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Publication numberUS3347225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateMar 10, 1964
Priority dateMar 10, 1964
Publication numberUS 3347225 A, US 3347225A, US-A-3347225, US3347225 A, US3347225A
InventorsSalsbury Albert L
Original AssigneeSalsbury Albert L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hydrotherapy bath with wave producing diaphragm
US 3347225 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. i7, l967 A. L.. SALSBURY 3,34%225 HYDROTHERAPY BATH WITH WAVE PRODUCING DIAPHRAGM Filed March lO, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR.

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Oct. 17, 1967 A. sALsBURY HYDROTHERAPY BATH WITH WAVE PRODUCING DIAPHRAGM 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March lO, 1964 @5m/1.545%@ BY NVENTOR raeA/E 71s.

Patented Oct. 17, 1967 3,347,225 HYDRGTHERAPY BATH WITH WAVE PRODUCNG DIAPHRAGM Albert L. Salsbury, 2635-46 SW., Seattle, Wash. 98116 Filed Mar. lil, i964, Ser. No. 350,785 12. Claims. (Cl. 12S- 66) This invention relates to a hydrotherapy bath and relates more particularly to Ia bath in which at least a portion of an individual to be treated is immersed and including means for subjecting that portion of the individual to pulsating differential pressure shock waves.

Hydrotherapy baths have been utilized heretofore, however, all such devices have relied upon mechanical arrangements designed and timed to impart motion to the liquid material within the bath, the motion of the liquid material over the surface of a body portion immersed therewithin theoretically providing therapeutic and beneficial effects. The device of the instant invention is particularly designed to provide frequent pulsations of relatively small pressure differential or shock waves which, due to the incompressibility of the liquid material within the bath, is equally distributed throughout the bath to be absorbed by a body portion immersed therewithin.

The above-described effect is accomplished by providing a tank means defining a chamber containing a predetermined volume of liquid material having a predetermined head, diaphragm assembly means being carried by the tank means with a front surface in contact with the liquid therewithin, and reciprocating means being operatively connected to diaphragm assembly means to move the front surface toward and away from the liquid material with a predetermined frequency and length of stroke, the dimensions of the diaphragm assembly means and the frequency and length of stroke of the reciprocating means being correlated with the Volume and head of liquid material within the chamber to minimize movement of the liquid material and to maximize pulsation of small pressure differentials within the liquid material. As the front surface of the diaphragm assembly means is moved toward the body of the liquid material, a shock or pressure wave is caused to travel forwardly causing a rise in pressure above the ordinary static pressure of the liquid material, such rise in pressure being known as a positive pressure. As the front surface of the diaphragm assembly means is returned or moved away from the body of liquid material, a reversal of the shock or pressure wave is caused reducing the pressure to less than the ordinary static pressure of the liquid material, thereby providing a negative pressure. The variation between the maximum positive pressure and the minimum negative pressure provides a total pressure differential pulsation in the liquid material.

It will be readily seen that the frequency or number of cycles per minute and the length of stroke of the reciprocating means will determine the intensity of the pulsation. These variables produce a particular velocity in the movement of the front surface of the diaphragm Iassembly means, the increase of which increases the intensity of the shock wave within certain limitations. As the front surface moves toward the body of liquid material, the positive pressure is caused by powered, mechanical action. But as the front surface is retracted by the reciprocating means, no mechanical force is available. This action depends upon the force of gravity and, therefore, limits the speed of operation. Should the frequency be faster than the force of gravity can return the shock wave to its original position, the following forward stroke would have little or no effect. This condition can be called cavi- .tati-on. If the reciprocatory movement is too slow, the

desired intensity will not be realized and the body of liquid material will be caused to move. This will also be true if the size of the diaphragm assembly means is very large compared to the volume and head of liquid material within the tank. If the frequency and stroke of the reciprocating means are too great, the tendency will be toward cavitation. By adjustment of each of these variables, `an optimum relationship can be determined to provide a desired intensity without substantial movement of the liquid material and Without cavitation. Such an arrangement can readily be calculated by those with ordinary skill in the art by predetermining one of the variables such as the quantity and head of liquid material within the bath and adjustment of the `other variables by trial and error to produce an optimum result.

