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Publication numberUS3351483 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1967
Filing dateOct 14, 1964
Priority dateFeb 14, 1963
Also published asDE1444090A1
Publication numberUS 3351483 A, US 3351483A, US-A-3351483, US3351483 A, US3351483A
InventorsJr Carl S Miner, Kathryn A Park, Walter F Weiss
Original AssigneeLittle Inc A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of softening textile fabrics
US 3351483 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,351,483 METHOD OF SGFTENING TEXTILE FABRICS Carl S. Miner, Jr., Winnetira, llL, Kathryn A. Park, Prairie Village, Karts, and Walter F. Weiss, Wheaton, Ill., assignors to Arthur D. Little, Inc, Cambridge, Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts No Drawing. Filed Oct. 14, 1964, Ser. No. 403,939 7 Claims. (Cl. 117-66) This application is a continuation-in-part of our copending application S.N. 258,645, now abandoned, filed Feb. 14, 1963.

This invention relates to compositions and methods for treating textile fabrics to clean the fabrics and to impart thereto desired feel characteristics.

In recent years, compositions useful for treating fabrics to improve the softness and feel characteristics thereof are known in the art. Generally these softener compositions, designated fabric softeners or textile softening agents, which are employed to treat fabrics, are liquids which contain as the principal active component a quaternary ammonium compound, that is, a substituted ammonium salt in which all four of the hydrogens of the ammonium radical are substituted by organic radicals.

When used in domestic laundering, the liquid fabric softeners are added to the rinse water during the rinse cycle which is generally from about 3 to 5 minutes duration. This necessitates that the user monitor the laundering operation or take other recautions so that the liquid fabric softener is added at the proper time. In the case of housewives and other users, particularly in connection with automatic washing machines, the user generally must return to the washing machine either just prior to or during the rinse cycle of the washing operation which, to a busy user, is obviously burdensome. Furthermore, the user must take special precaution to employ the proper amount of liquid fabric softener in the rinse cycle of the washing operation and avoid large excesses thereof in order to prevent an overdosage which frequently renders the clothes water repellent with a greasy film remaining on the fabric surface as well as imparting a certain degree of yellowness to the fabrics.

Obviously it is highly desirable and advantageous to have available a fabric softener which is satisfactory for use with the household laundry detergents normally used for laundering textile fabrics so that the fabric softener can be added during the wash cycle either separately or simultaneously in admixture with the household laundry detergent. In the case of automatic washing machines, this eliminates the need for the user returning to the laundering operation until the operation is completed and the clothes ready to be dried. However, it is generally accepted in the art that the liquid fabric softeners now available cannot and should not be employed in laundering operations during the wash cycle in the presence of common household laundry detergents. It is clear that the liquid fabric softeners cannot be combined with solid household laundry detergents in a single package but more important the conventional liquid softeners if added separately during the wash cycle do not fulfill their intended purpose and have no effect on the softness of the washed clothes. Laboratory tests indicate that the known liquid fabric softeners are, for all practical purposes, ineffective when used in the wash cycle together with or in the presence of household laundry detergents. Use directions on the labels of currently available fabric softeners caution that the products are to be used only in the rinse cycle, thus entailing all of the indicated disadvantages associated with the use of a fabric softener during the rinse cycle.

Over of the common household laundry detergents utilize synthetic surface active agents of the anionic and nonionic type. These household laundry detergent compositions generally include various builders such as alkali carbonates, silicates, phosphates and the like, but the synthetic surfactants are the principal active cleansing agents in the compositions. Throughout the present specification and claims the term household laundry detergent means any composition useful for laundering fabrics which includes synthetic surface active agents of the anionic or nonionic type and various builders, which composition may or may not include other conventional ingredients such as optical brighteners, perfumes, antiredeposition agents and soforth. Soaps with or without builders are also included in the term household laundry detergent.

It has now been found that certain fabric softener compositions can be employed in the presence of household laundry detergents during the wash cycle of a textile fabric laundering operation with totally unexpected advantages. Furthermore, it has been discovered in accordance with the present invention that the fabric softener compositions contemplated herein can be advantageously combined with household laundry detergents to provide stable, multi-purpose laundering compositions which can be added in one addition to the wash cycle of a laundering operation to provide an effective washing action and at the same time impart a desired soft texture and feel to the washed clothes. The addition of the compositions of this invention comprising a household laundry detergent and a specified fabric softener during the wash cycle of the laundering operation obviates the need and bother of the user returning to the washing machine during the rinse cycle as has been required heretofore.

