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Publication numberUS3346900 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateDec 22, 1966
Priority dateDec 22, 1966
Publication numberUS 3346900 A, US 3346900A, US-A-3346900, US3346900 A, US3346900A
InventorsJohn Philip K Greene, Stewart Willis Lee, Elston Gilbert Stanley
Original AssigneeH & G Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shingle brush
US 3346900 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 17, 1967 w W R L 3,346,900

SHINGLE BRUSH Filed Dec. 22, 1966 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 IHIHNMHHII I'M a 000000000 000000000 OOOOOOOO I-LQQ I N VENTOR-S (7 BY ATJW/EIYEV w. STEWART ETAL 3,346,900

WiZZz's 1 Lg ggg United States Patent 3,346,900 SHINGLE BRUSH Willis Lee Stewart, Sutferu, N.Y., and John Philip K.

Greene, Mountain Lakes, and Gilbert Stanley Elston,

Florham Park, N .J., assignors to H & G Industries, Inc.,

Belleville, N .J., a corporation of New York Filed Dec. 22, 1966, Ser. No. 603,864 3 Claims. (Cl. 15-160) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A large oblong rectangular head block has two sets of bristles secured in one of the larger planar sides thereof, with one set spaced and inclined away from the other set, providing a clearance for the end of a shingle that is in overhanging spaced relation to a portion of the face of another shingle for the insertion of one set of bristles beneath said overhanging end to apply paint to said portion of the second-mentioned shingle.

Background of the invention An ordinary paint brush does not hold enough paint and does not cover enough surface for economical paint distribution on a shingled siding of a building, and difficulty has been encountered in applying the paint beneath the projecting or overhanging ends of the shingles.

One known form of paint brush is shown by Patent No. 2,914,785 which has a single set of bristles projecting from one narrow or small side of a head, while German Patent No. 825,082 shows a shoe brush having two sets of bristles on the head, one set of bristles projecting perpendicularly from one planar surface and the other set of bristles projecting perpendicularly from another planar surface that is angularly related to the first-mentioned surface.

Summary of the invention In the brush embodying the invention, there is one set of bristles embodying a large number of tufts or knots that are preferably obliquely related to the planar surface of the head or inclined toward one end of the head, and another set of bristles having substantially fewer tufts or knots projecting from the same planar surface in spaced relation to the bristles of the other set and having the bristles of varying lengths and preferably disposed obliquely to said planar surface of the head or inclined toward the opposite end of the head, the space between the sets of bristles, providing a clearance for the end of a shingle that is in overhanging spaced relation to a portion of the face of another shingle for the insertion of one set of bristles beneath said overhanging end to apply paint to said portion of the second-mentioned shingle.

Brief description of the drawings Referring to the accompanying drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a brush embodying the invention, looking at the ends of the bristles;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view approximately from the plane of the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1 with the figure turned 180 on the sheet;

FIGURE 2A is a fragmentary side elevational view approximately from the plane of the line 2A2A of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is an end elevational view;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary plan view of the brush head with the bristles omitted and showing the preferred arrangement of the bristle knot holes;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a shingled building siding and showing in solid lines the brush embodying invention in the position assumed during application of paint beneath the overhanging end of a shingle, and showing in dot and dash lines the brush in the position assumed during application of paint to a face of a shingle;

FIGURE 6 is a side elevational view of a brush having one possible form of handle, and

FIGURE 7 is a similar view showing another form of the handle.

Description 0) the preferred embodiments Referring first to FIGURE 5 of the drawings, the reference character A designates a shingle in a shingled building siding, the lower end portion of which designated a overhangs in spaced relation a portion of the face of another shingle B. This siding construction is well known and needs no further description.

In painting such sidings it is highly desirable in the interest of economy of time and ease of operation that the paint be applied to the face of a shingle rapidly over large areas, for example the shingle A, and that there be a minimum of difiiculty in applying the paint to the portion of face of another shingle, for example the shingle B, that is overhung by the end portion of the shingle A.

