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Publication numberUS3346109 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1967
Filing dateJun 23, 1966
Priority dateJun 23, 1966
Publication numberUS 3346109 A, US 3346109A, US-A-3346109, US3346109 A, US3346109A
InventorsDuran Peter J
Original AssigneeDuran Peter J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Clear view coin pack
US 3346109 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1967 P. J. DURAN 3,346,109

CLEAR VIEW com PACK Filed June 25, 1966 |NVENTOR PETE-Rd. DURAN United States Patent M 3,346,109 CLEAR VIEW COIN PACK Peter J. Duran, 4201 S. 20th St., Abilene, Tex.

Filed June 23, 1966, Ser. No. 559,900 5 (Zlaims. (Cl. 206-.82)

This invention relates to coin holders and, more particularly, to a reusable coin holder.

A coin holder according .to this invention is a rigid tube with an inside diameter only slightly larger than the coins. Therefore, coins can be scooped into the holder and properly stacked within the holder. The holder is transparent, thus permitting ready calibration if it is not full. Furthermore, the transparent holder permits detection of bogus coins. Also, the holder is cylindrical so that several of the holders may be readily stacked.

At present, most coins are rolled in paper coin holders or paper tubes which are not reusable and require a skilled operator to fill and which must be opened to check the number and genuineness of the coins.

An object of this invention is to provide a coin holder having the above advantageous features.

Further objects are to achieve the above with a device that is sturdy, compact, durable, simple, safe, versatile, and reliable, yet inexpensive and easy tomanufacture and use.

The specific nature of the invention, as well as other objects, use-s, and advantages thereof, will clearly appear from the following description and from the accompanying drawing, the dilferent views of which are not necessarily to the same scale, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a coin holder according to this invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a coin holder according to this invention.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, it may be seen in FIG. 1 that one embodiment has a cylindrical tube which is transparent, constructed of either a synthetic material or glass. The tube 10 has an integral bottom 12 which closes the bottom end of the tube. The bottom closure 12 is at right angles or normal to the axis of the tube. The diameter of the bore 14 of the tube 10 is only slightly larger than the diameter of the coins 16 in the tube. It will be understood that all the coins in the tube would be the same denomination and, therefore, of uniform diameter and thickness. Therefore, the coins will fit precisely or nicely within the tube. It is possible to scoop the coins into the tube and they will arrange themselves so that the coins are co-axial with the tube and neatly stacked therein.

The top of the tube is open and has internal threads 18. The top cap 20 has external threads 22 which are correlative to the threads 18 and, therefore, the top cap 20 may be threaded onto the tube. The cap has an internal ridge 24 extending diametrically across a concavity, thus providing a convenient finger grip to attach or release the cap 20. The cap, being internal, leaves the exterior of the tube cylindrical so that a plurality of tubes may be stacked readily within a coin box.

The length of the bore 14 of the tube 10 is a multiple of five times the thickness of the coins 16. The length is measured from the bottom to the cap, e.g., the tube 10 illustrated in FIG. 1 is 25 times the thickness of the coins and, therefore, when 25 coins are placed Within the tube and the cap attached, it is readily apparent that the tube is filled with the correct number of coins.

The length of the tube is divided into five (5) equal parts axially along the tube by indicia 26 in the form of bands painted along the side of the tube 10. The indicia do not overlap. Also, the indicia are adjacent. Therefore, as illustrated, there would be five indicia, each measuring 5 coins so equaling the 25 coins for the full container;

' orange for 25 coins.

3,346,109 Patented Oct. 10, 1967 however, if the container is not full, the exact number of coins in the holder can be verified readily without opening it. As illustrated, the indicia read, beginning adjacent to the bottom 12, as follows: gold for 5 coins, brown for 10 coins, silver for 15 coins, blue for 20 coins, an

Referring more particularly to the second embodiment shown in FIG. 2, it may be seen that tube 30 is transparent and that one end is closed with a bottom 32, which is at right angles or normal to the axis of the tube 30. The diameter of bore 34 is only slightly larger than the diameter of coins 36 within the tube 30. Therefore, if the coins. are scooped into tube 30, they arrange themselves to be co-axial with the tube, neatly and nicely within the tube.

At the open end of the tube, the tube has a bead 38 to cooperate with a notch 42 within cylindrical flange 44 of cap 40. The notch 42 is correlative to the head 38. The cap 40 is made of a resilient material. Therefore, it may be seen that the cap 40 may be snapped into place upon the open end of the tube to effectively close the tube.

The tube 30 has a slot 46 extending axially of the tube from the bottom '32 to the open top. It may be seen that, when the cap is in place, the flange 44 encircles the open end of the tube 30 and reinforces the top where it has been slotted.

Follower 48 is substantially the same diameter as the coins 36 so that it readily fits over the coins within the tube. Tab 50 extends radially from the follower. The tab 50 extends from the follower 48 a distance approximately equal to the Wall thickness of the tube 30; therefore, when the tab 50 is within the slot 46, the tab 50 extends to the edge of the tube but does not project appreciably beyond it.

