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Publication numberUS3347310 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateOct 21, 1964
Priority dateOct 21, 1964
Publication numberUS 3347310 A, US 3347310A, US-A-3347310, US3347310 A, US3347310A
InventorsWilliam E Lind, Bert J Mitchell
Original AssigneeFrigikar Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchangers
US 3347310 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1967 w. E. LlND ETAL 3,347,310

HEAT EXCHANGERS & m

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INVENTORS William E.-Lind BEIfT J. Mitchel! BY Maya Y ATTORNEYS Oct. 17, 1967 w. E. LIND ETAL 0 HEAT EXCHANGERS Fi led Oct. 21, 1964 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Figs William E. Lind 8851 J. Mitchell BY Wm? 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS lLmd William E.

6 Bart). Mitchell w. E. LIND ETAL HEAT EXCHANGERS Oct. 17, 1967 Filed Oct. 21, 1964 United States Patent l 3,347,310 HEAT EXCHANGERS William E. Lind and Bert J. Mitchell, Dallas, Tern, assignors to Frigikar Corporation, Dallas, Tern, a corporation of Texas Filed Get. 21, 1964, Ser. No. 405,380 Claims. (Cl. 165124) This invention relates to heat exchangers.

An object of this invention is to provide a new and improved heat exchanger through which airmay be circulated to transfer heat to or from the circulated air.

Another object is to provide a heat exchanger having parallel heat exchanger assemblies each having conduit means through which a heat transporting fluid may be circulated, the assemblies permitting flow of air perpendicularly therethrough, whereby heat may be transferred between the air flowing therethrough and the heat transporting fluid.

Still another object is to provide a heat exchanger having means for moving air perpendicularly in one direction through middle portions of the two heat exchanger assemblies and simultaneously perpendicularly in the opposite direction through outer end portions of the two assemblies whereby air may be circulated through the heat exchanger inwardly through either the outer end portions of the two spaced assemblies and then outwardly through the middle portions or inwardly through the middle portions of the two assemblies and then outwardly through the outer end portions of the two assemblies. A further object is to provide a heat exchanger wherein the rate of flow of air through the middle portions of the assemblies is different than the rate of flow of the air through the end portions whereby the rate of transfer of heat between the air and the heat transporting fluid may be maintained substantially constant at all portions of the assemblies.

A still further object is to provide a heat exchanger which may be mounted on a vehicle to permit air to flow therethrough due to the movement of the vehicle and which has means for circulating air through the heat exchanger when the vehicle is not moving or moving very slowly.

A still further object is to provide a heat exchanger mountable on a vehicle whose air moving means, such as fans or blowers, are not caused to rotate or windmill due to the movement of air therepast when the vehicle is moving or due to wind blowing therepast when the vehicle is not moving.

An important object of the invention is to provide a heat exchanger which may be used as the evaporator unit of a refrigerant system to maintain a low temperature in a chamber, such as theinterior of a truck.

Still another object is to provide a chamber having a heat exchanger mounted therein which provides proper circulation of the air throughout all portions of the chamber whereby a predetermined substantially uniform temperaturemay be maintained in all portions of the chamber.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the reading of the following description of a device constructed in accordance with the invention, and reference to the accompanying drawings thereof, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side view, with some parts broken away, of a heat exchanger embodying the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a top view, with some parts broken away, of the heat exchanger;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4- is a perspective view showing the heat exchanger mounted on a vehicle;

3,3413% Patented Oct. 17, 1967 FIGURE 5 is a schematic vertical sectional illustration of the truck body having the heat exchanger embodying the invention installed therein for use as the evaporator unit of a refrigerant apparatus;

FIGURE 6 is a schematic sectional illustration taken on line 66 of FIGURE 5; and

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view taken on line 7-7 of FIGURE 6.

Referring now to the drawings, a heat exchanger 10 embodying the invention is shown in use as the condenser of a refrigerating apparatus employed to cool and condense refrigerant gas compressed by a compressor of the apparatus prior to its transmission to another heat exchanger of the apparatus wherein the condensed refrigerant gas evaporates and expands. The condenser 10 is mounted on the top of a truck or other vehicle V to permit air to circulate therethrough either due to the movement of the vehicle or due to the operation of the fan motor 12.

