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Publication numberUS3346055 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1967
Filing dateJul 23, 1964
Priority dateJul 23, 1964
Publication numberUS 3346055 A, US 3346055A, US-A-3346055, US3346055 A, US3346055A
InventorsYoung William G
Original AssigneeSalem Tool Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Augering machine for mining upwardly and downwardly at steep angles
US 3346055 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1967 Filed July 23, 1964 w. G. YOUNG 3,346,055 AUGERING MACHINE FOR MINING UPWARDLY AND DOWNWARDLY AT STEEP ANGLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 I NVE NTOR. M/IM/AMG. Yaw/6 BY Owen/5?: nwCn/eon/aes Hi5 Ar 7'02: Y5

W. G. YOUNG v AUGERINGMACHINE FOR MINING UPWARDLY AND Oct. 10, 1967 I DOWNWARDLY AT STEEP ANGLES 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed July 23, 1964 INVENTOR. W/LL/AM G You/v BY C420 771525 4M0 Caner/{ms H/s Arraems vs Oct. 10, 1967 w. G. YOUNG 3,346,055

AUGERING MACHINE FOR MINING UPWARDLY AND I DOWNWARDLY AT STEEP ANGLES Filed July 23, 1964 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 I I INVENTOR. VV/d/AMG Xouuc; y

BY 4, CAEO THE/Q5 nun CA/eo rye-es Hrs Arum/5Y5 3,346,055 MACHINE FOR MINING UPWARDLY AND S E L G m P. Wm m T A Y m wR A W N w 0 GD N I R B G U A 7 6 9 1| 0 l f c O 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed July 23. 1964 MYQ m INVENTOR. M ML/AM G. )buue BY CAeor-usesnuafaeorusfis Ms A TTORA/E Y5 United States Patent 3,346,055 AUGERING MACHINE FOR MINING UPWARDLY AND DOWNWARDLY AT'STEEP ANGLES William G. Young, Salem, Ohio, assignor to The Salem Tool Company, Salem, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed July 23, 1964, Ser. No. 384,608 3 Claims. (Cl. 173-37) This invention relates generally to auger mining machinery and more particularly to improvements in the operation of such machinery to be disposed at steep angles for mining upwardly or downwardly.

Heret-ofore mining machinery of the particular type involved herein has been well known in the art. Such machinery consists of a frame with quadrangularly positioned jacks to raise the frame off the ground. The frame is also provided with lateral skids upon which the frame is permitted to roll laterally when the jacks are completely withdrawn. The center of the frame is provided with a 'belly plate within which augers are placed. Spaced guide members support and guide the carriage to reciprocate the rotary auger mining assembly.

Such mining equipment may be used to mine into a wall of the material to be mined by moving the assembly laterally on the skids and also vertically on the jacks. Thus a number of holes may be augered while the machine remains generally in one mining position.

This type of mining produces horizontal augered holes which do not vary from the horizontal position or relative position of the machinery more than 3.

The principal object of this invention is an auger mining machine capable of mining at a longitudinal angle from the normal horizontal position.

Another object of this invention is an auger mining machine capable of mining at a lateral mining angle permitting the auger mining assembly to follow a mining angle greater than that previously known.

Another object of this invention is an anger mining machine capable of mining at an angle from the normal horizontal position to permit the rotary auger mining assembly to follow the seam of the material to be mined from the earth.

' Another object of this invention is the provision of an auger mining machine capable of mining at different consecutively selected longitudinal mining angles to improve the total recovery of material mined as against nor mal recovery from conventional horizontal auger mining.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a transverse flight conveyor for attachment under the frame of the auger mining machine to remove the material being mined which is adjustable in order that the flights remain horizontal regardless of the longitudinal mining angle of the auger mining machine.

Another object of this invention is an anger mining machine capable of mining at a longitudinal angle, from a horizontal position due to proper location of the center of gravity.

Another object of this invention is the provision of swivel feet on the bottom of the quadrangularly positioned frame jacks having cleats to engage the ground and properly support the machine when mining at an angle from the horizontal.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a hydraulic system to reciprocate the carriage assemblage and provide a compensating means to hold the carriage in position when the auger mining machine is placed in an angular mining position.

Another object of this invention is the provision of a hydraulic extension cylinder in order to provide the necessary fluid supply to the hoist assemblage and the carriage assemblage.

