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Publication numberUS3347450 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateJul 27, 1966
Priority dateJul 27, 1966
Publication numberUS 3347450 A, US 3347450A, US-A-3347450, US3347450 A, US3347450A
InventorsGodwin Owen L
Original AssigneeGodwin Owen L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin wrapper
US 3347450 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O. L. GODWIN COIN WRAPPER Oct. 17, 1967 Filed July 27, 1966 Il llh I l i 'IT I l I l 1||1 2 QQQQ QQMPQQQQQQQ Q.

QQQQQQAQQ QQQQQ 7. 00mn@ o 01o o o o o o o o o 1 3 11111 11,; 2 .111| 7 O. o o o @o o o o o o o 1 1 1 1 l 1 I I. 11| 1||.1 111 111/ 2T@ o o o o o o o o o `o o o o INVENTOR 'OWEN L .GoowlN makgrpwwr'xlj ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,347,450 COIN WRAPPER Owen L. Godwin, P.O. Box 397, Kissimmee, Fla. 32741 Filed July 27, 1966, Ser. No. 568,294 3 Claims. (Cl. 229-87.2)

ABSTRACT F THE DISCLOSURE This invention relates to a coin wrapper.

In many business enterprises which involve the handling of a large number of coins, the coins usually are counted and packaged in paper wrappers which facilitate their subsequent handling. Such wrappers which have been in general use in the past, have consisted generally of a sleeve member formed of a flexible, crimpable material, flattened to provide two overlying panels having a slit therethrough. The side edges form opposed folds which may be pressed toward each other to separate the two panels and simultaneously enlarge the slit in the wrapper. When the coins are inserted into the Wrapper, the panels are kept separated by maintaining pressure with the lingers on the side edges of the panels, and the wrapper is held in a vertical position with the bottom thereof resting on a hat surface. The coins then are inserted into the wrapper through the upper opening of the slit. As the coins are inserted into the wrapper, the wrapper assumes a cylindrical shape, conforming to the cylindrical shape of the stack of coins in the wrapper. After the requisite number of coins have been inserted into the wrapper, the ends thereof are folded against the outward faces of the coins on the end of the stack of coins, to close the ends of the wrapper.

In the conventional use of coin wrappers in the prior art, however, it has been found that such Wrappers have not been entirely satisfactory, in that often when a user of such wrappers presses the side edges of the closed wrapper toward each other to separate the two panels, instead of separating, the panels tend to bow transversely, maintaining the slit in the wrapper closed. The user then is required to manipulate the wrapper further in order to separate the panels. This additional effort required to manipulate the Wrapper into the open position is time consuming, which significantly impairs the eiiiciency of counting and packaging, particularly in instances where a large number of coins require handling.

It, therefore, is the principal object of this invention to provide a novel coin wrapper.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel coin wrapper which can be easily opened for the purpose of inserting coins therein.

A further object of this invention is to provide a novel coin wrapper of the type consisting of a flat sleeve member providing coeXtensive panel elements separable to receive coins therein, having a construction which facilitates the separation of the panel elements.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a novel coin wrapper of the type consisting of a flattened sleeve member, providing coeXtensive panel elements separable to receive coins therein, having a construction preventing the panel elements from bowing transversely when pressure is applied to the side edges of the sleeve mem-ber 3,347,450 Patented oct. 17, 1967 in the conventional manner, for the panel elements.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel coin wrapper having means to determine the level or nature of the coins contained in the wrapper.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved coin wrapper which may be easily manipulated to permit insertion ofthe coins to be Wrapped.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a novel coin wrapper which is simple in construction, easy to assemble and inexpensive to manufacture.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent to persons having skill in the art, from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a blank from which an embodiment of the invention can be formed;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the embodiment formed from the blank illustrated in FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 illustrates the same embodiment held in the open position;

FIGURE 4 is an end view of the embodiment illustrated in the closed position;

FIGURE 5 is an end view of the embodiment illustrated the purpose of separating in the open position;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of the embodiment in the open position, illustrating the manner by which the coins are inserted into the embodiment, and stacked therein; and

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of the embodiment loaded with a stack of coins, closed.

Briefly described, the present invention relates to a coin wrapper generally comprising a first panel, a second panel overlying the first panel, the panels having the side edges thereof adjoining to provide a slit therethrough, the panels being formed from a liexible material whereby the side edges of the panels may be moved together to separate the panels and enlarge the slit to receive coins therein and at least one of the panels having means for biasing the panels apart, whereby upon pressing the side edges of the panels toward each other, the panels will be caused to separate to enlarge the slit. According to a more specific embodiment of the invention, the biasing means comprises a longitudinally disposed crease line provided on the inner face of at least one of the panels between the side edges thereof, and the panels are formed of a flexible, crimpable material.

Referring to the drawing, there is illustrated an embodiment of the invention. FIGURE l illustrates a blank 10, from which the coin Wrapper is constructed. The blank 10 preferably is formed of a flexible, crimpable material such as paper, and has a substantially rectangular shape, including a top edge 11, a parallel bottom edge 12, and parallel side edges 13 and 14. The front face 15 of the blank is provided with parallel crease .lines 16, 17, 18 and 19, which are parallel to the side edges 13 and 14. The crease lines 17 and 19 provide panel members 20 and 21 which are equal in width, and a glue flap 2.2, formed along the free edge of the panel 21.