The condenser includes a base or support plate 14 having a plurality of resilient suction cups 15, secured thereto by means of the screws 16, by means of which the condenser may be mounted on the vehicle. The condenser may also be secured to the vehicle by additional other means such as straps, clamps and the like.

The condenser includes a front heat exchanger assembly 17 whose tubes or coils 18 extend through suitable apertures in and are expanded to bond to the usual spaced vertical heat conductor fins 20. The coils 18 also extend through apertures in and are suitably mounted on vertical support brackets 22 and 23 of the assembly disposed on opposite ends of the fins. The coils 13a of the front row are connected in series and the coils 18b of the rear or inner row are also connected in series. The support brackets 22 and 23 have transversely outwardly extending vertical flanges Z4 and 25, respectively, which extend downwardly within the front vertical flange 26 of the base 14 and are rigidly secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by the self tapping screws 28.

A similar rear heat exchanger assembly 29 includes a plurality of tubes or coils 3%) which extend through suitable apertures in and are expanded to bond to the usual heat conductor fins 31. Opposite ends of the tubes 30 extend through suitable apertures in the transversely spaced support brackets 32 and 33. The front or inner tubes Site are connected in series and the rear tubes 3% are similarly connected in series. The support brackets 32 and 33 have vertical flanges 34 and 35, respectively, which extend inwardly of the vertical rear flange 35 of the base and are rigidly secured thereto by the screws 36.

Hot compressed refrigerant gas is conducted to the upper ends of the two top tubes 36a and 3% of the rear heat exchanger assembly by an inlet conduit 40 which extends through a suitable aperture 42 in the flange 34 of the support bracket 32 and the cooled and condensed refrigerant gas is conducted from the two bottom tubes of the front heat exchanger assembly through the outlet conduit 43 which extends through a suitable aperture .5 in the flange 34. The bottom ends of the two bottom tubes Slla and 30b are connected to the two top tubes 18 of the front heat exchanger assembly by two connector conduits 47a and 47b. The tubes of the two heat exchanger assemblies, are thus connected in series. The refrigerant gas which flows through the outer tubes 30b of the rear heat exchanger assembly thus flows to the top tube 181') and then through the inner tubes 18b of the front heat exchanger assembly while the refrigerant gas which flows through the inner tubes 30a of the rear heat exchanger assembly thus flows to the top tube 18a and then through the outer tubes 18a of the front heat exchanger assembly.

The usual pressure responsive control means 48 of the refrigerating apparatus, which controls the operation of the fans, is rigidly secured to an angle support bracket 49 whose opposite ends are rigidly secured to the brackets 22 and 32 by the screws 51. The conduit 47a has a T- fitting 52 connected therein by means of which the pressure of the gas in the coils is communicated through a suitable fitting 53 to the pressure responsive control means.

It will be apparent that the refrigerant gas compressed by the usual compressor of the apparatus in flowing through the coils of the rear and front heat exchanger assemblies is cooled and condensed and the flows to the usual reservoir of the refrigerating appartus from which it may be conducted to the evaporator coils of another heat exchanger wherein the condensed refrigerant gas is allowed to evaporate and expand to cool a chamber of the vehicle in which such other heat exchanger is located.

The fins of the front heat exchanger assembly are protected against damage by a grill 55 formed of suitable wires, which are welded or otherwise secured to one another. The lower end portion of the grill extends between the fins 20 and the front flange 26 of the base and its upper rearwardly extending upper end portion 56 extends over the upper ends of the fins. The rear heat exchanger assembly is similarly protected by a grill 58 Whose lower end portion extends inwardly of the vertical rear flange of the base and whose upper end portion 59 extends forwardly over the upper ends of the fins 31. If desired, at least the lowermost bottom horizontal wires of the grills may be provided with hook ends 59a which hook or extend about the flanges or the adjacent support brackets of the support assemblies to prevent transverse movement of the grills.

A cover 60 extends over the heat exchanger assemblies and includes a top horizontal wall 61 which rests on the resilient insulator pads or strips 62 and 63 disposed on the upper inner portions of the fins 20 and 30, respectively, inwardly of the top end portions 56' and 59 of the protector grills. The cover also has side walls 66 and 67 which telescope over the vertical side flanges 69 and 70 of the base and are rigidly secured thereto by screws 72.

