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Publication numberUS3345454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1967
Filing dateDec 12, 1966
Priority dateDec 12, 1966
Publication numberUS 3345454 A, US 3345454A, US-A-3345454, US3345454 A, US3345454A
InventorsMixon Jr James Lenhart
Original AssigneeAmp Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Explosively-operated, wedge-type electrical connector
US 3345454 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. L. MixoN, .1R

Oct. 3, i967 EXPLOSIVELY-OPERATED, WEDGE-TYPE ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Dec. l2, 1966 lim. im.

ATTORNEY United States Patent O ABSTRACT F THE DISCLUSURE This disclosure relates to a device for splicing electrical cable. It includes a shell which is tapered at each end. A pair of collapsible jaws are located in either end.

The jaws have a taper matching the taper on the shell. Explosive means is located centrally of the shell to drive the jaws outwardly, thus causing them to grip a cable inserted therein.

Cross-references to related applications This case was originally filed Nov. 28, 1961, Ser. No. 155,384, and a continuation was filed lFeb. 12, 196.4, Ser. No, 344,401. These cases have been abandoned. This application is a substitute for application Ser. No. 344,401.

Background of the invention (1) Field of the invention: The field of the invention relates to cable splicing devices.

-(2) Description of the prior art: The prior art utilized a spring-loaded means for driving the jaws outwardly to compress them onto the cable.

Summary of the invention In the technique of connecting two electrical connectors to each other, it has been found desirable to cold-forge the conductors to a common ferrule. In many instances, the cables are of such a large size that it is ditlicult to apply the pressure required to make this crimped connection at the point of usage. Tools large enough to lgenerate the high forces required are cumbersome and diiicult to use by a lineman working at the top of the utility pole. Smaller tools will not generate the pressure required for making connections in these extremely large wires.

It is an object of this invention to provide a connector especially useful with large-sized conductors, such as are used by the electrical utilities, wherein the force required to make the connection is achieved by an explosive charge contained in the connector. It is also an object of this invention to provide a device having an explosive char-ge whereby ignition of the charge causes the conductors to 'be crimped within the device. It is a further object of this invention to provide such a ldevice wherein the charge cannot be ignited unless the wires are properly secured in place.

Description of the drawings FIGURE 1 illustrates a perspective, cut-away view of a connector embodying the principles of this invention prior to the securing to a pair of conductors;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary, sectional view of the device of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary View of the device of FIGURE 1 showing the conductors in place;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken through plane 4 4 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional, fragmentary view taken through section 5-5 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view, similar to FIGURE 5, showing the device after the charge has been exploded;

FIGURE 7 is an exploded view of FIGURE 1; and FIGURE 8 is a perspective View of the device of FIG- URE 1 showing the connectors crimped.

Description of the preferred embodiment As shown in FIGURE 7, the connector includes an outer shell 10 havin-g a cylindrical central portion 12 with an opening 13 therein, and tapered outer portions 14 and 16. A pair of conductor-receiving inserts 18 and 20 are adapted to be received in the tapered portions 14 and 16 of the shell 10. The conductor-receiving inserts are generally cylindrical, and have a taper slightly less than the taper of the shell portion.

A plurality of slots is formed in the inserts extending from the smaller end thereof to the larger end. This permits the smaller end of the tapered insert to be constricted in order to grasp a conductor inserted therein. Sealing rings 22 and 24 are disposed adjacent to the conductorreceiving inserts 18 and 20.

The device for containing the propellant includes an inner cylindrical member 26, undercut at each end, to form chambers 28 and '30 adapted to receive the propelling charge. Undercutting each end of the internal portion of the cylinder 26 leaves a ring 32 located internally of the cylinder 26. The ring has a slot 34 in the bottom portion to permit chamber 28 to communicate with chamber 30. An aperture 36 extends from the outer surface of the cylinder 26 into the area bounded by the internal surface of the ring 32. The cylinder 26 and its components may be made of plastic, eg., polyethylene.

The device for preventing actuation of the propelling charge, prior to insertion of the conductors, includes a rod-like member 38 having a central aperture 40 extending at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the member 38. The member 38 is disposed within the internal surface of the ring 32 with an interference tit. In assembly, the aperture 40 in the member 38 coincides with the opening 36 in the cylinder 26. The bottom portion of the aperture 40 is in communication with the slot 34. If the cylinder 26 and the rod-like member 38 are made of plastic, they may be molded in one piece.