It will also be seen that in order to provide maximum eciency of a hydrotherapy bath in accordance with the instant inventive concept, the tank means defining the chamber receiving the liquid material and the diaphragm assembly means should be relatively inelastic to preclude yielding of such elements which would absorb the shock waves and undesirably diminish the pulsations of pressure differentials to be imparted to the body portion immersed in the liquid material.

It is therefore a primary object of the instant invention to provide a hydrotherapy bath which minimizes movement of the liquid material therewithin and maximizes pulsations of small pressure differentials.

Another object of this invention is to provide a means for varying the length of stroke of the reciprocating means whereby the intensity of the pressure differential of each pulsation may be readily adjusted.

A further object of this invention is the provision of a hydrotherapy bath having a substantially rigid walled tank means defining a chamber receiving a volume of liquid material and ya substantially inelastic diaphragm assembly means to preclude loss of pressure differential by absorption of either of these elements.

A still further object of the instant invention is to provide a hydrotherapy bath having a diaphragm assembly means carrying a plunger substantially frusto-conical in configuration and including a base portion having outwardly flared peripheral edges to concentrate the pulsations and direct them toward the body portion immersed within the liquid material.

A further object of the instant invention is the provision of a seat means for supporting an individual with at least a portion of his body immersed in the liquid material of the hydrotherapy bath.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide lift means operatively connected to the seat means to lower and raise the same whereby the seat means and the individual supported thereby may be immersed and removed from the liquid material.

A still further object of the instant invention is the provision of a hydraulically operated, pivotally mounted seat means whereby an individual may be lifted from a position exteriorly of the tank means and immersed within the liquid material, and subsequently removed from the liquid material and replaced exteriorly of the tank means.

A further and important object of this invention is the provision of a method of treating a substantial portion of the human body to assist the circulation of body fluids.

An additional important object of this invention is the provision of a method for imparting pressure pulsations into a substantial portion of the human body through a liquid bath which covers a substantial portion of the body and is of sucient depth to provide a significant pressure head.

The provision of a method for treating the human body by imparting pressure pulses of positive and negative nature relative the static pressure on the body utilizing 3 a substantial depth of liquid to provide a pressure head is an important additional object of this invention.

Other and further objects reside in the combination of elements, arrangement of parts and features of construction.

Still other objects will in part be obvious and in -part be pointed out as the description of the invention proceeds and as shown in the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE l is a side elevational view of a hydrotherapy bath in accordance with the instant inventive concept showing a raised position of the seat means in dotted lines, and with various hidden parts being shown in dotted lines;

FIGURE 2 is a rear elevational view of the hydrotherapy bath with the seat means in the raised position;

FIGURE 3 is a top lplan view thereof showing a pivoted position of the seat means in dotted lines;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 4-4 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken substantially on line 5 5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary plan view taken substantially on line 6-6 `of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary side elevational view diagrammatically showing a relationship of the reciproeating means for minimal movement of the diaphragm assembly means; and

FIGURE 8 is a view similar to FIGURE 7 showing the same elements rearranged to provide a maximum movement of the diaphragm assembly means.

Like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views of the drawings.

Referring now to the drawings, a hydrotherapy bath in accordance with the instant inventive concept is designated generally by the reference numeral 10 and comprises basically a tank means 12 defining a chamber 14 therewithin containing a -predetermined volume and head ofliquid material 16 such as water or the like, a diaphragm lassembly means 18 carried by the tank means 12 and having reciprocating means 20 operatively connected thereto, with a seat-means 22 being operatively connected to a hydraulic lift means 24 for raising and lowering the same as will be explained inmore detail hereinafter.

The tank means k12 includes substantially rigid walls formed by inner and outer shell members 26, 28, respectively, defining a space therebetween which is filled with a solid insulating material 30 poured thereinto in any conventional manner, the inner shell member 26 defining the chamber 14 and one corner of the walls being angularly offset as shown particularly in FIGURE 4 to detine an enclosure 32 rece1ving the major portion of the reciprocating means and certain of the elements de` fining the hydraulic lift means 24.

