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Publication numberUS3346984 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateNov 17, 1965
Priority dateNov 17, 1965
Publication numberUS 3346984 A, US 3346984A, US-A-3346984, US3346984 A, US3346984A
InventorsRiley Lohr
Original AssigneeJohn H Hartman Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combustible gas toy gun
US 3346984 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FIG. l.

Oct. 17, 1967 'R LOHR 3,346,984

COMBUSTIBLE GAS TOY GUN Filed Nov. 17, 1965 2 SheetS-Sheei l INVENT OR ATTOR EY Oct. 17, 1967 R. Lol-:R

COMBUSTIBLE GAS TOY GUN Filed Nov. 17, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 2.

INVENT OR RlLEY LOI-1R wif-M' ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 17, 1967 3,346,984 COMBUSTIBLE GAS TOY GUN Riley Lohr, Lancaster, Pa., assignor to John H. Hartman, Jr., Strasburg, Pa. Filed Nov. 17, 1965, Ser. No. 508,350 6 Claims. (Cl. 42-55) ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE A combustible gas device including a fixed housing and a forward slide assembly reciprocable from a forward purging position rearwardly to a closed tiring position, said assembly including actuating means whereby when the assembly is moved rearwardly an additional amount, gas dispensing means is activated to deliver a measured amount `of gas to a combustion chamber formed by the rearward portion of a slide assembly and forward portion of the housing.

This invention relates generally to guns, and more v particularly, to toy guns of the gas type adapted to produce a large report upon the ignition of a highly combustible gas.

Many toy detonating devices have been produced in the past; however, in practically all instances it was necessary for the operator to combine specific measured amounts of a plurality of gas producing compounds prior to each detonation. The principal drawback of the foregoing is that the operation was not only time consuming but also tedious and inaccurate since critical amounts of the gas producing compounds must be mixed together for each gas-producing chemical reaction and this in itself presented a question of safety as the natural curiosity of children utilizing the prior known devices led to experimentation regarding the mixing of the highly reactive compounds.

Acetylene gas has long been a popular detonating i agent for use in toy noise producing devices. This gas is Y highly combustible and is readily produced by the instantaneous reaction achieved upon the mixing of calcium carbide with water. When subsequently mixed with air and enclosed within a chamber any suitable igniting means such as a spark produces an extremely loud report. In the prior known devices one of two methods were usually employed to generate the acetylene gas.

` Either measured amounts of water were deposited onto a measured supply of calcium carbide or on the other hand measured amounts of calcium carbide, usually in granular form, were dispensed into a reservoir of water whereupon during each of these admixtures a limited amount of highly explosive acetylene gas Would |be generated. Subsequently, igniting means would be actuated to produce a loud report from the combustible gas. Be-

fore the next detonation could occur, it was necessary charge of gaseous mixture, then there will not be a suliicient amount of pure air in the gaseous mixture to support a subsequent combustion. The lack of proper purging results in a mixture of air and acetylene that will either not explode at all, or if it does explode, the report will be very muiiled. Several attempts have been made in the past to provide scavenging or purging means in gas detonating devices; however, these devices have met with very little success since in most instances, complicated and expensive structure was required, and/ or a separate manual step by the operator of the device was necessitated, such as blowing into an open combustion chamber prior to closing same and before generating a new charge of explosive gas.

Another disadvantage of the previous devices as referred to hereinabove is the formation of residual deposits within the combustion or generating chamber of the device, which deposits are built up in increasing amounts upon each successive detonation of the device due to the chemical reaction, not only between the calcium carbide and water, but also when the resultant gaseous mixture is ignited.

Another disadvantage of the previous devices is that they are not truly portable, and there is splashing of the water supply on parts of the mechanism that must be kept dry. As a result, they are usually in the form of a cannon or other relatively stationary gun Vthat is not intended to be carried around during use thereof. Also, they are slow firing, requiring a waiting period for each gas generation.

The proper metering of either the calcium carbide or the supply of water is of paramount importance in the prior art devices since in most instances they are designed for the generation of single charges of acetylene gas and it is well known that too little or too much of either one of the principal ingredients will not only increase the residual deposits but may result in a detonation which will either be scarcely noticeable or muffled.

