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Publication numberUS3345978 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1967
Filing dateAug 26, 1965
Priority dateAug 26, 1965
Publication numberUS 3345978 A, US 3345978A, US-A-3345978, US3345978 A, US3345978A
InventorsYates John W
Original AssigneeYates John W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid fuel feeding system
US 3345978 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1967 J. w. YATES 7 3,345,978

LIQUID FUEL FEEDING SYSTEM 1 Filed Aug. 26. 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. JOHN M K4755 @MQM A r TOEA/EK? Oct. 10, 1967 J. w. YATES 3,345,978

LIQUID FUEL FEEDING SYSTEM Filed Aug. 26. 19 65 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N VEN TOR. Jay/v h! M755 ,4 7 TOR/YE V5 United States Patent 3,345,978 LIQUID FUEL FEEDING SYSTEM John W. Yates, 6085 6th St., Tampa, Fla. 33611 Filed Aug. 26, 1965, Ser. No. 482,692 11 Claims. (Cl. 12694) This invention relates to a liquid fuel feeding system for a stove and more particularly to a system for feeding liquid fuel to a heating stove with the fuel maintained under constant water pressure.

It has been proposed heretofore to feed fuel oil by placing it under the pressure of water. Such systems have not been practical because of variation in the water'pressure or because of the water being under too high a pressure, which has necessitated the use of relatively expensive controls to maintain the oil at a low, constant pressure.

The present invention relates to an improved liquid fuel feeding system especially designed for heating stoves or furnaces. The new system employs water maintained at a constant, low pressure so that a minimum number of controls are required for regulating the fuel feed. This is accomplished by the used of a water container, specifically a humidifier pan, which can be used to humidify air in the usual manner in the space being heated as well as to supply water of constant, low pressure to feed the fuel. The humidifier pan is mounted near the stove at a point a fixed distance above the stove burner with this height difference determining the pressure applied to the fuel fed to the stove. The fuel feeding system also includes improved oil tank controls employing a minimum amount of mechanism and linkages, thereby minimizing the cost of the overall system as well as reducing maintenance thereon.

It is, therefore, a principal object of the invention to provide an improved liquid fuel feeding system having the advantages outlined above.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, reference being made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a somewhat schematic view in cross section of an overall fuel feeding system, including a fuel tank and a heating stove or furnace, embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged detailed view, with parts broken away and with parts in cross section, of fuel tank controls shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the top of the fuel tank of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a view in vertical cross section of a humidifier pan taken along the line 44 of FIG. 1.

Referring to FIG. 1, a liquid fuel furnace or heating stove is shown within a building 12 to be heated. The stove 10 is supplied with fuel from a system which includes a water container or humidifier pan 14 communicating with an underground fuel tank 16. Because of the water pressure used to maintain pressure on the fuel in the tank 16, the tank can be located below ground since gravity is not required to provide the feeding force for the fuel. With the tank underground, it is not necessary to have .an unsightly, exposed tank located outside the building. The tank also is much less subject to damage from weather, vandalism, etc. In addition, maintenance in the form of painting and occasionally repairing the tank is also substantially eliminated.

The stove 10 includes a casing 18 and an internal combustion chamber 20 around which air flows to be heated, with the combustion chamber connected to the usual stack 22. A suitable fuel oil burner 24 is located at the bottom of the combustion chamber and can be of the usual pot type. Oil is supplied to the burner 24 through a supply line 26 controlled by a valve 28 which is regulated by a ice suitable thermostat 30 located in the space to be heated.

The humidifier pan 14 has water-supplying fins 32 extending into the stove 10 around the chamber 20 to supply moisture to the air being heated. Rather than the fins 32, other means can be employed with the humidifier pan 14 to distribute water to the air, such as low pressure spray nozzles or additional shallow pans. Water is supplied to the humidifier pan 14 through a supply line 34 connected to a water main or other suitable source of Water 36. The water level in the pan 14 is closely controlled by a float-operated valve 38 (FIG. 4) located at an outlet 40 of a manually-controlled valve 42. The valve 38 is controlled by a float 44 in the pan, the float being affixed to plates 46 which are pivotally supported by ears 48 aflixed to the interior surface of the wall of the pan 14. The float 44 and the valve 38 thereby maintain a constant level of water in the pan 14 and constant pressure on the fuel.

