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Publication numberUS3351040 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1967
Filing dateDec 3, 1965
Priority dateDec 3, 1965
Publication numberUS 3351040 A, US 3351040A, US-A-3351040, US3351040 A, US3351040A
InventorsMccall Hannon L
Original AssigneeMccall Hannon L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moistening or wetting apparatus
US 3351040 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV, 7, 1967 H. L. Mcc

MOISTENING OR WETTING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 5, 1965 INVENTOR HA NNON LMc CALL BY fmv p HIS ATTORNEY Nov. 7, 1967 H. L. M CALL MOISTENING OR WETTING APPARATUS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 5, 1965 INVENTOR. HANNON L.MCC-ALL BY HIS ATTORNEY United States Patent 3.35.1,d40 ltiOlt'dTENlNG QR WETTING APPARATUS Harmon L. McCall, 3G2 Circle Drive, F airacres, Bristol, Tenn. 37620 Filed Dec. 3, 1965, Ser. No. 511,524 2 iliaims. (Cl. 118-249) ABSTRACT @F THE DISQLOSURE A moistening or gumming device wherein stamps, labels and similar materials are fed between two rollers, an upper pressure roller and a lower applicating roller on a conveyor screen, liquid being applied to the under surface of material through the screen. i

This invention in one of its aspects relates to a moistening device which is particularly suitable for Wetting stamps or labels. In another of its aspects the invention pertains to an apparatus which can be used in the application of adhesive to labels and the like.

Various devices have been developed for applying a moistening, or adhesive film to thin sheets such as labels, stamps, flaps of large envelopes, shelf and drawer paper, and other thin pliant sheets of paper or synthetic materials. A study of these known gummers, moisteners, and adhesive applicators reveals that in general they embody a chamber or reservoir partially filled with water or an adhesive liquid, and a roller. The strips or squares of material, for instance, stamps or labels, are passed over the roller in the process of receiving a coat of liquid.

Moistening devices and gummers of the roller type are widely employed because they are practically the only suitable means of wetting only one side of a stamp or label, sponges and sprays being beset with various problems. Roller type moisteners or gumming devices are, however, subject to further improvement. The handling of the material during its passage over a roller is perplexing. For instance, a full page of trading stamps or a long strip, tends to so Wet as to soak through in some spots, because manipulation over the roller is difiicult. Corners and sides of the material frequently are not wetted at all. In addition, it is almost impossible to apply an even coat of moisture or adhesive to a strip, such as a sheet of stamps, when this sheet is to be passed over the roller without the use of a dispenser. The use of an apparatus having a roller, thus, is not completely effective When the stamps or labels are to be manipulated by hand.

An object of this invention is to provide an apparatus which requires no skill, but which nevertheless insures perfect wetting of stamps and labels.

Another object of this invention is to provide an apparatus which permits the moistening of one stamp or an entire sheet with equal facility.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a device which minimizes handling of wet stamps or labels.

A still further object is the provision of a moistening device which is simple in construction, inexpensive to manufacture, and eflicient in operation.

In accordance with this invention a roller-type apparatus for use in moistening or wetting strips of paper, such as stamps, labels, etc., is provided which does not require the manipulation of the stamps or labels and the like during passage over the moistening roller. Moreover, one stamp or several stamps can be moistened with equal facility. The invention contemplates a tray-like body structure having substantially parallel side members carrying a reservoir therebetween. Above the reservoir is a pair of parallel superimposed rollers capable of axial rotation, which includes an upper guide roller acting on a lower moistening roller extending across, and situated partially within, the reservoir. The moistening roller is surrounded with an absorbent sleeve, and shafts of the two rollers are held at their ends at the parallel side members.

A unique feature of the apparatus of this invention is the provision of a conveying screen in combination with the rollers. This conveying screen is in operative position between the moistening roller and the guide roller, and is capable of being moved back and forth therebetween so that the pressure of the guide roller maintains the screen, and any strip thereon against the moistening roller, which distributes liquid from the reservoir to the screen, and through the voids thereof to any paper strip carried thereon. In describing the invention in detail reference is made to the accompanying drawings which illustrate various components of the invention, the drawings being for the purpose of illustration only.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective showing the complete moistening apparatus of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a cut away view illustrating one means of 9 securing the operating rollers.

