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Publication numberUS3345672 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1967
Filing dateFeb 15, 1965
Priority dateFeb 15, 1965
Also published asDE1503756A1
Publication numberUS 3345672 A, US 3345672A, US-A-3345672, US3345672 A, US3345672A
InventorsLa Mers Herbert, Wayne Maury W
Original AssigneeCalifornia Car Wash Systems In
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window cleaning device
US 3345672 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10 1967 H. LA MERS ETAL 3,345,672

WINDOW CLEANING DEVICE Filed Feb. 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 H //vv/ /7'0/2s Elma/er LA 5/?5 1 2 AL/RY W. WAYN-E A 77'0/2NEY Oct. 10 1967 H. LA MERS ETAL 3,345,672

WINDOW CLEANING DEVICE Filed Feb. 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 VE/VTORS 1952511727 LA fine/as my 14/. WA vlvs 10 1967 H. LA MERS ETAL WINDOW CLEANING DEVICE Filed Feb. 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Y 25 w m5 Q V NM 0 5w n N A /W m w Z A a 1 5 Oct. 10 1967 H. LA MERS ETAL 3,345,672

WINDOW CLEANING DEVICE Filed Feb. 15, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 i //v vs/vrores 52788597 LA M/?5 Amway W. WAYNE United States Patent 3,345,672 WINDOW CLEANING DEVICE Herbert La Mers and Maury W. Wayne, Van Nuys, Califl, assignors to California Car Wash Systems, Inc., Sun Valley, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Feb. 15, 1965, Ser. No. 432,459 fl Claims. (Cl. 15-322) This invention relates to apparatus for cleaning surfaces such as windows, and more particularly to improvements therein.

Vhile a large number of mechanical devices have been devised for cleaning windows, the Windshields and rear windows of automobiles are still cleaned at the average service station by squirting them with water and wiping them dry with a towel made of either cloth or a specially treated paper. Apparently, mechanical devices are not able to satisfactorily remove the dirt and oil film which automobile windows seem to accumulate. Even the presently used method of cleaning is not altogether satisfactory, often resulting in streaking or filming which appears after one has left a service station and the moisture on the window has had an opportunity to thoroughly dry. The wiping procedure described apparently does not thoroughly dry the window.

An object of this invention is the provision of a device for cleaning windows which does not leave a streaked or wet window.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a device which both washes and dries a window as it is drawn across that window.

Yet another object of the present invention is the provision of a device Which is operable for cleaning windows more easily and more rapidly than heretofore.

Still another object of the present invention is the provision of a novel, unique and effective window cleaning device.

These and other objects of the invention may be achieved in a window cleaning device which includes a cleaning head made of a suitable rubber-like material. The working portion of the cleaning head has a substantially rectangular shape and comprises a somewhat V- shaped base with the point of the V extending outwardly along a center line of the rectangularly-shaped working surface. On either side of the center line there are positioned, extending outwardly from the base, spaced scrubbing teeth with spaced squeegee teeth outside of the spaced scrubbing teeth. A plurality of openings are provided along the center line of the working surface within which are placed contact valves which, when brought against a window surface, permit water to be sprayed on the window. The scrubbing teeth are periodically interrupted to provide passageways for the water to get between the scrubbing teeth as they ,are moved over the surface of the glass. Openings are also provided in the cleaning head at spaced locations along the squeegee teeth which connect to a vacuum source.

In the use of this invention for cleaning, one or the other of the V surfaces of the cleaning head is placed upon and drawn across a glass surface. When the head is moved away from the user, the portion of the V surface which is closest to the user is brought in contact with the glass so that the water from the contact valve wets the glass in front of the scrubbing teeth. These teeth loosen the dirt and oil. These are flushed by the water which is being sucked by the vacuum applied through the holes in the rearward portion of this surface through these holes and into a waste receiver. The squeegee teeth serve also to remove any remaining water and provide passageways to the vacuum openings whereby the vacuum is rendered more effective.

. When the cleaning head is moved toward the user,

3,345,672 Patented. Oct. 10, 1967 then the V portion of the working surface farthest away from the user is brought into contact with the glass, thus elevating other portions of the working surface. The operation of this portion of the working surface is the same as has been described above. The pressure valves spray water ahead of the scrubbing teeth. These scrubbing teeth can then loosen dirt and oil which are drawn through passageways and guided by the following squeegee teeth into the openings through which the vacuum is applied. In the event the window is wet, due to rain or some other cause, or for final mop up operation, the cleaning head may be held so that the pressure valves do not contact the glass and clean up of the glass may then be performed expeditiously.

