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Publication numberUS3350050 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1967
Filing dateMar 24, 1966
Priority dateMar 27, 1963
Publication numberUS 3350050 A, US 3350050A, US-A-3350050, US3350050 A, US3350050A
InventorsBuczala George S, Copeland Lynn L, Rosengarten Jr Walter E
Original AssigneeBuczala, Rosengarten
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Expendable mold with means to release trapped air and prevent escape of sealant
US 3350050 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

t. 31. 19 cs. 5. BUCZALA ET AL 3,350,050

. I EXPENDABLE MOLD WITH MEANS TO RELEASE TRAPPED AIR AND PREVENT ESCAPE 0F SEALANT Original Filed March 27, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVE TOR-S Gear 2 J. ua'za I:

Wail e Oct. 31, 1967 BUCZALA ETAL 3,350,050

EXPENDABLE MOLD WITH MEANS TO RELEASE TRAPPED R AND PREVENT ESCAPE OF SEALANT AI Original Filed March 27, 1963 4 SheetS- heet 2 522? ears 4 a er'i f as'e'w TORN EYS- Oct. 31, 1967 G. s. BUCZALA ET AL 3,350,050

EXPENDABLE MOLD WITH MEANS TO RELEASE TRAPPED AIR AND PREVENT ESCAPE OF SEALANT Original Filed March 27, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTO R N EYS Oct. 31, 1967 5, BUCZALA ETAL 3,350,050

EXPENDABLE MOLD WITH MEANS TO RELEASE TRAPPED AIR AND PREVENT ESCAPE OF SEALANT Original Filed March 27, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 I VENTO 3 6e J. 5 W? s. 5:2;

United States Patent 3 350 050 EXPENDABLE MOLD WITH MEANS TO RELEASE TRAPPED AIR AND PREVENT ESCAPE 0F SEALANT George S. Buczala, 306 Church Road, Abington Township, Montgomery County, Pa. 19001; Walter E.

This application is a division of our copending application Ser. No. 268,388, filed Mar. 27, 1963, now Patent No. 3,260,280 for Expendable Mold and Method for SealingJoints in Gas Mains.

The present application relates to an expendable mold for sealing bell and spigot joints in existing mains for carrying fiuid such as gas, water and other fluids.

A purpose of the present invention is to provide an expendable mold for receiving sealant for sealing leaks in bell and spigot joints.

A further purpose is to provide a mold which can be applied to a joint at the bottom of an excavation from a position at the surface of the excavation.

A further purpose is to be able to inject sealant into a mold at the bottom of an excavation from a position at the surface of the excavation.

A further purpose is to be mediately after the sealant mold.

A further purpose of the invention is to seal gas mains at the bell and spigot joints by means of a mold applied by an operator located at a point remote from the main.

A further purpose is to use commercially available steel banding for applying the mold on a joint.

A further purpose is to use a mold to create a cavity which extends outwardly from the joint packing space for the reception of a sealant.

A further purpose is to reduce the size of the hole necessary to gain access to the main to seal the joint.

A further purpose is to reduce the area of paving destroyed to gain access to seal the joint.

A further purpose is to keep the main in service while the joint is being sealed.

A further purpose is to provide an expendable mold which can compensate for variations from true roundness or lack of concentricity in the main or lack of angular alignment between the adjoining lengths of pipe.

Further purposes appear in the specification and in the claims.

In the drawings we have chosen to illustrate one embodiment only of the device for sealing the leak, choosing the form shown from the standpoints of convenience in illustration, satisfactory operation and clear demonstration of the principles involved.

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the mold of the invention applied to a pipe joint.

FIGURE 2 is an enlarged longitudinal vertical section of the mold of the invention applied to a bell and spigot joint.

FIGURE 3 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe taken on the line 4-4 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary section transverse to the able to backfill a hole imhas been injected into the axis of the pipe similar to FIGURE 3 showing a variation in the overlap.

FIGURE 6 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe taken on the line 6-6 of FIGURE 2 showing the inlet tubing.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary section transverse to the axis of the pipe similar to FIGURE 6 showing the sealing flap in the relaxed position.

FIGURES 8 through 16 show the application of the mold to a pipe joint.

FIGURE 8 is a transverse section with respect to the pipe showing the mold in elevation being lowered into the hole.

FIGURE 9 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe showing the mold in elevation, the mold being rotatably adjusted about the joint.

FIGURE 10 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe, showing the mold being closed by the use of hooked tongs to extend a spring.

FIGURE 11 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe showing a yoke being used to longitudinally tap the mold into position.