The length of the tube 30 is measured from the bottom 32'to the cap 40 when the cap is in placed and is equal to a multiple of five times the thickness of a coin of the denomination for which the tube is designed, plus the thickness of the follower 48. The elfective length of the tube, as used herein, means the length of the tube less the thickness of the follower 48. The effective length of the tube is divided into five equal parts by indicia 52 which, in this embodiment, is the bottomof the four notches 54 extending along one of the sides of the slot 46. The thickness of each of these notches 54 is the same as the thickness of the tab 50 which is equal to the thickness of the follower 48 itself. Therefore, it may be seen that the common United States coins would fit into the holders of the embodiments shown in either FIG. 1 or FIG. 2 according to the following chart:

Denomina- No. of coins Value of No. of coins Value of tion of coins for each coms for for full tube coins for indicia each indicia full tube It will be apparent that the embodiments shown are only exemplary and that various modifications can be made in use, construction, materials, and arrangement within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A coin holder comprising:

(a) a rigid transparent cylindrical tube with (b) one end being closed at right angles to the axis of the tube and (c) the other end of the tube being open,

(d) a plurality of coins of the same denomination in the tube,

(e) the coins co-axial with the tube,

(f) the inside diameter of the tube slightly larger than the diameter of the coins so that the coins fit nicely into the tube,

(g) a slot extending from the open end of the tube for at least four-fifths of the length of the tube,

(h) a plurality of notches along the side of the slot,

(j) the bottom of the notch adjacent the closed end being one-fifth of the effective length of the tube from the closed end,

(k) the bottom of each subsequent notch being onefifth of the effective length of the tube from the bottom of the next adjacent notch,

(m) a follower having a diameter substantially equal to the diameter of the coins,

(11) said follower being co-axial with the tube and (0) said follower having a tab extending radially therefrom,

(p) the tab fitted within one of the side notches,

(q) thus locking a plurality of coins between the follower and the closed end of the tube, and

(r) a cap closing the open end of the tube,

(s) said cap having a cylindrical flange thereon encircling the top of the tube, thus (t) binding the slotted open end of the tube together,

(u) the length of the tube measured from the closed end to the bottom of the cap being some multiple of five times the thickness of the coins plus the thickness of the follower.

2. A coin holder comprising:

(a) a rigid transparent cylindrical tube, with (b) one end being closed at right angles to the axis of the tube and (c) the other end of the tube being open,

(d) a plurality of coins of the same denomination in the tube,

(e) the inside diameter of the tube slightly larger than the diameter of the coins so that the coins fit nicely into the tube,

(f) an end cap for closing the tube at the open end thereof,

(g) the efiective length of the inside of the tube being some multiple of five times the thickness of the individual coins in the tube,

(h) the tube having indica beginning at the closed end,

(j) each indicia extending axially from the adjacent indicia the thickness of one-fifth of the effective length of the inside of the tube,

(k) the closed end being the zero indicia, and

(m) the indicia being colored bands along the Wall of the tube.

3. A coin holder comprising:

(a) a rigid transparent cylindrical tube, with (b) one end being closed at right angles to the axis of the tube and (c) the other end of the tube being open,

(d) a plurality of coins of the same denomination in the tube,

(e) the inside diameter of the tube slightly larger than the diameter of the coins so that the coins fit nicely into the tube,

(I) an end cap for closing the tube at the open end thereof,

(g) the effective length of the inside of the tube being some multiple of five times the thickness of the individual coins in the tube,

(h) the tube having indicia beginning at the closed end,

(j) the closed end being the zero indicia,

(k) a slot extending for substantially the length of the tube,

(In) the indicia being in the form of one edge of notches in the slot,

(11) a follower of substantially the same diameter of the coins,

(0) said follower having a tab extending radially thereform,

(p) said tab fitted within one if said notches,

(q) thus effectively locking a plurality of coins within the tube.

4. The invention as defined in claim 3 with the additional limitation of (r) each indicia extending axially from the adjacent indicia the thickness of one-fifth of the elfective length of the inside of the tube.

5. The invention as defined in claim 4 where-in (s) said end cap surrounds the end of the tube,

(t) thus binding the tube together Where it has been slotted.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,160,255 11/1915 Buchrim 1336 2,157,476 5/1939 Brodeser 2297 X FOREIGN PATENTS 905,073 2/ 1954 Germany 206-.82

573,435 2/1958 Italy 206.82

JOSEPH R. LECLAIR, Primary Examiner.

THERON E. OONDON, J. M. CASKIE, Examiners.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1160255 *Jun 1, 1914Nov 16, 1915Max BuchrimCoin or token holder.
US2157476 *Jun 2, 1937May 9, 1939Brodesser Roman ADispensing container
DE905073C *Mar 7, 1950Feb 25, 1954Meta Lais Geb RosewickHuelse fuer Hartgeld
IT573435B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3770121 *Sep 5, 1972Nov 6, 1973Raymond Lee Organization IncBank coin pack
US3998238 *Aug 11, 1975Dec 21, 1976Rodney L. GriffinChip-dispensing device
US4036358 *Nov 2, 1976Jul 19, 1977Philip KelleyClear view coin wrap
US4184590 *Feb 17, 1977Jan 22, 1980Tenbrink Arthur SrCoin holder and counter
US5021027 *Apr 27, 1989Jun 4, 1991Bremer John DCoin computer with integral coin indicia
US6709325 *Feb 27, 2002Mar 23, 2004Jack KorsenTube for holding coins
US6905014Nov 20, 2002Jun 14, 2005Hatim Gamal EldinTransparent scaled coins container
US6966828 *Oct 19, 2001Nov 22, 2005Fire King International, Inc.Money tube and associated dispensing units
US7784607Jul 22, 2008Aug 31, 2010Tony ThomasCoin holding apparatus
US8061512Jun 25, 2010Nov 22, 2011Tony ThomasCoin holding apparatus
DE9216053U1 *Nov 26, 1992Jan 21, 1993Schiffmann, NorbertTitle not available
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/.82, D09/443, 453/60
International ClassificationG07D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D9/004
European ClassificationG07D9/00C2