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Publication numberUS3349911 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1967
Filing dateDec 17, 1965
Priority dateDec 17, 1965
Publication numberUS 3349911 A, US 3349911A, US-A-3349911, US3349911 A, US3349911A
InventorsReddick John A
Original AssigneeClayton Anderson & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fractionating apparatus
US 3349911 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 31', 1967 J. A. REDDICK FRACTIONATING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 17, 1965 wd .k

mi i A F J. A. REDDICK Oct. 31, 1967 3,349,91 1 FRACTIONATING APPARATUS Filed D80.

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 A 2% W90 miwzm W9 im M/ w Och-'31, 1967 Filed Dec. '17. 1965 J. A. REDDICK FRACTIONATING APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 I N VENY UR. 4/550 /4, Fe 0 0961? y W F 4q A 5 9M United States Patent 3,349,911 FRACTIONATING APPARATUS John A. Reddick, Houston, Tex., assignor to Clayton Anderson & Co., Houston, Tex., a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 17, 1965, Ser. No. 514,461 2 Claims. (Cl. 209-304) ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE cylinder.

The present invention relates to an apparatus for fractionating distinct materials forming ;the constituents ,of a mixture, and more particularly, relates to an apparatus for separating trash components from cottonseed.

.Sticks, immature seed, and other large trash particles .remaining with cottonseed after a ginning operation adversely affect the quality and value of the cottonseed. For instance, oil mills purchasing cottonseed for'extraction of oil therein usually buy by the pound and are .thus paying for useless material when the-cottonseed is high in trash content. Furthermore, it sticks and other large trash particles are present in cottonseed when .linter'fibers are removed therefrom, the sticks and associated particles mix with the linter fibers and substantially decrease-the value of such fibers for paper making purposes, etc.'Therefore, it is desirable to fractionate or separatetrash components from materials such as cottonseed order to upgrade the seed.

The present invention is directed to an apparatus where- .in centrifugal force is .imparted .by a rotating ,screento material to be separated such as a mixture of cottonseed and trash. Simultaneously, rotor means are employed to force such material into a circular or rhelical patharound and .in the same rotating direction asthe screen whereby smaller particles pass through the screen and 'are separated from larger materials which remain within the screen. Coaction of the centrifugal force exerted on the material by the screen 'andthe circular force exerted by the rotor means operates to align the larger particles such as sticks axially with'thescreen'and prevent passage therethrough. Conventional methods and apparatus for 1separating materials such as sticks and other trash from cottonseed have centered around the use primarily of shaker screens which are effective in removing small trash particles but ineffective in adequately separating out sticks because of-inabilityto align sticks when using such screens. The presentinvention is directed .to improvements in a fractionating apparatus which combines centrifugal .and circular force to effectively separate sticks and other large trash particles from the cottonseed.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an apparatus for-separatingdistinct materials forming the constituents of amixture through the use of centrifugal and circular force exerted on such material.

A further object of the present invention is E'the ,pro-

vision of means for separating constituents of a mixture by the use of rotating screen drum meansin combination with rotormeans whereby particles of one size range are separated from particles of another size range.

Yet .anotherobject of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus for separating sticks, immature seed, and other large trash particles from cottonseed by the use of rotating screen drum means for imparting centrifugal force to the mixture and rotor means revolving in the same direction as the screen for imparting circular force to the mixture whereupon :the cottonseed and smaller particles pass through the screen drummeans and sticks and other large particles are retained within said means.

.Still a further object of the present invention is the provision of an apparatus for separating sticks from cottonseed by .use of a rotating screen drum and a rotary brush coaxial therein whereby passage of the stick and cottonseed mixture between the rotor and screen causes the cottonseed to penetrate the screen whereas sticks are aligningly retained within the screen.

Other and further objects, features and advantages will be apparent from the following description of presently preferred embodiments of the invention, given for the purpose of disclosure, and taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, .Wherein like character references designate like parts throughout the several views and where,

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view, partly in section, illustrating a continuous fractionating apparatus according to the present invention,

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view, partly in section, illustrating a furtherembodiment of a continuous fractionating apparatus according .to the present invention.

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of the apparatus of FIG- .URE 2,

FIGURE 4 is a partial elevational view illustrating the combination of a .plurality of devices according to the present invention.