In contrast to the arts teachings and warnings, the fabric softeners utilized in the present invention function effectively when employed during the wash cycle of the laundering operation in the presence of household laundry detergents. The use of the fabric softeners in the Wash cycle is highly advantageous from the standpoint of user convenience, and offers the significant and totally unexpected advantages that desired softness and feel characteristics are effectively imparted to the fabrics. Moreover, these desiderata are accomplished while at the same time the possibility of the fabrics receiving an overdosage of the fabric softener is effectively avoided.

The fabric softeners can be added to a washload of textile fabrics in accordance with the present invention prior to or during the wash cycle of the laundering operation before addition of the household laundry detergent or simultaneously therewith, or during the washing cycle after addition of the detergent. It is also an object of the present invention to provide stable, solid, multipurpose fabric Washing and softening compositions comprising a household laundry detergent and a specified solid fabric softener whereby one addition of the composition to the wash cycle achieves both a cleaning and softening effect on the textile fabrics.

The fabric softeners which are employed in the present invention are cation-active organic nitrogen compounds having textile softening properties and being capable of forming solid complexes or adducts with urea. These cation-active organic nitrogen compounds, which can be used as active textile softening agents, are known to the art and comprise compounds such as quaternary ammonium compounds and amines containing at least one straight-chain organic radical of at least 8 carbon atoms and preferably from 12 to 22 carbon atoms. Representative of these preferred cationic compounds are quaternary ammonium compounds having at least one straightchain organic radical containing between 12 and 22 carbon atoms; primary, secondary and tertiary amine compounds having at least one straight-chain organic radical containing between 12 and 22 carbon atoms; 1,3-propylene diamine compounds having a C to C straight-chain organic radical; imidazoline compounds having a C to C straight-chain organic radical and like compounds. Specific preferred fabric softening compositions include such compounds as di-(hydrogenated tallow) dimethylammonium chloride, Z-heptadecyl-l, l-methyl [(2-stearoylamido)ethyl] imidazolinium methyl sulfate, di-(hydrogenated tallow) dimethylammonium methyl sulfate, primary tallow amine, primary hydrogenated tallow amine, tallow 1,3-propylene diamine, oleyl 1,3-propylene diamine and coco 1,3-propylene diamine, di-(soya) dimethylammonium chloride, and di-(coco) dimethylammonium chloride.

Cationic nitrogen compounds having at least one organic radical of at least 8 carbon atoms, preferably from 12 to 22 carbon atoms, which themselves may range from liquids to semi-solid waxy masses, can be converted into free-flowing powders by reaction with urea as is known in the art. It is in the form of the urea complex that the cationic fabric softeners are employed in the methods and compositions of the present invention. The preparation of solid water-soluble urea adducts of quaternary ammonium compounds is disclosed in various prior art patents such as, for example, US. Patent 2,676,955 to Weitkamp et al., dated April 27, 1954; the disclosure thereof being hereby incorporated herein and made part of this application.

A dry, free-flowing fabric softener comprising a urea inclusion compound of a softening agent is likewise disclosed in US. Patent 2,940,816 to Mitchell S. Sniegowski, dated June 14, 1960, and this type of material can be used in the present invention.

7 The cationic nitrogen-containing component constitutes from about 4 to about 40 percent, preferably from about 18 to about 30 percent by Weight of the softener compositions utilized in the present invention. Urea which is reacted with the cationic nitrogen-containing compound to form an adduct constitutes the major component of the softener composition and is employed in amounts ranging from about 50 to about 90 percent by weight. The urea should be employed in an amount at least equal to that required for reaction with the cationic compound and preferably the urea is employed in theoretical excess of the cationic compound in a proportion ranging from about 2 to 180 moles of urea per mole of the cationic compound.

One preferred method of producing in flake form waterdispersible fabric softener compositions of the type under consideration is disclosed and claimed in the applications for United States Patent Ser. No. 216,763, now abandoned, filed by Walter Weiss on Aug. 17, 1962, and Ser. No. 296,894, now Patent No. 3,256,180, filed July 23, 1963; the disclosures of which are hereby incorporated herein. According to the Weiss process, urea is reacted with a cationic nitrogen compound preferably containing at least one straight-chain organic radical of at least 12 carbon atoms in the presence of a small amount of Water which has been found necessary to produce a solid product in flake form. The amount of Water present in the reaction mixture corresponds to from about 2 to about 15 percent, preferably about 3 to about 5 percent by weight of the composition. A solid reaction product is produced and flaked on a rolling mill or the like to a thickness not substantially in excess of 0.025 inch.