Other objects and advantages appear in the following description and claims.

The accompanying drawings show for the purpose of exemplification but without limiting the invention or claims thereto, certain practical embodiments of the invention wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the machine comprising this invention with the quadrangularly positioned frame jacks shown in various positions in order to illustrate various longitudinal angular positions of the mining machine.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the machine shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of one of the four quadrangularly positioned frame jacks and its footplate when the auger mining machine is raised off the ground level in the full maximum angular position.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the frame jack and footplate assembly shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a bottom view of the footplate.

FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram of part of the hydraulic system of the auger mining machine comprising this invention.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the auger mining machine shown is of the type of auger machine previously known in this art and as a matter of description generally consists of a frame 1 consisting of side members 2 and 3 which are joined together by a plurality of channel members 4. A belly plate shown clearly in FIG. 2 is provided in the central portion of the frame 1 and supports the auger 6 when placed in position for mining.

The forward end 8 of the frame 1 is provided with an auger guide extension 9 which guides the auger in its forward travel and also maintains the same within the axial longitudinal alignment with the frame 1 in the belly plate 5.

The frame 1 may be supported upon the ground by the skid members 7. The frame 1 may be moved transversely of the forward end 8 of the mining machine on rollers 10. The channel members 11 retain the skid members 7 with the frame 1 and also aid in guiding the auger mining machine in its transverse movement. Any transverse motion on the skid member 7 is accomplished through the hydraulic fluid motors 12, one of which is shown in FIG. 2.

The carriage 13 is supported on the side members 2 and 3 of the frame 1 through the rollers 14 and thus is enabled to move forwardly and rearwardly on the side members. The carriage 13 supports the engine 15, clutch assembly 16, transmission 17 and gear assemblage 18. The gear assemblage 18 drives the auger chuck 20, which in turn is connected to the auger 6, thereby transmitting rotary power from the engine 15 to the auger section 6 to permit rotation thereof. This rotary motion in relation with the reciprocal movement of the carriage 13 on the frame 1 imparts to the auger section 6 a forward rotary movement necessary for auger mining.

As shown in FIG. 2 the carriage 13 is reciprocated by means of fluid motors 21 which consist of a pair of oppositely faced longitudinally disposed jack members 22 and 23 having their cylinders tied together and having oppositely disposed piston rods (not shown). The fluid motors 21 upon extension of their piston rods from within the cylinders cause the carriage to move forwardly along and on the frame 1. The fluid of these motors may be reversed, wherein the piston rods will be drawn within their respective cylinders and cause the carriage to move rearwardly on the frame 1. Extension cylinders 24 are provided to supply fluid to the fluid motors 21 during the reciprocal movement of the carriage 13.

It should be noted that the fluid motors 21 are tied together on their own carrier 25 which may move along the guide members 26. Thus the extension cylinders 24 are also secured to the carrier 25 with their piston rods (not shown) at some convenient point connected to the frame 1.

The guide members 27 materially aid in guiding the carriage 13 along the frame 1 during the reciprocal movement on the side members 2 and 3.

The auxiliary engine 28 supplies power to the fluid pump 30 which in turn supplies fluid pressure to the rear lift jacks 31 and the forward lift jacks 32 and also to the fluid motors 21 to reciprocate the carriage 13.

The machine may be supplied with a carriage hose pole 33 to insure proper handling of the hose lines to and from the carriage 13, especially during reciprocation of the carriage, and thus prevent any entanglement of the hose while the carriage 13 is either moving forward or rearward on the frame 1.

The fluid pump 30 also supplies fluid power to the fluid motors 12 which reciprocate the frame 1 on the skid members 7.

The operation of the lift jacks 31 and 32, the carriage 13, and the fluid motors 12 is accomplished through the use of double-actuating fluid valve controls 34 which are [located at the operator station 35. The operator station 35 consists of a platform 36 pivotally secured on the frame 1 at 37 so as to be adjustable horizontally. Parallel adjustment is made through the use of the chain 38 when the auger mining machine is lifted off the ground at an angular position. The station 35 is also provided with a railing 40.

