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Publication numberUS3351889 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1967
Filing dateAug 3, 1964
Priority dateAug 3, 1964
Publication numberUS 3351889 A, US 3351889A, US-A-3351889, US3351889 A, US3351889A
InventorsBeaudion John E, Lawlor Robert E
Original AssigneeCornell Paul A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector with wire-gripping means and insulation piercing contact jaw
US 3351889 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N 7, 1967 R. E. LAWLOR ETAL 3,351,889

I ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR WITH WIRE-GRIFFING MEANS AND INSULATION PIERCING CONTACT JAW Filed Aug. 5, 1964 so s INVENTORS; ROBERT E. LAWLOR, BY JOHN E. saw/01v,

ATTORNEY.

United States Patent 3,351,889 ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR WITH WIRE-GRIP- PING MEANS AND INSULATION PIERCING CONTACT JAW Robert E. Lawlor, Ridgecrest, and John E. Beaudion,

Sherman Oaks, Calif., assignors of fifty-five percent to Paul A. Cornell, Los Angeles, Calif.

Filed Aug. 3, 1964, Ser. No. 386,913 Claims. (Cl. 339-97) This invention relates to electrical connectors of the general type which becomes operative to establish an eflicient electrical connection to a conductor wire or cable, as the result of attachment of the connector to a support by means of a fastener. The invention has as its general object to provide improvements in such fasteners as disclosed in Shuck et al. Patent No. 3,118,720 for Electrical Connectors issued Jan. 21, 1964 and Lawlor Patent No. 3,138,422 for Electrical Connector With Wire-Gripping Means, issue date June 23, 1964. Toward the attainment of this general object, the invention aims to provide such a connector:

(1) Having relatively rotatable opposed jaws adapted to penetrate the insulation of a conductor and to establish good electrical contact with the conductor in response to movement of respective mounting tails into contact with one another and securing the same to a support by a suitable fastener element inserted through such tails;

(2) Which can be simply and inexpensively fabricated by stamping from ribbon metal;

(3) Which eliminates the necessity for stripping the insulation from the end of a conductor to which a connection is to be made;

(4) Having improved, simplified means for maintaining the respective jaws in circumferential alignment while permitting limited relative rotation thereof.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent in the ensuing specification and appended drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional View of a connector embodying one form of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a front end view of the same, partially broken away and sectioned;

FIG. 3 is a plan view of the inner connector element;

FIGS. 4 and 5 respectively are plan views of the flat blanks from which the inner and outer elements of the connector of FIG. 1 are fabricated;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the assembled connector;

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of the outer connector element of FIG. 6 prior to assembly and attachment thereof to the inner connector element;

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of a connector embodying a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a transverse sectional view of the same taken on the line 9-9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a longitudinal sectional view of a connector embodying another modified form of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a front end view of a connector embodying another modified form of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a front end View of a connector embodying another form of the invention; and

FIG. 13 is a front end view of a connector embodying still another modified form of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, .and in particular to FIGS. 1-7 inclusive, I have shown therein, as an example of one form in which the invention may be embodied, an electrical connector comprising, in general, a pair of outer and inner connector parts A and B respectively with respective lateral margins in alignment in common planes of the respective sides of the connector, as indicated in FIG. 2. A conductor C with insulation there- 3,351,889 Patented Nov. 7, 1967 on is adapted to be received and clamped between the connector parts A and B.

Outer connector part A comprises a cylindrical jaw member 10 having diametrically aligned jaw apertures 11 and 12, a flat mounting tail 13 having a fastener aperture 14, and an integral right angle bend 15 joining the tail 13 to the jaw 10. Connector part A further includes a retainer tongue 16 stamped out of an aperture 17 in jaw member 10. The portions of the blank A (FIG. 5) from which the jaw part 10 and tail part 13 are fabricated are indicated by the reference numerals 10 and 13' and the other parts, as lanced in the blank, are indicated by the same numerals as in FIG. 1.

The inner connector part B is generally similar to the part A, embodying a cylindrical jaw member 20 provided with diametrically aligned jaw apertures 21 and 22, a fiat mounting tail 23 having a fastener aperture 24, and a right angle bend 25 joining the tail 23 to the jaw member 20 through a tangential offset portion 26. A similar tangential offset portion is embodied between the bend 15 and cylindrical jaw 10 of connector part A.

Apertures 21 and 22 are joined by a relatively narrow longitudinal slot 27 extending along the longitudinal axis of connector part B. Tongue 16, which is narrower than slot 27 just suificiently to provide for free sliding movement therein, is bent downwardly into the slot 27 as shown in FIG. 1, thereby providing a limited rotatable coupling connection between the two connector parts such as to maintain these parts in lateral registration, preventing lateral displacement of one part relative to the other while permitting free limited rotative movement of the jaw 20 within the jaw 10.