As shown in FIGURE 5, the aperture 40 in the rod 38 has a shoulder member 42 adapted to receive a priming charge 44. The end of the priming charge is in communication with a propellant charge 46. Spacing the inserts 18 and 20 a slight distance from the ring 32 forms a chamber to contain the propellant, which may be any suitable explosive.

As ydisclosed in FIGURE 7, the rod member 38 has a slot 48 extending the length of the rod on the upper side thereof. A pair of keyways 50 and 52 are situated in the bottom surface of the slot 48. Each of these keyways extends from the outer end of the rod toward the center, a distance less than the full length of the slot. A pair of keys 54 and 56 are vadapted to be inserted into the slot 48, one from each end. Each of these keys has a spline member, 58 and 60 respectively, adapted to slide in keyways 50 and 52. Each of the keys S4 and 56 also has a finger, 62 and 64 respectively, emanating from the end thereof. It is noted that the width of the key 54, plus the width of the linger of the opposite key 56, is equal to the width of the slot 48 (note FIGURE 3).

As shown in FIGURE 2, when the keys 54 and r56 are fully inserted into the slot 48, with the splines 58 and 60 in the keyways 50 and 52 respectively, the fingers 62 and l64 project out beyond the ends of the rod 38. In this position, the keys 54 and 56 cover the aperture 40 in the rod member 38, thus preventing access to the priming member.

As shown in FIGURE 3, when a pair of conductors, C and C are inserted into the respective ends of the shell 18 and 20, they abut the overhanging end of the Patented Oct. 3, 1967.

. U keys 62,v64,'and drive the keys rearwardly to uncover the priming member 44.

In assembly, the rod member 38, with sealing members 22 and 24 retaining the propellant, is inserted into the shell v26 with the aperture40 aligned with the opening 36 in the shell. The primer 44 and keys 54, 56 are also pre-assembled to cover the primer and cause the end of the fingers to overhang the rod-like members.

Initially, one end of the outer shell is tapered, as at 14, whereas the opposite end is left cylindrical. The conductor-receiving member is inserted into the cylindrical member 16 and fed down lchrough to the tapered end 14. 'Ilhe propelling device, cylinder 26, etc., is then inserted through the end 16 until it is located Within the central portion 12 of the outer shell 10. The other conductor-receiving member 20 is fed into the cylindrical portion 16. The cylindrical portion 16 is then tapered to cause it to retain the various members in their proper position, as well as forming the tapered section.

As an alternative, the outer shell may 'be made in two parts, with a screw-threaded joint (not shown) some place between the tapered portion 14 and the tapered portion 16 for ease in assembly.

Operation-A pair of conductors C and C are fed into the respective ends of the tapered portions. Inserting the conductor into the shell to its full extent drives each of the keys rearwardly to expose the primer 40. This insures that the conductors are properly inserted within the shell before the shell may be operate-d.

With the conductors in place, a percussion device (not shown) is inserted through the aperture 36 with a percussion suitable to discharge the primer 44. Discharge of the primer 44 ignites the propellant 46. Ignition of this charge derives the conductor-receiver inserts 18 and 2t) outwardly. The tapered portions 14 and 16 on the outer shell constrict the conductor-receiving inserts 1S and 20 radially so that they are firmly secured to the conductors. This is effected by the lesser taper on the inserts compared to the shell, as well as the slots in the inserts which permit the inserts to `be deformed more readily.

An optional means for detonating the primer 44 includes a percussion device P (FIGURE 4) comprised of a cylinder 70, having screw threads on its outer surface which mate with screw threads in the opening 13. A hammer 72 is slidably located within the cylinder 70, and a spring 74 urges the hammer outwardly. A slot 76 in the outer end of the cylinder permits the cylinder to be threaded in place.

Threading the cylinder 7l) into the opening 13 (FIG- URE 4) loa-ds the spring. The keys 54 and 55 prohibit the hammer 72 from striking the primer 44. When the conductors C and C are driven into place, keys 54 and 56 move longitudinally to uncover the primer 44 and release the hammer 72 to detonate the device.

Changes in construction will occur to those skilled in the art and Various apparently different modifications and embodiments may be made without departing from the scope of lche invention. The matter set forth in the foregoing description and accompanying drawings is offered by way of illustration only. The a-ctual scope of the invention is intended to be delined in the following claims when viewed in their proper perspective against the prior art.