Machines of the character comprising this invention generally include hoist assemblage such as shown at 41 which consists of a mast arm 42 secured to a mast pole 43 which is journaled within a mast socket 44. The mast socket 44 is rigidly secured to the frame 1. Cylindrical pole members 45 are placed on the upper ends of the hydraulic lift jacks 31 and are secured rigidly to one another by the brace member 46. The tops of the pole members 45 are secured together by the platform 47 which not only strengthens the complete assembly, but also provides a convenient manner for observation of the mining operation as well as making necessary repairs on the mast assemblage 41. The platform 47 may be reached by means of the ladder 48.

The mast assemblage 41 is provided with additional support by the connecting rods 49 and 50 which connect the top of the pole members 45, respectively, to the mast brace member 51 located at the top of the mast pole 43. The brace member 51 thus supports the mast arm 42 during its rotary movement and at the same time permits rotation of the mast pole 43. Since the brace member 51 is supported or secured within the mast pole 43 through the use of bearing surfaces (not shown) this tying arrangement provides a rigid structure for the mast as-.. semblage 41 and also increases the lifting capacity of the mast arm 42.

The motor 52 rotates the mast pole 43 through the sprocket and chain assemblage 53. The motor 52 permits the rotation of the mast arm 42 in either a counterclockwise or clockwise direction in order that auger sections thus may be retrieved from either side of the auger mining machine for placement or removal from the belly plate 5.

The mast arm '42 comprises an extension beam 54 rotatably supported and guided between rollers 55 and 56. The beam 54 may be extended and retracted through the operation of the fluid motor 57, which motor is supplied with fluid pressure from the pump 30 through the supply lines 115, 118 and 120 as shown in FIG. 6.

The hoist motor 58 may be operated to raise and lower the hoist line 60. The hoist line 60' is directed through a central opening at the end 61 of the beam 54 and is guided in its raising and lowering movement by two different sets of spaced rollers 62 and 63. It should be noted that the pair of rollers 62 is disposed in a direction transverse to that of the pair of rollers 63 in order to properly guide the hoist line 60 into the hoist 58 no matter what angular position the mining machine may be in relationship to the ground.

Motor 64 is a fluid driven motor and is supplied with fluid power through appropriate connections (not shown) from the pump 30.

Guide member 65 is placed at the end of the hoist line 60 in order that the hoist line 60 along with the auger hook 66 is not completely withdrawn into the hoist 58.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 3 through 5, each of the pairs of lift jacks 31 and 32 is provided with a swivel jack foot or footplate 67 supporting a base 68. The base 68 has an upwardly extending socket 70 in which the ball 71 is placed to allow universal movement between the footplate 67 and the lift jacks 31 and 32. The ball member 71 is secured to the lift jacks 31 and 32 as indicated at 72 through the use of a pin which is held in place by the cotter pin 73. The limit sleeve 74 prevents any extreme universal movement by the ball member 71. It should be noted that the pin member 72 is only to provide a method for easy removal of the ball member 71 and not as a point of pivoting of the same.

The limit sleeve 74 is beveled as indicated at 75 so as to limit the angle of universal travel of the ball member 71, which in this case is approximately eighteen to twenty degrees. It should be noted that any transmission of the weight of the machine to the ground through the footplate 67 is directed through the ball and socket 71 and 70, eliminating any lateral stress transferred to the limit sleeve 74.

The ball 71 is retained in the socket 70 through the retainer ring 76 which is secured to the base member 68. As shown in FIG. 4 the limit sleeve limits the angular position of the lift jack in relation to the footplate 67; otherwise the ball member 71 may forcibly withdraw from the socket 70 if the ball member were allowed to swivel to a greater extent.

The fo'otplates 67 are provided with radially positioned cleats 77 to insure positive engagement with the ground. Furthermore if desired the spear point 78 may be employed on the bottom of the footplate 67 to aid the cleats 77 in the support of the auger mining machine in an angular position from the ground.

Referring to FIG. 1 there is shown two different lines 80 and 81 which represents, for purposes of explanation, the ground level wherein the lift jacks 31 and 32 are placed in different respective positions for various mining angles, the purpose of explanation assuming first that the mining machine through the controls 34 is placed in a longitudinally downward sloping mining position in relationship to the ground level line 80. Thus it is possible for the machine to mine a seam of material 82 which is to be mined, which seam does not follow the ordinary plane of the ground level line 80. With this in mind an important point is made in that with a mining machine of the capability of the one disclosed herein, one is able to more readily follow a sloping seam such as 82 and thereby increase the efliciency of removal of the material 82 being mined .as against the normal mining machine not capable of mining in an angular position. The latter type machine would commence boring into the seam 82 but on continuously boring would enter into the strata of material such as 83, thereby reducing the overall mining efiiciency of the operation in view of the increased impurity 83 that will be present in the final mined material.