For purposes of illustration ,and by way of example only, the present invention is described and is useful in cleaning and separating trash from cotton seed and will be described as performing that function. Of course, the apparatus of the present invention is useful in cleaning or fractionating many and various types of material mix- .tures.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly FIG- URE l, the .reference .numeral 10 generally designates the apparatus of the present invention for fractionating mixtures such as cottonseed and trash particles. The apparatus 10 generally comprises an inlet chamber '12 through whichthe material tobe separated is passed'by ducts 14. The material ,is then distributed'by means of blades 16 into contact withrthe screen drum ,18 which rotates at a speed great enough to exert centrifugal force on-the material. The rotor 20 has brushes 22 mounted thereon which contact and push the material being separated ina circular or helical path upon rotation of the rotor 20. Approximately a /2 inch clearance between the brushes 22 and thescreen 18 is preferred. Material small enough to pass through-the perforations of the screen 18 .drop into the chamber 24 and are removedby means of the duct 26. Material retained within the screen 18 is conveyed in a spiral path to the bottom of the screen and through ports 27 into the chamber 28 for Withdrawal through the duct 30. It should be noted that if there is a high volume of material entering the chamber .28, it willbe advantageousto provide a sweeper arm, not shown aflixed to the rotor .20 toexpedite removal of material from such chamber.

The rotatable screendrum 18 is fixedly securedto a "base 32 which in turn is rotatably secured tot-he shaft "34byrmeans of suitable bearings 36. Rotationis imparted tothe screen .andbase by a motor 38 andsuitable pulley .dri-vevi40.

The rotor 20 is fixedly secured to the shaft 34 and the shaft in turn is rotatably secured by means of suitable bearings 42 to any suitable support means not shown. Rotary movement is imparted to the shaft 34 and rotor 20 by a motor 44 and pulley drive 46. It will be recognized that pulley drives 40 and 46 may be operated from a single motor by use of pulley wheels of proper diameter.

Referring now to FIGURES 2 and 3 for more detailed explanation of the present invention, a slightly different embodiment of the invention is illustrated. In FIGURE 2, the shaft 34 is shown rotatably supported by the bearings 42 on the frame support members 48 and also at its upper extremity by bearing 50 supported on the frame of the inlet chamber 12. The inlet chamber 12 and outlet chambers 24 and 28 are integrally connected to support members 52.

Perforations 54 in the screen 18 are of sufficient size to permit clearance of cottonseed but small enough to cause sticks and larger particles to be retained within the screen. Also, the perforations are preferably flared or tapered outwardly on the exterior side of the screen 18 so that the cottonseed penetrates the screen without being wedged therein. The number of perforations in the screen is limited only by screen diameter and thickness to maintain structural rigidity of the screen as well as desired capacity of the apparatus. It will be recognized that there should be an adequate number of perforations to accommodate and expedite the passage of cottonseed through the screen.

It is seen from the drawings that at least two spaced bearings are required to mount the shaft 34 to the support members 48 or as shown in FIGURE 2 the inlet chamber 12 which acts also as a support member. Such mounting technique assures proper alignment of the shaft for true rotation. Likewise, the screen drum 18 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 34 by at least two bearings such as bearings 36 on the base 32 to provide proper alignment for true rotation of the screen.

In operation, and with reference to FIGURES 1, 2 and 3, sticks and other large trash particles are separated from cottonseed by passing the mixture through inlet ducts 14 to the inlet chamber 12 where the blades 16 as well as the effect of gravity transfers the mixture to the screen drum 18. Upon contacting the screen drum 18, centrifugal force as a result of rotation of the screen 18 and the pushing effect of the rotating brushes. 22 affixed to the rotor 20 combine to force the cottonseed sticks and any other material into rotation around and down the wall of the screen 18 more or less in a spiral path. The rotor, screen. As the seed and sticks pass over the perforations 54 of the screen, seed and other material equal to or smaller than the size of the perforations 54 pass through the perforations and into the collection chamber 24 whereupon they are removed through the outlet duct 26. Centrifugal force of the screen 18 and pushing action of the brushes 22 causes sticks to align axially with the screen drum 18 and are gradually worked to the bottom of the screen by virtue of speed differential between the rotor 20 and the screen 18 as well as the efiect of gravity. Upon reaching the bottom of the screen 18, sticks and other large trash particles are expelled through the ports 27 of the screen into the outlet chamber 28 and are discharged through the duct 30.

The screen drum 18 must be rotated at sufiicient speed so that the centrifugal force exerted thereby on the material being separated causes sticks to align axially but does not exert enough force to balance the weight of the material therein so that the cottonseed may freely penetrate the screen. In addition to causing sticks to align axially rather than randomly (in which event the sticks would also penetrate the screen 18), rotation of the screen .increases velocity of the material therein to reduce drag on the inner surface of the screen thereby providing a of course, rotates in the same direction as the 4 wiping action of the screen by the material adjacent to it to provide self-cleaning action.

The rotor 20 should rotate at a speed great enough such that the brushes 22 push the material being separated in a circular and helical path around the interior of the screen 18. A speed differential between the rotor 20 and the screen 18 is desirable so that gravity causes the sticks and other large trash to work down the screen 18 into the discharger chamber 28.