The oil tank 16 is located below ground level and is accessible through a cover 50 (FIG. 1). The tank is made of two hemispherical parts 52 and 54 of autoclaved, high density concrete and lined with a suitable plastic. With this construction, the tank requires no maintenance or painting which is needed for the usual exposed type of oil tank. Further, by using the water for applying pressure to the oil, there is virtually no chance that the water will freeze in the tank even though the ambient temperature drops below 32 F. for a short time. The water lines used with the system also can be appropriately buried to a desired depth to prevent freezing.

Referring to FIG. 3, a suitable circular top 56 is provided for the upper hemispherical part 54 and includes four openings and a gauge. A filler opening 58 at the top of the tank is used to supply liquid fuel or oil to the tank, when empty, from an oil truck or other suitable source of supply. The opening 58 has an upper housing 60 extending therefrom to receive a suitable cap (not shown). Near the filler opening 58 is an oil supply opening 62 through which oil is forced under water pressure through the line 26 and to the burner 24. A water discharge opening 64 in the top 56 enables water in the tank to be removed when the tank is filled with oil. The opening 64 also has a housing 66 thereabove to receive a suitable cap. When the water is discharged, a hose or the like can be connected with the opening 64 by means of the housing 66 with the water drained at a remote point. Finally, a water inlet opening 68 in the top 56 supplies water to the tank 16 from the humidifier pan 14 through a line 70 (FIG. 1) which is connected to the pan below the water level maintained therein.

The water inlet opening 68 can be connected to a tube extension 72 so that water supplied thereto is directed toward the bottom of the tank, below the lighter oil. The line 72 is no absolutely essential, however, since the water will sink in the oil with or without the line. A large drain tube or conduit 74 communicates with the discharge opening 64 and extends to a point near the bottom of the tank so that the water will discharge properly when the tank is filled with oil. Some mixing of the oil and water may occur when the tank is full of water and is then filled with oil through the filler opening 58. Such mixing is not detrimental, however, because the oil and water 'soon separate after filling.

tion of the tank but to sink in the oil in the upper portion thereof. In this manner, the float will always be located at the meeting plane of the oil and water. An adjustable weight 82 is mounted on the arm 73 and can be moved therealong until the float operates in the desired manner. The weight 82 can be moved toward the float 76 to decrease the buoyancy thereof or away from the float to increase the buoyancy thereof.

To determine the amount of oil in the tank, a gauge housing 84 is formed on the cover 56 and includes an arcuate window 86. A gauge arm 88 with a pointer 90 is pivotally supported in the tank by an ear 92 extending downwardly from the cover 56 and pivotally connected by a pivot pin 94. The pointer thereby can swing in an are having a center of curvature referably superimposed with that of the window 86. Suitable indicia are provided on the housing 84 to indicate the contents of the tank 16. The gauge arm 88 is pivotally connected through a link 96 to a rear extension 93 of the float arm 78. With this arrangement, as the oil is used and the float 76 swings upwardly in a clockwise direction as shown in FIG. 2, the link 96 will move the pointer 90 in a clockwise direction toward the empty mark on the gauge.

In order to prevent water from being supplied to the burner 24 when the oil has been consumed, a valve 100 is associated with the oil supply opening 62 and the gauge arm 88 to close the outlet line when the oil is gone. For this purpose, the valve 100 includes a valve seat 162 formed at the bottom edge of a valve housing 104 located immediately below the opening 62. A valve 106 is carried on a valve rod 108 which is pivotally connected to a lower pointer arm extension 110'. When oil is depleted, the float '76 is raised sufliciently high that the pointer extension 110 moves the valve 106 against the annular valve seat 102 to prevent further flow through the opening 62. With this arrangement of the tank controls, the single float 76 provides both functions of regulating the gauge 90 and also of stopping flow through the supply opening 62 when the oil is gone.

Because constant pressure is maintained on the oil by virtue of the humidifier pan 14- and the level control always maintains a constant pressure on the oil, this ressure being determined by the height of the water level in the pan 14 above the burner 24, no additional controls are required to either reduce the pressure of the water or to maintain the pressure uniformly.