The line 84 rep-resents the approximate center of gravity of the mining machine at its average elevated angular mining position from the ground level 80, which is usually from twelve to fifteen degrees for a machine of this character. Thus the center of gravity 84 when the carriage 13 is in its foremost rearwardly position is correctly Within approximately the center of the mining machine per se between the pairs of lift jacks 31 and 32. Of course as the carriage 13 moves forwardly and downwardly on the frame 1 the center of gravity will also move downwardly towards the front end 8 of the mining machine progressively with the carriage. However it should be noted that the center of gravity never will be situated beyond the axial centers of the front lift jacks 32.

Hydraulic actuated motor 85 is provided on the frame 1 in order that horizontal adjustment in relation to the ground level line 80 may be made to the conveyor 86. The conveyor 86 is transversely of the longitudinal mining machine assembly and belly plate 5 and is attached to the under side of the frame to receive the material mined by the assembly. The motor 85 is supplied with hydraulic fluid from the pump 30 and is controlled through a valve at 34 so that the operator may position the conveyor with respect to the ground level 80 when the mining machine is operating at an angular position.

The conveyor 86 is pivoted from the frame 1 at 87 in order that proper adjustment may be made with the ground level. It should be noted also that resilient flap members or shield means may be provided on the bottom of the frame 1 rearwardly of the conveyor shown at 88 and also on the rearward edge of the conveyor as shown at 90 in order to prevent any of the material mined by the auger assembly from falling between the conveyor 86 and the frame 1 when the mining machine is placed in the angular position as shown in FIG. 1. Thus the material, as mined, is kept within the conveyor and not thrown out rearwardly under the frame 1.

It is important to note that when mining at an angle with a machine supported on four quadrangularly positioned lift jacks such as 31 and 32, from a ground level line such as 80, it is absolutely necessary that the rearward lift jacks 31 slide somewhat rearwardly as the rearward end of the machine is raised off the ground. This is a known geometrical fact in that when the machine is positioned at such an angular position as shown in FIG. 1 with the rearward lift jacks 31 higher than the forward lift jacks 32, the outline appearance of the lift jacks 31 and 32 and the frame 1 in relation to the ground level 80 is in the form of a trapezoid rather than a rectangle, the latter resulting when the lift jacks are raised or extended the same height. Thus in forming a trapezoidal configuration it is imperative that the back lift jacks 31 and corre spond-ing footplate 67 slide rearwardly. of the mining machine. The amount of slide caused by lifting the mining machine at an angular degree of approximately 15 at the rearward end thereof from the ground line 80 is shown in FIG. 3 wherein the footplate 67 and corresponding lift jack 31 slide from a position illustrated by the construction line 91a to the position shown in FIG. 3 being through the construction line 91b. The amount of slide in the type of machine shown in this application at 15 may be within a range of five to ten inches. Such a rearwardly sliding action at the rearward footplate 67 does not go on without being unwanted since upon raising the machine to a desired mining angular elevation the rearward footplates 67 will entrench themselves into the ground to form a better gripping contact of the angularly positioned mining machine in relationship to the ground 81.

The ground level line 81 illustrates in dotted line representation the positioning of the lift jacks 31 and 32 in relation to the ground in order to place the forward end 8 of the mining machine in an upwardly extending mining position so as to follow a seam of material to be mined which extends upwardly at an angle in relationship to the ground 81, thus improving the percentage of efficiency in the recovery of the amount of material being mined. The machine as just above positionally described has on the average the capability of mining at approximately 5.

In this connection it should be noted that one of the forward lift jacks 32 is shorter than the other forward lift jack 32 and the lift jacks 31 in order that auger sections such as 6 may be taken from and returned to the mining assembly and the belly plate 5 without interfering with the upper end of the lift jacks 31 and 32. This is especially true when the mining machine is at an angular position with respect to the ground in order that the hoist 58 is capable of raising the auger section 6 high enough so that the mast assembly 41 may swing the auger section out and away from the mining assembly with suflicient clearance over the shorter forward lift jack 32.