A typical fabric softener composition suitable for use in accordance with the present invention is as follows, the parts being by weight:

Urea 75.00 Cationic softening agent 22.00 Surface active agent 2.75 Perfume 0.250 Dye 0.005

A solid fabric softener composition as exemplified above can be employed in the wash cycle of a laundering operation in the presence of conventional household laundry detergents. Representative of the anionic surface active agents employed in household laundry detergent compositions are the alkyl sulfates, alkyl aryl sulfonates such as alkyl benzene sulfonates, mono-glyceride sulfates, sulfoethyl oleates, sulfoethyl-N-methyl olcic amides, fatty acid soaps such as sodium stearate and the like. Representative nonionic surfactants include polyglycol ether type surfactants; polyalkylene oxide derivatives of phenolic compounds such as dibutyl and diamyl phenols and cresols, heptyl, octyl, nonyl, decyl phenols and cresols; polyalkylene oxide derivatives of aliphatic organic hydroxy compounds and carboxy compounds; polyalkylene oxide derivatives of such mercapto compounds as dodecyl mercaptan, oleyl mercaptan, etc.; polyalkylene oxide derivatives of carboxylic acid amides and of sulfonamides.

In the compositions of the invention, the fabric softener composition comprising the urea-cationic complex is employed in amounts sufficient to obtain satisfactory fabric softening. The specific amount to employ depends, of course, upon the amount of the active textile softening agent present. In general, the fabric softener composition (cationic-urea complex) constitutes from about 10 to about 50 percent or more by weight of the fabric softenerdetergent composition. Minor amounts of secondary ingredients such as perfumes and dyes can also be employed in the compositions of the invention. Typical fabric softener-household laundry detergent compositions of the invention are as follows, the parts being by Weight:

Organic surfactant 15-407 Sodium phosphate or polyphosphate 20-50 Sodium sulfate 5-60 Sodium silicate 0-8 Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose 0-1.5

Solid fabric softener (urea complex) 10-30 Anionic surfactant 40" Sodium tripolyphosphate 32 Tetrasodium pyrophosphate Sodium metasilicate 10 Sodium sulfate 10 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) Anionic surfactant 10- Sodium tripolyphosphate 40 Tetrasodium pyrophosphate 10 Sodium metasilicate 10 Sodium sulfate 10 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) 10-30 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) 20 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) (urea 75 %hydrogenated tallow amine 25%) 30 Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate 10 Sodium dodecyl sulfate 10 Sodium tripolyphosphate 4O Tetrasodium pyrophosphate 10 75 Sodium metasilicate 10 Sodium sulfate 20 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) (urea 70%di (hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate 18 Lauric diethanolamide 4 Sodium tripolyphosphate a- 50 85 Sodium metasilicate 6 Sodium sulfate 22 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) (urea 70%di (hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride 25% hydrogenated tallow amine 15 Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate 10 Sodium tallow sulfate 5 Laurie diethanolamide 5 Sodium tripolyphosphate 40 80 Tetrasodium pyrophosphate 10 Sodium metasilicate 10 Sodium sulfate 20 Solid fabric softener (urea complex) (urea 70%oleyl The proportion of active cationic ingredient complexed with urea is susceptible to variation; accordingly when other proportions of active textile softening agents are employed the amount of solid fabric softener in the softener-household laundry detergent composition can be adjusted correspondingly.

As previously indicated, the specified solid fabric softeners can be added in accordance with this invention prior to or during the wash cycle of the laundering operation separately from the household laundry detergent and either before or after addition thereof or simultaneously therewith such as is the case when the fabric softenerhousehold laundry detergent compositions of the invention are employed. The fabric softener composition is employed in sufficient amounts to obtain a desired effect on the texture and feel of the fabrics treated therewith. The make-up of the compositions of this invention given heretofore is such to provide this amount of fabric softener when the laundry detergents are employed in usual amounts.

To illustrate the advantages of employing the specified fabric softeners in accordance with the invention the results of several test programs are included herein.