Aperture 22 is slightly elongated and of bifurcated form as shown in FIG. 4, whereby an insulation-penetrating point 28 is formed within the remote end of this aperture. The penetration point 28 is beveled at 30 to sharp, pointed pyramidal form as by grinding off one corner of the point 28 as formed in a die-blanking operation on a strip of ribbon metal. For most efficient penetration, its sharpened point is located at the inner radius of the jaw 20.

The aperture 11 of the outer connector part A is of similarly elongated and bifurcated form, an insulationpenetrating point 29 being formed at the end thereof adjacent the end of jaw member 10, and being positioned to just clear the margin of the adjacent inner jaw aperture 21 when the connector is in the open position indicated in phantom in FIG. 1. The penetrating point 29 may be formed similarly to the point 28.

The apertures 21, 12 of the respective connector parts are preferably circular as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, with a diameter somewhat greater than the outer diameter of the conductor C that is to be inserted therethrough. Correspondingly, the inner extremities of apertures 11 and 22 are approximately semicircular on the same radius and are adapted to register with the peripheries of apertures 21, 12 in an opened position of the connector illustrated in dotted lines in FIG. 1, in which position the tail 13 of the outer connector part A is swung away from the tail 23 of the part B. In these registered positions of the apertures (shown in dotted lines in FIG. 1) the penetration points 2-8, 29 will just clear the margins of apertures 21, 12 so as not to obstruct the same, thus providing for free entry of the conductor C through the aligned apertures (on an axis tilted upwardly and leftwardly at an angle of between 20 and 30 degrees to the plane of the mounting tail 23 of connector part B as shown in FIG. 1). The apertures 21, 12 have, at their sides remote from jaws 28, 29 anvil surfaces 31, 32 which, being opposed to the points 28, 29 respectively, will operate to apply pressure to the conductor C to force it against the jaws 28, 29 respectively.

With the conductor C inserted through the registered apertures, the tails 13, 23 may then be brought into con tact as shown in full lines in FIG. 1, the conductor being subjected to a pinching action by relative rotation of the jaw members and 20, with the points 28 and 29 piercing the insulation and establishing pressure contact with the connector wire or cable within the insulation to provide a good electrical conductive contact. A fastener screw or bolt may then be inserted through the aligned tail apertures 14 and 24 and tightened so as to secure the tall 23 against a support. The same fastener may be utilized as a part of an electrical connection from the conductor C to an electrical component.

FIG. 8 illustrates a modified form of the invention wherein the respective connector parts A and B" are assembled and held in positions with their tails 13, 23 spread apart (the open position of the connector) by means of a thin soft metal sleeve 40 which is extended through the aligned apertures in jaw members 10a, 20a, the ends of the sleeve 40 being secured by swaging them outwardly into shallow counterbores at the outer ends of the apertures 11 and 12. A penetration point 29, in the offset portion 26 of the inner jaw member 20 and projecting into its aperture 22, is arranged with its point in contact with the sleeve 40 in this open position of the connector, and is adapted to penetrate through the soft thin wall of sleeve 49 and thence through the insulation and into conductive contact with the conductor wire within a conductor C, as shown in FIG. 9. Aperture 21a of inner jaw member 20a may be elongated to allow arcuate shifting of sleeve 40 during closing of the tails 13, 23 together, or may have a penetration point similar to point 29 and projecting in the same direction circumferentially, for double piercing of connector C as in the connector of FIG. 10 described in the next paragraph.

As shown in FIG. 10, the jaw members 1011 and 2% may be curled tangentially from tails 13 and 23 in the opposite direction as compared to the curling of jaws 10 and 20 of FIG. 1 from the offset intermediate portions 26 of the connector parts of that figure; and the penetrating points 28b and 29b may be disposed at the ends of apertures 12b and 11b (both in the outer jaw member 1%). In this arrangement, the apertures 21b and 22b of the inner jaw member 20b may be circular, just large enough in diameter to freely receive the conductor C; and arranged so as to each have one side registering with the back side of a respective aperture 11b, 121), with the penetration points 28b, 2% being in contact with opposite sides of the conductor C, and pointing in the same direction circumferentially. Thus, in closing the connector of FIG. 10, the conductor C will be turned about the axis of relative rotation of the jaw members A, B so as to have one side forced against the penetrating point 28b and its other side forced against the pentrating point 2%.

FIG. 11 illustrates a dual connector to which a pair of conductors can be connected, the jaw members 100 and 2&0 being sufficiently wide to accommodate laterally spaced pairs of openings 110 etc. In other respects the construction shown in FIG. 11 may be the same as that shown in FIG. 1 (or a similar dual aperture arrangement could be embodied in FIG. 10).

FIG. 12 illustrates a further modified form of the invention wherein the insulation penetrating jaw 28d is of knife edge form extending circumferentially at one side of jaw aperture 21d of the inner jaw member and is adapted to cut through the insulation of conductor C with a shearing action.