The space between the forward and rear heat exchangers assemblies and between the cover cooperating therewith and the base is divided into three passages 75, 76 and 77 by a pair of orifice plates 78 and 79. Each of the orifice plates has a horizontal bottom flange 80 which rests upon and is rigidly seured by screws 81 to the base plate 14, and front and rear vertical flanges 82 and 83 which abut the inner sides of the fins 20 and 30, respectively, of the two heat exchanger assemblies. The top horizontal flanges 85 of the orifice plates are rigidly secured to the top wall 61 by means of screws 89 which extend through suitable apertures in the cover into suitable nuts 90 rigidly secured to the top flanges. Suitable insulator pads or gaskets 91 may be interposed between the top flanges and the inner surface of the horizontal wall 61 of the cover.

The orifice plates 78 and '79 have apertures or orifices 93 and 94, respectively, in which are rotatably disposed the fans 96 and 97 rigidly secured to opposite ends of the drive shaft 99 of the blower motor 12.

The motor is rigidly mounted on the base by a pair of mount brackets 101 and 102 whose horizontal flanges 103 and 104, respectively, are rigidly secured to the base plate by means of bolts 105 which extend through suitable slots 106 in the horizontal flanges and suitable apertures in the base. The motor is disposed between and secured to the mount brackets by means of suitable bolts 107. Suitable washers 110 and/ or rubber mounts may be interposed between the mount brackets and the motor. The drive shaft 99 extends through suitable upwardly opening slots 111 provided in the mount brackets.

The blades of the fans 97 and 96 are of opposite pitch so that when the drive shaft revolves in a counter-clockwise direction, FIGURE 3, air is moved from the end passage 75 through the orifice 93 of the orifice plate 78 by the fan 96 into the middle passage 76 and simultaneously air is moved by the fan 97 from the other end passage 77 through the orifice 94 into the middle passage 76. As a result, during the operation of the motor, air is drawn inwardly through the outer end portions of both the front and rear heat exchanger assemblies into the end passages 75 and 77, thence through the orifices 93 and 94 of the orifice plates into the middle passage 76 and then forwardly and rearwardly from the middle passage through the middle portions of the forward and rear heat exchanger assemblies. During the passage of the air through the heat exchanger assemblies it absorbs heat from the coil and the fins thereof and therefor from the hot refrigerant gas flowing through the coils.

If the passages 75, 76 and 77 are of the same lengths, as illustrated in the drawings, the air moves outwardly from the middle passage through the middle portions of the forward and rear heat exchanger assemblies at twice the rate as it is moved through the outer end portions of the heat exchanger assemblies into the end passages since the air moved by both the fans must flow outwardly through the middle portions. This difference in the rate or volume per unit of time of flow of air through the outer end portions and the middle portions of the heat exchanger assemblies increases the efficiency of the heat exchanger since the temperature of the air flowing through the outer end portions of the coil assemblies into the end passages 75 and 77 increases as it absorbs heat from the hot refrigerant gas in the coils and the air flowing outwardly from the middle passage through the middle portions of the heat exchanger assemblies is therefore of a higher temperature. The increased rate of flow of air through the middle portions of the heat exchanger assemblies thus compensates for its higher temperature and ensures proper transfer of heat from the refrigerant gas to the air, it being apparent that the rate of transfer of heat varies not only with the difference in the temperatures of the air and the refrigerant gas but also with the volume of air per unit of time moving through the middle and end portions of the heat exchanger assemblies.

In use, the motor, which may be controlled by a suitable switch is operated only when the truck is moving very slowly or is stationary. When the vehicle is traveling at a normal speed, the ram effect of the air causes it to flow directly rearwardly through the forward heat exchanger assembly, through the three passages, and then through the rear heat exchanger in assembly. The air absorbs heat from the refrigerant gas in passing through the coils. The refrigerant gas in the rear coils of the rear assembly is, of course, at a higher temperature than the refrigerant gas flowing through the coils of the front assembly.

The blades of the fans 96 and 97 being of opposite pitch, even in number, for example, four, and rotatable about an axis which is perpendicular to the direction of flow of air through the passages during the normal movement of the vehicle, such ram flow of air therepast does not cause the fans to rotate thus minimizing wear of the bearings which support the drive shaft. The opposed pitch of the blades of the two fans balances the longitudinal thrust on the drive shaft and therefore on the bearings which support the drive shaft during the rotation of the drive shaft.

