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Publication numberUS3348616 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1967
Filing dateJun 11, 1965
Priority dateJun 11, 1965
Publication numberUS 3348616 A, US 3348616A, US-A-3348616, US3348616 A, US3348616A
InventorsZingg Warren M
Original AssigneeDow Chemical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Jetting device
US 3348616 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

JETTING DEVICE Filed June 11. 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I INVENTOR. Warren M. 2/719 HGENT Oct. 24, 1967 w. M. ZINGG 3,348,616

JETTING DEVICE 7 Filed June 11. 1965 2 she ts-sheet z IYNVENTOR. Warren M. Z ing 9 Eff/be I AGE/VT United States Patent 3,348,616 JETTING DEVICE Warren M. Zingg, Tulsa, Okla., assignor to The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Filed June 11, 1965, Ser. No. 463,289 6 Claims. (Cl. 166-223) This invention relates to jetting tools of the type used in oil or gas wells, and particularly to a jetting tool which is adapted for use in so-called open hole jetting service.

' Jetting tools for use in down-hole well treating or servicing use are well known in the art. An example of such a device is shown and claimed in US. Patent No. 3,066,- 735 issued Dec. 4, 1962, to Warren M. Zingg.

Most of the prior art jetting tools have been made for use in cased wells or for use where the surface against which the abrasive or other jet stream is directed is a short distance, e.g., less than 6 inches, from the body of the tool. Because the tool is usually used where the bore hole is liquid filled at the point of use, it can be appreciated that the distance between the jet nozzles and the surface to be worked on should be as small as practicable it really effective use of the jets is to be achieved.

However, since the jetting tool must be lowered through well casing, it can be appreciated that the overall diameter of the tool must be small (7" OD. casing is commonly used).

- Accordingly, a principal object of this invention is to provide an improved jetting tool for use in well treating service.

Another object of this invention is to provide an improved jetting tool which is adapted to be lowered into a well bore through well casing but is adapted for use against a surface which is substantially further distance from the tool than is the wall of the casing.

A further object of this invention is to provide an improved jetting tool which is adapted to be used to jet surfaces of a large diameter cavity in a bore hole but may be raised from and lowered to the bore hole cavity through a small diameter casing.

In accordance with this invention, there is provided a well jetting tool comprising an elongated rigid body member having tubular means extending along and mechanically coupled thereto. Jetting assemblies, adapted to swivel during use, are coupled to the tubular means at spaced apart intervals along the body member. The jetting assemblies include a swivel head and elongated jet tubes having jet nozzles at their outer extremities. Means are provided for controlling the degree of swiveling of the jetting assemblies.

The invention, as well as additional objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood when the following detailed description is read in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, in section, of jetting apparatus in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view taken 90 degrees from the view of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of a swivel element used in a jet assembly of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

Referring to the drawings, there is shown a jetting tool, indicated generally by the numeral comprising an elongated body member 12 of solid bar stock having coupling elements 14, 16 at each end.

A fluid flow line, indicated generally by the numeral 18, extends from near the coupling element 14 towards the lower end coupling element 16 of the body member 12. The flow line 18 is threaded back and forth through the 3,348,616 Patented Oct. 24, 1967 bar-like body member in a plurality of loops. The flow line 18 is welded or otherwise mechanically coupled to the body member 12 each time it passes through the body member, as at 20', 22, 24, 26, for example.

A plurality of jet head assemblies, indicated generally by the numeral 28, are coupled, by means of tubes 30, 32, 34, 36 to the flow line 18. Each of the tubes 30, 32, 34, 36 is fixedly secured, as by welds, for example, to the body member 18.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4, as well as to FIGS. 1 and 2, it may be seen that the swivel member 38 of the jet head assembly 28 includes a bolt-like element 40' having a head 42, and a cylindrical part 44 having threads 46 at its end which has reduced diameter. A bore 48 extends longitudinally from the end 50 of the element towards the head 42. A cross-bore 52 extends through the cylindrical part 44 of the member 38.

A pair of grooves 54, 56 extend around the periphery of the cylindrical part 44, one groove being on each side of the bore 52. An 0 ring seal 58, 60 is disposed in each groove 54, 56, respectively.

A cylindrical element 62 whose thickness is less than its diameter and whose diameter is substantially larger than the diameter of the cylindrical part 44, has an axially extending bore 64 completely through it. A transverse bore 66, having threads 68 at its outer end, extends from the periphery of the element 62 to the bore 64. The bore 66 is of smaller diameter than the distance between the grooves 54, 56.

When the element 62 is assembled over the cylindrical part 44 of the element 38, the -O-ring seals 58, 60 bear against the wall of the bore 64 and prevent leakage of fluid along the bore 64. Communication for fluid flow is provided through the bores 48, 52 and 66.

As may be seen more clearly in FIGS. 1 and 2, an elbow type flow element 70 is coupled to the threaded end 68 of the bore 66, with another elbow type coupling element 72 being coupled to the output of the element 70. A flexible hose 74 having a jetting nozzle 76 coupled to one end, has its other end coupled to the output of the element 72.

The hose 74, nozzle 76, elements 70' and 72, and the element 62 are so aligned that flow through them tends to cause movement of the mentioned elements along a single plane.

Stop means, in the form of a protuberance 78 extending from the body member 12 in the path of movement of the element 70, is provided to prevent excessive rotation of the jetting assembly 38 as material is flowed therethrough.