It is interesting to note that the forward thrust capability of auger mining machines of this type is determined so as not to exceed the coeflicient of friction of the entire machine in relationship to the ground so that the auger mining machine will be permitted to drill without any rearward slippage. Such a coeflicient of friction is determined not particularly on rough ground terrain but rather on a smooth surface in order that the proper forward thrust of the machine can be determined. It has been found that on the average type of machine shown herein the total possible forward thrust of the auger mining assembly is limited to or around ten percent of the total weight of the machine. However when the machine is lifted from the ground position on the lift jacks such as 31 and 32 the coefiicient of friction thus increases due to better contact of the machine in relationship to the ground, thus increasing the limit of the possible forward thrust of the auger mining assembly to as much as seventy-five percent of the total weight of the auger mining machine. Thus since the lift jacks are necessary in order to mine at an angular position the forward thrust and coeflicient of friction problem does not become a material one even though the machine is held in an angular position with relationship to the ground during the mining operation.

FIG. 6 illustrates a portion of the hydraulic system for operating the auger mining machine comprising this invention. The portion shown illustrates the supply of hydraulic fluid to the hydraulic motors 21 which reciprocate the carriage 13 forwardly and rearwardly on the frame 1. There is also shown the method of supplying hydraulic fluid to the hoist motor 64.

The engine 28 operates the pumps 30 which pump bydraulic fluid from the reservoir tank 19. The valves 92 may be used to regulate the flow through the pumps 30 or completely shut off the fluid supply to the same.

Fluid supply line 93 supplies hydraulic fluid to the carriage manual control valve 94. Line 93 also supplies bydraulic fluid to the relief valve 95. Needle valve 96 supplies hydraulic fluid to the pressure gauge 97. Thus if the fluid pressure in line 93 exceeds a predetermined amount measured by the gauge 97 the relief valve will release the pressure and flow back to the reservoir tank 19.

The control valve 94 upon manipulation will permit fluid to be supplied to either fluid supply line 98 or 100. Supply line 99 is a return line to the tank 19 and when the control valve 94 is in the position shown in FIG. 6 (open position) fluid supply will pass from the line 93 through the valve 94 to line 99 and on to the reservoir tank 19.

Thus in order to extend the carriage 13 forwardly on the frame 1 the piston (including the piston rods) 101 of the motors 21 must be extended from within their respective cylinders 102. Section 94a of the valve 94 is brought into position connecting lines 93 with 98 and lines 100 with 99. The lines 93 and 99 are now also disconnected. The fluid supply continues through line 98, through the load compensating valve or counterbalance valve 103, which permits pressure to be supplied through its check valve to line 104, through the first extension cylinder 24, line 105 to the first cylinder 102 of the first motor 21. The piston 101 is thus forced to move forwardly extending its corresponding piston rod from within the first cylinder 102 due to the hydraulic pressure being supplied to the cylinder. The other end of the first cylinder 102 is connected through supply line 107 to one end of the second cylinder 102 of the second fluid motor 21. Thus the hydraulic fluid entrapped between the two pistons 101 forces the second piston 101 to extend its corresponding piston rod from within the second cylinder 102 due to the fluid pressure exerted on the first piston 101 above described. The second piston 101 forces the hydraulic fluid contained in the remaining portion of the cylinder 102 to be expelled through supply line 110 through the second extension cylinder 24, to the supply line 111, to a second load compensating valve or counterbalance valve 112.

The check valve located in the counterbalance valve 112 will not permit passage of the hydraulic fluid nor will the relief valve incorporated in the counterbalance valve 112 permit passage of any hydraulic fluid until the fluid pressure between the second piston 101 and the relief valve itself exceeds the tension of the spring located on the relief valve which has been set to a higher predetermined pressure before it will open. Thus when the pressure on the relief valve exceeds the predetermined pressure on the spring tension, hydraulic fluid will be permitted to pass on to line 100 and on back to the reservoir tank 19, through the supply line 99.

As can be seen in FIG. 6, the performance of work on the pistons 101 causes them to move their corresponding piston rods outwardly from within the cylinders 102, thereby moving the carriage 13 forwardly in relationship to the frame 1.