FIG. 13 illustrates a further possible modification wherein the jaw 28e of the inner jaw member is formed as a series of fine points in a saw tooth arrangement extending chordally across the one side of aperture 216.

We claim:

1. An electrical connector comprising: a pair of connector parts of strap metal each embodying a jaw member of split cylindrical ring form and a flat tail extending as an integral continuation of one cylindrical extremity thereof, said tails adapted to be both secured to a support, one of said jaw members being rotatably mounted within the other, said jaw members having respective apertures adapted to be substantially registered upon spreading said tails in a hinging movement, whereby a conductor with insulation sheath may be extended through said apertures, one of said jaw members having an insulationpenetrating jaw formed integrally in the margin of its respective aperture at one circumferential extremity thereof and projecting circumferentially into said respective aperture, the other jaw member having, at the opposite extremity of its respective aperture, an anvil surface in opposed relation to said insulation-penetrating jaw and adapted, upon closing of said tails into abutting contact with one another, to force said conductor against said jaw so as to cause the jaw to lance through said sheath and establish conductive contact with said conductor, the inner jaw member having a circumferentially extending slot; said outer jaw member including an integral tongue struck inwardly from its median area and slidably engaged in said slot to retain said jaw members in coupled assembly.

2. An electrical connector comprising: a pair of connector parts each embodying a substantially cylindrical jaw member and an integral mounting tail projecting from one side thereof, one of said jaw members being rotatably fitted within the other, said tails extending transversely with respect to the axis of relative rotation of said jaw members; each jaw member having a pair of diametricallyopposed jaw apertures adapted to be substantially registered with the apertures of the other pair when said tails are spread apart by relative rotation of said jaw members, whereby a conductor may be extended through said pairs of apertures, one of said jaw members having an insulation-penetrating jaw projecting within the extended perimeter of one of its jaw apertures, and adapted, when said tails are brought together in abutting relation, to be forced through the insulation sheath of said conductor and into conductive contact with a conductor core within said sheath as the result of rotary displacement of the apertures of one pair relative to the apertures of the other pair, resulting in a pinching action of the edges of said apertures upon said insulation sheath, such as to cause said jaw to lance through said sheath, the inner jaw member having a circumferentially extending slot; said outer jaw member including an integral tongue projecting inwardly and slidably engaged in said slot to retain said jaw members in coupled assembly.

3. An electrical connector comprising: a pair of connector parts each embodying a substantially cylindrical jaw member and an integral mounting tail projecting from one side thereof, one of said jaw members being rotatably fitted within the other, said tails extending transversely with respect to the axis of relative rotation of said jaw members; each jaw member having a pair of diametricallyopposed jaw apertures adapted to be substantially registered with the apertures of the other pair when said tails are spread apart by relative rotation of said jaw members, whereby a conductor may be extended through said pairs of apertures, said jaw members being operative to grip said conductor and anchor it to the connector as the result of rotary displacement of the apertures of one pair relative to the apertures of the other pair, resulting in a pinching action of the edges of said apertures upon said conductor; the inner jaw member having a circumferentially extending slot; said outer jaw member including an integral tongue struck inwardly from its median area and slidably engaged in said slot to retain said jaw members in coupled assembly.

4. A connetcor as defined in claim 3, wherein the apertures of said inner jaw member are bridged by said slot.

5. An electrical connector comprising: a pair of connector parts of strap metal each embodying a jaw member of split cylindrical ring form and a fiat tail extending as an integral continuation of one cylindrical extremity thereof, said tails adapted to be both secured to a support, one of said jaw members being rotatably mounted within the other, said jaw members having respective apertures adapted to be substantially registered upon spreading said tails in a hinging movement, whereby a conductor may be extended through said apertures, one of said jaw members having a circumferentially extending slot, the other jaw member having an integral tongue struck therefrom and slidably engaged in said slot to retain said connector parts in hi ngedly coupled assembly; said jaw members being operative, upon closing of said tails into abutting contact with one another, to exert a pinching action against said conductor such as to anchor said conductor to said connector.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS 12/1955 Belgium.

MARVIN A. CHAMPION, Primary Examiner.

15 J. H. McGLYNN, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3406372 *Dec 1, 1966Oct 15, 1968Electro Clamp CorpNon-shearing wire-clamping electrical connector
US3831134 *Jun 15, 1973Aug 20, 1974Electro Clamp CorpCable clamp with non-shearing jaws
US3932021 *Apr 10, 1974Jan 13, 1976Electro Clamp CorporationTension energized cable clamp
US3973821 *Nov 29, 1974Aug 10, 1976Ideal Industries, Inc.Connector
US3980381 *Sep 26, 1974Sep 14, 1976Electro-Clamp CorporationCable connector
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/410, 439/789
International ClassificationH01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2491
European ClassificationH01R4/24E