Accordingly, one of the primary objects of the present invention is to provide a toy gas gun of simple and inexpensive construction having improved means for dispensingV measured amounts of combustible gas from storage means adapted to contain a suflicient volume of gas to produce a plurality of detonations of the device. I

Another object of the present invention isto provide a toy gas gun that is rapid ring in any position, without any waiting period required for the gas to be generated.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a toy gas gun having a combustion chamber provided with improved purging means and adapted to receive measured amounts of a combustible gas from a remote source of supply.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide an improved toy gas gun adapted to ignite measured amounts of acetylene gas, said gas being produced by the metering of a self-contained water supply for reacting the water with a selfcontained calcium carbide supply to generate a suliicient volume of acetylene gas for the subsequent detonation of a plurality of charges.

With these and other objects in View which will more readily appear as the nature of the invention is better understood, the invention consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts hereinafter more fully described, illustrated and claimed.l

A preferred and practical embodiment of the invention is shown in the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation, partly in section, of a gas gun according to the present invention.

FIGURE 2 is a partial side elevation, on an enlarged scale and partly in section, showing a modification of the present invention.

FIGURE 3 is a partial side elevation partly in section, and illustrates the trigger actuating means for the igniting means of the present invention.

Similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now to the drawings, the present invention will be seen to comprise a toy gun fabricated to simulate an automatic weapon and includes a shoulder stock 1, trigger housing generally designated 2, and a forward slide assembly 3. Quite obviously, these components may assume any of other various configurations in the practice of the present invention. A hollow barrel 4 fixedly attached to the forward portion Aof lthe trigger housing comprises, together with the shoulder stock 1, a relatively xed sub-assembly while the slide assembly 3 is mounted around the rear portion of the barrel 4 and adapted for limited rectilinear movement thereupon. Disposed between the forward portion of the trigger housing 2 and the rear of the barrel 4 is a combustion chamber 5 enclosed by a pair of side walls 6, 6 connected at the rear thereof to the trigger housing and joined together at the forward portion by a combustion chamber front wall 7 provided with a gas passage 8 communicating with the hollow interior 9 of the barrel 4.

The combustion chamber will be seen to be completely enclosed when the slide assembly 3 is in the rearward or firing position as shown by the full lines in FIG- URE 1. However, when the slide assembly is moved to its forward or purging position, it will be understood that the top and bottom of the combustion chamber will be exposed to the atmosphere thereby permitting purging thereof as fresh air is admitted to the combustion charnber and the spent products of combustion are dissipated. The portion of the combustion chamber adjacent the trigger housing comprises a xed rear wall 10, extending Vertically for a portion of the height of the combustion chamber on the one hand, and a downwardly extending gas discharge actuator 11, depending from the top wall of the slide assembly 3. When the slide assembly is in the firing position of FIGURE 1, it will be seen that the bottom of the gas discharge actuator 11 engages the top of the rear wall to provide a continuous rear wall to the combustion chamber.

The angular alignment of the slide assembly upon the remainder of the gun is maintained by means of a longitudinal rib 12 extending outwardly from each of the side walls 6 of the combustion chamber. Each side wall of the slide assembly is provided with a mating longitudinal groove 13 adapted to engage the rib 12 to provide a sliding fit therewith.

Means for dispensing measured amounts of acetylene gas into the combustion chamber 5 include a gas metering valve 14 which is xedly mounted within the forward portion of the trigger housing 2. This valve is of any suitable construction well known in the art and includes a dispensing nozzle 15 projecting from the forward portion thereof, which nozzle, when depressed axially ejects a predetermined measured amount of gas, which volume, will always be constant regardless of the length of time the dispensing nozzle is depressed. A-s will be most clearly seen when viewing FIGURE 2, the lower portion of the gas discharge actuator 11 is provided with a gas port 16 axially aligned with the dispensing nozzle 15 and communicating on the one hand with the combustion chamber 5 and provided on the rear surface thereof with a nozzle seat 17 adapted to engage the forward end of the dispensing nozzle 15.