To construct the coin wrapper illustrated in FIG- URES 2 through 7, the glue flap 14 is first folded along crease line 19 so that it overlies panel member 21. After an adhesive is applied to the upper exposed surface of the glue rflap 14, as shown at 23, the blankis folded along crease line 17 so that the panel member 20 overlies panel member 21 and the portion of panel member 20' lying along side edge 13, overlies and is adhered to the adhesive strip 23 as best shown in FIGURES 2 and 4. With the `blank thus folded and secured together, the panel mem-bers 20 and 21 Will overlie each other to form a fiat sleeve member having a longitudinal slit therethrough,

having 'the ends thereof and the crease lines `14S and 18 will lie in opposed relation, as best illustrated in FIGURE 4. The crease lines provided on the inner faces of panel members 20 and 21 will tend to bias the panels apart so that when the side edges of the sleeve member are pressed together as shown in FIGURE 5, the panel members will tend to separate, enlarging the longitudinal slit instead of bowing transversely as pressure on the side edges is applied.

In the use of the embodiment illustrated in the drawing, the wrapper is held in one hand in a vertical position, and the side edges thereof are pressed together with the fingers, to separate the panel members 20 and 21, enlarging the longitudinal slit in the wrapper to the extent illustrated in FIGURE 5. The crease lines 16 and 18 will cause the panel members 20 and 21 to be biased apart, thereby preventing the panel members from moving together as pressure is applied by the fingers. When the wrapper slit has been opened a sufficient amount, the panel members 20 and 21 are maintained apart by the fingers, and the lower end of the wrapper is placed on a flat surface. The coins to be packaged then are inserted in the upper open end of the wrapper and are stacked at the lower end thereof, as illustrated in FIGURE 6'. When the wrapper has been loaded with the requisite number of coins, the ends are folded over the outer faces of the end coins, as illustrated in FIGURE 7. In an alternate method, the lower end of the wrapper can be closed after the first few coins have been loaded into the wrapper. In either event, it will be noted that as the coins are inserted and become stacked in the wrapper, the wrapper assumes a cylindrical form, conforming to the shape of the stack of coins loaded therein.

In order to be able to determine the level or the nature of the coins within the wrapper, a longitudinally extending series of perforations may be provided in the wrapper. As best seen in FIGURE 1, panel member 20 is provided with two series of perforations 24 and 25. The perforations in each series are equally spaced and the series of perforations 24 and 2S are staggered, to prevent weakening of the wrapper. Similarly, panel member 21 is provided with two series of perforations 26 and 27. The perforations in each of the series 26 and 27 are equally spaced, and the series are staggered similar to the series v 4 of perforations 24 and 25. As best illustrated in FIG- URES 6 and 7, the perforations in the wrapper permit the coins disposed within Vthe wrapper to be inspected for the purpose of determining the level of the coins and also the nature of the coins.

From the foregoing detailed description it will be evident that there are a number of changes, adaptations and modifications of the present invention which come within the province of those skilled in the art. However, it is intended that all such variations not departing from the spirit of the invention be considered as within the scope thereof as limited solely by the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A coin wrapper comprising a sleeve member including a first panel and a second panel overlying said first panel, said panels having the side edges thereof adjoining to provide a slit therethrough, said panels being formed of a flexible material whereby the opposite sides of said panels may be moved together to enlarge said slit to receive coins therein and at least one of said panels having means for biasing Said panels apart whereby upon moving the opposite sides of said panels toward each other, said panels will 'be caused to separate enlarging said slit, and said biasing means comprises a longitudinally disposed crease line provided on the interface of at least one of said panels between said side portions thereof.

2. A coin wrapper according to claim 1, wherein said panels are formed of a crimpable material.

3. A coin wrapper according to claim 1, wherein at least one of said panels is provided with a series of longitudinally disposed perforations.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 768,664 8/1904 Johnson 229-87.2 2,507,626 5/1950 Ekstrand 229-872 FOREIGN PATENTS 630 11/1899 Austria. 378,995 6/ 1907 France.

DAVID M. BOCKENE'K, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US768664 *May 23, 1903Aug 30, 1904Coin Counting Machine CompanyPaper carton for coin-containing packages.
US2507626 *Nov 1, 1943May 16, 1950Ekstrand Mfg Co IncMethod of making coin wrappers
AT630B * Title not available
FR378995A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4178735 *Jul 13, 1977Dec 18, 1979The Kendall CompanyMethod of sheathing catheter
US4905823 *Apr 14, 1989Mar 6, 1990Nasir KaraCoin holder
US5207612 *Sep 5, 1991May 4, 1993Graham WollastonCoin bander
US5595338 *Dec 2, 1994Jan 21, 1997Abler; Frederick F.Reusable container for a stack of coins
US6811075 *Dec 16, 2002Nov 2, 2004Printmark Industries, Inc.Coin wrapper and method of wrapping coins using coin wrapper
US7959001 *Aug 12, 2004Jun 14, 2011Miroslav SimonekWrapping for used chewing gum
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.2
International ClassificationG07D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D9/006
European ClassificationG07D9/00C2B