An opening 34 is defined in the walls of the angularly offset portion of the tank means 12 to receive the diaphragm assembly means 18. The diaphragm assembly means 18 is comprised basically of a exible, substantially inelastic diaphragm member 36 secured to an annular flange 38 by a plurality of bolts 40 and carrying on its front .surface a substantially frusto-conical plunger 42 having a base portion with upturned peripheral side edges 44, and on its rear surface a washer member 46, these latter two elements being rigid and defining a major portion of the front and rear surfaces, respectively, of the diaphragm assembly means 18. The surfaces of the plunger 42 and washer member 46 in contact with the diaphragm member 36 are arcuately defined adjacent their peripheral edges to preclude cutting of the diaphragm member 36.

The reciprocating means 20 includes va substantially Vshaped crank means 48 having a first connecting rod 5) with one end 52 secured to the diaphragm assembly means 18 in any conventional manner, the remainder of the first connecting rod 50 extending in substantially right 'u threadably feeds the wire control angular relationship to the rear surface of the diaphragm assembly means 18 and including rubber bushings 54 t0 allow for curvilinear as well as rectilinear motion as will be explained hereinafter, and a second connecting rod.

V-shape of the crank means 48. VThe driving means 58v includes a motor means 60 with its power take off shaft operatively connected t0 a small pulley means 62 carried in bearings 64 in a U-shaped support bracket 66, a belt means 70 drivingly connecting the small pulley means 62 to a large pulley means 72 connected to a shaft 74 supported in bearings 76 inthe support bracket 66 and being eccentrically keyed at one end 78 to a disc rotatably carried by the second connecting rod 56 to provide a reciprocatory movement in the direction of the doubleheaded arrow D. The reciprocating means 20 further includes a link means 84 carrying a first floating pivot means 86 at one end and a second floating pivot means 88 at its other end, the iirst iioating pivot means 86 being operatively secured to the crank means 48 at its apex.

An adjustable arm 90 is operatively secured to the second t floating pivot means 88 4and has one of its ends secured to fixed pivot means 92 carried by the bracket member 66 in spaced relationship to the second floating pivot means 88. The opposite endof the adjustable arm.90 carries an `outstanding lug member 94 threadably receiving a spring covered wire control member 96 extending to a control knob 98 conveniently secured to the tank means 12,.with a spring pressed locking means 100 being provided, if desired, to retain control knob 98 in a `preselected position. Rotation of the control knob 98 member 96 through the lug 94 to raise or lower the adjusting arm 90 as will be seen particularly in FIGURES 7 and 8. By movingI the adjustable arm 90 the position of the second iioating pivot means 88 4and the relationship of thevlink means S4 to the crank means 48 is varied thereby varying the movement of the first connecting rod 50 on reciprocation of the second connecting rod 56 by the driving means 58 from substantially curvilinear motion as schematilcally designated in FIGURE 7 by the dashed lines 50a and the double-headed arcuate arrow 102 causing minimum length of stroke of the diaphragm assembly means designated schematically by the dotted lines 18a in FIG- URE 7 and thereby -minimum intensity of the pressure differential of the motion designated schematically by and the double-headed arcuate arrow 104 in FIGURE 8 thereby causing maximum length of stroke of the diaphragm assembly means designated schematically by the dotted lines 18b in FIGURE 8 and maximum intensity of the pressure differential of the pulsations.

The seat means 22 includes a seat member 106 of aluminum or other similar material having an upstanding backrest and frame 108 carried by a structural support Amember 110 secured to a roller guide means 112` on the end of a piston rod 114 of a hydraulic cylinder 116 forming part of a vertical standard member 118 having outstanding lugs 124, 126, respectively, secured by brackets or the like exteriorly of the tank means 12. A conventional threeway hydraulic controlvalve means 128 is operatively connected to a conventional hydraulic pump 130 by conduit means 132, to a storage tank 134 by conduit means 136 and to the hydraulic cylinder 116 by conduit means 138. The hydraulic pump 130 is energized by the motor means 60 as will be seen particularly in FIGURE 5 and the hydraulictvalve means 128 is actuated in any conventional manner by a flexible member 140 carried by -a control level 142 conveniently carried by the tank means 12.