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary longitudinal elevation showing the step illustrated in FIGURE 11.

FIGURE 13 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe showing the insertion of a band around the joint.

FIGURE 14 is a view transverse to the axis of the pipe showing the closed band with the free end of the steel band hooked behind the buckle.

FIGURE 15 is a section transverse to the axis of the pipe showing the use of the extension tensor to tighten the band around the mold. This view also illustrates'a special wrench for tightening the band.

FIGURE 16 is a view similar in position to FIGURE 15, but showing the insertion of the sealant into the mold.

FIGURE 17 is a fragmentary elevation partly in section of the special wrench of the character employed in FIGURE 15.

Describing in illustration but not in limitation and referring to the drawings:

In the distribution of gas for domestic, commercial and industrial use, a network of mains is employed to carry the gas from central points to points of usage. These mains in many instances have bell and spigot joints which are typically packed by jute and then usually leaded or cemented at the outside. When these joints were originally installed, many of the mains were distributing carbureted water gas or coke oven gas or other manufactured gas which contained a substantial content of moisture, tars and oils. These liquids had over a period of time saturated the packing materials to provide relatively leak-free joints.

In recent years there has been a shift over to natural gas which is of a comparatively dry nature. The natural gas has reduced by absorption the content of tars and oils which has been built up in the joints, thus drying out the joints. Furthermore, many of the textile packing materials tend to shrink when they dry. The result encountered in' a widespread way has been a tendency of the packing to shrink, causing openings through the dried out packing which permit leakage of gas.

In other instances leaks have been caused in many areas of the country by active earth conditions which in certain localized areas has involved settling or movement of the earth in the order of a half inch or even one inch a year. This settling has caused a certain tendency for misalignment of the various pipe sections, both vertically and also horizontally and this has further increased the tendency toward leakage. This misalignment in some instances has caused a withdrawal to some extent of the pipe from the spigot causing additional leakage.

All of these factors have made it quite important to develop some technique for sealing the joints. One approach to the problem has been to cut out the line, and actually introduce a self-propelled plug, which cleans the line and locates the joint, sometimes electronically, and then to coat the inside with a suitable sealing compound.

This involves several complications, the worst of which is taking the line out of service and the need to provide an alternate temporary supply to the customer and also the need to operate on relatively straight pipe stretches and not on pronounced bends.

In order to overcome the disadvantages of sealing by a self-propelled crawler inside the line, extensive use has been made in some areas of external sealing techniques, which may be used without taking the line out of service. These usually involve digging an excavation at each joint large enough for a man to descend to the area around the hell or pipe and to fix a bolted clamp fitting around the joint. The fitting compresses a rubber gasket which seals against the outside of the bell and also against the adjoining straight pipe section of the spigot.

There is also another technique which in effect butters epoxy resin around the face of the bell in order to accomplish sealing. This method also requires extensive excavation.

The present invention, as in copending application Ser. No. 192,817, for Apparatus For Sealing Mains, filed May 7, 1962, now Patent No. 3,178,793, issued Apr. 20, 1965, permits the line to remain in service at normal pressure without any interruption of gas flow, and permits the line to be repaired with a minimum of excavation. The process and equipment can function using a slit about 18 inches in length and about 4 inches in width where it penetrates the sidewalk or other paving, and slightly wider in the earth at the bottom where the pipe joint is located. Thus it will be evident that successful operation can be carried on through an opening which is less than 1 square foot in area and in many cases as small as /2. square foot in area at grade in the paving. In addition, in the present invention the excavation can be backfilled immediately after the repair is made so that a minimum of inconvenience is caused to the public.

The present invention as compared to any preformed gasket technique gives a greatly improved seal by providing a bond to the metal surface.

Principally due to the reduced amount of excavation, the speed of the operation is considerably increased compared to the other techniques. It is believed that the time is not more than one-half that of the best prior technique.

By virtue of the relatively small size of the opening in the paving, it is much less costly to repave after sealing the leak than it was in prior art methods. In addition, highway authorities have permitted openings of this size in paving to be repaired with a mere block of concrete rather than extensive cutback and repaving according to specification. This provides quite substantial savings. Also, it is usually possible to work around reinforcing rods in concrete paving, thus eliminating the necessity for replacing and/ or tie-welding new rods with repaving. Furthermore, the repair to the paving can be made immediately.

