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Publication numberUS3347460 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1967
Filing dateJun 3, 1965
Priority dateJun 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3347460 A, US 3347460A, US-A-3347460, US3347460 A, US3347460A
InventorsDickson John
Original AssigneeDickson John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board
US 3347460 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,347,460 GAME BOARD .Iohn Dickson, 3855 Valley Hill Road, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 Filed June 3, 1965, Ser. No. 460,957 9 Claims. (Cl. 235-90) This invention relates to a game board, and more par ticularly to a game board for use with and a method of playing a game similar to cribbage.

The ancient and honorable games of cribbage is a game played with a cribbage board and a standard deck of 52 playing cards. The well known cribbage board contains several columns of holes in the surface of the board, the columns being arranged in parallel paths with arcuate sections at each end. The number of holes in each column amount to 121. A pair of pegs, receivable in the holes in the surface of the board, are used with the board to keep track of points won by the players, and the object of the game is for one player to traverse the entire column of 121 holes before his opponent or opponents.

Because of the nature of the game of cribbage, two or more players are required to play the game. In the stand- =ard game of cribbage, points are won and the pegs moved along the columns on two bases. The first of these is determined by cards dealt to each player and the manner in which they are evaluated. The second is on the interplay of the cards dealt to the players.

The game board and method of play in which this invention is embodied provides a means by which a cribbage player can play alone, using most of the standard rules of cribbage, without requiring another or several other players. The board comprises, generally, a plurality of columns of holes in the surface of the board, the number of holes reaching 40 in each column. Also in the board are two other columns of holes, one of which relates to the number of times hands are dealt and the other of which relates to a means for scoring points lost in relation to the number of hands dealt. These latter two columns are coordinated in such a manner that upon having dealt a number of hands, the points lost for an average player will be a particular number. For the better than average player, less points will be lost for the number of deals, and for a worse than average player, more points Will be lost for the given number of deals. A plurality of pegs are provided to keep track of the points by their position in the various columns of holes in the surface of the board.

It is also contemplated that an overlay, received over a standard cribbage board having the usual 120 holes can be provided with two coordinated columns of holes formed in the overlay, the holes being in registry with the standard holes in the cribbage board. In using the overlay, the overlay covers all but 40 of the holes in the standard board so that the solitare game may be played with the standard board and overlay.

With either the specially formed board or the standard board and overlay combination, it is possible for a single person to play a game quite similar to the standard cribbage game and to score against an average, or norm, which has been predetermined. In this way, the player may not only gain enjoyment out of playing the game alone, but may also train himself in the evaluation of dealt hands in the same manner as he would in playing a standard game of cribbage with another or others. Thus, the device is not only an enjoyable game, but is also a training aid. With either the specially formed game board or the overlay and standard board combination, a normal game of cribbage can be played with others by simply traversing the various columns more than once to complete the usual 120 hole cycle.

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These and other advantages will become more apparent from the following description and drawing in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of a game board having holes in the surface thereof and with pegs in various positions therein;

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view with parts broken away and in section of the game board illustrated in FIGURE 1;

b FISURE 3 is a plan view of a typical cribbage game oar FIGURE 4 is a plan view of an overlay adapted to be received on the standard board illustrated in FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 is an elevational view of a standard board, such as illustrated in FIGURE 3, and an overlay such as illustrated in FIGURE 4, illustrating the position of the overlay relative to the board.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, FIGURES l and 2 best illustrate the game board and the position of the various holes therein. The board, illustrated generally by the numeral 10, may be of any suitable shape, although it is preferred that the board be rectangular. The board may be formed of any suitable material, such as wood, which may be easily provided with a series of holes. Game board 10 includes an upper surface 12, along one side of which is formed three columns of holes, illustrated generally by the numeral 14. Each of the columns of holes 14 include a series of forty holes 16 extending into the surface of the board 10. The columns extend along one side of the board 10, transversely or arcuately across the top of the board 10, and down the opposite side of the board 10 the extent necessary. The columns may, of course, be arranged in any other suitable configuration around the surface 12 of the board 10.