A supply of acetylene gas is continuously delivered to the metering valve 14 by means of a gas feed line 18 whereupon when the `operator moves the slide assembly 3 from the full line position shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 towards the rear lof the gun it will be understood that the gas discharge actuator 11 will be moved against the force of the normally spring-urged dispensing nozzle 1S whereupon a measured volume of acetylene gas will be injected through the gas port 16 into the enclosed combustion chamber 5. It is only necessary to retain the slide assembly in the rearward or charging position for an instant and when pressure is released upon the slide assembly, the inherent spring action behind the dispensing nozzle 15 will return the slide assembly 3 t-o the firing position shown in the full lines in FIGURE 1.

From the foregoing it will be understood that a predetermined volume of acetylene gas will be injected into the combustion chamber 5 and ready for detonation at anytime thereafter by the operator. This detonation is achieved by a unique sparking assembly adapted to be actuated by linger pressure applied to a trigger 19.

The arrangement of the igniting means is most clearly illustrated in FIGURE 2 and will be understood to be incorporated in either embodiment of the invention as herein illustrated. Disposed within the trigger housing 2 is a longitudinal spark rod 20 mounted for rectilinear movement above the trigger 19 and including a serrated or otherwise roughened forward portion 21 disposed through an opening in the lower portion of the rear wall 10 of the combustion chamber. Most conveniently the spark rod 20 may be mounted for the aforedescribed movement by means of a plurality of guides or bearings xedly attached within the trigger housing 2. A front bear ing 22 is disposed adjacent the forward portion 21 of the spark r-od 20 while a rear bearing 23 is provided for the rearmost portion of the rod. An intermediate bearing 24 supports the medial portion of the spark rod. When in the normal, Ior at-rest position, the spark rod 20 is disposed with its forward portion 21 projecting into the combustion chamber 5 with the spark producing material or int 25 engaging the under surface of the forward portion 21 at the rear thereof. The rod 20 is maintained in this position by means of a return spring 2.6 of the compression type which normally bears on the one end against the rear bearing 23 and at its other end against a stop shoulder 26a xedly secured to the spark rod 2G, which shoulder in turn is urged against the intermediate bearing 24 to limit the forward movement of the rod 20.

Following the charging of the combustion chamber 5 by moving the slide assembly rearwardly in order to inject a measured amount of acetylene gas into the chamber, and it is then desired to detonate the gas, the trigger 19 is actuated to cause the forward portion 21 of the spark rod 20 to cooperate with the flint 2S to inject a plurality of sparks into the combustion chamber. The trigger 19 is mounted for horizontal rectilinear movement within the housing 2 and includes a rearwardly projecting guide rod 27 passing through a xed guide rod bearing 28. The trigger 19 is normally disposed in the forward, or full line position as illustrated in FIGURE 2 and maintained in this position by means of a return spring 29 which abuts on the one hand the guide rod bearing 28 and has its other or forward end engaging the rear of the trigger 19. The trigger includes an actuator arm 31) provided with a linger portion 31 at the top thereof which is normally engaged within the notch 32 formed in the undersurface of the spark rod 20. The rod 20 also includes an inclined ramp 33 on the under surface thereof immediately adjacent the rear of the rod, which ramp cooperates with a xed release pin 34 formed within the trigger housing 2 as the trigger 19 is pulled rearwardly. The operation of the sparking mechanism will be readily apparent upon a review of the full line and broken line positions of this mechanism in FIGURE 2 wherein it will be seen that as the trigger 19 is pulled rearwardly the rod 20 is likewise rearwardly disposed and the continued movement of the trigger forces the ramp 33 to engage the fixed release pin 34 and to progressively elevate the rear of the spark rod until the finger portion 31 of the trigger is disengaged from within the notch 32. Immediately upon this disengagement it will be apparent that the return spring 26, which has been compressed as a result of the rearward movement of the trigger, will drive the spark rod 20 forwardly until the stop shoulder 26 abuts the intermediate bearing 24. During this forward movement the portion 21 of the spark rod 20 is driven at a rapid rate across the end of the iiint 25 which is spring urged by any suitable means into constant engagement with the under surface of the forward portion 21. By forming the serrations on the portion 21 so that they are directed forwardly of the spark rod 20 it will be apparent that only during the rapid forward movement of the rod 20 will a plurality of sparks be directed into the combustion chamber 5. After the rod 20 is `driven to its forward position and finger pressure is released from the trigger 19, the return spring 29 will drive the trigger 19 to its full line position as shown in FIGURE 2, during which movement the inclined portion at the top of the actuator arm 30 slides against the ramp 33 of the spark rod 20 and displaces this end of the rod upwardly until the linger portion 31 is disposed within the notch 32.