In accordance with the present invention, a cleaning technique is employed, which may conveniently be sand blasting but could be grit blasting, wheat blasting or refractory blasting. Alternatively the joint could be cleaned by wire brushing, scraping or by solvent. After the cleaning has been completed, a mold is introduced about the joint more or less by remote control since the operator is at ground level. A suitable sealing material is introduced under pressure into the mold space. The mold is left in position about the pipe or joint, the sealing material inlet tube extension is disconnected from the mold and the excavation is immediately backfilled.

The preferred sand basting device and technique is set forth in copending application Ser. No. 192,817 referred to above. This device and technique consist essentially of a rotating element having a nozzle adapted to sand blast the pipe, the rotating element being manipulated remotely from the main by means of a handle.

The present invention is adapted to be used on a joint of the type comprising lengths of pipe 20 and 21. Pipe 20 has a bell 22 having a flange 23, a web 24, a longitudinally and circumferentially extending surface 25 and a radially and transversely extending face 26. The spigot 27 is in effect an integral extension of pipe 21 having the same inside and outside diameter. The outer circum= ference of the spigot 27 and-the inner circumference of the bell 22 form a space having a circumferentially extending portion and a radially extending portion. Jute packing 28 occupies the radially extending portion and a part of the circumferentially extending portion and a lead packing 30 extends circumferentially at the remain ing part of the space not occupied by the jute.

Considering now the mold itself as shown in FIGURES 1 through 7, a girdle 50 has a circumferential longitudi= nally extending spigot portion 53, a circumferential longi= tudinally inclined cavity-forming portion 52, and a citcumferential longitudinally extending bell portion 51. The girdle portions 51, 52 and 53 are permissibly integral but as shown are desirably of separate elements cemented or sewn together at longitudinal overlap positions 47 and 48, and further connected by circumferentially extending reinforcing cemented rubber tapes 54 and 55. The girdle portions 51 and 53 are composed suitably of an outer layer of rubberized fabric 56 laminated to an inner layer of foam rubber 57. The diagonal or intermediate portion 52 is of a rubberized fabric of the type employed at 56.

The mold 50 in a relaxed position conforms to the diameter and shape of the bell and spigot joint to which it is to be applied.

The mold is separated longitudinally at overlap 58 with an inner lap 60 and an outer lap 61. In FIGURE 3, the outside lap 61 has the foam rubber 57 terminating at the end of lap 61. In an alternative shown in FIGURE 5, the foam rubber 57 terminates short of the overlap 61 to permit a closer engagement as at 59.

The inner lap 60 of girdle portion 52 has a thin fiexi ble plastic or fabric film flap 62 adhesively connected at 63 as best seen in FIGURES 6 and 7. The flap 62 tends to remain smooth against the stiffer material of girdle portion 52 when subjected to internal pressure. The inner flap 60 extends between flap 62 and outer lap 61 as seen in FIGURES 6 and 7.

In FIGURE 6, the flap 62 is shown in a stressed position, and in FIGURE 7, the flap 62 is shown in an unstressed position.

A fill tube 65 as best seen in FIGURE 6 is composed of a tube portion 66 and a flange portion 67. The tube portion 66 fits through a circular opening 68 in the intermediate portion 52 of the girdle and is held in place by flange 67 which is suitably cemented to portion 52 at 69.

A helically wound tension spring 70 having a hooked end 71 is anchored to a D-ring cemented or otherwise secured to girdle portion 52 at 72.

The girdle 50 will be held in position over the joint by steel straps and 81 which extend over the bell portion 51 and the spigot portion 53 of the girdle 50. These straps 80 and 81 are of a well known commercial type consisting of a band 82 and a buckle 83. One end of band 82 is secured in buckle 83 by a bend 84 and the opposite end of band 82 is held in buckle 83 by a bolt 85.

It will be noted that the band of strap 80 is placed over the bell portion of the girdle 51 over circumferentially extending surface 25 of the bell 22. This is best seen in FIGURE 2. Likewise steel strap 81 extends around girdle portion 53 to secure the portion to spigot 27.

As seen in FIGURE 2, the joint and girdle form a cavity 90 which is annular and which is of a generally triangular longitudinal cross section. The cavity 90 is defined by bell transverse face 26, lead packing 30, spigot 27, and by the girdle portion 52. A small portion of the foam rubber at 91 completes the cavity definition.

In operation, a hole is excavated about the joint by the use of long handled tools from the Surface. This excavation can be of approximately 18 inches in length and about 4 inches in width at the surface where it penetrates the sidewalk or other paving. The excavation is made slightly larger at the base in the area of the joint so that the mold can be properly manipulated.