At the end of the columns 14 is a single hole 18, the purpose for which will become hereinafter more apparent, the hole 18 forming the hole 41 (indicating a game for one) for each of the columns 14.

Adjacent the opposite edge of the board 10 is a column of holes, illustrated by the numeral 20, formed in the surface 12. The number of holes 22 in the column 20 are predetermined in a manner to be hereinafter more particularly described.

Adjacent the column of holes 20 is a second column of holes, indicated by the numeral 24, each of the holes 26 being labeled by suitable indicia, such as the printed numbers indicated by the reference numeral 28.

All of the holes 16, 18, 22 and 26 are so formed in the surface of the board 10 and of sufficient dimension and depth to receive and support pegs, illustrated generally by the numeral 30, the pegs being of any suitable shape and construction. It may be desirable to provide different colored pegs for the various columns. For example, red pegs may be provided for the three-columns of holes 14, green pegs for the column 20 and a black peg for the column 24. Two pegs 30 may be provided for each of the columns 14, the pegs being moved in leap-frog fashion as the game is played.

For convenience, adjacent the initial end of the columns 14, holes 32 may be provided to receive the pegs 30 before the game is started. Similarly, a pair of holes 34 at the end of the column 20 and a single hole 36 at the end of the column 24 may be provided for similar purposes.

Formed within the board 10 and at one end thereof is a chamber 38 of sufficient size and depth to receive the pegs 30. This provides a convenient storage place for the pegs when the game board is not in use. Chamber 38 is closed by a slidable member 40, slidable in slots 42 formed in the board 10 along side surfaces of the chamber 38. Thus, the board may be inverted and the pegs 30 placed in a chamber 38, the sliding member 40 closing the 3 chamber by being slid into the slots 42 so that the board may be transported from place to place without losing the pegs 30.

The column of holes 20 and the column of holes 24 are arranged in a predetermined relationship, the column 24 indicating the number of deals of two or more hands, as will become hereinafter more apparent, and the column of holes 20 indicating the points lost as the game is played. The relationship is so determined that upon a particular number of deals, for example seven, the average, or par, in the scoring column 20 is the hole opposite the hole indicating the seventh deal. In other words, should one of the pegs in the column 20 be disposed above the hole adjacent the number seven deal, the player would be below average or worse than par. Should the peg be below the number seven deal hole, the player is better than average and better than par.

Referring next to FIGURES 3 through 5, a typical or standard cribbage board, indicated generally by the numeral 44, is illustrated, and includes a plurality of columns of holes, indicated by the numeral 46, the total numbering 120 holes in each column. Such a standard board 44 is usually provided with a leg of forty holes in the columns 46 along the left hand side of the board and prior to the arcuate turn at the end of the board.

An overlay member, illustrated generally by the numeral 48, is provided of suitable shape to be placed over the standard board 44 and covering all but forty of the peg holes in the standard board 44. Assuming a forty-hole leg along the left hand side of the board 44, the overlay 48 is of L shape, as illustrated in FIGURE 4, so that the forty-hole leg of the standard board 44 remains uncovered and the remaining eighty holes in the standard board 44 are covered. Overlay 48 may be formed of any suitable material such as plastic, cardboard, wood or the like. Extending downwardly from the undersurface of overlay 48 may be a plurality of pegs 50 which are received in suitable holes in the board 44 to hold the overlay 48 in place.

Overlay 48 is provided with a single hole 52 adjacent the end of the forty-hole leg in the board 44. This provides the hole 41, such as above-described with respect to hole 18 in the game board 10. Along the right side of overlay 48 is a column of points lost holes, indicated by the numeral 54, and adjacent the column 54 are the columns of number of deals holes, indicated by the numeral 56. Columns of holes 54 and 56 are so arranged as to be in registry with the holes in the game board 44 so that the pegs 30 may pass through the overlay 48 and into the holes in the columns 46 that are otherwise covered by the overlay 48. The holes in column 54 are coordinated with the holes in column 56 in the manner above-described. Game board 44 may be provided with a peg receiving chamber 58 covered by a sliding member 60 to retain the pegs used with the board 44 and overlay 48.