In use, when the vehicle is stationary and the refrigerating apparatus is in operation, the motor 12 is connected to the battery of the vehicle by a suitable switch means in order to circulate the air through the heat exchanger assemblies in the manner described to cause the hot compressed refrigerant gas flowing through the coils of the heat exchanger assemblies to cool and condense. If the vehicle is traveling at such speed that the rate of flow of air through the front heat exchanger assembly, the passages 75, 76, and 77 and then the rear'exchanger assembly, is sufliciently great to cool and condense the:

refrigerant gas flowing through the coils of the heat exchanger assemblies, the motor 12 is not energized. During this normal operation of the heat exchanger when the motor 12 is not in operation, the air flows through all portions of the front heat exchanger assembly into the passages, and during its passage through the front heat exchanger unit its temperature is increased due to the absorption of heat from the refrigerant gas in the coils 18 so that this air flowing through the rear heat exchanger assembly is at a higher temperature than the air flowing through the front heat exchanger unit. However, the temperature of the refrigerant gas in the coils 30 is higher than the temperature of the refrigerant gas flowing through the coils 18 and therefore the temperature differential between the air flowing through the front heat exchanger and the refrigerant gas in the coils 3t) and thus both heat exchanger assemblies tend to transfer substantially equal amounts of heat from the refrigerant gas to the air.

It will now be seen that the heat exchanger embodying the invention includes a front heat exchanger means through which air is movable to absorb heat from a fluid flowing through the coils 18 of the front heat exchanger means or assembly 17, a rear heat exchanger assembly 29 spaced rearwardly of the front heat exchanger means, through which air is movable to absorb heat from fluid flowing through its coils 30, means such as the cover 60, the base 14 and the two orifice plates 78 and 79, defining the space between the two heat exchanger means into three passages, and an air moving means, such as the fans 96 and 97, for moving air between the middle passage and the end passages when the air moving means is in operation and therefore through end and middle portions of the two heat exchanger means.

It will further be seen that during the travel of the vehicle at relatively high speeds, the air which moves through the front heat exchanger unit is warmed by the absorption of heat from the refrigerant gas circulating therethrough and then flows through the rear heat exchanger unit and that the two heat exchanger assemblies thus function as a single unit but since the volume of the air flowing therethrough per unit of time is relatively great, the required cooling of the refrigerant gas easily takes place It will further be seen that when the air is being circulated through the heat exchanger by the operation of the fans, the two heat exchanger assemblies in effect operate as separate units with fresh air being circulated through each heat exchanger assembly without also being circulated through the other so that the air flowing through either heat exchanger assembly has not been previously warmed by flowing through the other whereby the required cooling of the refrigerant gas flowing through the heat exchanger assemblies takes place even though the volume of air flowing through each assembly per unit of time may be considerably smaller than when the vehicle is traveling at a normal speed over the highway and ram flow of air is taking place through the heat exchanger assembly.

It will further be seen that while particular connections have been illustrated and described between the tubes of the two heat exchanger assemblies to provide a particular pattern of circulation of the hot refrigerant gas therethrough, that different patterns of circulation of the refrigerant gas through these tubes may be provided as required or made desirable by particular installation. For example, the two rows of tubes of each heat exchanger assembly may be connected in series, instead of in parallel as illustrated and described, for series flow of the refrigerant gas therethrough, it being preferable, however, whenever the heat exchanger is used as the condenser of a refrigeration apparatus, that the hot refrigerant gas be circulated first through the tubes of the rear heat exchanger assembly before being circulated through the tubes of the front heat exchanger assembly ti in order that a substantially uniform heat differential be maintained between the air flowing through the two heat exchanger assemblies and the hot refrigerant gas being circulated therethrough.

Referring now to FIGURES 5, 6 and 7 of the drawings the heat exchanger 1061 which is shown in use as the evaporator unit of a refrigeration apparatus to cool the interior or chamber 2'00 of a truck 201, is similar to the heat exchanger 10, and accordingly, its elements have been provided with the same reference numerals, to which the subscript a has been added, as the corresponding elements of the heat exchanger 10. The heat exchanger ltla is secured to the top wall or roof 204 of the truck body by means of a pair of support angle members 205 and 206 whose vertical flanges are secured to the vertical flanges 26a and 35a of the support plate 14a by means of bolts or screws 28a and 36a, respectively. The horizontal flanges of the angle members, whose top surfaces abut the bottom surface of the roof of the truck, are rigidly secured to the roof in any suitable manner, as by bolts 208.