FIG. 3 is a side view in section illustrating the principle upon which the apparatus of the invention operates.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view illustrating another method of fabricating the device of this invention.

Referring particularly to FIG. 1, 2 designates the apparatus of the invention having a body structure 4 which can be made of metal or glass, but which preferably will be made of a high impact plastic, for instance polystyrene, a phenolaldehyde resin, a modified epoxide, polyethylene, polyester or similar resin. As can be seen from FIG. 1 the apparatus herein is so constructed as to provide a pair of side members 6 and 8 in separate parallel relation.

Refer now to FIG. 2. In order to form a reservoir 10 between side members 6 and 8, the bottom of body structure 4 preferably is cylindrically concave so that liquid contained in this trough or reservoir 10 will be at its deepest in the center.

In each of the side members adjacent the reservoir there is provided a lower vertical recess 12 which is adapted to receive a roller shaft 14 of a roller which conforms generally in shape to the cylindrically concave reservoir, the end of which is visible in FIG. 3. Secured to shaft 14 is a plastic or metal roller 16 which is sleeved by an absorbent roller or sleeve 13 (FIG. 3). This sleeve can be made of wool, cotton and synthetic fabrics so long as they are sufii-ciently thick. However, natural or synthetic sponges are preferred, such as cellulose and rubber sponges. Roller 16 is thus moistened by capillary action of the water or adhesive 20 in reservoir 10. Reservoir 10 is directly beneath moistening roller 16, the roller being situated partially within the reservoir. Therefore as the roller is rotated, its surrounding sleeve 18 is constantly moistened.

Unless there is an attached dispenser, it is the usual practice to hold stamps or labels against the roller with one hand, and to pull them with the other hand. Referring again to FIG. 1, it can be seen. that this is not necessary with the apparatus of this invention. The figure shows body structure 4 and upper rubber, metal, glass or plastic guide roller 22, moistening roller 16 not being visible. As indicated hereinbefore, perhaps the most important component of this apparatus, and that Which makes it operate as does no similar device, is the provision of conveying screen 24'. The rollers without the screen are of little advantage. It is the screen which carries the strips to be moistened such as stamps 26, labels and the like, and which is operated in combination with the rollers.

One method of fabricating the apparatus of this invention will be apparent from FIG. 2. The shaft 14 of lower plastic, metal or glass moistening roller 16 is positioned in recess 12. Above this, moistening roller shaft 28 of upper roller 22 snaps into place in vertical recess 30 which is so shaped to hold the rollers securely in position. Roller 22 is thus a guide roller, the function of which is to hold screen 24 against sleeve 18 of moistening roller 16.

The action of the apparatus of this invention, when the screen is operated in the direction indicated by the arrow, is shown in FIG. 3. When so operated the upper roller will rotate in a counter-clockwise direction, whereas the lower roller rotates in a clockwise direction. Thus pushing or pulling screen 24 brings about the rotation of both the moistening roller and the guide roller acting thereon. In addition to conveying the stamps uniformly across the moistening roller, screen 24 also serves another purpose. Its additional function is to prevent stamps 25 from becoming overly moistened. As can be seen from FIG. 3 the screen prevents all of the water or other liquid from reaching the stamps. Much of the water is forced back into the reservoir since the principle of capillary action also applies to the screen. Thus the combination of top roller, screen and bottom roller consistently meters the correct amount of water or liquid as the stamps pass between the rollers. Moreover, adhesive forces at the interface due to liquid on the screen hold the stamps against the screen so that they do not tend to wrap around the guide roller. The pressure is determined by the distance between the rollers, their placement being such that rotation of the upper roller drives the bottom one. The device so constructed insures that the screen is against the lower wetting roller and that both rollers rotate during operation. The screen can thus be pushed or pulled from one side to the other and stamp or stamps 26 removed.