To review the overall operation of the fuel feeding system, when the thermostat 30 calls for heat and opens the valve 28, the oil in the tank 16 is supplied to the burner 24 under a constant, low pressure as determined by the water level of the humidifier pan 14. As the oil is used, water is supplied from the pan 14 through the line 70 and to the opening 68 in the tank from which it flows into the tank and forces oil upwardly and outwardly through the supply opening 62 and connecting piping to the burner. As the oil in the tank is consumed, the float 76 rises as the water therein rises to cause the pointer 90 of the gauge to move accordingly and indicate the contents of the tank. When the water reaches a level near the top of the tank, the float 76 will have been raised sufficiently to cause the valve 106 to move against the seat 102 and prevent Water from entering the burner supply opening 62.

From the above, it will be seen that the fuel feeding system embodying the invention has many advantages. As discussed, the underground tank has advantages from the standpoint of appearance and maintenance as well as longer life and protection against freezing. The use of the humidifier pan 14 for the oil pressure control eliminates the need for additional equipment to supply the proper water pressure and also enables the controls in the tank 16 to be as simple as possible. Hence, the overall feeding system provides an extremely practical arrangement not heretofore achieved.

Many modifications of the above described embodi- 4 ment of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art, and it is to be understood that such modifications can be made without departing from the scope of the invention, if they are within the spirit and the tenor of the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. A heating system for a building comprising a liquid fuel oil stove in a space within the building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel oil burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan attached to said stove above said burner, means for supplying water to said pan, a valve in said Water supply means, a float in said pan operating said valve for maintaining a constant level of water in said pan, said pan having a water outlet, an oil tank assembly for storing fuel oil and for feeding the oil under constant pressure to the stove, said assembly comprising an underground tank having an oil outlet at the top thereof, an oil inlet at the top thereof, a water inlet at the top thereof, a water outlet at the top thereof, a discharge conduit connecting said water outlet with a lower portion of the interior of said tank, a water line connected between said pan water outlet and said tank water inlet for said liquid fuel storage tank, a liquid fuel line connected between said liquid fuel outlet of said tank and said burner inlet, a lever float arm pivotally attached to said water discharge conduit at an intermediate point in said tank, an adjustable weight affixed to said arm, a float at the outer end of said arm, a connecting link pivotally attached to said arm on the side of the conduit pivot opposite said float, a gauge pointer arm for indicating the quantity of fuel in said tank, a gauge housing on said tank top associated with said pointer arm, means pivotally supporting an intermediate point of said pointer arm from the top of said tank, said connecting link being connected to said pointer arm above said intermediate point, a valve seat associated with said oil outlet opening, a valve pivotally connected to said pointer arm below said intermediate point, said connecting link, said pointer arm, and said oil outlet valve being of such lengths that when said tank is substantially full of water, said float will be at the upper portion thereof, said pointer will indicate empty on said gauge, and said oil discharge valve will seat on said oil discharge valve seat and prevent water from flowing through said oil outlet opening.

2. A heating system for a building comprising a liquid fuel oil stove in a space within the building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel oil burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan attached to said stove above said burner, means for supplying water to said pan, a valve in said water supply means, a float in said pan operating said valve for maintaining a constant level of water in said pan, said pan having a water outlet, an oil tank assembly for storing fuel oil and for feeding the oil under constant pressure to the stove, said assembly comprising an underground tank having an oil outlet at the top thereof, a water inlet at the top thereof, a water outlet at the top thereof, and a discharge conduit connecting said water outlet with a lower portion of the interior of said tank, a water line connected between said pan water outlet and said tank water inlet for said liquid fuel storage tank, a liquid fuel line connected between said liquid fuel outlet of said tank and said burner inlet, a lever float arm pivotally attached to said water discharge conduit at an intermediate point in said tank, a float at the outer end of said arm, a gauge pointer arm for indicating the quantity of fuel in said tank, a gauge housing on said tank top associated with said pointer arm, means pivotally supporting said pointer arm from the top of said tank, a connecting link pivotally attached to said float arm and said pointer arm, a valve seat associated with said oil outlet opening, a valve pivotally carried by said gauge pointer arm, said connecting link, said pointer arm, said float arm and said oil outlet valve being arranged so that when said tank is substantially full of water, said float will be at the upper portion thereof, said pointer will indicate empty on said gauge, and said oil'discharge valve will seat on said oil discharge valve seat and prevent water from flowing through said oil outlet opening.

