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Publication numberUS3347248 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateOct 22, 1964
Priority dateOct 22, 1964
Publication numberUS 3347248 A, US 3347248A, US-A-3347248, US3347248 A, US3347248A
InventorsWeitzner Dorothea M
Original AssigneeWeitzner Dorothea M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrically heated hair curling device
US 3347248 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1967 D. M. WEITZNER 3,

ELECTRICALLY HEATED HAIR (JURLING DEVICE Filed Oct. 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet l 6 a INVENTOR.

/66 go/0272M /7 M9 9 7 ATTURNEVS,

Get. 17, 197 D. M. WEITZNER 3,347,248

ELECTRICALLY HEATED HAIR CURLING DEVICE Filed Oct. 22, 1964 2 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR.

United States Patent Of" 3,347,248 ELECTRICALLY HEATED HAIR CURLING DEVICE Dorothea M. Weitzner, 8 E. 62nd St., New York, NY. 10021 Filed Oct. 22, 1964, Ser. No. 405,875 Claims. (Cl. 132-40) ABSTRAQT OF THE DISCLOSURE An electrically heated hair curler assembly having a hollow cylindrical body composed of axially extending bars joined at their ends by rings. An electrical resistance wire element is wound around the bars adapted to receive hair wound thereon. A curved flexible clamping frame clamps the wound hair on the body. Means is provided for connecting the wire element to a source of electric motive force.

The objects of the invention are:

(1) To provide a cylindrical heater body around which a lock of hair can be twisted, with an electrical resistance element supported by said body, and means for conducting electric energy to the resistance element to heat the same for setting said lock of hair in curled form;

(2) To provide the cylindrical heater body with an associated clamp on clamping frame for holding a hair curl in place on the heater body;

(3) To provide the heater body with an electrical connector so that a plurality of curl heaters can be connected together in series or parallel to the electrical energy source;

(4) To make the cylindrical heater body in the form of a rolled springy pad which can be unrolled to engage a lock of hair and which automatically rolls up engaging the curled lock of hair therein; and

(5) To provide an electrolytic liquid in the pad which serves as the electrical resistance element.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of an electrically heated hair curler and holding frame for the hair curl.

FIG. 2 is a side view showing a plurality of electrically heated hair curlers on a reduced scale mounted in place on a persons head.

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of another electrically heated hair curler and holding frame.

FIG. 3A is a section taken on line 3A--3A of FIG. 3.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a further electrically heated hair curler.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a side view on a reduced scale of a plurality of electrically heated hair curlers with an associated electrical connector.

FIG. 6A is a diagram of the electric circuit of the heaters and connector of FIG. 6.

FIGS. 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 are exploded perspective views of parts of various different electrically heated hair curler assemblies.

FIG. 11A is a diagram of the electric circuit employed in the hair curler assembly of FIG. 11.

3,347,248 Patented Oct. 17, 1967 FIG. 12 is an exploded perspective view of another electrically heated hair curler assembly.

FIGS. 13, 14 and 15 are enlarged sectional views taken on lines 13-13, 1414 and 15--15 respectively of FIG. 12.

Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown an electrically heated hair curler assembly H1 including a cylindrical curler body 30 and associated cylindrically curved frame 32. The curler body has a pair of circular end rings 34, 36 in which are anchored ends of axially extending bars or rods 38 spaced apart circumferentially of the curler body. Wound around the bars 33 in helical fashion is a coil 40. This coil is made of insulated electrical resistance wire. One end 41 of the coil extends outwardly through a hole in ring 34 and terminates in a socket 42. The other end 43 of the coil extends outwardly through a hole in ring 36 and terminates in a plug 45.

The clamping frame 32 includes a pair of circularly curved end frame bars 46, 47 and a plurality of axially extending straight bars 48 spaced apart circumferentially about the frame. The arcuate end bars 46 are springy and extend slightly more than 180 so that the frame can be snapped partially around the cylindrical curler body 30 to clamp a lock of hair thereon.

As shown in FIG. 2, a chain of heater assemblies H1 can be connected together electrically in series. The plug of each curler connects to the socket 42 of the next curler in the chain. The plug 45' of one curler H1 at one end of the chain engages in a socket 49 of an electrical connector 50 at the end of a two-wire power supply cord 51. The socket 42 of the curler H1" at the other end of the chain is engaged by a plug 52 on connector 50. A switch 53 may be provided in circuit with the cord 51 for turning on and off the electrical energy supply to the series connected heater coils 40. Cord 51 terminates in a plug 54 which can be plugged into a suitable outlet of an electrical energy electrical supply source.