It should be noted that section 9411 of the control valve 94 may be placed within the supply 'lines 93, 98, 100 and 99, thereby reversing the direction of hydraulic fluid to and from the fluid motors 21 and thus reversing the direction of the work performed on the fluid motors 21, causing the carriage 13 to move rearwardly in relation to the frame 1.

The valves 103 and 112 counterbalance the fluid pressure through lines 113 and 114. With the valve 94 in the selected position 94a the movement on the carriage 13 downwardly on the frame 1 When the latter is in a raised angular position relative to the ground will not have a tendency to move in a jerking motion which may frequently be caused by increasing weight of the carriage due to the fact that the frame is in an elevated position. Thus a time delay or lag may develop between the operation of the two fluid motors 21 which results in a somewhat jerky movement of the carriage forwardly and down wardly on the frame 1. The counterbalancing of the relief valves in each of the compensating valves 103 and 112 through the use of supply lines 113 and 114 connecting each corresponding relief valve to the main supply line of the other compensating valve causes any sudden change in pressure to be counterbalanced due to the above mentioned connection made to the opposite supply line. Thus with section 94a of the control valve 94 in proper operating position any sudden increase of pressure through line 111 and the relief valve of the compensating valve 112 and into the supply line 100 will also affect the pressure into supply line 114 due to the relief valve of the compensating valve 103. This will have the effect of repelling the spring tension and opening the relief valve to increase the pressure through line 104, thus compensating for any fluctuation in pressure between the lines supplying and returning the hydraulic fluid to the fluid motors 21.

The relief valves of the compensating valves 103 and 112 are opened either by fluid pressure through the relief valve with sufficient pressure or through the pilot line (either 113 or 114 whichever the case may be) with sufficient pressure to open the relief valve. Generally the relief valve operating pressure to the pilot operating pressure is about 3:1 depending on the style of the valve used. Thus the pressure need only be one-third of the pressure required to operate the relief valve per se and operate it to permit free passage of hydraulic fluid.

When the control valve is in the normally nonoperative position or in the position shown in FIG. 6 and the frame 1 is raised in the angular mining position relative to the ground, as illustrated in the example outlined above, the compensating valves may also act to securely hold the carriage in the stop position and thus prevent any drifting of the carriage downwardly on the frame 1 due to the angular circumstances in which the carriage 13 has been placed. Thus the load compensating valves 103 and 112 will compensate the fluid pressure between the supply and return lines which may have existed due to the previous operation of the carriage in this angular position. The pressure between lines 104 and 111 will thus be equalized and the hydraulic fluid held in abeyance, thus holding the carriage 13 in a secured stop position until the control valve 94 is again brought into operation.

Adjustment of the spring tension for each of the valves 103 and 112 in order to hold the carriage 13 when the machine is at the maximum mining angle may be made by turning the pump 30 off and opening the control valve 94 as shown in FIG. 6. The tension on the springs is set at the pressure at which the relief valves will operate to counterbalance through lines 113 and 114 any differential in pressure existing between supply lines 104 and 111. Thus these two relief valves are the load compensating valves 103 and 112 which are set up to relieve high pressure from either one of the supply lines and which valves may discharge any excess liquid into the other supply line.

The hoist motor 64 is supplied with hydraulic fluid through supply line 115. The supply line 115 supplies two double-acting control valves 116 and 117. The control valve 116 supplies any necessary hydraulic pressure to the hoist motor 64, whereas the control valve 117 supplies hydraulic fluid to the double-acting piston cylinder mot-or 57 which is the hoist extension motor. The hoist extension motor 57 is supplied through lines 118 and 120. One of these lines is supplied with a needle valve 121 so as to regulate the speed of travel of the hoist extension motor 57.

The manual control valve 117 has two sections 117a and 117b wherein the direction of the fluid through the lines 118 and may be reversed, thus directing the reciprocal motion of the fluid motor 57.

Relief valve 122 is connected to supply line 115 having a set range of between 900 to 1500 p.s.i. If the pressure in the supply line 115 reaches a predetermined level the relief valve 122 will release this pressure into line 123 which returns the hydraulic fluid to the reservoir tank 19.

Each of the manual control valves 116 and 117 is shown in its nonoperative position wherein supply line 115 supplies through a check valve to one side of this normal nonoperating position and supply line 123 acts as a return line when either of said valves is placed in operative position.