3. A heating system for a building comprising a liquid fuel stove in a space within the building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan attached to said stove above said burner, means for supplying water to said pan, a valve in said water supply means, a float in said pan operating said valve for maintaining a constant level of water in said pan, said pan having a water outlet, an underground liquid fuel storage tank remotely located from the space to be heated, a water line connected between said water outlet and a water inlet for said liquid fuel storage tank, said tank having a water outlet line extending substantially to the bottom of said tank for draining water therefrom when the tank is filled with liquid fuel, said tank having a liquid fuel inlet opening in the top thereof, said tank also having a liquid fuel outlet opening in the top, a liquid fuel line connected from said liquid fuel outlet of said tank to said liquid fuel burner, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel but float on the water, an arm pivotally supported in said tank and connected to said float, a valve located adjacent said liquid fuel outlet opening, and linkage means connecting 'said liquid fuel outlet valve and said float arm to cause said valve to close when the water in said tank reaches a predetermined level with substantially all of the liquid fuel consumed.

4. A heating system for a building comprising a liquid fuel stove in a space within the building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan attached to said stove above said burner, means for supplying water to said pan, a valve in said water supply means, a float in said pan operating said valve for maintaining a constant level of water in said pan, said pan having a water outlet, a liquid fuel storage tank remotely located from the space to be heated, a water line connected between said water outlet and a water inlet for said liquid fuel storage tank, said tank having a water outlet line extending substantially to the bottom of said tank for draining water therefrom when the tank is filled with liquid fuel, said tank having a liquid fuel inlet opening in the top thereof, said tank also having a liquid fuel outlet opening in the top, a liquid fuel line connected from said liquid fuel outlet of said tank to said liquid fuel burner, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel but float on the water, an arm pivotally supported in said tank and connected to said float, and a gauge pointer operated by said arm to indicate the contents of said tank.

5. An oil tank asssembly for storing fuel oil and for feeding the oil to a stove, said assembly comprising an underground tank having an oil outlet at the top thereof, an oil inlet at the top thereof, a water inlet at the top thereof, a water outlet at the top thereof, and a discharge conduit connecting said water outlet with a lower portion of the interior of said tank, a lever arm pivotally attached to said Water discharge conduit at an intermediate point in said tank, an adjustable weight aflixed to said arm, a float at the outer end of said arm, a connecting link pivotally attached to said arm on the side of the conduit pivot opposite said float, a gauge pointer arm for indicating the quantity of fuel in said tank, a gauge housing on said tank top associated with said pointer arm, means pivotally supporting an intermediate point of said pointer arm from the top of said tank,

said connecting link being connected to said pointer arm above said intermediate point, a valve seat' associated With said oil outlet opening, a valve pivotally connected to said gauge pointer arm below said intermediate point, and said connecting link, said pointer arm, and said oil outlet valve being arranged so that when said tank is substantially full of water, said float will be at the upper portion thereof, said pointer arm will indicate empty on said gauge, and said oil discharge valve will seat on said oil discharge valve seat and prevent water from flowing through said oil outlet opening.

6. An oil tank assembly for storing fuel oil and for feeding the oil to a stove, said assembly comprising an underground tank having an oil outlet at the top thereof, an oil inlet at the top thereof, a water inlet at the top thereof, a water outlet at the top thereof, and a discharge conduit connecting said water outlet with a lower portion of the interior of said tank, a lever arm pivotally attached to said water discharge conduit at an intermediate point in said tank, an adjustable weight aflixed to said arm, a float at the outer end of said arm, a connecting link pivotally attached to said arm on the side of the conduit pivot opposite said float, a gauge pointer for indicating the quantity of fuel in said tank, said gauge pointer being pivotally connected to said connecting link, a valve seat associated with said oil outlet opening, a valve pivotally linked to said arm through said gauge pointer, and said arm and said oil outlet valve being arranged so that when said tank is substantially full of water, said float will be at the upper portion thereof, said gauge pointer will indicate empty, and said oil discharge valve will seat on said oil discharge valve seat and prevent water from flowing through said oil outlet opening.

7. A heating system for a building comprising, in combination, a liquid fuel stove located in a space within a building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan supported adjacent said stove above said burner, said pan having means for supplying water there in to air heated by said stove, level control means in said humidifier pan for maintaining a substantially constant level of water therein, said .pan having a Water outlet, an underground liquid fuel storage tank located below the surface of the ground and remotely located from the space to be heated, said liquid fuel storage tank having a water outlet, a water inlet, a liquid fuel outlet, and a liquid fuel inlet in an upper portion thereof, a water line connected between said pan Water outlet and said tank water inlet, said tank having a water discharge line extending from said tank water outlet substantially to the bottom of said tank, a liquid fuel line connected from said tank liquid fuel outlet to said burner fuel inlet, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel and to float on the Water, gauge means operated by said float to indicate the contents of liquid fuel in said tank, and valve means operated by said float to close said liquid fuel outlet when the tank issubstantially filled with water.