The novel features that are considered characteristic of this invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The invention itself both as to its organization and method of operation, as well as additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood from the following description, when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view of the working face of the embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a cross-sectional view along the lines 22 of FIGURE 1 illustrating the V-shape of the working face, as 'well as the disposition of the scrubbing teeth and squeegee teeth;

FIGURE 3 is a rear view of the working face illustrating the compartmental construction thereof;

FIGURE 4 is a cross-sectional view of FIGURE 3 taken along the lines 4-4 illustrating a portion of the working face which contains only teeth;

FIGURE 5 is a view in cross-section of FIGURE 3 along the lines 55 and illustrates the appearance of the portion of the working head which contains the water pressure valve;

FIGURE 6 is a view in cross-section of FIGURE 3 taken along the lines 6-6 and it shows the portion of the working head which contains vacuum holes;

FIGURE 7 is a view of the top of the embodiment of the invention showing its appearance when mounted in the handle;

FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view along the lines 8-8 of FIGURE 7 illustrating the manner of feeding water and vacuum to the working head through the handle.

FIGURE 9 is a view in cross-section along the lines 9-9 which illustrates the construction of a pressure valve which may be employed for providing water in the embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 10 is a perspective view of a detail showing a load spring which is used for resiliently supporting the working head;

FIGURE ll is a cross-sectional view of container apparatus used in conjunction with the embodiment of the invention for supplying water and vacuum thereto, and which may be mounted conveniently adjacent thereto;

FIGURE 12 is a top view of the container shown in FIGURE 11; and

FIGURE 13 is a cross-sectional view along the lines 13-13 of FIGURE 12 illustrating the arrangement of the container for providing vacuum, water, and for receiving water which has been removed from a window.

Reference will now be made to FIGURES 1 through 6 of the drawings. FIGURE 1 is a view of the working surface 10 of the embodiment of the invention which, as may be seen in FIGURE 2, is a cross-sectional view along the lines 2-2 and is V-shaped. It should be understood that as may be seen in FIGURE 2, while the entire head may be made of resilient material, sufiicient base material is provided so that the V shape is maintained in use, or

alternatively expressed, the cross-sectional shape is substantially nondeformable. There are four Openings 12, 14, 16, 18 spaced along the center line of the working surface 10. These openings as may be seen in FIGURE 5, which is a cross-sectional view along the lines 55 of FIGURE 3, lead into a tubular cavity 20 which, as may be seen in FIGURE 9, holds a contact valve 22 which upon pressure on the pin 24, permits water to be squirted onto the cleaning surface through the opening in the bottom of the tubular cavity 20.

Adjacent either side of the center line defined by the aligned openings 12, 14, 16, 18 there is positioned a set of scrubbing teeth respectively 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36. These scrubbing teeth are thick rubber ridges which are spaced from one another and are parallel to one another, and have, as may be seen in FIGURE 1 openings or interruptions such as 38, 40, spaced along the lengths thereof which permit the passage of water through the scrubbing teeth as the head is moved along a window surface.

Adjacent either side of the scrubbing teeth are spaced, parallel, flexible squeegee teeth respectively 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52. These squeegee teeth are more flexible than the scrubbing teeth, and serve the function of guiding the water, dirt, and/ or oil which may have been loosened by the scrubbing teeth, into openings respectively 54, 56, 58, 60, 62, 64. As may be seen in FIGURES 3 and 6,

which is a cross-sectional view along the lines 66 of FIGURE 3, these openings lead into a rectangular cavity 66 which, as may be seen in FIGURE 8, connects to the inside of the handle 68 which operatively supports the cleaning head. As will also appear in subsequent description herein, a vacuum or lower than atmospheric pressure air source is connected to the interior of the handle 68 and is applied to the Window surface being cleaned through the respective openings 54 through 64. The squeegee teeth 46 and 52 are on the outer edges of the cleaning surface. It may thus be seen that when the cleaning device is in use, the squeegee teeth 40, 42, 44 and 46, or 48, 50 and 52, depending upon the direction of the stroke, are at the trailing edge of the cleaning device and serve to channel the mixture of water and dirt toward the vacuum openings which are within the squeegee teeth.