Referring to FIGURE 8, the girdle 50 is lowered into excavation 100 from surface 101 by grasping the fill tube 65 with a pair of straight tongs 102. It will be evident that prior to the insertion of the mold into the excavation, a hose 103 has been connected to the fill tube 65 as by a suitable clamp 103'. The mold will extend in a slightly curved fashion so an operator can manipulate the hose around the joint until the girdle assumes the position shown in FIGURE 9.

As shown in FIGURE 9, the tongs 102 are used to slide the mold around the joint. Because of the molds resilience it will stay in almost a closed position around the joint. The hook 71 of spring 70 is then grasped by the offset tongs 104 and hooked around the fill tube 65 as shown in FIGURE 10. The spring 70 keeps the mold circumferentially positioned about the joint.

Using a long handled yoke 105 having a straight handle 106 and a yoke portion 107, the mold is tapped longitudinally at the spigot portion 53 to insure that the mold is up against the bell 22, as shown in FIGURES 11 and 12. The mold is now in position for application of the steel straps 80 and 81.

A buckle 83 is applied to the steel band 82 which is played out from a coiled roll (not shown). The buckle 83 is tightened along the band 82 by bolt 85 and secured lightly thereto so that it does not slip down. The strap 82 is then placed along one side of the spigot portion 53 of the girdle 50 until it curls around the spigot portion 53 and comes up on the other side as shown in FIGURE 13. The band 82 is manipulated from the excavation surface 101. Straight nosed tongs or pliers 108 are used to grasp the free end of the band at 110 and the free end is brought to the surface 101. The free end 110 is threaded through buckle 83 and bent back on itself at 84 as in the normal banding fashion. The buckle 83 is then pushed down along the band 82 as far as can be reached by hand from the surface 101 as shown in FIGURE 14.

The side slot of the tensor head 111 of a conventional band tensor 112 having an elongated handle 113 extends from the hole. The tensor head 111 is pushed down against the buckle 83 and the strap is pulled up snugly as in FIG- URE 15.

The conventional handle 114 at the top of the tensor 112 is rotated to tighten up the band 82 about the spigot 27. When the band is sufficiently tight a special wrench 115 with three universal joints is used to engage and tighten the bolt 85 on the buckle 83 as shown in FIG- URE 15. The special wrench includes a tube 83' suitably bent to 90 degrees, having at one end a crank handle 83 suitably journalled on a bearing 83 which connects to a series of suitably three universal joints 83 connected end to end in the bend of tube 83 and at the output end suitably journalled in a bearing 83 and connecting to a socket wrench 83 Thus it will be evident that torsional force applied at the crank end is made effective at right angles in the socket wrench.

When the nut 85 on the buckle 83 has been tightened, the steel band 82 is cut adjacent to buckle 83 by operating the conventional cut-01f lever 116 of the band tensor 112 by forcing handle 117 downward.

The same procedure is followed for placing strap 80 on the bell portion 51 of the mold.

After both bands have been placed and properly secured the mold is ready for injection of the sealant. The sealant is preferably of a type which will partially harden but which will remain flexible throughout its life.

In FIGURE 16 there is shown the step of injecting the sealant into the mold by the use of a fluid pump 118 of any well known type which connects through inlet hose 103 to fill tube 65.

I The flap 62 acts as a valve which permits the air being displaced by the sealant entering the cavity to escape through the overlap 58 of girdle portion 52 but prevents similar escape of the highly viscid sealant.

The sealant is of a material of such viscosity that it will not leak out through the mold even though the mold would not be tight to water.

A guage 123 or other technique, such as observing difficulty in further operation of the pump 118 or, for instance, a grease gun, is used to indicate when the cavity 90 is completely filled with sealant.

After the sealant has been injected into the mold and the inlet hose 103 secured against leakage as, for instance, by bending the hose 103 into a kink and tying the hose, the hose is disconnected from the pump at 122 and allowed to drop into the hole. The hole can be immediately backfilled.

In view of our invention and disclosure, variations and modifications to meet individual whim or particular need will doubtless become evident to others skilled in the art, to obtain all or part of the benefits of our invention without copying the structure shown, and we, therefore, claim all such insofar as they fall within the reasonable spirit and scope of our claims.

Having thus described our invention what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In an expendable mold for sealing bell and spigot joints in fluid mains, a first flexible portion adapted to circumferentially surround a bell, a second flexible portion adapted to circumferentially surround a spigot, and a third flexible intermediate portion connecting said first and second portion and forming an annular cavity to receive a liquid sealant, said first, second and third portions being overlapped circumferentially, the overlap of said third portion being adapted to release trapped air from the cavity and to prevent escape of sealant therefrom, inlet means in said third portion for introducing sealant into the cavity, and metal band means for securing the first and second portions to the bell and spigot respectively of a bell and spigot joint. 4

2. A mold of claim 1, having a foam rubber radially inward lining on said bell and spigot portions.

3. A mold of claim 1, in combination with means for initially keeping the mold circumferentially positioned about the joint.