With reference to the board of FIGURES 1 and 2, and the board 44 and overlay 48 of FIGURES 3 through 5, the method of play will now be described. It is first necessary to remove the pegs 30 from the chamber in the board, and the pegs may be conveniently placed in the holes 32, 34 and 36. A standard deck of 52 playing cards is used, and for purposes of illustration it is assumed that a game similar to three-handed cribbage will be played. Three hands of five cards are dealt and the remainder of the deck of cards is placed aside. Each hand in turn is evaluated for point score in the well known manner, and one card is discarded or separated from the five cards in each hand. The remainder of the deck of cards is cut and the cut card exposed on the top. Then, each hand in turn is scored, using the four cards remaining in the hand and the exposed cut card on the deck of cards. As each hand is scored, the pegs 30 are moved in the columns 14 in accordance with the number of points contained therein. The discarded card from each hand is then returned to the hand, and the hand reevaluated, this time in combination with the exposed card on the remainder of the deck. Could one or more other cards have been discarded to gain more points, the maximum number of additional points that could have been obtained is scored in the points lost column 20 or 54, this computation being made for each of the three dealt hands. The cards are then reassembled in the deck, shuflied, and re-dealt, and the cycle is continued until the pegs in one of the three columns have traversed the forty holes in the column and reached the 41 hole. The remaining hands in the deal are reevaluated, points lost are scored, and the game is finished. As each hand is dealt, the peg in the deal column 24 or 56 is advanced to keep track of the number of hands dealt.

The game should be completed in eight deals and before the pegs in the points lost column 20 or 54 pass beyond the hole opposite the number eight deal. It has been determined that eight deals are normally sufficient to traverse the forty holes in the columns 14 and reach the 41 hole and the relationship between the number of deals and the points lost has been determined to establish a par or average number of points lost per deal for a typical player. It is readily apparent that the number of deals and the relationship may be changed in accordance with the degree of skill of the player using the board or overlay.

Thus, a game board and a method of play are provided that permits a cribbage player to play a game substantially the same as cribbage by himself and without the necessity of other players. The manner of play is of sufficient similarity to the game of cribbage that use of the board and method of play results not only in enjoyment for the player, but also in training and practice for the player. The game board is easily adapted to use for a standard game of cribbage, and if in the form of the overlay, is readily adaptable to a standard cribbage board to be easily mounted and demounted on a standard board for solitary or multiple play.

Numerous modifications and changes to the game board and overlay will become apparent to those having skill in the art after having had reference to the foregoing description and drawings. However, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention by the foregoing description and drawings but by the scope of the appended claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An overlay adapted to be used in combination with a standard cribbage board, said board having a plurality of apertures therein arranged in parallel rows, said overlay being receivable over said cribbage board and covering a portion of said board to leave some of the apertures in said board exposed, said overlay comprising:

a single aperture in said overlay adjacent the end of the exposed rows of apertures in said cribbage board;

a row of regularly spaced apertures in said overlay and in registry with apertures in said portion of said board covered by said overlay;

and a plurality of apertures in said overlay adjacent said row of regularly spaced apertures, at least some of said apertures being successively spaced in increasing increments and being aligned with preselected apertures in said row of apertures, said plurality of apertures being in registry with apertures in said portion of said board covered by said overlay, the number of said plurality of apertures in said overlay being fewer than the number of apertures in said row of apertures in said overlay.

2. The overlay set forth in claim 1 wherein said overlay is shaped to expose forty apertures in each of said parallel rows in said standard cribbage board.

3. The overlay set forth in claim 1 wherein the number of apertures in said row of apertures is at least nineteen.

4. The overlay set forth in claim 3 wherein said plurality of apertures are aligned with the first, second, third,

fifth, eighth, twelfth, and seventeenth apertures in said row of apertures.

5. The overlay set forth in claim 1 and further in cluding indicia on the surface of said overlay to identify plurality of apertures.

