicator means having opposed surfaces disposed on opposite sides of said plane for providing a processing channel between said surfaces, said channel having an inlet and exit for said strip, and said opposite surfaces each having fluid communication means formed therein for directing fluid into said passageway toward said inlet along a direction intersecting said plane at an acute angle;

fluid supply means coupled to said applicator means for supplying under pressure to said fluid communication means;

intercept means symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of said plane and coupled to said applicator means adjacent said inlet thereof for intercepting and deflecting fluid flow from said fluid communication means whereby fluid in between said applicator means opposed surfaces is agitated and simultaneously directed in at least a first direction along said plane toward said inlet and in a second direction toward said exit; and

inlet channel means coupled to said intercept means for receiving said strip and restricting said fluid flow in said first direction, said restricted flow prewetting said strip material as it is transported through said inlet channel means.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said plane is substantially horizontal.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein said inlet channel means include spaced opposed surfaces symmetrically disposed in opposite sides of said planes.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said plane is horizontal and said opposed surfaces are parallel, substantially horizontal plates.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said applicator means opposed surfaces define a channel converging towards the exit of said applicator means whereby flow f fluid in said second direction is restricted.

6. In a photographic strip material fluid processing apparatus in which said strip material is transported substantially in a plane, the improvement comprising:

a pair of spaced symmetrical applicator means having opposed surfaces disposed on opposite sides of said plane for providing a processing channel between said surfaces, said channel having an inlet and exit for said strip, said channel converging toward said exit, and said opposite surfaces each having fluid communication means formed therein for directing fluid into said passageway toward said inlet along a direction intersecting said horizontal plane at an acute angle;

fluid supply means coupled to said applicator means for supplying fluid under pressure to said fluid communication means;

intercept means symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of said plane and coupled to said applicator means adjacent said inlet thereof for intercepting and deflecting fluid flow from said fluid communication means whereby fluid between said applicator means opposed surfaces is caused to be agitated and simultaneously directed in at least a first direction along said plane toward said inlet and in the second direction toward said exit;

inlet channel means coupled to said intercept means for receiving said strip and restricting said fluid flow in said first direction, said restricted flow prewetting said strip material as it is transported through said inlet channel means; and

transport means for transporting said material through inlet channel means and applicator means substantially horizontally.

7. The combination of claim 6 wherein said transport means transports said film at a substantially uniform rate.

-8. The combination of claim 6 wherein said transport means includes a pair of exit rollers disposed adjacent said applicator means exit, said roller pair having its nip disposed in said horizontal plane whereby said strip is transported through said inlet and applicator means substantially horizontally.

9. The combination of claim 6 wherein said transport means includes a pair of delivery rollers disposed adjacent said inlet means, said roller pair having its nip disposed in said horizontal plane whereby strip material is delivered to said inlet means substantially horizontally.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said transport means further includes a pair of exit rollers disposed adjacent said applicator means exit, the nips of both said roller pairs lying in said horizontal plane.

11. The combination of claim 10' wherein said fluid communication means each include an elongated narrow slit.

12. The combination of claim 11 wherein each of said slits is elongated in a direction substantially parallel to said delivery roller pair nip.

13. The combination of claim 12 further including means for simultaneously drying both sides of said strip after processing.

14. The combination of claim 12 wherein said delivery roller above said horizontal plane has wiping means in contact with the surface for preventing processing fluid from collecting on the entrance side of said nip.

15. In a processor for applying processing fluid to web material transported therethrough:

(a) a fluid applicator having a channel forming wall portion substantially parallel to the surface of said web material for applying fluid to said web material at a flow rate suflicient to fill the channel by said wall portion between said applicator wall portion and said web material,

(b) said fluid applicator having a web inlet portion and a web exit portion, and

(0) means positioned between said Wall portion of said applicator and said web material for intercepting and deflecting fluid emerging from said fluid applicator to cause turbulence in said channel between said applicator wall portion and said web material, thereby to increase processing uniformity and speed.

16. The combination as set forth in claim 15 wherein said fluid applicator applies fluid at the underside of said web for supporting said web by forming a liquid bearing thereunder.

17. The combination as set forth in claim 15, wherein said fluid applicator comprises a wall having an elongated orifice means contained therein.

18. The combination as set forth in claim 17 wherein said elongated orifice means comprises an elongated slit oriented to direct fluid into said space at an acute angle with respect to the surface of said web material.

19. The combination as set forth in claim 18 wherein said means for intercepting and deflecting comprises a baffle oriented substantially at a right angle with respect to said wall.

20. In a processor for applying processing fluid to web material transported therethrough:

(a) a pair of spaced fluid applicator means having channel forming wall portions positioned on opposite sides of said web for providing a processing channel having web inlet and exit portions, said channel forming wall portions each having fluid communication means therein for directing fluid into said processing channel;

(b) fluid supply means coupled to said fluid applicator means for supplying fluid to said fluid communication means; and

(c) fluid intercept means disposed between said channel forming wall portions and said web for intercepting and deflecting fluid flow emerging from said fluid communication means to thereby cause turbulence in said processing'fluid to increase the processing rate.

21. The combination as set forth in claim 20 wherein said channel forming wall portions are horizontally oriented.

22. The combination as set forth in claim 20 further including a pair of input drive rollers having a nip positioned adjacent said web inlet portion.

23. In a photographic strip material fluid processing apparatus in which said strip material is transported substantially in a plane, the improvement comprising:

(a) a pair of spaced symmetrical applicator means having opposed surfaces disposed on opposite sides of said plane for providing a processing channel between said surfaces, said channel having an inlet and exit for said strip, and said opposite surfaces each having fluid communication means formed therein for directing fluid into said passageway toward said inlet along a direction intersecting said plane at an acute angle;

(b) fluid supply means coupled to said applicator means for supplying fluid under pressure to said fluid communication means;

(c) intercept means symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of said plane and coupled to said applicator means adjacent said inlet thereof for intercepting and deflecting fluid flow from said fluid communication means whereby fluid in between said applicator means opposed surfaces is agitated and simultaneously directed in at least a first direction along said plane toward said inlet and in a second direction toward said exit; and

(d) a pair of input drive rollers having a nip positioned adjacent said web inlet portion.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,539,549 1/ 1931 Rayburn.

2,779,183 1/ 1957 Fornelli 95-89 X 3,060,889 10/1962 Knapp 118125 X 3,192,845 7/1965 Schmidt 95-89 3,192,846 7/1965 Wright 9594 20 NORTON ANSI-IER, Primary Examiner.

CLIFFORD B. PRICE, JOSEPH F. PETERS, JR.,

Assistant Examiners.

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Referenced by
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US3405626 *Jun 11, 1965Oct 15, 1968Itek CorpApparatus for processing photographic material and the like
US3435750 *Apr 19, 1966Apr 1, 1969Lumoprint Zindler KgApparatus for producing copies
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US3463073 *Jul 26, 1966Aug 26, 1969Logetronics IncFilm processing apparatus
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US3922702 *May 18, 1973Nov 25, 1975Pako CorpLiquid circulating system for photographic film processing tanks
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EP0491181A2 *Nov 22, 1991Jun 24, 1992Eastman Kodak CompanyApparatus for processing photosensitive material
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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/64.00R, 134/199, 134/122.00R, 118/405, 396/620, 396/599
International ClassificationG03D5/00, G03D5/04
Cooperative ClassificationG03D5/04
European ClassificationG03D5/04