A drain valve 144 is provided for the tank means 12.

pulsations, to substantially rectilinear the dotted lines 50b 120, 122 pivotally carried by pinsv The use and operation of the hydrotherapy bath of the instant invention will now be apparent. The drain valve 144 is closed and the chamber 14 is filled with water or the like 16 to a desired volume and head. An individual to be treated in the bath sits on the seat means 22 in the dotted position shown in FIGURE 3, lowered adjacent the door. The control lever 142 is then actuated to open the hydraulic control valve 128 thereby raising the seat means 22 to its uppermost position after which it is rotated about the pivot pins 124, 126 to the position shown in dotted lines in FIGURE l and then lowere-d by reversing the hydraulic control valve 128 until the seat means 22 and the individual supported thereby is immersed in the liquid material 16 to a desired degree. The control knob 9S is then rotated to selectively move the adjustable arm 9thv to provide a desired intensity to the pulsations. On energizing the motor means 60 the reciprocating means is actuated to move the diaphragm assembly means 18 back and forth according to a predetermined frequency and length of stroke thereby providing pulsations of pressure differentials communicated through the liquid material 16 to the individual. The intensity of the pulsations may be varied at any time by rotation of the control knob 98. On completion of the use of the -bath 10 the seat means 22 may be raised, rotated and lowered to remove the individual and the liquid material 16 may be drained through the Valve 144, if desired.

As conducive to a better understanding of the instant invention an example of the dimensions of one embodimet of the hydrotherapy bath of the instant invention will be set forth. It will be understood that these dimensions are not to be considered limitative, but merely illustrative of one arrangement providing optimum results. With a chamber 14 having an average total volume of approximately 8100 cubic inches, a maximum stroke of approximately 7/32 inch has been provided for the diaphragm assembly unit 18, with the base of the plunger 42 having a diameter of approximately 6 inches and the opening 34 being approximately 7 inches in diameter. Thus, the total surface area of the diaphragm assembly means 18 is approximately 36 square inches and the liquid material displacement will vary from approximately 7.8 cubic inches at the maximum reciprocatory movement of the diaphragm assembly means 18 to 0 cubic inches at the minimum reciprocatory movement, an average setting of approximately 4.5 cubic inches being provided. Thus, it will be seen that the ratio of liquid material displacement to total volume is only approximately 4.5 to 8100 resulting in substantially no liquid material movement. Experimentation has shown the optimum frequency to be approximately 322 cycles per minute resulting in suicient intensity of pulsations without effecting cavitation.

Although the descriptive matter and drawings have been `directed to a substantially oval bath sufiiciently large to immerse the major portion of an individuals body, it will be readily seen that smaller baths may be used for receiving only the arm or leg of an individual. Similarly, while specific materials and configurations have been set forth for such elements as the seat means and the plunger, and while specific dimensional and operating values have Vbeen provided for an illustrative example, it will now be seen that since many embodiments may be made of the instant inventive concept, and since many modifications may be made of the embodiments hereinbefore shown and described, all matter herein is to be interpreted merely as exemplary and not as limitations on the appended claims.

Thus, there is herein provided an improved hydrotherapy bath which satisfies all of the objectives of the instant invention, and others, inclu-ding many advantages of great practical utility and commercial importance.

I claim:

1. A hydrotherapy bath comprising a tank means defining a chamber containing a predetermined volume of liquid material having a predetermined head, said chamber being 0f size and shape to hold an adult human body in a sitting position substantially submersed in the liquid material, diaphragm assembly means carried by said tank means and having a fnont surface in contact with said liquid material and a rear surface outside of said chamber, and reciprocating means operatively connected to said diaphragm assembly means for moving said front surface toward and away from said liquid material with a predetermined frequency and length of stroke, the dimensions of said diaphragm assembly means and the frequency and length of stroke of said reciprocating means being correlated with the volume and head of said liquid material within said chamber to minimize movement of said liquid material and to maximize pulsations of small pressure differentials within said liquid material.