When the manual control valve 116 is placed in operating position 116a hydraulic fluid is supplied through the check valve 124, line 125, through extension cylinder 126, line 127 to the hoist motor 64. The return line from hoist motor 64 is through line- 128, which connects the hoist motor 64 to the counterbalance valve 130. The counterbalance valve 130 comprises a check valve 131 which does not permit hydraulic fluid to :pass through the same. The other section of the counterbalance valve 130 comprises a relief valve which upon a predetermined pressure by-passes the fluid supply from motor 64 and thus connects line 128 to line 133. Line 128 alsois connected to the brake valve 134.

It should be noted that with the manual control valve 116 in position 116a, the hoist 64 is permitted to lower the load which is supported by the winch and cable line.

The pilot operated relief valve 130 is provided in return line 128 to retain the load and prevent drifting thereof when the manual control valve is in its shut off or closed position. The relief valve spring setting is high enough to hold a load as large as the hoist motor 64 is able to lift.

It should be noted that operation of the pilot valve comes from the opposite or supply line 127. The opertion of the pilot valve is at a much lower pressure than the pressure required through the relief valve per se. Thus the pilot operation permits the downward movement of the load since, as mentioned above, the spring setting of the relief valve is as high as the hoist will lift. As just mentioned, the pilot operation comes from the pressure on the supply line 127 for operating the valve at a much lower pressure than is generally required to operate the relief valve spring. Thus the pilot valve regulates the pressure with respect to the supply line 127' by keeping the pressure with respect to both lines constant and equal in accordance with its spring setting.

However when the relief valve is open to permit hydraulic fluid to freely flow through it, the load may cause the motor to run at a faster rate than the pump 30 is supplying the hydraulic fluid. This drops the pressure in line 127 practically to zero and thus closes the relief valve. The result is a continual jerky operation in lowering the load. To prevent this, the needle valve 139 is provided in the pilot line to throttle the flow of fluid that operates the relief valve. This operation creates a high pressure before the relief valve can be operated through operation of the pilot valve. The jerky (chatter or stair-stepping effect) motion is thus dampened out.

The setting of the needle valve 139 depends upon the viscosity of the oil which also is dependent on temperature.

When a load is to be lifted by the hoist 64 the manual control 116 is placed in the position 116b, whereupon fluid will proceed through supply line 136, extension cylinder 135, line 133, through the check valve 131, and then to supply line 128 and hoist motor 64. As explained above the fluid motor with the valve in this position returns through line 127, extension cylinder 126 and line 125, and thence to the return line 123 back to the reservoir tank 19.

No matter what direction the hoist motor 64 is to rotate, upon reversing the direction of flow of the hydraulic fluid through the motor it is necessary to provide a braking system due to the fact that inertia exists in the system after the manual control valve 116 is brought back to its normal nonoperating or closed position. Thus each of the fluid lines 128 and 133 is connected to the normal nonoperating position of the brake valve 134. The brake valve 134 is of solenoid operation and is caused to operate when the manual valve 116 is brought into its normal nonoperative position. Thus if the control valve 116 is in position 116a, upon return of the control valve to its normal nonoperative position, the brake valve 134 is actuated into operation positioning section 134a into operation. Thus fluid returning through line 128 will be directed to the dynamic brake 149 wherein the brake valve section 134a connects line 128 with line 137. Thus any unexpended energy left in the supply lines through the hoist motor 64 after the control valve is brought into its normal nonoperating position is directed to the dynamic brake 149 which takes up the energy through its spring 138, thus directing all the work of the fluid to the brake 149 and thereby letting the hoist motor 64 come to an immediate standstill position.

The same is true when the control valve is returned to the normal nonoperating position from selected position 116b, the brake valve 134 is actuated causing section 134b to be placed in operative position and the dynamic inertia of the hydraulic fluid is directed through line 133, thence through the brake valve section 134b, and line 137, to the brake 149. Thus all the potential energy of the fluid is directed to cause work on the brake 149 rather than the hoist motor 64 due to the operation of the bypass brake valve system. With the valve 116 in its normal nonoperative position the two supply lines 125 and 136 are connected together as shown in FIG. 6, thus equalizing the pressure in the lines on both sides of the hoist I motor 64 after the dynamic braking has been accomplished and permitting the hydraulic fluid to return through line 123 to the reservoir tank 19. Thus the hoist motor will maintain this position until the control valve 116 is again actuated. When the solenoid operated brake valve 134 is brought back to its normal nonoperating position any excess fluid supplied to the brake 149 is forced back through the brake valve 134 to the reservoir tank 19 due to the compression of the spring 138 in the brake 149.