6. The overlay set forth in claim 1 and further including means for locating said overlay on said board With said apertures in said overlay in registry with said apertures in said board.

7. In combination:

a cribbage board having parallel rows of apertures in the surface thereof;

an overlay covering a portion of said cribbage board to leave a predetermined number of apertures exposed, said overlay having a row of regularly spaced apertures therein in registry With apertures in said portion of said board covered by said overlay and a row of irregularly spaced apertures in registry with others of the apertures in said portion of said board covered by said overlay and adjacent said row of regularly spaced apertures, certain of said apertures in said irregularly spaced row being successively spaced in increasing increments and being aligned IOW;

and means for locating said overlay on said board with said apertures in said overlay in registry with said apertures in said board. 8. The combination set forth in claim 7 wherein said said single aperture and said row of apertures and said means for locating said overlay includes a plurality of pins extending from the undersurface of said overlay and being receivable in preselected apertures in said board. 9. The combination set forth in claim 7 and further including indicia on the surface of said overlay to identify 10 said row of apertures and said plurality of apertures.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS RICHARD B. WILKINSON, Primary Examiner.

LEO SMILOW, T. J. ANDERSON, Examiners. With preselected apertures in said regularly spaced STANLEY A. WAL, Assistant Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,347,460 October 17, 1967 John Dickson It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 1, line 11, for "games" read game column 2, line 26, for "is" read are column 5, line 12, before "cribbage" insert standard same column 5, after line 20 insert Other Reference Publication "Toys 15 Novelties" September 1947, p. 139.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER Commissioner of Patents Edward M. Fletcher, Ir.

Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1843457 *May 9, 1931Feb 2, 1932Frank L MorseCribbage board
US1993322 *Sep 21, 1934Mar 5, 1935Sherman Ford TraceDuplicate cribbage board
US2017479 *Nov 12, 1934Oct 15, 1935Andrew TerkelsenGame board or the like
US2415073 *Jan 25, 1945Feb 4, 1947Allan H BuffmireGame
US2992625 *Aug 26, 1958Jul 18, 1961Raymond H EckenbachSystems and structures for storing and utilizing information, data, etc.
USD159808 *Dec 10, 1949Aug 22, 1950 Canasta scorer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4002339 *Nov 20, 1974Jan 11, 1977Reiner Lawrence LPoker pool game
US4805909 *Apr 8, 1988Feb 21, 1989Roland Homer LScore keeping apparatus
US4998035 *Jul 26, 1990Mar 5, 1991American Standard Inc.Method for attaching a motor lead restraint device to a compressor pump
US5028765 *Apr 11, 1990Jul 2, 1991Hull Harold LGive-a-way and cribbage game board
US5498005 *Nov 23, 1994Mar 12, 1996Jacques; Alexander A.Circular pegboard strategy game
US20120282988 *Jul 17, 2012Nov 8, 2012Martens Philip SCribbage card game and pegging board
Classifications
U.S. Classification235/90, 273/148.00R, 116/222, 273/284, 273/282.1
International ClassificationA63F1/06, A63F3/00, A63F3/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00082, A63F3/00006, A63F2003/0034, A63F1/06, A63F2003/00583
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10, A63F1/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 16, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: DICKSON, GEORGE C. 1130 CENTER COURT, HOMEWOOD, IL
Owner name: MCCLELLAND, MURIEL JEAN 3855 VALLEY HILL ROAD, BLO
Free format text: ASSIGN TO EACH ASSIGNEE, 50% INTEREST. SUBJECT TO CONDITIONS RECITED.;ASSIGNOR:PETERSON, ROBERT V.;INDEPENDENT PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF JOHN DICKSON, DECEASED;REEL/FRAME:004248/0969
Effective date: 19840316
Owner name: PETERSON, ROBERT V. INDEPENDENT PERSONAL REPRESENT
Free format text: LETTERS OF TESTAMENTARY;ASSIGNOR:DICKSON, JOHN DEC D, BY THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE REGISTER OF MICHIGAN;REEL/FRAME:004248/0966
Effective date: 19840202