The horizontal wall 61a of the cover 60a of the heat exchanger is provided with upwardly extending vertical flanges 265 and 210 which extend between the vertical side walls 66a and 67a of the cover. The insulator pads or gaskets 91a, which are interposed between the horizontal cover wall 61a and the horizontal flanges 85a of the orifice plates 78 and 79 may be provided with apertures or passages 212 through which the condensate draining off the tubes may flow to a condensate duct, connected to the horizontal cover wall 61a, which opens to a suitable aperture 215 of the horizontal wall. The condensate drain tube or conduit 214 may lie close to the horizontal wall 61a, its spacing therefrom being exaggerated in the drawings, in order that it not take up unnecessary space and that it not be exposed to physical damage,

Cooled liquified refrigerant gas is supplied to the tubes 18 and 30 of the two heat exchanger assemblies 17a and 2%, respectively, through the conduit. 40a which may extend from the condenser of the refrigerator apparatus to the interior of the truck through a suitable aperture in a wall of the truck while the war-med and evaporated refrigerant gas after passing through the tubes flows to the compresser of the refrigeration apparatus through the conduit 43a which may also extend to the exterior of the truck through a suitable aperture in the truck wall. It will be appreciated that it is preferable that the refrigerant gas be conducted to the bottom tubes of the two heat exchanger assemblies through the conduit ttla which is connected to an end of each one of the tubes of the heat exchanger assemblies and that the refrigerant gas conduit 43a be connected to the other ends of the tubes of the two heat exchanger assemblies so that the tubes of the two assemblies are in effect connected in parallel between the two conduits 40a and 43a and the gas fiowing through, for example, the tubes 18 of one heat exchanger assembly does not flow through the tubes 30 of the other assembly and vice versa.

The heat exchanger ltla preferably extends substantially the length of the chamber 290 of the truck and occupies a very small cubic volume thereof. When the fans 96a and 97a are in operation, the air is drawn inwardly through the outer end portions of the two heat exchanger assemblies and into the end passages a and 77a, then through the orifices of the orifice plates 78a and 7% into the middle passage 76a and then outwardly in opposite directions through the middle portions of the two heat exchanger assemblies. It will be apparent that an effective circulation of the air throughout the chamber is obtained 'by the operation of the heat exchanger like since the cooled air as it flows laterally outwardly from the middle passage 76a, because it is now cold, tends to flow not only outwardly but also downwardly and the warm air which rises to the top of the truck is drawn in through both sides of the end passages 75a and 77a. Such uniform circulation of the air throughout the chamber 2&0 tends to maintain the temperature through all portions of the chamber substantially uniform.

It will further be seen that the heat exchanger may be used as a condenser to cause heat to be transferred from a refrigerant fluid flowing through the coils of the two exchanger assemblies to the air flowing therethrough, and also to cause heat to be transferred from the air flowing through the exchanger unit to a refrigerant fluid flowing through the coils of the two heat exchanger assemblies, whereby the heat exchanger may be employed as the evaporator unit of a refrigerant apparatus to cool air such as in a food compartment or chamber of a truck.

It will further be seen that the pitch of the blades of the two fans could be reversed so that upon rotation of the drive shaft, air would be moved inwardly into the middle passage 76 through the middle portions of the two heat exchanger assemblies, into the end passages 75 and 77, and thence outwardly through the outer end portions of the two heat exchanger assemblies. This reverse flow may be desired where the heat exchanger 10 is used to cool air being moved therethrough in order to provide a better circulation or distribution of the air in closed chamber such as a truck cab or the load compartment of a truck. In this case, the transverse length of the middle passage would be made preferably twice as long as the length of the two end passages 75 and 77 in order that the rate of flow of air through each outer end portion of each heat exchanger assembly be twice as great as' the flow of air into the middle passage through its middle portion since the air flowing outwardly from the outer end passages would, of course, be of a lower temperature than the air flowing into the middle passage through the middle portions of the heat exchanger assemblies.