In use of the curlers, individual locks L of a persons hair ready for curling and setting, generally in a wet condition, will be wound around each curler body 30. Then the frame 32 will be clamped on the curler body to hold the hair curl in place. The several curler bodies will then be connected together in series as shown in FIG. 2 and the power supply cord will be attached. Plug 54 will be connected to a suitable power supply and the switch 53 will be turned on. The curlers H1 will heat up quickly and will heat the hair curls in turn. The moist curls will dry out quickly and will be set in curled condition. The frames 32 will then be removed and the curled hair will be taken off the curler bodies. The hair will be left in a set curled condition.

The heated curler assemblies operate quickly. They require no long processing or elaborate setting and drying apparatus. The curler assemblies can be used at home by women to set their hair in a few minutes. This avoids having to wear unsightly and uncomfortable hair curlers for long periods of time. The electrically heated hair curlers are inexpensive to manufacture, light in weight and require no particular skill to use. They are prefectly safe and the user cannot experience burns or other injury to skin or hair.

In FIGS. 3 and 3A is shown another electrically heated hair curler H2 in which the cylindrical heater body 36a includes a soft plastic pad normally maintained in a rolled up condition. The pad includes a pair of springy strips 61, 62 embedded in opposite edges of the plastic pad and biased to a rolled or coiled condition. A resistance heater wire 48a is also embedded in the plastic pad and is arranged in coiled rows so that it is distributed throughout the pad. Opposite ends 41a, 43a of wire 40a extend out of the outer end of the rolled up pad and terminate in socket 42a and plug 45a. A plurality of curlers H2 can be connecdet in series in the same manner as described in connection with hair curlers H1. A springy clamping frame 32a similar to clamping frame 32 is provided for engaging the pad 60, when a lock of hair is enclosed in the pad. This frame has longitudinal bars 48a joined to arcuate springy end bars 46a, 47a, in a manner similar to the structure of frame 32.

In use of the hair curler H2, the pad will be unrolled and manually held against tension in strips 61, 62. The lock L1 of hair indicated by dotted lines will be placed on the unrolled pad which will then be released so that the pad rolls up lock of hair into a tight curl. Then the clamping frame 32a will be snapped on the cylindrical body 3011 defined by the rolled up pad and will hold the hair securely in place in the pad. The coiled wire 40a can then be energized by applied electric energy to heat the curled lock of hair and set it in curled condition.

In FIGS. 4 and is shown a hair curler body 301; of an electrically heated hair curler H3 which includes a soft hollow plastic pad 66a filled with an electrically conductive salt solution 64. This solution has rather high resistance to serve as an electrical heater element in the curler body. Springy strips 61a, 62a are embedded in opposite lateral edges of the pad and are biased to coiled position. At opposite edges of the outer end of the pad are wires 41b and 43b extending into the pad to contact the electrically conductive salt solution in two spaced positions. Socket 42b and plug 45b are connected to ends of the respective wires. Pad 60a of curler body 3017 normally assumes a coiled position in the same manner as described in connection with curler body 30a. A lock L2 of hair will be placed in the unrolled curler body and will curl up with the released curler body.

Clamping frame 32a can then be applied to the rolled u curler body 301) to complete the curler assembly and hold the curled lock L2 in place. In both curler assemblies H2 and H3 the hair curl is heated uniformly along its circumferential length, rather than radially outward as in curler H1.

FIG. 6 shows electrically heated curlers H4 which are similar to curlers H1 and corresponding parts are identically numbered. In each of curler bodies 300 is a single insulated cord 65 containing opposite ends of electrical resistance coil 40c, pass out through end ring 360 and terminate in a tWo-pronged plug 450. A plurality of these plugs can be inserted into interconnected sockets 49c of an electrical connector Stia at the end of power cord 51a.

As shown in circuit C1 of FIG. 6A opposite ends 41c and 430 of coils 4510 terminate in plugs 450 which are insertable into sockets 4% having contacts located at the ends of wires 66a, 66b in power cord 51a. The power cord terminates in power plug 54a and can be connected to a suitable power supply. The arrangement of curlers H4 enables them to be connected in parallel to the power supply as contrasted with the arrangement of curlers H1 which are in series.

In FIG. 7 is shown a hair curler assembly H5 having a hollow cylindrical curler body 30d upon which can be engaged a cylindrically curved clamping frame 32c. Electrical resistance coil itld is embedded in the flexible, plastic body 30d. Opposite ends 41d, 43d of the coil 40d are connected to wires 1G8, 1G9 in electric power supply cord 110. In assembly H5 heating of a lock of hair curled on body 30d is efiected from the outside in rather than inside out as in curlers H1, H4.

