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Publication numberUS3348456 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1967
Filing dateJul 1, 1965
Priority dateJul 1, 1965
Publication numberUS 3348456 A, US 3348456A, US-A-3348456, US3348456 A, US3348456A
InventorsLutz Virgil L, Marconet Ronald P, Wolf Robert C
Original AssigneeInt Paper Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Scrap stripping apparatus
US 3348456 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1967 R. P. MARCONET ETAL SCRAP STRIPPING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed July 1, 1965 ATTORNEY.

Oct. 24, 1967 p, MARCONET ETAL 3,348,456

SCRAP STRIPPING APPARATUS Filed July 1, 1965 Z Sheets-Sheet 2 & -4

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Oct. 24, 1967 SCRAP STRIPPING APPARATUS Filed July 1, 1965' Z Sheets-Sheet 5 I INVENTOR. F RQZCZ PMQPCOIZGZ Z/Q'zygZZ, .Zufz

BYMZW W ATTORNEY:

3,348,456 SCRAP STREPPING APPARATUS Ronald P. Marconet, West Chester, and Virgil L. Lntz, Cincinnati, Ohio, and Robert C. Wolf, Timonium, Md, assignors to International Paper Company, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed July 1, 1965, Ser. No. 463,708 3 Claims. ((II. 93-36) This invention relates to an apparatus for perfecting the manufacture of carton or other blanks from a flat piece of material. More particularly, it relates to a device for stripping away scrap produced by the stamping or die-cutting of carton blanks from sheets or webs of paperboard, paper, plastic, laminates thereof, and comparable materials.

With todays great emphasis on packaging attractively and, wherever possible, uniquely, to appeal to the purchasing public, every size, shape, and design of carton-which not only protects, but displays, the packaged product-is being brought forward and in large quantities. Such cartons often incorporate a great variety of windows or other interstices (e.g., for receiving closure locking tongues or tabs) and the perimeters of their fiat blanks are often quite irregular, not to say fanciful. Accordingly, any means for clearing away scrap when such a carton blank is stamped into a piece of paperboard or the like, and which scrap does not fall away by itself from the blank because some cellulose fibers remain uncut or because friction bars it, should be adaptable, versatile and as universally usable as possible. The present invention comprehends such means.

Moreover, particularly considering the great volume of carton blanks made today, a scrap stripper of the type here involved must be capable of operating continuously or intermittently, at high speeds and with consistently high quality performance. It cannot become clogged with scraps or fibers and allow its work to be interrupted. The present invention comprehends such a scrap stripper.

Broadly, the present invention resides in a rotatable drum made up of two or more spaced-apart disks, one or more arcuate plates adjustably fastened to and between pairs of such disks, scrap ejector lugs adjustably fastened to such plates, drum drive and support means, and means adapted to guide blanks for cartons and the like (from which scrap must be stripped) into contact with and past the drum and lugs.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference should be had to the attached drawings in which FIGURE 1 shows a side view of the scrap stripping device of the present invention placed in a production line made up of a sheet feeder, a sheet cutter and creaser, and a sheet stacker;

FIGURE 2 shows a plan view of a sheet impressed with a carton blank by the sheet cutter and creaser of FIG- URE 1;

FIGURE 3 shows a sectional side view of the carton blank of FIGURE 2, taken along line 44;

FIGURE 4 shows a sectional side view of the carton blank of FIGURE 2, taken along line 4-4, after passing through the scrap stripping device of the present invention;

FIGURE 5 shows a plan view of the scrap stripping device of the present invention;

FIGURE 6 shows an enlarged side view of the production line of FIGURE 1, centering on the scrap stripping device of the present invention;

FIGURE 7 shows a side view of the scrap stripping device of FIGURE 5, taken along line 77;

FIGURE 8 shows an enlarged plan view of the scrap stripping device of FIGURE 5; and,

FIGURE 9 shows an isometric view of an arcuate plate United States Patent 0 element of the scrap stripping device of the present invention.