FIGURE 4 which is a cross-sectional view along the lines 44 of FIGURE 3, is shown to complete the presentation of the appearance of the section 70 of that portion of the cleaning head within which there is neither a vacuum opening nor provision for holding the water pressure valves.

FIGURE 7 is a view showing the back of the completed cleaning device wherein the working head is mounted in the handle 68. FIGURE 8 is a cross-sectional view along the lines 88 of FIGURE 7 which is taken through the handle 68. The handle 68 has a hollow tubular portion 68A and a head holding portion 68B which extends at right angles to the tubular portion 68A. The cleaning head is mounted, by any suitable means, within the opening in the head holding portion 68B. In order to insure flexibility of the working surface 10 when the cleaning head is applied to the curved portion of the windshield, so that the working surface may adapt or contour itself to such curved surfaces, there are provided a number of leaf springs respectively 70, 72, only two of which are shown in FIGURE 8. The shape of the leaf springs may be seen in FIGURE 10, which is an isometric view thereof. These springs are attached by means of screws to the interior of the head holding portion 68B of the handle 68, and the back edge of the working head abuts thereon.

As may be seen in FIGURE 9, the contact water valve 22 comprises a body 23, which is within the cavity 20. A pin 24 extends from the body 23 through the opening provided in the cavity therefor. The opening is closed by the mechanism of a spring 25, which presses the body 23 so that it seats at the opening end of the cavity 20 to close the hole therein. Pressure on the pin 24 pushes the body 23 away from the opening in the cavity 20. This enables water to be ejected from the opening. The water comes from a source, as will be described subsequently herein, up through a water tube 74, which is within the opening 68A of the handle 63 to a manifold 76 which couples the tube 74 to four tubes 78, 80, 82, 84 which connect to each one of the tubular chambers 20.

The handle 68 is substantially rigid. It connects to a flexible hose 86 which, as may be seen in FIGURE 11, has its other end coupled to a container 88. While the cleaning head, which has been described thus far, may be coupled to any suitable source of water and a vacuum, when it is to be used for the purpose of cleaning automobile windows, it will be appreciated that while the average service station does have a source of water at the location of the gasoline pumps, it does not have a vacuum source located there, nor does it have a facility for disposing of the water which may be sucked up by the vacuum source when the windows of a car are cleaned. It should be further noted that any ararngement which is provided for furnishing the vacuum to the cleaning device must avoid creating sparks or any other potential hazard at the location of the gasoline pumps. Accordingly, apparatus will be described which accomplishes this function. However, this is not to be construed as a limitation upon the invention since as indicated previously, a cleaning device may be used with any other suitable source of water and a vacuum.

The container may be formed of any suitable plastic material. If desired, it may be mounted by means of brackets 90, 92 which are bolted to one side of the container. These are slidably inserted upon mating holding fixtures 94, 96. Underneath the container 88 there is attached a holding fixture 98 for the handle 68. This includes a bracket 100 which is suitably attached to the bottom of the container 88. The extending end of the bracket 100 has a pivotably attached holding arm 102 thereto, which holding arm is also biased upwardly by a spring 104. The other end of the holding arm 102 is split into a forked portion 106 so that the handle 68 may be supported thereby. The spring biased holding arm 102, when the handle 68 is removed therefrom, holds open a contact valve mechanism 108. This mechanism includes a valve pin 110 which can close off air applied to a hose 112 from the high pressure air supply usually found at the location of the gasoline pumps. When the handle is removed from the arm 102, then the spring bias pushes up the valve pin 110 to enable air to be supplied through the air hose 112, which is connected to a hose 114 inside the housing 88, to a venturi arrangement 116.

The high pressure air which rushes through the venturi arrangement 116 creates a low air pressure region adjacent the nozzle of the venturi arrangement 116 thereby providing the vacuum source required for removing the cleansing water, dirt particles, oil, etc. which is contained in the cleansing water from the surface of the window being cleaned. This low pressure region extends through the load chamber 120 formed in the base of the container upwardly through a pipe 122 which has an air filter 124 on the top thereof to prevent dirt particles from being sucked through the pipe 122. A second internal chamber 126 communicates with the top of the pipe 122. The walls thereof include the external walls of the housing 88 and a transverse partition wall 128. The chamber 126 communicates with one end of the hose 86 and thus the low pressure air or vacuum is applied through the handle 68 to the vacuum openings in the cleaning head. The dirty water which is sucked up is caught in the chamber 126 from where it can be emptied through an opening 127 which is covered by a cap 129.