8. A heating system for a building comprising, in combination, a liquid fuel stove located in a space within a building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said con1- bustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan supported adjacent said stove above said burner, level control means in said humidifier pan for maintaining a substantially constant level of water therein, said pan having a water outlet, a liquid fuel storage tank located at a level below said pan and located outside the space to be heated, said liquid fuel storage tank having a water outlet, a water inlet, and a liquid fuel outlet, in an upper portion thereof, a water line connected between said pan Water outlet and said tank water inlet, a liquid fuel line connected from said tank liquid fuel outlet to said burner fuel inlet, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel and to float on the Water, gauge means operated by said float to indicate the contents of liquid fuel in said tank, and valve means operated by said float to close said liquid fuel outlet when the tank is su stantially filled with water.

9. A heating system for a building comprising, in combination, a liquid fuel stove located in a space within a building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan supported adjacent said stove above said burner, level control means in said humidifier pan for maintaining a substantially constant level of Water therein, said pan having a water outlet, a liquid fuel storage tank located at a level below said pan and located outside the space to be heated, said liquid fuel storage tank having a water outlet, a water inlet, and a liquid fuel outlet in an upper portion thereof, a Water line connected between said pan water outlet and Said tank water inlet, a liquid fuel line connected from said tank liquid fuel outlet to said burner fuel inlet, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel and to float on the water, and valve means operated by said float to close said liquid fuel outlet when the tank is substantially filled with water.

10. A heating system for a building comprising, in combination, a liquid fuel stove located in a space within a building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said comhustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan supported adjacent said stove above said burner, level control means in said humidifier pan for maintaining a substantially constant level of water therein, said pan having a Water outlet, a liquid fuel storage tank located at a level below said pan and located outside the space to be heated, said liquid fuel storage tank having a water outlet, a water inlet, and a liquid fuel outlet, in an upper portion thereof, a water line connected between said pan water outlet and said tank water inlet, a liquid fuel line connected from said tank liquid fuel outlet to said burner fuel inlet, a float in said tank designed to sink in the liquid fuel and to float on the water, and gauge means operated by said float to indicate the contents of liquid fuel in said tank.

11. A heating'system for a building comprising, in combination, a liquid fuel stove located in a space within a building to be heated, a combustion chamber within said stove, a liquid fuel burner in a lower portion of said combustion chamber, said burner having a liquid fuel inlet, a humidifier pan supported adjacent said stove above said burner, said pan having means for supplying water therein to air heated by said stove, level control means in said humidifier pan for maintaining a substantially constant level of Water therein, said pan having a water outlet, a liquid fuel storage tank remotely located from the space to be heated, said liquid fuel storage tank having a Water outlet, a water inlet, and a liquid fuel outlet, a water line connected between said pan water outlet and said tank water inlet, and .a liquid fuel line connected from said tank liquid fuel outlet to said burner inlet.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 422,848 4/1890 De St. Aubin et al. 158-502 607,286 7/1898 Sharp 137556.3 X 1,177,963 4/1916 Peterson 137-425 1,461,992 7/1923 Weber 22262 1,582,857 4/ 1926 Peter 222--62 FREDERICK KETTERER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US422848 *Nov 16, 1880Mar 4, 1890 Vent de st
US607286 *Feb 2, 1897Jul 12, 1898 Automatic boiler-feeder
US1177963 *Jul 25, 1914Apr 4, 1916Nils PetersonValve-actuating mechanism.
US1461992 *Jun 27, 1921Jul 17, 1923Henry L WeberDispensing apparatus
US1582857 *Jul 15, 1925Apr 27, 1926William J PeterAutomatic water-discharge valve for hydraulic oil-dispensing systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4995186 *Apr 20, 1990Feb 26, 1991Boudreau And CollieInflatable warning sign
EP2264369A1 *Mar 27, 2009Dec 22, 2010Alley Enterprises LimitedA safety device for an oil fired boiler
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/94, 137/425, 126/113, 222/62, 137/556.3
International ClassificationF23K5/02
Cooperative ClassificationF23K5/02
European ClassificationF23K5/02