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Publication numberUS3349222 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1967
Filing dateJul 2, 1964
Priority dateJul 2, 1964
Publication numberUS 3349222 A, US 3349222A, US-A-3349222, US3349222 A, US3349222A
InventorsJohnston Bevan H
Original AssigneeStromberg Carlson Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for contact heating of moving sheet material
US 3349222 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. H. JOHNSTON DEVICE FOR CONTACT HEATING OF MOVING SHEET MATERIAL Filed July 2, 1964 MECHANISM STEPPING HEATING ELEMENT PLATEN 1 ELECTRICAL OF PAPER TRAVEL DIRECTION INVENTOR. BEVA/V H. JOHNSTON A TTORNE) United States Patent 3,349,222 DEVICE FOR CONTACT HEATING OF MOVING SHEET MATERIAL Bevan H. Johnston, La Mesa, Califi, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Stromberg-Carlson Corporation, Rochester, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed July 2, 1964, Ser. No. 379,823 2 Claims. (Cl. 219-388) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A device for contact heating of moving sheet material having an image including lines of printing wherein a heat conducting platen contacting said sheet material is provided with indentations substantially transverse to the movement of the sheet material and means for moving the sheet bearing the image in incremental steps adjusted so that the lines of printing lie in between the indentations after each incremental step.

The present invention relates to xerographic image fixing apparatus and more specifically to image fixing apparatus which utilizes heat to fix a thermoplastic powder image to the surface of a sheet carrying said image.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved heating device for fixing a thermoplastic powder image upon a sheet being processed by a xerographic reproducing machine.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a new and improved image fixing heating device for at least quadrupling the speed in which a sheet bearing a xerographic image to be fixed is passed over a direct contact type heating platen.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a new and improved direct contact type heating platen which reduces the mean pulling force required to cause the image bearing sheet to traverse the platen.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the following description proceeds and the features of novelty which characterize the invention will be pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this specification.

For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be had to the sole figure which discloses a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

Direct contact type heating platens are well known in the Xerographic art for fusing an image of thermoplastic powdered ink to an image bearing sheet, which sheet is passed over the platen thereby to provide visible copy. As the paper is pulled in small incremental steps over the surface of the heating platen, it is alternately tightened and loosened which often results in the creation of an air cushion between the paper and the surface of the heating platen after each step. It is desirable to cause a rapid breakdown of this air cushion so as to increase the rate of heat transfer and, hence, increase the speed in which the paper may be processed by being passed over the surface of the platen. In addition, a vacuum is sometimes formed between the paper and the platen surface which increases the mean force which must be utilized by the pulley to effect paper travel. The crux of my invention is to provide a platen surface having pressure equalizing indentations or ports which communicate with the outside air and which sharply reduce the aforesaid air cushion, so

3,349,222 Patented Oct. 24, 1967 ICC as to greatly increase the permissible speed of paper travel across the platen surface. In addition, these indentations reduce the mean pulley force necessary to maintain paper travel since an easy release of the air pressure that holds the paper to the platen is provided for.

The sole figure discloses a preferred embodiment of the invention. Platen 1 is shown in intimate contact with heating element 2 which may be a silicon rubber-covered resistance wire heater, bonded to the concave surface of the platen. A paper feed pulley 3 is disclosed for feeding the paper sheet 4 to the platen. A take-up pulley 6 is also disclosed which is actuated by stepping mechanism 7. In this embodiment of my invention, paper 4 is maintained in intimate contact with platen 1 by virtue of the tension introduced into paper 4 by pulleys 3 and 6. As the paper bearing the powder image traverses platen 1, heat generated by heating element 2 causes the image to be fixed to the paper, as is well known in the art. As mentioned hereinbefore, a thin cushion of air is often created between paper 4 and platen 1 after each step, thereby to reduce heat transfer. This cushion of air is substantially eliminated by the inclusion of traverse grooves 8 which are formed upon the surface of platen 1, as shown. Since grooves 8 communicate with platen edge 9, they are able to function as pressure equalizers. As the paper comes to rest toward the end of each incremental step, air between paper 4 and platen 1 is plowed into grooves 8. The thin cushion of air is thus sharply reduced. Since the grooves 8 could reduce the rate of heat transfer somewhat, it is preferable that stepping mechanism 7 be adjusted so that the lines of printing to be fixed to paper 4 lie in between the grooves when the paper comes to rest after each incremental step.

Pressure equalizing grooves 8 also prevent the buildup of a partial vacuum between paper 4 and platen 1. This partial vacuum causes an increase in the frictional force needed to be overcome by pulley 6, since the net normal force exerted upon paper 4 is increased. In other words, the grooves create an easy release of the air pressure that occasionally holds the paper to the platen and accordingly the mean pulling force is reduced.

The shape of the grooves is relatively unimportant. Good results were obtained by utilizing grooves having a width of of an inch and a depth of of an inch.

It should be understood that other pressure equalizing indentations, other than grooves, may be utilized so long as the indentations communicate with the outside atmosphere, or the equivalent thereof, such as a chamber kept at about atmospheric pressure. For example, the indentations could be staggered lines of pot holes which communicate with the outside atmosphere.