In hair curler H6 of FIG. 8 the cylindrical curler body 30e has corrugations 112 so that the body surface is sinuous in the axial direction of the body Site. The cylindrically flexible curved clamping frame 3212 has similar mating corrugations 114, being convex on its inner surface where the outside of the hollow body 3% is concave and being concave where the body 30e is convex. The electrical resistance heating coil 4% is embedded in the flexible plastic body of the clamping frame 32c and electric power supply cord 116a is connected to opposite ends of this coil.

In hair curler assembly H7 of FIG. 9, the hollow cylindrical curler body 30 has knobs or projections distributed around and along the outside of the hollow body. Mating recesses 116 are formed in the flexible plastic clamping frame 311 Power cord lltlb is connected to opposite ends of coil 40f embedded in the plastic body of the frame 30].

The hair curler assemblies H6 and H7 are useful for producing novel and usual undulations and projections in hair curls set by use of these curler assemblies.

Hair curler assembly H8 of FIG. 10 has a rigid solid cylindrical body 30g in which is embedded electrical resistance coil 40g. Opposite ends of this coil are connected to Wires 41g, 43g which extend away from opposite ends of the body 30g. These wires can be terminated in a socket and plug respectively as shown in curler body 30 of FIG. 1. The clamping frame 32g may be made of metal or plastic material shaped to semicylindrical form. The frame has a central section 122 which extends slightly more than 180 to engage securely on the body 30g. The frame is provided with outwardly flared edges 124 to facilitate engaging the frame on the body 30g.

In electrically heated curler assembly H9 of FIG. 11, a solid cylindrical curler body 36th is provided in which is electrical resistance coil 40h. Opposite ends of this coil are connected to electrical contact rings 125, 126 at opposite ends of the curler body and are also connected to external wires 41h, 43h. The rings are contacted by contacts 120, 130 in springy fingers 133, 134 at opposite ends of the flexible clamping frame 32h when this frame is engaged on body 31th. Frame 36h is made of plastic material in Which is embedded an electrical resistance coil 40h. Opposite ends of coil 46h are connected to contacts 133, 134.

As shown by circuit C2 of FIG. 11A, the contacts 133, 134 engage the contact rings 125, 126 and connect coil 40h in parallel with coil 4011 so that both the clamping frame and curler body heat up simultaneously to set a curled lock of hair therebetween. Heating takes place radially from the inside out and then outside in in the assembly H9. A plurality of assemblies H9 can be connected in series in the same manner as shown in FIGS 1 and 2 by attachment of sockets 42 and plugs 45 respectively to ends of wires 41h, 43h.

In FIGS. 1215 is shown one manner in which a plurality of curler bodies 30g of the type described in connection with curler assembly H8 can be connected in series. A flexible rubber or plastic socket is provided at the end of the jacket 142 enclosing wire 41g which is connected to one end of electrical resistance heater coil 40g. A hard rubber or plastic knob or ball 144 is provided at the end of jacket 146 enclosing wire 43g connected to the other end of coil 40g. Wire 41g terminates in an electrical contact 148 inside of socket 140. Wire 43g terminates in an electrical contact 150 at the end of knob 144. The knob can be snapped into clamping engagement with socket 140 which is somewhat more than a hollow hemisphere. The edge 141 of the socket can be beveled to facilitate entry of the knob 144. When the knob of each assembly H8 is connected to the socket of the next assembly the coils 40g of the curler assemblies are connected in series as each contact 148 engages a contact 150. The sockets can easily be pulled apart to detach the curlers from each other.

In all forms of the invention described, there is pro vided a cylindrical body hollow or solid upon which a lock or strand of hair can be wound. Waving or setting lotion can be applied before or after the hair is wound on the cylindrical body. A clamping frame is applied and then heat is applied by applying electric energy to a resistance heater element in the cylindrical body for clamping 75 frame or both body and frame.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise constructions herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An electrically heated hair curler assembly, comprising a cylindrical body member upon which a lock of hair can be wound, said member including a pair of circular end rings, axially extending bars joined at their ends to the rings, an electrical resistance wire element wound around the bars of said body member, a cylindrically curved flexible clamping frame member engageable on said body in coaxial alignment to engage the wound lock of hair therebetween under spring pressure, and means for applying electric energy to said wire element for heating the same.

2. An electrically heated hair curler assembly, comprising a cylindrical body member upon which a lock of hair can be wound, said member including a pair of circular end rings, axially extending bars joined at their ends to the rings, an electrical resistance wire element wound around the bars of said body member, a cylindrically curved flexible clamping frame member engageable on said body in coaxial alignment to engage the wound lock of hair therebetween under spring pressure, said frame member including a pair of arcuate springy end bars, a plurality of straight bars joined at their ends to the arcuate bars; and means for applying electric energy to said Wire element for heating the same.