To this end the invention provides a large oblong rectangular brush head C, in form of a block of material suitable such as plastic or wood, for example, seven inches in length, four inches in width and about one half inch thick; and the bristles or plastic fibers are inserted into one of the broader faces 1 of the head block. The bristle knots or tufts 2 may be secured in the head in known manner for example with a staple set construction, with each knot inserted into a hole or recess 3 in the head and preferably the holes are arranged in rows, parallel to the edges of the brush head with the holes in one row in staggered relation to the holes in adjacent rows as best shown in FIGURE 4.

There are two sets of bristles or plastic fibers, namely a major set D and a minor set E. The knots of the major set of bristles are disposed in inclined relation to the planar face of the brush head, for example at an angle of 15 as shown in FIGURE 3, and the bristle knots of the set E are also inclined at about the same angle to said face of the brush head but away from the bristles of the set D. In other words the bristles of set D incline towards one end of the brush head while the bristles of set E incline toward the opposite end of the brush head.

The two sets of bristles are spaced apart, for example three quarters of an inch, so that the overhanging end portion a of the shingle A may freely enter the space X between the bristle sets as shown in FIGURE 5. The outermost bristle knots of the set E have their end portions dis-posed in a common plane Y inclined at an angle of about 30 to an imaginary plane perpendicular to the planar surface of the brush head, or at an angle of 60 to said planar surface; while the innermost bristles have their ends disposed in approximately a common plane with the ends of the bristles in set D, all as best shown in FIG- URE 3 of the drawings.

In using the brush to apply paint to the main portions of faces of the shingles, the brush is held so the bristles of set D are utilized as shown by dot and dash lines in FIGURE 5, and when it is desired to apply paint to a portion of the shingle, for example B, beneath the overhanging end a of another shingle, for example A, the brush is turned upside down and tilted so that end a of the shingle enters the space X between the bristle sets and the outermost bristles of the set E contact the portion of the shingle B that is overhung by the end portion a of the shingle A while the ends of the innermost bristles of the set E contact the end surface of the spacer F that is disposed between the shingles A and B.

The brush may be used without a handle as shown in FIGURES l-S or a suitable handle may be attached to the head block as shown in FIGURES 6 and 7. In FIG- URE 6 a handle of the piston grip type is secured at one end to one end of the brush head, while in FIGURE 7 the brush head has a socket H formed integrally therewith as by molding a synthetic plastic composition and provided with suitable means such as screw threads for a pole handle I.

From the "foregoing it will be evident that the invention provides a brush which will hold a large amount of paint and by which the paint can be rapidly applied over large areas. The space or gap X between the two sets of bristles makes it easy to apply paint to the portions of a shingle that are overhung by another shingle, without interference of said overhangingend with the bristles or fibers. The inclination of the bristles or fibers provides a directional effect When the brush is drawn over the surface of a shingle and makes application of the paint easier. The inclination of the bristles of the set E and the disposition of the ends of the outer bristle knots as indicated at Y makes easy the application of paint to the portion of a shingle that is disposed beneath the overhanging end of another shingle as shown by solid lines in FIGURE of the drawings. In use, the brush is held as shown by dot and dash lines in FIGURE 5 for painting the major portion of the shingle face, and then the brush is tilted from that position into the position shown by solid lines to apply the paint to the portion of the next lower shingle beneath the overhanging end a of the shingle. The graduation of the lengths of the bristles ensures that when the brush head is tilted, the ends of the bristles rather than the sides thereof will contact the face of the shingle that is overhung by the end portion a of the next higher shingle.

The staggering of the knots in the rows of knots as shown in FIGURE 4 eliminates clear channels between the knots along the face of the head so that there is a minimum of tendency for the paint to run out and drip from the sides of the head when the brush is overloaded or after a period of use. As shown in the drawings itis desirable that each of the two sets of bristles be approximately rectangular in plan view and that the rows of tufts of one set be parallel to One long edge of the head block while the rows of the bristles of the other set are parallel to the opposite long edge of the head block.