It should be apparent from the above description of the machine comprising this invention that through independent control of each of the lift jacks 31 and 32 that the frame 1 may be lifted to an angular position with respect to the ground line, which position is in a transverse plane to that of the above described longitudinal angular position. Thus by way of example the rear lift jacks 31 not only may be extended a distance more than the extension of the front lift jack but also the left forward lift jack 32 may be extended further than the right forward lift jack 32 in order to place the machine in a downward and lateral sloping angle with respect to the ground line. Thus through the independent control of each of the lift jacks 31 and 32 in combination with the swivel footplates 67 on each of the lift jacks the mining machine of this invention is capable of being placed in not only longitudinal angles with respect to the ground line but also in angular positions transverse with respect to such longitudinal angular positions.

I claim:

1. A freely supported auger mining machine including a frame having quadrangularly positioned front and rear lift jacks and spaced guides for a carriage supporting a rotary auger motor means and reciprocated on the guides by a motor means connected between the frame and the carriage to reciprocate an elongated rotary auger mining assembly supported on the frame and rotatably driven by the rotary auger motor means while the frame is supported on said front and rear lift jacks, said lift jacks being extensible selectively to their full length to dispose said frame and carriage at a longitudinal mining angle greater than three degrees, characterized by a hydraulic control system to control the reciprocation by said motor means of said carriage on said frame, said motor means consisting of two double-acting fluid cylinder and piston motors hydraulically tied together at one end, the other ends of said motors hydraulically connected to independent extension cylinders, said motors and extension cylinders carried on a second carriage with the piston of one of said motors connected to said frame and the piston of the'second of said motors connected to the first mentioned carriage, pump means to supply fluid to and from said extension cylinders to said motors through supply lines, counterbalance valves in each of said supply lines to counterbalance the fluid pressure on each of said motors to hold said first mentioned carriage from drifting along said frame when said frame is at a longitudinal mining angle relative to the horizontal.

2. The auger mining machine of claim 1 characterized by a control valve connected in said supply lines between said pump means and said counterbalance valves to control the hydraulic flow to said motor means through each of said lines.

3. The auger mining machine of claim 2 characterized in that each of said counterbalance valves consists of a check valve permitting flow in one direction to its cor- 1 1 1 2 responding supply line, a relief valve permitting flow in 2,328,316 9/1943 Herman et a1. 9142O the opposite direction in its corresponding supply line at 2,726,064 12/ 1955 Goodrich et :11, t 17337 a predetermined pressure, and a bypass fluid line from 2,764,397 9/1956 Compton 29956 the other supply line connected to said relief valve to 2 90 515 1 1959 Swanson et 1 299 55 remote control the opening of said relief valve. 2 93 5/1960 McCarthy d 55 X References Cited 3,015,316 1/1962 Thomas 91-420 3,107,738 10/1963 Osborn 175-62 UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,208,698 9/ 1965 Sarnhamrner et al 24813 1,684,888 9/1928 Rundqvist 9142l X 1 77 9 9 1930 Black 299 42 10 ERNEST R. PURSER, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US1776099 *Oct 1, 1927Sep 16, 1930Matthew Smith MooreLifting jack for coal-cutting machines and the like
US2328316 *Aug 20, 1941Aug 31, 1943Edison Wood Products IncCrib
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US3015316 *Jan 8, 1959Jan 2, 1962William WatermanCounterbalance valves and the like
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3746110 *Jun 24, 1971Jul 17, 1973Salem Tool CoAuger section positioning hoist having pendent control means
US5879057 *Nov 12, 1996Mar 9, 1999Amvest CorporationHorizontal remote mining system, and method
US7959378 *Jul 26, 2006Jun 14, 2011Sandvik Mining And Construction G.M.B.H.Base for a drilling device
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/37, 299/55, 173/189, 91/420, 173/152, 299/31
International ClassificationE21C25/58, E21C35/06, E21C35/00, E21C25/00, E21B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationE21C35/06, E21C25/58
European ClassificationE21C25/58, E21C35/06