While not necessary, in order to permit ready stamp removal using both hands, shelves 32 are formed opposite each other on the inside walls of side members 6 and 8. Shelves 32 support screen 24 so that the screen remains parallel to the base of the body structure. With the use of the shelves it is easier to move screen 24 from one end to the other. In addition shelves 32, along with the rollers, support the screen when it is withdrawn to one end, so that moistened stamps can be lifted off using both hands without supporting the screen. Thus, the screen is supported in its position during stamp removal. A small amount of water may accumulate on the top roller when wetting one stamp, or less than a full sheet. However, this accumulation of water, because of the material of which the upper roller is made, is slight. Since the slight amount of water does not reduce the efiiciency of the wetting operation, no provision is included for removing this slight amount of water from the roller.

The preferred construction of the moistening appara tus of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 4. Body structure 114 is shown having its side members 116 and 118 horizontally recessed to form shelves 132. The body structure is provided with three legs 134 enabling it to stand without wobbling on a surface which is not completely level. Normally the apparatus will be placed on a table, bench or floor, and, if desired, 134 can be a suction cup. Screen 124 of FIG. 4 is constructed in the same manner as that shown in FIG. 1. If a very flexible screen is employed rigidity can be obtained by the use of a molding or frame 136. However, this can be eliminated by the use of a more rigid screen.

The preferred apparatus of FIG. 4 differs from that of FIG. 2 in the roller retaining means. Rather than separate recesses to hold each roller, a shaft or vertical groove 140 is adapted to guide and retain a brace 142.

The ends of upper guide roller 122 and lower moistening roller 146 are adapted to seat in holes 144 in brace 142. Brace 142 is sufficiently elastic to permit the rollers to be inserted or withdrawn therefrom. Thus if sleeve 148 of moistening roller 146 becomes worn, or is to be changed for any other reason, the ends of brace 142 can be pulled slightly apart so that the rollers can be removed. After changing sleeves the rollers are reassembled in the brace, which will be reinserted in slot provided in the body structure.

Two methods of holding the rollers in the apparatus of this invention have been illustrated herein. Obviously others will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art. Other modifications will also occur to those in the art. For example, instead of a wire or coated wire screen, a perforated sheet of plastic, coated cardboard, etc., can be employed. The holes punched in the sheets can be of various sizes depending upon the size of the apparatus, with the understanding, of course, that large holes overcome the capillary action, and that strips to be moistened will be wetter. By virtue of the operation of the apparatus the size of the holes determine the degree of moistening and with a given size screen holes the stamps are uniformly wetted regardless of how fast or slow the screen is operated so long as tension is such that both rollers rotate. Larger holes can render it more difficult to take hold of corners when removing the wetted stamps. An example of another variation possible within the spirit of this invention is the size of the apparatus itself. Thus, while the apparatus shown is especially desirable for wetting sheets of trading stamps, a smaller one can be made for individual stamps. Such a device would be pocket size and could even be provided with a lid or cover. For use with labels the apparatus will be larger than shown; and it will be desirable to fabricate an even larger device for applying paste to six-foot sections of wallpaper. Such Variations and ramifications are deemed to be within the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for use in applying a liquid to strips of paper such as stamps and labels comprising the combination of (a) a tray-like body structure having substantially parallel side walls and a reservoir therebetween, said side walls extending above said reservoir and being relieved along the inner sides thereof above said reservoir to form a shelf on each wall, a first cylindrical roller, a sleeve of absorbent material tightly but removably fitted around said first roller forming a liquid applying roller, a second cylindrical roller having a smooth non-absorptive surface, said second cylinder acting as a pressure roller, and journal means holding the two rollers in freely rotatable horizontal positions at the body sides with the liquid applying roller extending across and situated partially within the reservoir and with the pressure roller superimposed above the applying roller, and in touching contact therewith, with its shaft parallel to the shaft of the liquid applying roller to form a nip aligned with the shelf, the journal for the pressure roller permitting vertical movement of said pressure roller with (b) a self supporting, rigid rectangular transporting screen of uniform thickness adapted to be supported on said shelf, to fit between the parallel side walls and to pass completely between the rollers and through the nip in both directions, said screen being sufficiently rigid to be pushed from its end rectilinearly between the rollers, to drive the rollers, and to convey a strip therebetween at the nip, the apparatus thereby being operated by the transporting screen which brings about the rotation of both rollers while permitting the pressure roller to maintain the screen and strip carried thereby against the liquid applying roller which liquid applying roller distributes liquid from the reservoir to the transporting screen, and through the voids thereof to the surface of the strip being transported by the transporting screen when it is passed forward and nip.