I claim:

1. An electrical connector capable of being secured to a conductor including an outer shell having an internal taper, a conductor-receiving member within'said shell, said conductor-receiving member comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending arcuate members which may be compressed radially to grasp a conductor therein, said arcuate members being circumferentially spaced, and means for radially compressing said arcuate members, said means comprising an explosive charge located interally in said shell, and means for detonating the charge to a-ctuate the conductor-receiving means, whereby the conductor-receiving means is driven longitudinally and the tapered surface of the shell constricts the arcuate sections radially.

2. The device of claim 1 including means for preventing actuation of the explosive change when a conductor is not properly positioned in said shell.

3. The device of claim 1 including means for automatically detonating the explosive change when a conductor is properly positioned in said shell.

4. An electrical connector capable of being secured to a conductor including an outer shell, a conductorreceiving means within said s'hell, said conductor-receiving means comprising a plurality of longitudinally extending members which may be compressed radially to grasp a conductor therein, said members being circumferentially spaced, and means for radially compressing said mem- `bers onto said conductor, said compressing means comprising an explosive charge located in said shell, and means for detonating the charge to actuate the conductorreceiving means, whereby the conductor-receiving means is driven longitudinally to constrict the conductor-receiving members to the conductor.

5. The device of claim 4 including a plurality of conductor-receiving means for joining a plurality of conductors in electrical relationship.

No references cited.

DARRELL L. CLAY, Primary Examiner.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3515794 *Aug 13, 1968Jun 2, 1970Amp IncElectrical connector assembly
US3681512 *May 6, 1971Aug 1, 1972Amp IncElectrical connector
US3761602 *Jan 12, 1972Sep 25, 1973Amp IncMethod and connector having conductive elastomeric material encircled by a continuous layer of insulation in intimate contact therewith
US4252992 *May 21, 1979Feb 24, 1981Amp IncorporatedInternally fired splicing device
US4374483 *Mar 30, 1981Feb 22, 1983Amp IncorporatedIgnition system for an electrical connector
US5687955 *Feb 12, 1996Nov 18, 1997The Detroit Edison CompanyPretensioning device for automatic line splice
US6851262Aug 1, 2003Feb 8, 2005Tyco Electronics, CorporationTools for securing connectors using explosive charges and methods for using the same
US6996987Jul 27, 2004Feb 14, 2006Tyco Electronics CorporationTools for securing connectors using explosive charges and methods for using the same
US7182653Apr 21, 2006Feb 27, 2007Tyco Electronics CorporationConnector assemblies and methods for forming a connection between cables
US7342175 *Sep 6, 2006Mar 11, 2008Fci Americas Technology, Inc.Electrical connector
US7385138Aug 21, 2006Jun 10, 2008Fci Americas Technology, Inc.Electrical connector with wedges and spring
US7426782Apr 17, 2006Sep 23, 2008Tyco Electronics CorporationMethods and apparatus for connecting conductors using a wedge connector
US7858882Jan 23, 2009Dec 28, 2010Burndy Technology LlcConnector for core and stranded cable
US8402641Aug 13, 2008Mar 26, 2013Tyco Electronics CorporationApparatus for connecting conductors using a wedge connector
US9059522Dec 3, 2013Jun 16, 2015Tyco Electronics CorporationWedge connector assemblies and methods for connecting electrical conductors using same
US9240655 *Jan 13, 2014Jan 19, 2016Hubbell IncorporatedAutomatic splice having a magnetic indicator
US20050081524 *Jul 27, 2004Apr 21, 2005Owen GregoryTools for securing connectors using explosive charges and methods for using the same
US20070062718 *Sep 6, 2006Mar 22, 2007Fci Americas Technology, Inc.Electrical connector
US20070066153 *Aug 21, 2006Mar 22, 2007Fci Americas Technology, Inc.Electrical connector
US20070240301 *Apr 17, 2006Oct 18, 2007Tyco Electronics CorporationMethods and apparatus for connecting conductors using a wedge connector
US20100190389 *Jan 23, 2009Jul 29, 2010Fci Americas Technology, Inc.Connector for core and stranded cable
US20140273610 *Jan 13, 2014Sep 18, 2014Hubbell IncorporatedAutomatic Splice Having A Magnetic Indicator
WO2016037289A1 *Sep 11, 2015Mar 17, 2016Cicame Énergie Inc.Wedge cartouche
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/84.00R, 439/863, 403/371, 174/90, 403/314, 403/11
International ClassificationH01R4/50, H01R4/08, H01R4/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/50, H01R4/08
European ClassificationH01R4/50, H01R4/08