Example I In one set of tests cup of a commercial laundry detergent sold under the trade name Tide by the Procter & Gamble Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio, was used in a General Electric top-loading automatic washing machine. Tide is a Well known commercially available household laundry detergent comprising sodium alkyl aryl sulfonate, sodium alkyl sulfate, sodium tripolyphosphate. Twenty grams of a solid flake fabric softener containing 4.8 grams (24%) of the active softener, a urea adduct of the quaternary ammonium compound, di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethylammonium chloride, were added to the wash cycle simultaneously with the detergent. The urea adduct of the quaternary ammonium compound was prepared in flake form by the method described in the above-mentioned Weiss patent applications.

The wash load was composed of three Terry cloth bath towels and huck towel ballast to make a 6 lb. total load. The machine fill was set to the 6-10 lb. load fill (20.51-1 gal. of water). City tap Water having a hardness of about 136 ppm. (as calcium carbonate) was used in all washing and rinsing.

The softness of the fabrics as compared with the control treated in an identical manner except for addition of the fabric softener was evaluated by a panel of 3 to 6 experts. The results obtained were that 69% of the evaluations favored the Wash cycle treated samples as being softer than the respective controls.

Example 11 Using substantially the same procedure as in Example I, various cationic textile softening agents having at least one straight-chain organic radical of at least 8 or more carbon atoms complexed with urea were employed it as the active fabric softeners. These cationic softeners were complexed with urea as previously indicated and employed in the solid flake form. The number of panel members participating in each evaluation is indicated by the number below the slant bar. The number of panel members who selected the test fabric as softer or as having a better hand than the control (no fabric softener) is indicated by the number above the slant bar. The results are shown in Table I.

TABLE I.DETERGENT+CATIONIC SOFTENER WASH- ING VS. DETERGENT WASHING (CONTROL) Hydrogenated tallow amine/control 4/5 Tallow 1,3-propylenediamine/control 5/5 Oleyl 1,3-propylenediamine/control 5/5 Coco 1,3-propylenediamine/control 5/5 Example III Utilizing substantially the same test procedure as in Example I and the same solid fabric softener, a number of washing operations were carried out with different household laundry detergents; detergent #1 being a commercially available low foaming anionic type household laundry detergent (sold under the trade name Dash by Procter & Gamble Co. of Cincinnati, Ohio) and detergent #2 a commercially available controlled foam nonionic type household laundry detergent (sold under the trade name All by Lever Brothers, Inc.). In both cases cup of detergent was used, which in the case of detergent #1 weighed 106 grams and detergent #2 Weighed 108 grams. Panel evaluations of duplicate washings are given in Table II.

TABLE II.VARIOUS DETERGENTS+ SOLID SOFTENER WASHINGS VS. RESPECTIVE DETERGENT WASHINGS Solid softener-l-Detergent l/ Detergent #1 4/ 4 Solid softener-l-Detergent l/ Detergent #1 3 3 Solid softener+Detergent #2/ Detergent #2 4/4 Solid softener-l-Detergent #2/ Detergent #2 3/3 Example IV Utilizing substantially the same procedure as in Example 1, three popular brand liquid fabric softeners were evaluated for softening ability in the washing cycle. In all cases the amount of active liquid softener added to the wash cycle was controlled to provide substantially the same amount of active textile softening agent as in the solid softener (urea-di(hydrogenated tallow)dimethylarnmonium chloride). The solid softener was added to the dry clothes while the liquid softeners were necessarily added after introduction of wash water to avoid localized deposition. The liquid softeners used in the wash cycle were evaluated against the control (household laundry detergent alone) and the solid softener plus the same detergent (Tide). The results are indicated in Table III. TABLE III.SOLID SOFTENER-l-DETERGENT WASH- ING VS. LIQUID SOFTE NERS-l-DETERGENT WASH- I-NG Solid Softener-l-Detergent/ control 5/5 Liquid Softener 1 +Detergent/ control 1/5 Liquid Softener 2+Deter gent/ control 1 5 Liquid Softener 3 +Detergent/ control 0/5 As seen from the above, the solid textile softeners of the invention exhibited softening properties superior to the common liquid softeners when used in the wash cycle.

Example V Laboratory tests on treated fabrics showed no decrease in water absorbency by the water drop method after 15 consecutive launderings of a 6-pound load with a household laundry detergent and 2 rounded tablespoons full (about 20 grams) of a solid fabric softener (urea complex).

Another laboratory test to determine the effect of heavy overdosing was conducted in which 6 pounds of laundry was washed 6 times with the household laundry detergent and 20 grams of the solid fabric softener. Two pounds of this load were washed with the detergent a seventh time adding 40 grams (an overdosage) of the solid softener to the wash cycle. No measurable decrease in water absorption could be detected by the water drop method, that is to say almost instantaneous absorption occurred.