We claim:

1. A shingle brush comprising a rectangular head block having a planar side, a major set of bristles and a minor set of bristles, both sets comprising bristle knots secured in said head block and projecting from said planar side, the bristles being arranged in rows parallel to the edges of the block and there being a space between said sets ot bristles,-the major set of bristles having their ends in a common plane parallel with said planar side for applying paint to the major portion of a face of a shingle, and the dimensions of the minor set of bristles providing, upon tilting of said head block from said major portion of the shingle face, for insertion of said minor set of bristles between a portion of the face of a second shingle and the end of the first-mentioned shingle that is in spaced overhanging relation to said portion of the second shingle, the

sets of bristles being inclined toward opposite edges of the head, respectively, and the knots of bristles of each set being inclined to said planar side of the head, and each set of bristles being approximately rectangular in plan and the rows of bristles of both sets being parallel to opposite edges of the head block.

2. A shingle brush comprising a rectangular head block having a planar side, a major set of bristles and a minor set of bristles, both sets comprising bristle knots secured in said head block and projecting from said planar side, the bristles being arranged in rows parallel to the edges of the block and there being a space between said sets of bristles, the major set of bristles having their ends in a common plane parallel with said planar side for applying paint to the major portion of a face of a shingle, and the dimensions of the minor set of bristles providing, upon tilting of said head block from said major portion of the shingle face, for insertion of said minor set of bristles between a portion of the face of a second shingle and the end of the first-mentioned shingle that is in spaced overhanging relation to said portion of the second shingle, the outermost bristles of the minor set having their end portions disposed in a common plane that is inclined at an angle to said planar side.

3. A shingle brush as defined in claim 2 wherein the innermost bristles of said minor set have their ends disposed in approximately a common plane with the ends of the bristles in the major set.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,254,160 8/1941 Spyckober 15-106 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,387,220 12/ 1963 France.

825,082 12/ 1951 Germany.

6,320 1893 Great Britain.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

PETER FELDMAN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2254160 *Aug 28, 1939Aug 26, 1941Spyckaboer John MartinBrush
DE825082C *Oct 2, 1948Dec 17, 1951Willibald BrombergerSchuhbuerste zum Reinigen, Auftragen und Polieren
FR1387220A * Title not available
GB189306320A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3761990 *Sep 30, 1971Oct 2, 1973D LynnCorner brush
US3831358 *May 4, 1972Aug 27, 1974Goodyear Tire & RubberBelt and connecting means therefor
US4514872 *Apr 29, 1983May 7, 1985Hopkins Hammond WEscalator tread cleaning brush
US4850073 *Mar 31, 1987Jul 25, 1989Herbert PreussNapped fiber brush for cleaning textile fabrics
US5307861 *Nov 2, 1992May 3, 1994John Lysaght (Australia) LimitedBrush
US5507063 *Jan 9, 1995Apr 16, 1996Hirsch; LelandDiffuse edge hair coloring brush
US5537707 *Nov 14, 1994Jul 23, 1996Racine Industries, Inc.Brush for removing spots from carpet
US5707454 *Jan 11, 1996Jan 13, 1998Racine Industries, Inc.Method for removing spots from carpet
US6101658 *Aug 14, 1998Aug 15, 2000Newell Operating CompanyLiquid coating applicator having spaced applicating mediums
US6272714 *Mar 29, 1999Aug 14, 2001Gillette Canada CompanyToothbrush
US6928685Jul 22, 2004Aug 16, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyComplex motion toothbrush
US8266756Oct 21, 2010Sep 18, 2012Kovarik Andrew CScrubber adapted for cleaning a side face and under surface of lap siding
US8402590 *Jun 7, 2001Mar 26, 2013Carlisle Foodservice Products, IncorporatedPush broom head
US8650699Jun 6, 2012Feb 18, 2014Andrew C. KovarikScrubber adapted for cleaning a side surface of a rain gutter
EP2550894A1 *Jul 20, 2012Jan 30, 2013Bama S.p.A.Cleaning tool with bristles divided into groups
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/160, D04/130, 15/106, 15/207.2
International ClassificationA46B9/02, A46B5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA46B9/02, A46B2200/302, A46B2200/3073, A46B5/02
European ClassificationA46B5/02, A46B9/02