It will further be seen that while the three passages 75, 76 and 77 of the heat exchanger have been described and illustrated as having lengths of particular ratios or relationship, that the relative lengths of these passages may be varied as made desirable by the particular circulation or heat exchanger requirements of different installations.

It will further be seen that while the two fans have been shown as being driven by a single motor, if desired, separate motors may be employed to drive the fans or air moving means which may be especially desirable if the middle passage is of considerable length.

It will further be seen that the flow of the refrigerant gas through the heat exchanger, whether it is used as the condenser or the evaporator of a refrigeration apparatus, and the operation of the fan motor may be controlled either by manually operable switches or by suitable automatic control devices, such as pressure or temperature responsive switches well known in the art.

It will also be seen that while the heat exchanger assemblies 17, 17a, 29 and 29a have been illustrated as including two vertical rows of tubes through which the refrigerant gas is circulated, each of such assemblies could have only a single row of tubes or two or more rows.

The foregoing descripteon of the invention is explanatory only, and changes in the details of the construction illustrated may be made by those skilled in the art, Within the scope of the appended claims, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical spaced heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetween said assemblies permitting flow of air perpendicularly therethrough between said space and the exterior thereof; means cooperating with said assemblies closing said space to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said assemblies; dividing means extending perpendicularly to and between said assemblies dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, said dividing means having apertures permitting air flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; and means for moving air between said middle passage and said end passages through said apertures.

2. The heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space there-between, each of said assemblies including tubular means extending substantially the length of said assemblies through which a heat transporting fluid may flow, said assemblies permitting flow of air perpendicularly therethrough between said space and the exterior thereof; means cooperating with said assemblies closing said space to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said heat exchanger assemblies; a pair of spaced plates extending between and perpendicular to said assemblies and dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, said plates having apertures permitting fluid flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; and air moving means disposed in said apertures and movable simultaneously for moving air between said middle passage and said end passages through said orifices.

3. A heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetwe en; means cooperating with said assemblies and closing said space at its top, bottom and ends to prevent air fiow into and from said space except through said heat exchanger assemblies; dividing means extending perpendicular to and between said assemblies and dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, air being movable between said end passages and the exterior of said heat exchanger through outer end portions of said assemblies and being movable between said middle passage and the exterior through middle portions of said assemblies, said dividing means having apertures permitting fluid flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; and means for moving air between said middle passage and said end passages through said apertures whereby when said air moving means is in operation air is moved through said outer end portions of said assemblies inwardly into said end passages and outwardly from said middle passage through said middle portions of said assemblies.

4. A heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetween, each of said assemblies including tubular means extending substantially the length of said assemblies through which a heat transporting fluid may flow, said assemblies permitting flow of air therethrough between said space and the exterior thereof; means cooperating with said assemblies and closing said space to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said heat exchanger assemblies; a pair of spaced plates extending between and perpendicular to said assemblies and dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, said plates having apertures permitting fluid flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; means for moving air through said apertures; and means for simultaneously driving said moving means.

5. A heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetween; means cooperating with said assemblies closing said space at its top, bottom and ends to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said heat exchanger assemblies; dividing means extending perpendicular to and between said assemblies and dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, air being movable between said end passages and the exterior of said heat exchanger through outer end portions of said assemblies and being movable between said middle passage and the exterior through middle portions of said assemblies, said dividing means having apertures permitting fluid flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; a drive means mounted in said middle passage and having a rotatable drive shaft; and air moving means driven by said drive means for moving air through said apertures from said end passages into said middle passage.

6. A heat exchanger mountable on the exterior of a vehicle in exposed position wherein movement of the vehicle causes ram flow of air through said heat exchanger, said heat exchanger including: an elongate base; front and rear longitudinally extending transversely spaced parallel vertical heat exchanger assemblies mounted on said base, said heat exchanger assemblies extending transversely to the direction of movement of a vehicle when the heat exchanger is mounted thereon; a cover disposed over the tops of said assemblies defining with said base and said assemblies a longitudinally extending space; air flowing through said front assembly into said space and from said space rearwardly to the exterior of said heat exchanger through said rear assembly when the vehicle is in motion; a pair of orifice plates in said space between said bottom and cover and between said assemblies dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, said passages being aligned longitudinally, air being movable between said middle passage and the exterior of the heat exchanger through middle portions of said assemblies between said orifice plates and being movable between each of said end passages and the exterior of the heat exchanger through outer end portions of said assemblies extending longitudinally outwardly of its adjacent orifice plate, said orifice plates having orifices communicating said middle passage with said end passages; drive means in said middle passage; and air moving means driven by said drive means for simultaneously moving air between said middle passage and each of said end passages through said orifices.