In contrast to the above, three pounds of laundry were treated in the rinse cycle with an overdosage (30-35 grams) of the solid softener alone. This treatment with solid softener in the rinse cycle produced a marked decrease in the water absorption rate of treated laundry ninety seconds elapsed before the drop of water was completely absorbed. Obviously, with certain textile fabrics such as bath towels, this water-proofing effect or loss in water adsorbency is a definite disadvantage.

Example V1 Four solid fabric softener compositions were prepared by the preferred method previously described. Each of these compositions contained 22% of the active cationic fabric softener and 75% urea with the remainder being the minor ingredients shown in the typical composition illustrated heretofore. Using substantially the same procedure as in Example I, each of these products was employed in a wash-cycle softening test, the temperature of the wash water being 120 F. The active cationic material in each of these compositions was as follows:

(A) Di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride (B) Di-coco dimethyl ammonium chloride (C) Equal parts of di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride and di-coco dimethyl ammonium chloride (D) Di-soy dimethyl ammonium chloride A control wash with no fabric softener added was also carried out. After the washing step as described in Example I had been completed, each fabric load Was dried in a gas-fired automatic clothes dryer.

Each of the three terry-cloth towels from each of the test loads was then evaluated for softness by the following procedure: The three towels from the test using softener A were designated A-l, A-2 and A-3. The three from the test using softener B were designated B-l, B-2 and B-3, and so on with the other test towels, including the control. The test towels were then presented in pairs to a panel of six individuals who were asked to pick one of the pair as softer, an answer of no difference not being permitted. In no case was a panel member aware of the history of the specific towels he was judging. The

test towels were paired so that each treatment was compared three times by each panel member to each of the other treatments. That is, towel A-l was compared to B-l, C-l, D-1 and Control-l, A-2 was compared to 13-2, (3-2, D-2 and Control 2, and so on. Similarly, B-l was compared to C-l, D-1 and Control-l, and so on. Three towels per treatment, each compared to four other treatments, gives twelve comparisons. With six panel members, this gives a total of 72 panel comparisons for each treatment. The total number of times a towel representing a given treatment was chosen as softer, expressed as a percentage of the maximum possible choices (72), is an index of its relative softness. The results of this experiment are shown in Table IV.

TAB LE IV Percent of maximum Softener: possible choices Control 29 Example VII When fabrics are washed repeatedly using the same solid fabric softener in each wash cycle, the softness is enhanced compared to that attained in a single cycle. The data in Table V were obtained using the same procedure as in Example VI, except that the test wash loads were subjected to five consecutive washings using solid softeners containing 22% of the designated active cationic compounds before the test terry-cloth towels were evaluated for relative softness by the panel.

Long-chain primary amines are effective softening ingredients in the solid fabric softener compositions of the invention. Compositions containing 22% of a long-chain primary amine with 75% urea were evaluated using the procedure of Example VI except that the terry-cloth towels were first cut in half and then distributed among the wash loads according to the following pattern:

Towel Treatment A B C D E F 11 i- X v X TABLE VI Amine in solid fabric softener composition:

Percent of maximum possible choices (A) C H NH 43 (B) C H NH 39 (C) C H NH 47 MlXtllI-C1 H 3NH and C H NH drogenated tallow amine) 64 (E) C H NH 58 MiXt'llI-C20H41NH2 and C22H45NH2 It is to be understood that mixtures of the various cation-active organic nitrogen textile softening agents complexed with urea can be employed with advantage in the novel compositions of the invention. In the following examples mixtures of various cation-active textile softening agents complexed with urea are employed with good results as evidenced by the evaluation procedure set forth in Example VIII.

Example X .Blenas of di-coco dimethyl ammonium chloride (2C) and amines Percent of maximum possible first choices (A) 30% 2C 52 (B) 20% 2C+10% lauryl amine (C) 20% 2C+10% H-tallow amine 45 (D) 20% 2C+10% arachidyl-behenyl amine 43 (E) 20% 2C+10% oleyl amine 58 (F) 20% 2C+10% tallow-l,3-propy1enediamine 50 (G) 20% 2C+10% stearlc ethanol ethylene diamide 52 Example 1X Percent of Maximum Possible First Choices With Household Laundry Five 0 cles y Detergent 140 F. 120 F. F. 140 F. F. 90 F.