While there has been shown and described a specific embodiment of the invention, other modifications will readily occur to those skilled in the art. It is not, therefore, desired that this invention be limited to the specific arrangement shown and described, and it is intended in the appended claims to cover all modifications within the spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for fixing a thermoplastic powder image including lines of printing to the surface of a sheet hearing said image, said apparatus including a stationary heat conducting platen having a surface and a plurality of lines of indentations in said surface which communicate with the outside atmosphere, means for directly heating said platen, and means for moving said sheet bearing said image in small increments across said surface in contact therewith at a substantial angle to said indentations thereby to fix said image, said small increments being adjusted so that the lines of printing lie in between the lines of indentations after each incremental step.

2. Apparatus for fixing a thermoplastic powder image including lines of printing to the surface of a sheet hearing said image, said apparatus including a heat conducting platen having a curved surface, an edge, and a plurality of grooves formed upon said surface and extending to said edge, means for directly heating said platen, and means for moving said sheet bearing said image in small increments across said curved surface in contact therewith in a direction substantially perpendicular to said grooves, said small increments being adjusted so that References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS.

2,074,455 3/1937 Carleton 219-469 X 2,532,562 12/1950 Lorig 219-469 2,701,765 2/1955 Codichini et al. 219-388 X 3,074,332 l/1963 Robinson 34152 X FOREIGN PATENTS 742,371 12/ 1955 Great Britain.

RICHARD M. WOOD, Primary Examiner.

the lines of printing lie in between the grooves after each 15 STAUBLY, Assistant Examinerincremental step.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2074455 *Feb 5, 1932Mar 23, 1937Nat Electric Heating Company IElectric heating and drying roll
US2532562 *Sep 12, 1949Dec 5, 1950Carnegie Illinois Steel CorpContinuous strand helical conveying and heating apparatus
US2701765 *Jun 18, 1951Feb 8, 1955Haloid CoXerographic fusing apparatus
US3074332 *Oct 20, 1958Jan 22, 1963Cons Electrodynamics CorpDrying platen for a recording system
GB742371A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3553424 *Feb 25, 1969Jan 5, 1971Litton Systems IncPaper stabilization heater
US3559965 *Jul 18, 1969Feb 2, 1971Teijin LtdApparatus for heating synthetic filaments
US3648383 *Apr 6, 1970Mar 14, 1972Eastman Kodak CoSealing apparatus for transport of material between regions at different pressures
US3660636 *Mar 3, 1971May 2, 1972Honeywell IncPlate heater
US3845742 *May 17, 1973Nov 5, 1974Xerox CorpFuser roll construction
US3867767 *Jun 25, 1973Feb 25, 1975Xerox CorpPreconditioner for paper stock
US3902041 *Jul 9, 1973Aug 26, 1975Xerox CorpDry film processing apparatus
US4043292 *Jul 21, 1975Aug 23, 1977Corning Glass WorksMicroscope slide staining apparatus having temperature control
US4118179 *Dec 8, 1976Oct 3, 1978Honeywell Inc.Material processor with relative movement between material and its positioner
US4193680 *Jun 28, 1977Mar 18, 1980Rank Xerox LimitedTransfer sheet drying device for electrophotographic copying machine
US4217093 *Nov 28, 1978Aug 12, 1980Agfa-Gevaert, A.G.Fixing arrangement in electrostatic copying machine
US4275959 *May 10, 1979Jun 30, 1981Edo Western CorporationFilm processor apparatus
US4310304 *Jul 10, 1980Jan 12, 1982Compagnie Industrielle Des Telecommunications Cit-AlcatelInstallation for assembling electronic components
US4653890 *Oct 16, 1985Mar 31, 1987Bell & Howell CompanyFilm developing system for microimage recording apparatus
US4697919 *Nov 28, 1986Oct 6, 1987Bell & Howell CompanyFilm developing system for microimage recording apparatus
US4761311 *Feb 19, 1987Aug 2, 1988The Mead CorporationProcess for glossing a developer sheet and an apparatus useful therein
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US5600900 *Apr 19, 1995Feb 11, 1997Marquip, Inc.Vacuum assisted web drying system
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US5779758 *May 17, 1996Jul 14, 1998Owens-Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for forming continuous glass fibers
US5837974 *Oct 16, 1996Nov 17, 1998Interfic, Inc.Corrugated paperboard manufacturing apparatus with board profile monitoring and related methods
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US5847362 *Oct 16, 1996Dec 8, 1998Interfic, Inc.Corrugated paperboard manufacturing apparatus providing controllable heat and related methods
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US5916679 *Aug 3, 1998Jun 29, 1999Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.In-line processing of continuous glass fibers with thermoset solution epoxy
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DE2753625A1 *Dec 1, 1977Jun 7, 1979Agfa Gevaert AgFixiereinrichtung fuer ein elektrofotografisches kopiergeraet
EP0748992A2 *Apr 17, 1996Dec 18, 1996Marquip, Inc.Vacuum assisted web drying system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification219/388, 432/230, 165/68, 118/59, 34/624, 219/553, 432/59, 219/216
International ClassificationG03G15/20, F26B13/10
Cooperative ClassificationG03G15/2014, F26B13/105
European ClassificationF26B13/10C, G03G15/20H2