7. The heat exchanger of claim 8 wherein said air moving means comprise fans operatively associated with said orifices rotatable about a longitudinal horizontal axis extending transverse to the direction of movement of a vehicle when the exchanger is mounted on the vehicle by said drive means for moving air into said middle passage from said end passages through said orifices.

8. A heat exchanger mounted in a chamber to a top wall defining the top of a chamber, said heat exchanger including: a pair of parallel vertical spaced heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetween, said assemblies permitting air fiow perpendicularly therethrough between said space and exterior thereof; means cooperating with said assemblies closing said space to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said assemblies; means extending perpendicularly to and between said assemblies dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages, said dividing means having apertures providing air flow between said middle passage and said end passages; and means for moving air between said middle passage and said end passages through said apertures whereby when said air moving means is in operation air is simultaneously moved inwardly into one of said middle passage and said end passages through certain portions of said heat exchanger assemblies and outwardly from the other of said middle passage and said end passages through other portions of said heat exchanger assemblie.

9. A heat exchanger mountable in a chamber to a top wall defining the top of the chamber, said heat exchanger including: a pair of elongate parallel spaced heat exchanger assemblies providing an elongate space therebetween and extending substantially one full dimension of said chamber, said assemblies permitting flow of air therethrough between said space and the exterior thereof perpendicularly to said one dimension; means cooperating with said assemblies closing said space to prevent air flow into and from said space except through said assemblies; means extending perpendicularly to and between said assemblies dividing said space into a middle passage and a pair of end passages; said dividing means having apertures providing for air flow between said middle passage and said end passages parallel to said assemblies; and means for moving air between said middle pasage and said end passages through said apertures.

10. The heat exchanger of claim '7, wherein each of said assemblies includes tubular means extending substantially the length of said assemblies through which a heat transporting fluid may flow, said tubular means of said front and rear assemblies being connected to cause heat conducting fluid to flow first through the tubular means of said rear assembly and then through the tubular means of said front assembly.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,877,905 9/1932 Le Grand -122 2,029,368 2/1936 Goldwaite 165-121 2,184,837 12/1939 Hemming 165-422 2,447,278 8/1948 Roper 62-259 2,977,774 4/1961 Ferris 62-212 2,995,906 8/1961 Brandimarte 165124 3,163,995 1/1965 Maier 165-44 ROBERT A. OLEARY, Primary Examiner. T. W. Assistant Examiner,

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3848428 *May 21, 1973Nov 19, 1974Vapor CorpAir conditioning system for a locomotive cab
US3885398 *Dec 10, 1973May 27, 1975Dawkins Claude WAir conditioning system for a motor home vehicle or the like
US3900301 *Jul 16, 1974Aug 19, 1975Metalul Rosu Cluj IntreprinderAir treatment apparatus
US3984224 *May 27, 1975Oct 5, 1976Dawkins Claude WAir conditioning system for a motor home vehicle or the like
US4051691 *Oct 5, 1976Oct 4, 1977Dawkins Claude WAir conditioning apparatus
US4909311 *May 12, 1988Mar 20, 1990Aisin Seiki Kabushiki KaishaEngine cooler
US5778832 *Apr 14, 1997Jul 14, 1998Kohler Co.Modular radiator for an engine-generator set
US5782290 *Nov 17, 1995Jul 21, 1998Cook; David R.Tubular heat exchange system
US6450133 *Sep 19, 2000Sep 17, 2002Solutions Jupiter Inc.Partitioned container for high output mobile generator
US7175399 *Jul 2, 2003Feb 13, 2007Minebea Co., Ltd.Serial ventilation device
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/124, 62/426, 62/239, 62/259.1
International ClassificationF25D19/00, F25B39/02
Cooperative ClassificationF25B39/02, F25D19/003
European ClassificationF25B39/02, F25D19/00B