A. Commercial Liquid Fabric Softener (Rinse 0 c1 ca aenjow HTA=H drogenated tallow amine. 2I-II=Di(lrydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride.

Example Xl.Blends 0f imidazolinium quaternary ammonium compound (imid.) and amines Percent of maximum possible first choices (E) 20% imid.+ 10% tallow 1,3 propylene diamine 74 (F) 20% imid.+l0% stearic polyamine condensate 3 1 It is apparent from the foregoing that the present invention provides unique methods and compositions which are particularly advantageous for simultaneously washing textile fabrics and treating the fabrics to improve their feel and softness characteristics. The advantages of the methods and compositions of the invention are manifest; househoud laundry detergent and fabric softener can be added at substantially the same time during the wash cycle thus eliminating the need of the user returning to the Washing operation during the rinse cycle; the solid fabric softener of the invention can be advantageously utilized with household laundry detergents; deposition of an excessive amount of textile softening agent on the fabrics is effectively avoided thereby obviating the possibility of the fabrics losing their desired water absorbency nating the deposition of greasy yellow colored films on the clothes; multi-purpose softening and cleaning compositions having formulations such as can be packaged together are provided thus affording conveniences to both the supplier and the user.

It is to be understood that the fabric softener compositions contemplated herein need not be employed in flake form but can be in powder or granular form, the principal requirement being that they be solid complexes with urea. As seen from the results reported in Example IV, liquid fabric softeners not complexed with urea do not afford satisfactory results when employed in the wash cycle of the laundering operation as opposed to the rinse cycle. In general, the wash cycle can be considered as complete when the wash water containing the added household laundry detergent is drained from the wash tub, and the terms washing, wash cycle and washing operation should be so interpreted.

It may be found also that particular compositions of the r invention exhibit greater effectiveness under particular use conditions. This can be routinely determined by those practicing the invention. Therefore, those modifications and equivalents which fall within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims are to be considered part of the invention.

We claim:

1. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises Washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic organic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders, said solid fabric softener composition being present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with (1) a quaternary ammonium textile softening compound containing at least one straight-chain hydrocarbon radical of at least 8 carbon atoms or (2) an amine textile softening compound containing at least one straight-chain hydrocarbon radical of at least 8 carbon atoms.

2. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a and elimifabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic organic detergent and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders, said solid fabric softener composition being present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with (1) a quaternary ammonium textile softening compound containing at least one straight-chain hydrocarbon radical of from 12 to 22 carbon atoms or (2) an amine textile softening compound containing at least one straight-chain hydrocarbon radical of from 12 to 22 carbon atoms.

3. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition which is present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with a quaternary ammonium compound containing at least one straightchain hydrocarbon radical of from 12 to 22 carbon atoms, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and non ionic organic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders.

4. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition which is present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with an amine compound containing at least one straight-chain hydrocarbon radical of from 12 to 22 carbon atoms, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic organic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders.

5. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition which is present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic or ganic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders.

6. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition which i present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a complex of urea with hydrogenated tallow amine, said household laundry detergent being se lected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic organic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders.

7. A method of treating a textile fabric to clean and soften the fabric which comprises Washing said fabric with a household laundry detergent in the presence of a fabric softening effective amount of a solid fabric softener composition which is present during the wash cycle and consisting essentially of a mixture of hydrogenated tallow amine and di(hydrogenated tallow) dimethyl ammonium chloride complexed with urea, said household laundry detergent being selected from the group consisting of anionic organic detergents and nonionic organic detergents and mixtures thereof with or without detergent builders.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,584,056 1/1952 Soule et al. 252137 2,634,261 4/1953 Fetterly et al. 252--152 (Other references on following page) 13 14- UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,095,373 6/1963 Blomfield 252-8.8 3,256,180 6/1966 Weiss et a1. 252-8.8 4/1954 'Weitkamp et 167-93 LEON D. ROSDOL, Primary Examiner. 2/1956 Haage at ALBERT T. MEYERS, JULIUS GREENWALD, 6/1960 Sniegowski et '31. 252 s.75 5 Exammm 10/ 1961 Brown et a1 252-152 J. T. FEDIGAN, Assistant Examiner.

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification8/137, 427/242, 510/333, 510/330, 510/332, 510/331
International ClassificationC11D1/38, C11D3/32, D06M13/432, C11D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/323, D06M13/432, C11D3/001, C11D1/38
European ClassificationD06M13/432, C11D1/38, C11D3/32B, C11D3/00B3