The modification illustrated in FIGURE 3 differentiates from the first described embodiment in that the detonating device is entirely self-contained, that is, the means for generating the acetylene gas is disposed within the toy gun. In this latter form the interior of the shoulder stock 1 serves as a gas storage chamber 36 and includes a chemical chamber 37 therein having a suitable filler cap 38 which may be removed for the purpose of placing a relatively large supply of calcium carbide within the chamber 37. The trigger housing 2 includes metering means for injecting measured amounts of water into the chemical chamber 37 in order to generate a supply of acetylene gas. This means includes a water reservoir 39 having a suitable filler plug 40 for introducing water to the reservoir. Disposed within the reservoir 39 is a water pump assembly including a cylinder 41 within which is disposed a reciprocating plunger 42 mounted at the bottom of the plunger rod 43. The cylinder 41 is provided with inlet 44 and outlet 45 valves which may be of any suitable well-known construction. The plunger 42 is normally disposed in the uppermost position as illustrated in FIGURE 3 and retained therein by means of the return spring 46.

Assuming that the reservoir 39 is filled with a supply of water, the operation of the water pump assembly will now be described. With a measured amount of water within the cylinder 41 the plunger 42 is moved downwardly by actuation of the plunger rod 43 to force the lwater contained within the cylinder 41 through the oneway outlet Valve 45. When linger pressure is released from the plunger rod 43, the return spring 46 drives the plunger rod and plunger upwardly, which action draws additional water into the cylinder 41 through the inlet valve 44 from the water reservoir 39. It will thus be understood that each time the plunger rod 43 is displaced downwardly, a measured amount of water will be forced through the outlet valve 45 and into the water feed line 47. The discharge end of the feed line 47 is connected to a water inlet 48 communicating with the forward portion of the chemical chamber 37. Thus, it will be seen that as each measured amount of water is injected into the chemical chamber 37, it will immediately react with the calcium carbide contained therein to generate a predetermined amount of acetylene gas. This gas las it is formed passes through a gas outlet 49 adjacent the rear of the chemical chamber 37 and into the gas storage chamber 36. The maintenance of a safe pressure level of gas within the storage chamber 36 is insured by means of a safety vent valve 50 communicating with the interior of the storage chamber and venting to the atmosphere so that should the operator inject an excessive amount of water into the chemical chamber 37 to thus produce a dangerously high pressure of acetylene gas, all such gas produced in excess of the rating of the vent valve 50 will be ejected to the atmosphere.

The charging and tiring mechanism of the -toy gas gun illustrated in the embodiment of FIGURE 3 is similar to that as previously described with respect to the modification of FIGURE 1. In the self-contained form of the invention the gas supply from the storage chamber 36 is in direct communication with the gas metering valve 14 by means of a gas fed line 18a which is joined to the gas storage chamber 36 through the gas inlet 51.

From the foregoing it will be seen that toy gas guns are provided having an extremely rapid rate of fire and including novel charging and firing mechanism for loading and detonating measured amounts of a combustible gas which is supplied to the combustion chamber from a multi-charge gas source.

What is claimed is:

1. A combustible gas detonating device, comprising, a fixed housing, a forward assembly slidably mounted with respect to said housing, a combustion chamber between said housing and assembly, said assembly movable from a forward purging position whereby said chamber is open to the atmosphere to a closed tiring position whereby said chamber is sealed from the atmosphere by the rear portion of said assembly, metered gas dispensing means mounted in said housing adjacent the rear of said chamber, actuating means carried by the rear portion of said assembly engageable with said gas dispensing means after said assembly is first moved to the closed lring position and subsequently moved rearwardly an additional amount from said firing position to charge said chamber with gas, spring means automatically returning said assembly forwardly to the firing position after release of manual rearward pressure upon said assembly, feed means delivering a constant supply of gas to said dispensing means, and linger-actuated igniting means mounted in said housing and extending into said chamber.