4. A mold of claim 1, in which said portions are of elastomerized fabric.

5. In an expendable mold for sealing bell and spigot joints in fluid mains, a first flexible portion adapted to circumferentially surround a bell, a second flexible portion adapted to circumferentially surround a spigot, and a third flexible intermediate portion connecting said first and second portions and forming an annular cavity to receive a liquid sealant, inlet means in said third portion for introducing sealant into the cavity, flap means associated with said third portion for permitting escape of entrapped air from said cavity and preventing escape of sealant from said cavity, and metal band means for securing the first and second portions to the bell and spigot respectively of a bell and spigot joint.

6. An expendable mold of generally cylindrical shape for sealing joints in fluid means having a longitudinally extending bell portion at one end adapted to conform to the outer circumference of a bell in a bell and spigot joint, a longitudinally extending spigot portion having a diameter less than the bell portion at the end remote from the bell portion and adapted to conform to the outer circumference of a spigot in a bell and spigot joint, a conical middle por- 7 8 tion connecting said bell portion and spigot portion and References Cited adapted to form a cavity at the bell and spigot joint, means UNITED STATES PATENTS for introducing sealant into the cavity comprising an inlet opening in said middle portion, an inlet tube adapted to 2,268,069 12/1941 Ev'ans 2 carry sealing material to the inlet opening, a flap associ- 5 2,735,450 3/1957 W l t 249-89 ated with said middle portion adapted to release trapped 1, 9 Copeland 138-99 air from the mold and to insure filling the cavity with 3,178,793 4/ 1965 Rosengarten et a1 25-127 said sealant, and metal bands for holding the spigot portion and the bell portion radially inward against the cir- SPENCER OVERHOLSER Pnmary Examiner cumference of the said bell and spigot. 10 R. D. BALDWIN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2268069 *Feb 6, 1940Dec 30, 1941Evans James LPipe joint forming device
US2785450 *Feb 1, 1954Mar 19, 1957Giles GradyLead jointer
US3141478 *Jun 25, 1962Jul 21, 1964Rubco ProductsUnderground seal for gas mains, etc.
US3178793 *May 7, 1962Apr 20, 1965RosengartenApparatus for sealing mains
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3502112 *Jul 5, 1966Mar 24, 1970Hankila MichaelPipe clamp
US3742756 *Apr 8, 1971Jul 3, 1973Seager W And Ass LtdAccess duct for pipelines
US4358417 *May 22, 1981Nov 9, 1982Amp IncorporatedMethod for repairing a pipe coupling
US4459251 *Apr 29, 1982Jul 10, 1984Joint Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for controlled application of a coating material to a pipe joint
US6286541 *Nov 3, 1997Sep 11, 2001General Kinematics CorporationMechanical leak-proof coupling
US6296006 *Mar 10, 1998Oct 2, 2001Koppl Company, Inc.System and method for sealing leaks in vessels
US7367362 *Dec 29, 2006May 6, 2008Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US7426942Feb 23, 2006Sep 23, 2008Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US7500494Apr 13, 2007Mar 10, 2009Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US7673654Feb 29, 2008Mar 9, 2010Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US8141592Dec 3, 2004Mar 27, 2012Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US20060118191 *Dec 3, 2004Jun 8, 2006Rice Brian LSystem and method for pipe repair
US20060137756 *Feb 23, 2006Jun 29, 2006Rice Brian LSystem and method for pipe repair
US20060272724 *Apr 25, 2006Dec 7, 2006Borland Robin NSystem and method for pipe repair using fiber wrap and polymeric resin
US20070107791 *Dec 29, 2006May 17, 2007Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
US20080017263 *Apr 13, 2007Jan 24, 2008Robinson David PSystem and method for pipe repair
US20080216938 *Feb 29, 2008Sep 11, 2008Illinois Tool Works Inc.System and method for pipe repair
EP0157972A2 *Apr 9, 1984Oct 16, 1985Joint Systems, Inc.Pipe joint coating applicator
EP0157972A3 *Apr 9, 1984Jul 9, 1986Joint Systems, Inc.Pipe joint coating applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification249/89, 425/169, 285/290.3, 138/99, 425/117, 403/265
International ClassificationF16L55/16, F16L55/175
Cooperative ClassificationF16L55/175
European ClassificationF16L55/175