In operation, the jetting tool 10 is cou led by means of coupling 14 to a string of tubing (not shown) and is lowered down a bore hole through casing until the tool 10 is beyond the casing and is adjacent to an enlarged part of the bore hole, such as where the bore hole had previously been shot with nitro glycerin, for example. If desired, additional tubing (not shown) may be coupled, as at 16, below the tool 10.

The string of tubing (not shown) which is attached to coupling 14 communicates with flow line 18 by a passageway through coupling element 19 which joins coupling 14 and flow line 18. A suitable pumping means (not shown) is attached at the upper end of the string of tubing for forcing fluids and/or fluids plus abrasive material down the flow line 18 as'is well known in the art.

When the tool is in position, fluid is forced through the flow line 18 and through the jetting assemblies 38, causing the assemblies to rotate until stopped by the pins or protuberances 78. The pins 78 stop the assemblies 38 when the nozzles 76 are directed horizontally or nearly perpendicularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the body member 12.

Actually, as illustrated, the pins 78 cause the nozzles 76 to be directed at an angle about 30 degrees less than perpendicular with respect to the body member 12.

Thus, as the jetting assemblies rotate, the nozzles are advanced towards the wall of the bore hole and the distance of the nozzles from the body member 12 may be greatly in excess of the radius of the casing.

When the jetting treatment is completed, the jetting assemblies are free to return to their at rest position parallel to the body member 12, thus permitting the jetting tool to be withdrawn from the bore hole through the casing.

The swiveled jetting assembly is threadedly coupled to the flow line 18 through the tube 30, 32, 34, for example.

Flexible tubing 74 of different lengths may beused, the required length usually being determined after interpretation of a profile survey of the part of the bore hole to be jetted.

In practice, jet nozzles 76 having a inch orifice are commonly used. Because such orifices are easily plugged, it is often wise to mount a filter screen just above the tool 10 to prevent plugging of the jet nozzles by scale from the tubing or similar particulated materials.

The swivel arrangement of the jetting assemblies causes the jetting assemblies to fold downwardly towards the body member 12 as the tool is raised into the casing in event the weight of the jet assembly does not cause this movement of its own accord.

Thus, this invention provides a simple, convenient to use means for jet cleaning and perforating of the walls of well bores Where the wall surface is beyond the effective distance of ordinary jetting tools.

What is claimed is:

1. A jetting tool assembly comprising an elongated body member having coupling means at least at one end thereof, a flow line extending along said body member and mechanically coupled thereto at intervals along its length, said flow line having a coupling element adjacent to an end of said body member, a plurality of swiveled jetting assemblies, said jetting assemblies being mechanically coupled to said body member and fluid flow coupled to said flow line at spaced apart intervals along the length of said body member, said jetting assemblies each comprising a swivel head having an offset flow member coupled there to and a jetting nozzle coupled to said offset flow member by a conduit.

2. A jetting tool assembly in accordance with claim 1, wherein stop means are provided for preventing excess movement of said swivel heads.

3. A jetting tool assembly in accordance with claim 1, wherein said jetting assemblies are coupled to more than one side of said body member.

4. A jetting tool assembly in accordance with claim 1, wherein said flow line passes through said body member at spaced apart intervals along said body member.

5. A jetting tool assembly in accordance with claim 1, wherein said conduit and nozzle are detachably coupled to said offset flow member.

6. A jetting tool assembly comprising an elongated body member having coupling means at least at one end thereof, a flow line extending along said body member and mechanically coupled thereto at intervals along its length, said flow line having a coupling element adjacent to an end of said body member, at least one swiveled jetting assembly, said jetting assembly being mechanically coupled to said body member and fluid flow coupled to said flow line, said jetting assembly comprising a swivel head having an offset flow member coupled there to and a jetting nozzle coupled to said offset flow member by a conduit.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,123,690 1/ 1915 Con-rade-r 166-223 1,524,592 l/'1925 Stephens 166-223 2,228,640 1/1941 ONeill 166-223 2,533,563 12/ 1950 Dobbs 166-223 3,224,506 12/ 1965 Huitt et al 166-223 CHARLES E. OCONNELL, Primary Examiner.

JAMES A. LEPPINK, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1123690 *Feb 27, 1912Jan 5, 1915Rudolph ConraderDevice for treating artesian wells.
US1524592 *Feb 21, 1924Jan 27, 1925Ely Stephens LewisCasing washer
US2228640 *Dec 11, 1939Jan 14, 1941O'neill Frank ECasing washer
US2533563 *Dec 11, 1947Dec 12, 1950Tide Water Associated Oil CompWell activator
US3224506 *Feb 18, 1963Dec 21, 1965Gulf Research Development CoSubsurface formation fracturing method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6397864 *Mar 8, 1999Jun 4, 2002Schlumberger Technology CorporationNozzle arrangement for well cleaning apparatus
US20090151936 *Dec 18, 2007Jun 18, 2009Robert GreenawaySystem and Method for Monitoring Scale Removal from a Wellbore
US20100089571 *Nov 13, 2009Apr 15, 2010Guillaume RevellatCoiled Tubing Gamma Ray Detector
US20110048743 *Aug 12, 2010Mar 3, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationDissolvable bridge plug
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/223, 175/424
International ClassificationE21B7/18
Cooperative ClassificationE21B7/18
European ClassificationE21B7/18