FIGURE 1 shows a stack of sheets 10 of paperboard in a sheet feeding unit 11 of the type made commercially by Dexter Folder (10., Pearl River, New York, which delivers the sheets in rapid succession to a cutter and creasing machine 12 of the type made commercially available by, for example, Miehle, and which operates very much like a common letterpress. The principal components of this machine are a flatbed 14 on which knives and the like (not shown) are mounted in a predetermined pattern and a cylinder 13 covered with a hard metal jacket. Their function is to cut, score, perforate, or otherwise impress on each sheet at least one blank for a carton, folder, lid, or the like which reflects the predetermined pattern of the knives, etc. This purpose is accomplished, ultimately, when other elements of machine 12 position the sheet between cylinder 13 and bed 14 and the two are moved reciprocatingly in such a way as to cause the knives on bed 14 to drive into the sheet and against cylinder 13. The cut, creasing cylinder 13 has grip fingers (not shown) which grab the front end of the sheet and roll it around the cylinder and down between the cylinder and the bed 14 until the sheet is fully cut and creased. The cylinder then continues rotating and brings the sheet (still rolled on the cylinder) back to its starting position. The grip fingers then release and the stripper fingers 21 move down below the leading edge of the sheet. The cylinder then rotates clockwise and the sheet moves over the stripper fingers .and into the bite between the roll disks 30 and 31.

At the end of a cycle of cutting and creasing machine 12, a typical sheet 10, having thereon and therein the impression of carton blank A which is comprised of, for instance, straight cuts 15 and 16, straight scores 17, annular (window) cuts 18, and annular (intersticial) cuts 19 shown in FIGURE 2, is positioned on roll 13 and the sheets leading edge is run over one or more so-called stripper fingers 21 which lift or peel such sheet from the cylinder, the gripping fingers of which have now released the sheets leading edge, and assist in its advancement to the scrap stripping station of the present invention.

With the aid of fingers 21, sheet 10 is guided into the scrap stripping device 22 of the present invention. As is to be seen in FIGURES 5 to 8, this device consists principally of a large, rotatable cylindrical member or drum 23 made up of at least two spaced-apart, parallel disks 24 mounted through collars 24a thereon, and with the aid of set screws 24b positioned in threaded holes in such collars, on single, rotatable shaft 25 which has a flattened portion 25a thereon to provide a bearing surface for set screws 24b. Disks 24 can be moved laterally along shaft 25 for purposes of changing the adjustment on disposition of elements on drum 23. Then, one or more arcuate plates 26 (see, particularly, FIGURE 9), are incorporated, each of which is adjustably fastened to and disposed between a pair of disks 24. Such disks are, preferably, tapped and drilled at many points 240 along their circumferences to permit different positionings of arcuate plates 26 on disks 24 and with relation to one another. Scrap ejector prods or lugs 27 are adjustably, and removably, fastened to the convex surfaces of arcuate plates 26 by means of machine screws or the like. It will be seen in FIGURE 9 that plates 26 have slots 28 along their ends which allow them to be slid for adjustment purposes along the circumferences of disks 24 without complete detachment therefrom and holes 29 which can have threads and can be disposed in plates 26 as shown or in a greater number for use in fastening lugs 27 to such plates.

For the rest, the device 22 is made up of drum drive and support means and means for guiding sheet 10 past drum 23, as it rotates with shaft 25, in such a way as to enable lugs 27, the leading edges of which can be straight,

angled, or even hooked, to punch scrap portions from the sheet and away from carton blank A thereon. Such means are, preferably, those shown in the attached drawings, but others can be made to serve as well.