A second chamber 130 is provided on the other side of the transverse wall 128. This chamber is filled with water through an opening 132 for which a suitable cap 133, as may be seen in FIGURE 12, is provided. The air under pressure which blows through the venturi 116 is directed to a pipe 134 which, as may be seen in FIGURE 11, applies this air under pressure to the chamber 130 at the top thereof. This applies pressure to any water which is within the chamber whereby it can be supplied through the pipe 136, which is connected to the chamber 130 at the bottom, to the pipe 74, and thence through the manifold 76 to the valves in the working head. It may therefore be seen that both water and vacuum are applied to the working head when the handle is lifted from the holding fixture therefor. Otherwise, the pin 110 cuts off the air being supplied from the hose 112 whereby both vacuum and water are cut 01f.

The embodiment of this invention provides a cleaning device with which there is no waste motion. It functions to clean a surface when the cleaning head is pushed away from the body of the operator, as well as when the cleaning head is pulled toward the body of the operator. When the head is pushed away, then the handle is tilted so that the half of the V surface of the cleaning head which is closest to the body of the operator is in contact with the glass surface. The water released by the contact valves washes the glass surface and the scrubbing teeth 32, 34, 36 loosen the dirt, grime, etc. from the glass surface which is wetted by the water coming through the openings 12, 14, 16, 18 which precede the scrubbing teeth. The vacuum obtained through the holes 54, 56, 58 cause the water to flow toward these holes. The squeegee teeth 48, 50, 52 serve to channel the remaining water toward the vacuum openings. The squeegee teeth also serve to assist in drying the window surface. On the return stroke the head is tilted so that the portion thereof, including scrubbing teeth 26, 28, 30 and squeegee teeth 42, 44, 46, are in contact with the surface of the window. Here again, the water coming through the openings provided for them wets the glass in front of the scrubbing teeth whereby the scrubbing teeth can more easily loosen the dirt and grime.

In the event the window is wet by reason of rain or other causes, then the handle may be held so that the water contact valves are not actuated. The scrubbing teeth can then loosen the dirt and grime and the vacuum will remove the water from the surface of the glass leaving it dry and clean. Furthermore, this arrangement can also be used to mop up any wet spots which remain, using only the vacuum and the squeegee teeth for this purpose. Because of the placement of the water contact valves at the center and highest portion of the cleaning head, either backside of the head can be used for the dry mop operation. The vacuum is still present, but the water is cut off.

There has been accordingly described and shown hereinabove a novel, useful and unique arrangement for the cleaning of windows.

What is claimed is:

1. A cleaning device comprising a cleaning head, a handle for holding said cleaning head, said cleaning head having a working surface with an elongated axis, said working surface having a substantially nondeformable V- shaped cross-section in a plane at right angles to said elongated axis, with the apex of said V extending outwardly of said head, a plurality of water openings disposed along the apex of said V, a plurality of resilient parallel spaced scrubbing teeth disposed on both sides of said plurality of water openings and extending in the long direction of said rectangularly shaped working surface, a plurality of parallel spaced resilient squeegee teeth positioned adjacent said scrubbing teeth on the sides farthest away from said water openings, said squeegee teeth being parallel to said scrubbing teeth, and a plurality of vacuum openings in said head disposed in the region of said squeegee teeth communicating with said handle through said cleaning head.

2. A cleaning device comprising a head having a substantially nondeformable shape, said head having a substantially elongated rectangular shape with a cross-section taken along one side of said rectangle being in the shape of a V with the apex of the V intersecting the center line of said rectangle, a plurality of water openings through said head disposed spaced along said apex of said V, a plurality of resilient scrubbing teeth, said scrubbing teeth extending parallel to the center line of said rectangularly shaped working surface and being disposed on both sides of said water openings, a plurality of vacuum openings in said cleaning head, said openings being disposed adjacent said scrubbing teeth, a plurality of spaced parallel squeegee teeth extending parallel to said scrubbing teeth between said vacuum openings, said scrubbing teeth each having a plurality of openings to enable water flow therethrough to said vacuum openings, passage means connected to said vacuum openings for applying vacuum to said vacuum openings, passage means connected to said water openings for applying water to said water openings, and contact valve means positioned. within said Water openings to prevent the flow of water therefrom until said contact valve means have been brought into contact with a surface to be cleaned.