3. An electrically heated hair curler assembly, comprising a cylindrical body member upon which a lock of hair can be wound, said member including a pair of circular end rings, axially extending bars joined at their ends to the rings, an electrical resistance wire element wound around the bars of said body member, a cylindrically curved flexible clamping frame member engage-able on said body in coaxial alignment to engage the wound lock of hair therebetween under spring pressure, said frame member including a pair of arcuate springy end bars, a plurality of straight bars joined at their ends to the arcuate bars, wires connected to opposite ends of said resistance element and extending away from said body member and frame member, a plug at one end of one wire, and a socket at the other end of the other wire, whereby a plurality of hair curler assemblies may be connected together with their electrical resistance elements connected electrically in series.

4. An electrically heated hair curler assembly, comprising a cylindrical body member upon which a lock of hair can be wound, said member including a pair of circular end rings, axially extending bars joined at their ends to the rings, an electrical resistance wire element Wound around the bars of said body member, a cylindrically curved flexible clamping frame member engageable on said body in coaxial alignment to engage the wound lock of hair therebetween under spring pressure, said frame member including a pair of arcuate springy end bars, a plurality of straight bars joined at their ends to the arcuate bars; a power supply cord having two wires connected to opposite ends of said resistance element and extending away from one end of the body member and frame member, and an electrical connector at the end of said two wires for connection to an electrical power source to supply electric energy to the resistance element for heating the same.

5. An electrically heated hair curler assembly, comprising a cylindrical body member upon which a lock of hair can be wound, said member including a pair of circular end rings, axially extending bars joined at their ends to the rings, an electrical resistance wire element wound around the bars of said body member, a cylindrically curved flexible clamping frame member engageable on said body in coaxial alignment to engage the wound lock of hair therebetween under spring pressure, said frame member including a pair of arcuate springy end bars, a plurality of straight bars joined at their ends to the arcuate bars; wires connected to opposite ends of said resistance element and extending away from said body member and frame member, a plug at one end of one wire, and a socket at the other end of the other wire, whereby a plurality of hair curler assemblies may be connected together with their electrical resistance elements connected electrically in series, said plug being a knob-like member having an electrical contact at one end connected to said one wire, said socket being a flexible insulated cup shaped member engageable in said socket, said socket having another electrical contact therein for contacting the first named electrical contact, said other electrical contact being connected to the other wire.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,052,353 8/1936 Kiss 132-36 2,558,305 6/1951 Marvin 132-39 FOREIGN PATENTS 74,410 6/1952 Denmark.

RICHARD A. GAUDET, Primary Examiner.

L. W. TRAPP, Examiner,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2052353 *Jul 26, 1935Aug 25, 1936Electricitatsgesellschaft SaniHair waving apparatus
US2558305 *Mar 25, 1946Jun 26, 1951Marvin Lillian JeanHair curler
DK74410A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3431917 *Jun 30, 1966Mar 11, 1969Harris Mechell FHair drying hair roller
US3908672 *Mar 8, 1974Sep 30, 1975OrealNovel process for improving and modifying the properties of hair
US4147921 *Sep 9, 1977Apr 3, 1979Clairol Inc.Heat treating articles
US4388936 *Mar 22, 1982Jun 21, 1983Roberts Shephard DCombination applicator-dispenser hair styler
US4619280 *Mar 14, 1983Oct 28, 1986Ludmila YampolskayaCut and style--device for fashion haircutting-hairshaping and hairstyling
US4714820 *Aug 22, 1985Dec 22, 1987Clairol IncorporatedElectrically heated curling wrapper
US5551457 *Nov 15, 1994Sep 3, 1996Williamson; Diane L.Hairstyling rod
US6647989 *Mar 21, 2000Nov 18, 2003Alfredo De BenedictisHair treatment device and method
US8517034 *Dec 16, 2009Aug 27, 2013L'orealPermanent reshaping process using a heating mechanical tensioning device
US8684012 *May 31, 2012Apr 1, 2014Denise Lynn RyanRemote control rollers
US20120060858 *Apr 21, 2010Mar 15, 2012Elc Management LlcInfrared Emitting Hair Roller And Methods Of Use
USRE35287 *Sep 2, 1993Jul 2, 1996Caruso; RichardHair curler
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/252, 219/222, D28/37
International ClassificationA45D4/12, A45D4/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D4/12
European ClassificationA45D4/12