Particularly in FIGURES 5 to 8, it will be seen that, between pairs of disks 24 and towards the ends of shaft 25, there are mounted wheels 30 having collars 30a and set screws 30b therethrough. These wheels, affixed to and driven by shaft 25, in turn drive sheet through device 22 by forming a nip at intervals along its length with small roll 31 (mounted with the aid of set screw 31a on shaft 33 which has a flattened portion to receive the set screw end). The nip grasps such sheet. This is best seen in FIGURE 7. Of course, the portions of sheet 10 travelling through such nip or nips are limited to exclude any portions thereof from which scrap is to be stripped by means of lugs 27 Shafts and 33 are driven as the result of the rotation of meshed gears 34 and 35 which are mounted thereon, respectively, and the rotation of sprocket 36, also mounted on shaft 33, at the urging of driver chain 37. This is best seen in FIGURE 6. Preferably, driver chain 37 is itself driven and timed by the main drive (not shown) of the cutting and creasing apparatus 12, so that the entire operation of device 22 and its ejector lugs 27 will be in perfect registry with the cutting and creasing of sheets 10.

Both shafts 25 and 33 are journaled for rotation in bearings 25 and 33 forming elements of a pair of support members 38 which are mounted on machine side rails 12. A support brace 39 connects the two members. In addition, two support rods 40, in which are sli-dably mounted one or more bands 41, connect the two members. Bands 41 support from below sheet 10 as it passes under revolving drum 23 and lugs 27. Short belts 42 and i3 aid in the smooth transportation of sheet 10 from the 4 cutter creaser unit, past the scrap stripper 22, to a bed 44 and carton blank stacker 45.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device adapted to strip scrap from sheets having blanks cut and creased thereon, a rotatable dr-um comprising at least two spaced-apart disks adjustably mounted on a shaft, at least one arcuate plate adjustably fastened to and between the two disks, and at least one scrap ejector lug adjustably fastened to the arcuate plate.

2. In a device adapted to strip scrap from sheets having blanks cut and creased thereon, a rotatable drum comprising at least two spaced-apart disks adjustably mounted on a shaft, at least one arcuate plate adjustably fastened to and between the two disks, and at least one scrap ejector lug adjustably fastened to the arcuate plate; drum support means; drum drive means; sheet drive means; and, sheet guide means.

3. In combination, a machine adapted to cut and crease blanks on sheets and a device adapted to strip scrap from the sheets having the blanks cut and creased thereon, including a rotatable drum comprising at least two spacedapart disks adjustably mounted on a shaft, at least one arcuate plate adjustably fastened to and between the two disks, and at least one scrap ejector lug adjustably fastened to the arcuate plate; drum support means; drum drive means connected to and timed by the machine drive means; sheet drive means; and, sheet guide means.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,615,376 10/1952 Pelikan 9336 2,899,871 8/1959 Auer 93-36 3,171,315 3/1965 Jahn 83669 X BERNARD STICKNEY, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2615376 *Jun 9, 1949Oct 28, 1952Fed Carton CorpDevice for automatically removing window cutouts from blanks
US2899871 *Aug 28, 1953Aug 18, 1959 Stripper mechanism
US3171315 *Mar 6, 1964Mar 2, 1965Colborne Mfg CompanyPie crust marker
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3430542 *Feb 24, 1966Mar 4, 1969Harris Intertype CorpMaterial processing apparatus with relatively movable processing components
US3459080 *Dec 12, 1966Aug 5, 1969Harris Intertype CorpRotary stripping unit
US3709415 *Dec 18, 1970Jan 9, 1973Nagy BAutomatic stripping machine
US3780921 *Jun 16, 1972Dec 25, 1973Union Carbide CorpMethod and apparatus for producing gang of separably interconnected elongate articles
US5049122 *May 25, 1990Sep 17, 1991Marguip, Inc.Apparatus for stripping scrap from die cut blanks
US5181444 *Sep 23, 1991Jan 26, 1993International Paper CompanyMultiple barb pick
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/373, 83/103, 225/97
International ClassificationB26D7/18
Cooperative ClassificationB26D7/18
European ClassificationB26D7/18