2. A combustible gas detonating device according to claim 1, wherein, said actuating means comprises a rear Wall of said combustion chamber when said assembly is in said firing position, and said rear wall includes a gas port axially aligned with said gas dispensing means.

3. A combustible gas detonating device according to claim 1, wherein, said feed means com-prises a liexible tube passing from said housing to a remote gas supply.

4. A combustible gas detonating device according to claim 1, wherein, said housing includes, a chemical cham- Y. l

ber, water feed means connected to said chemical chamber, pump means for directing measured amounts of Water to said chemical chamber, a gas storage chamber in communication with said chemical chamber, and said gas feed means is connected to said storage chamber.

5. A combustible gas detonating device, comprising, a fixed housing, a forward assembly slidably mounted with respect to said housing, a combustion chamber between said housing and assembly, said assembly movable from a forward purging position whereby said chamber is open to the atmosphere to a closed firing position whereby said chamber is sealed from the atmosphere, metered gas dispensing means mounted in said housing adjacent said chamber, actuating means carried by said assembly engageable with said dispensing means when said assembly is moved rearwardly from said firing position to charge said chamber with gas, feed means delivering a constant supply of gas to said dispensing means, and nger-actuating igniting means mounted in said housing, said igniting means including a slidably mounted spark rod, a trigger engageable with one end of said rod, spring means urging said rod to a forward position, release means in said housing, whereby, rearward move-ment of said trigger concurrently moves said rod into contact with said release means to disengage said rod from said trigger to permit said spring means to drive said rod forwardly, and spark producing means mounted in contact with the forward portion of said rod extending into said chamber.

6. A combustible gas detonating device according to claim S, wherein, said trigger is provided with an actuator arm including an inclined portion at the top thereof, a notch on said rod engageablewith said inclined portion, said rod having a ramp on the undersurface thereof rearwardly of said notch, whereby, said rearward movement of said trigger forces said ramp to ride over said release means to axially displace said rod and remove said inclined portion from said notch.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,383,111 6/1921 Hall et al, 89-7 1,596,057 8/1926 Mallory 89-7 1,883,028 10/1932 Smith 42-55 3,255,669 6/1966 Olofsson 89--7 BENJAMIN A. BORCHELT, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1383111 *Mar 18, 1918Jun 28, 1921Andrew P WeidmanGas-gun
US1596057 *Aug 4, 1925Aug 17, 1926Mallory Junius LGas rifle
US1883028 *Aug 1, 1931Oct 18, 1932Smith Welding Equipment CorpGun
US3255669 *Mar 5, 1965Jun 14, 1966Marenius Olofsson SigfridGas-operated firearm
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US4148245 *Dec 12, 1977Apr 10, 1979BtgcoFluid propellant projectile firing device
US4654008 *Apr 18, 1983Mar 31, 1987Pulsepower, Inc.Automatic weapons effect signature simulator
US5944006 *Apr 9, 1998Aug 31, 1999Hasbro, Inc.Toy gun with a selectively extendable barrel
US7594463 *Aug 19, 2005Sep 29, 2009Stanley SkinnerEvaporative barrel cooler
US7665396Dec 4, 2006Feb 23, 2010Tippmann Sports, LlcProjectile launcher
US7712244 *Nov 9, 2006May 11, 2010Mamae Tautofi Taurik IApparatus and method for fishing
US7770504Aug 12, 2005Aug 10, 2010Tippmann Sports, LlcApparatus and method for firing a projectile
US8015907Aug 15, 2007Sep 13, 2011Tippmann Sports, LlcProjectile launcher
US8826792 *Mar 9, 2009Sep 9, 2014Christopher George GrangerProjectile propulsion method and apparatus
US20060032487 *Aug 12, 2005Feb 16, 2006Tippmann Dennis J SrApparatus and method for firing a projectile
US20060164704 *Jan 27, 2005Jul 27, 2006Eotech Acquisition Corp.Low profile holographic sight and method of manufacturing same
US20070039224 *Aug 19, 2005Feb 22, 2007Stanley SkinnerEvaporative barrel cooler
US20070251136 *Nov 9, 2006Nov 1, 2007Mamae Tautofi TApparatus and method for fishing
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/55, 89/7, D21/573
International ClassificationF41A1/00, F41A1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF41A1/04
European ClassificationF41A1/04