2. The structure of claim 1 further comprising, in combination, means for Varying said length of stroke of said reciprocating means whereby the intensity of the pressure differential of each pulsation may be adjusted.

3. The structure Iof claim 2 wherein said reciprocating means includes a V-shaped crank means having a first connecting rod with one end secured to said diaphragm assembly means and extending in substantially right angular relationship to said rear surface thereof, and a second connecting rod with one end operatively secured to a driving means for reciprocatory movement, the others ends of said connecting rods being secured to each other to define the apex of the V-shape of said crank means, a link means carrying a first oating pivot means at one end and a second oating pivot means at its -other end, said first floating pivot means being operatively secured to said crank means at said apex, an adjustable arm operatively secured to said second floating pivot means, and a fixed pivot means operatively carrying said adjustable arm in spaced relationship to said second fioating pivot means, whereby movement of said adjustable arm about said fixed pivot means changes the position of said second oating pivot means and the relationship of said link means to said crank means to vary movement of said first connecting rod on reciprocation of said second connecting rod by said driving means from substantially rectilinear motion causing maximum length of stroke and thereby maximum intensity of the pressure differential of the pulsations, to substantially curvilinear motion causing minimum length of stroke and thereby minimum intensity of the pressure differential of the pulsations.

4. The structure of claim 1 wherein said tank means includes substantially rigid walls defining said chamber and further including a seat in the chamber for supporting the body of an individual while said individual is being treated.

S. The structure of claim 4 wherein said walls include inner and outer shell members defining a space therebetween, and a solid insulating material filling said space.

6. The structure of claim 1 wherein said diaphragm assembly means includes a substantially inelastic, exible diaphragm member, a rigid plunger member secured to the fnont of said diaphragm member and defining the major portion of said front surface of said diaphragm assembly means, and a rigid washer member secured to the rear of said diaphragm member and defining the major portion of said rear surface of said diaphragm assembly means and further including a seat in the chamber for supporting the body of an individual while said individual is being treated.

7. The structure of claim 6 wherein said plunger is substantially frusto-conical.

8. The structure of claim 6 wherein said plunger includes a base portion having outwardly dared peripheral edges.

9. The structure of claim 1 further including, in combination, seat means for supporting an individual with at least a portion of his body immersed in said liquid material.

10. The structure of claim 9 further including, in combination, lift means operatively connected to said seat means to lower and raise the same whereby said seat means and the individual supported thereby may bey immersed and removed from said liquid material.

11. The structure of claim 10 wherein said lift means are hydraulically actuated.

12. The structure of claim 10 further including, in combination, pivot means operatively connected to said seat means whereby said seat means may be moved from a rst position aligned with said chamber wherein said seat means and the individual supported thereby may be immersed in said liquid material and removed therefrom by said lift means, to a second position remote from said chamber wherein said seat means may be raised and lowered by said lift means for receiving and depositing an individual exteriorly of said tank means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Great Britain.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

L. W. TRAPP, Exam ner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US916152 *Feb 21, 1908Mar 23, 1909Heinrich HoeglauerDevice for agitating the water in baths.
US2152455 *Oct 28, 1938Mar 28, 1939Ballentine George KDishwashing machine
US2203479 *Mar 5, 1937Jun 4, 1940B W B CompanyWashing machine
US2515667 *Dec 21, 1948Jul 18, 1950Pierre SchaufflerBathing apparatus, including mechanism for imparting oscillating movements to water
US2904037 *Oct 28, 1957Sep 15, 1959Pace IncBath apparatus
US2906111 *Mar 5, 1954Sep 29, 1959Gen Motors CorpWashing machine
US3094983 *Jul 25, 1961Jun 25, 1963Frank F ReedBlood circulation device and method
US3188657 *Nov 29, 1962Jun 15, 1965Cotner John CLift for sitz bath
GB191223154A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3776223 *Sep 21, 1971Dec 4, 1973H YeagerHydrotherapy bath with wave energy producing mechanism
US4217892 *Aug 6, 1979Aug 19, 1980Brill J HHydro-therapy device
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/157
International ClassificationA47K3/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47K3/10
European ClassificationA47K3/10