3. A cleaning device comprising a head having a cleaning surface with a substantially V-shaped crosssection, the apex of said V coinciding substantially with the center line of said cleaning surface, a plurality of spaced water openings in said head disposed along the apex of said V, a first and a second set of spaced parallel scrubbing teeth respectively disposed on either side of said water openings, each of the scrubbing teeth in said first and second sets of scrubbing teeth having interruptions therein for enabling water flow therethrough, a first and a second set of squeegee teeth being disposed on said cleaning surface respectively adjacent said first and second set of scrubbing teeth, a first and a second set of vacuum holes extending through said cleaning head, said vacuum holes being disposed within and interrupting said respective first and second sets of squeegee teeth, said vacuum holes being disposed to communicate with the interruptions of said scrubbing teeth, handle means for holding said cleaning head, passage means extending through said handle means for applying lower than atmospheric pressure air through said handle to said vacuum holes, and passage means in said handle for applying water to said water openings through said handle.

4. Apparatus for cleaning and drying the surface of a window comprising a cleaning head having two cleaning surfaces thereon joined together at a center line, said two cleaning surfaces being slightly angled respective to one another to provide a V-shaped cross-section, material means supporting said two cleaning surfaces to provide a substantially unyielding V-shaped cross section, each said cleaning surface having a plurality of parallel spaced resilient scrubbing teeth extending outwardly therefrom and parallel to said center line, a plurality of spaced resilient squeegee teeth parallel to and adjacent to said scrubbing teeth, a plurality of vacuum openings through said cleaning surface and head interrupting said squeegee teeth, said scrubbing teeth having interruptions therein to enable the passage of water therethrough, a

plurality of water openings through said cleaning head,

said water openings being spaced along said center line, a contact valve in each one of said water openings, handle means for resiliently holding said resilient cleaning head, passage means for providing water through said handle means to said water openings, and passage means for providing vacuum through said handle means to said vacuum openings.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 483,359 9/ 1892 Lewis 15-531 1,114,592 10/1914 DeWitt 15321 2,293,115 8/ 1942 Child. 3,056,994 10/1962 Noble 15321 3,195,167 7/1965 Wayne 15-322 ROBERT W. MICHELL, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US483359 *Sep 4, 1891Sep 27, 1892 Window-cleaner
US1114592 *Feb 26, 1914Oct 20, 1914Clinton C De WittHydropneumatic window-cleaning apparatus.
US2293115 *Aug 23, 1940Aug 18, 1942Aubrey Frederick CWindshield wiper
US3056994 *Aug 18, 1960Oct 9, 1962Noble John WVacuum cleaning and mopping apparatus
US3195167 *Aug 22, 1963Jul 20, 1965Wayne Maury WWindow cleaning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3538535 *Jun 15, 1967Nov 10, 1970Standard Oil CoWindow cleaning apparatus
US3604049 *Mar 17, 1969Sep 14, 1971Alpana Aluminum ProdSqueegee vacuum pickup unit for mobile window washer
US3818538 *Oct 30, 1972Jun 25, 1974Ind Ab Broderna LarssonWashing apparatus
US4282626 *Aug 6, 1979Aug 11, 1981California Institute Of TechnologyCleaning devices
US5615449 *Jan 4, 1996Apr 1, 1997White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Cleaning attachment for a vacuum cleaner
US6513192 *May 26, 2000Feb 4, 2003Dennis L. PearlsteinVacuum nozzle tool and stain removal method
US7803258 *Jun 16, 2006Sep 28, 2010Edk Research AgMachine for localized cleaning with an electrolytic cell, for pickling and/or polishing metal surfaces
US8510902Dec 3, 2008Aug 20, 2013Dri-Eaz Products, Inc.Air induction hard surface cleaning tool with an internal baffle
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/322, 15/321
International ClassificationA47L1/02, A47L1/00, A47L1/08
Cooperative ClassificationA47L1/08, A47L1/02
European ClassificationA47L1/02, A47L1/08