As an example of relative speeds of the screen 18 and rotor 20 to effect efficient separation of sticks and other large trash particles from cottonseed, a rotor speed of 900 revolutions per minute and a screen speed of approximately 270 feet per minute have provided highly acceptable results.

As shown in FIGURE 4, the device of the present invention may be used advantageously in series operation as a continuous process for fractionating mixtures such as cottonseed and trash particles of any size. For example, the apparatus of FIGURE 4 generally comprises three cleaning devices operating as just described. The material to be separated is fed into the first cleaner designated generally by.the reference numeral 56 through the inlet ducts 58. Thereupon cottonseed and smaller trash particles penetrate the rotating screen 60 and are drawn off through the duct 62. Sticks, larger trash particles and some good seed fall within the screen 60 and are drawn off through the duct 64. Duct 64 is fed to a second cleaning device represented generally by the reference numeral 66 wherein cottonseed and smaller trash particles not separated in the first cleaner 56 penetrate the screen 68 of cleaner 66 and are drawn off by duct 70. Again the sticks and large trash particles are drawn off through duct 72.

The cottonseed and smaller trash particles from cleaners 56 and 66 are fed through ducts 62 and 70 into a third cleaner 74 having perforations in the rotating screen drum 76 large enough to permit penetration of small trash particles therethrough but small enough to cause cottonseed to be retained within the screen 76. Thus the smaller trash particles passing through the screen 76 of the third cleaner 74 may be drawn off through duct 78 and combined with sticks and large trash particles in duct 72 for waste treatment. The substantially clean cottonseed is drawn from the third cleaner 74 by duct 80 for further processing. It will be recognized that suitable perforation size of the screens and speed differential of the rotors and screens of the cleaning system just described must be provided so that separation of the cottonseed and trash particles may be carried out.

Thus provided is a highly effective device for separating distinct materials forming the constituents of a mixture and particularly trash particles from cottonseed by the combined use of centrifugal and circular forces in an apparatus comprising rotating screen drum means and rotor means.

The present invention, therefore, is well adapted to carry out the objects and attain the ends and advantages mentioned as well as others inherent therein. While presently preferred embodiments of the invention have been given for the purpose of disclosure, numerous changes in the detail of construction and arrangement of parts may be made which will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art and which are encompassed within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for separating sticks, immature seeds and other heavy trash particles from cottonseed comprising:

ashaft,

support means for supporting the shaft within the vertical plane for rotation axially,

means for imparting rotary movement to the shaft,

brushes secured to and transversely of the shaft,

a perforated cylinder coaxially and rotatably secured to the shaft and surrounding but spaced outwardly of the brushes whereby clearance is provided for cottonseed between the cylinder and the outer ends of the brushes,

means for imparting rotary movement to the cylinder simultaneously with and in the same direction as movement of the brushes on the shaft,

an inlet duct mounted on the support means through which the trash and cottonseed is passed for gravitational contact with the brushes, and

a separation chamber secured to the support means for separation of cottonseed passing through the perforated cylinder from trash retained Within said cylinder.

2. The invention of claim 1 wherein the perforations of the cylinder flare outwardly for free passage of cottonseed from therewithin.

References Cited 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 292,259 1/1884 Schutz 2o9 3o4 373,453 11/1887 Gilbert 209404 x 1,315,775 9/1919 Jones 209-296 x 10 FOREIGN PATENTS 563,233 9/1923 France. 700,944 12/1953 Great Britain.

15 HARRY B. THORNTON, Primary Examiner.

TIM R. MILES, Assistant Examiner.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,349,911 October 31, 1967 John A. Reddick rs in the above numbered petthat error appea Letters Patent should read as It is hereby certified d that the said ent requiring correction an corrected below.

printed specification, lines 3 and 4,

In the heading to the read Anderson, Clayton 25 Co.

for "Clayton Anderson E Co.

Signed and sealed this 3rd day of December 1968.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD J. BRENNER Edward M. Fletcher, J r.

Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US292259 *Jan 22, 1884 Flour-dressing machine
US373453 *Dec 9, 1880Nov 22, 1887 Bran-duster
US1315775 *Feb 25, 1918Sep 9, 1919 Cotton-seed-sef abating machine
FR563233A * Title not available
GB700944A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3909400 *Aug 28, 1973Sep 30, 1975Black Clawson CoApparatus for fractionating fiber suspensions in accordance with fiber length
US3979194 *Mar 4, 1975Sep 7, 1976Wiser Abram JDust filter
US6220446 *Mar 25, 1999Apr 24, 2001Pq CorporationParticle size classifier
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/304, 209/390
International ClassificationD01B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationD01B9/00
European ClassificationD01B9/00