2. An apparatus for use in applying a liquid to strips of paper such as stamps and labels comprising the combination of (a) a tray-like body structure having substantially parallel side walls and a reservoir therebetween, a first cylindrical roller, a sleeve of absorbent material tightly but removably fitted around said first roller forming a liquid applying roller, a second cylindrical roller having a smooth nonabsorptive surface, said second cylinder acting as a pressure roller, and brace means holding the two rollers in freely rotatable horizontal positions at the body sides with the liquid applying roller extending across and situated partially within the reservoir and with the pressure roller superimposed above the applying roller, and in touching contact therewith, with its shaft parallel to the shaft of the liquid applying roller to form a nip, with (b) a self supporting, rigid rectangular transporting screen of uniform thickness adapted to fit between the parallel side walls and to pass completely between the rollers and through the nip in both directions, said screen being sufliciently rigid to be pushed from its end rectilinearly between the rollers, to drive, the rollers, and to convey a strip therebetween at the nip, the apparatus thereby being operated by the transporting screen which backward through the brings about the rotation of both rollers while permitting the pressure roller to maintain the screen and strip carried thereby against the liquid applying roller which liquid applying roller distributes liquid from the reservoir to the transporting screen, and through the voids thereof to the surface of the strip being transported by the transporting screen when it is passed forward and backward through the nip.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 546,506 9/1895 Carlisle 118-238 X 681,961 9/ 1901 Flitcroft 118-249 1,119,820 12/1914 Gillespie 118-249 1,127,538 2/1915 Staude 118-249 2,503,694 4/1950 Voorhies 118-249 2,620,498 12/ 1952 Jockers et al. 15-573 2,681,636 6/ 1954 Fridolph 118-249 2,864,308 12/1958 Luppold 101-124- 3,099,207 7/1963 Kiang 101-124 CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner. R. I. SMITH, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US546506 *Jul 1, 1895Sep 17, 1895The Holyoke Card and Paper CompanyMachine for pasting and mounting sheets
US681961 *Mar 19, 1901Sep 3, 1901George W O BrienMachine for painting tin.
US1119820 *Mar 25, 1907Dec 8, 1914United Shoe Machinery AbCoating-machine.
US1127538 *Mar 8, 1909Feb 9, 1915E G Staude Mfg CoGlue-pot for box-making machines.
US2503694 *Sep 17, 1948Apr 11, 1950Voorhies Austin ILabel moistening and/or gumming device
US2620498 *Sep 7, 1946Dec 9, 1952Jockers Harry WPaint applying device
US2681636 *Jan 15, 1951Jun 22, 1954Black Clawson CoPaper coating machine
US2864308 *Mar 29, 1955Dec 16, 1958John Caveney TSilk screen printing apparatus
US3099207 *Jun 11, 1962Jul 30, 1963Kuen Kiang John ChienStencil printer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3999505 *Jun 3, 1975Dec 28, 1976Olympus Optical Co., Ltd.Apparatus for automatic application of blood serum
US4073263 *May 10, 1976Feb 14, 1978Melton Baxter WayneLiquid adhesive coating machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/249, D19/70, 118/207, 101/124
International ClassificationB43M11/00, B43M11/02
Cooperative ClassificationB43M11/02
European ClassificationB43M11/02