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Publication numberUS3353570 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1967
Filing dateJul 21, 1966
Priority dateJul 21, 1966
Publication numberUS 3353570 A, US 3353570A, US-A-3353570, US3353570 A, US3353570A
InventorsSweat Henry D
Original AssigneeSweat Henry D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Harness frame connector
US 3353570 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 21, 1967 H. D. SWEAT HARNESS FRAME CONNECTOR Filed July 21, 1966 Fig./

Henry D Swear I N VEN TOR.

United States Patent 3,353,570 HARNESS FRAME CONNECTOR Henry D. Sweat, 809 Sessions St, Soperton, Ga. 30457 Filed July 21, 1966, Ser. No. 566,822 8 Claims. (Cl. 139-88) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in harness frame connectors for weaving looms.

In accordance with conventional practice, a harness frame has wooden upper and lower rails or sticks, into which are screw-threaded simple hooks for connecting upper and lower harness straps thereto. Under operational strain, the hooks frequently become pulled out and separated from the wooden rails, and valuable time is lost while the loom is stopped and the hooks are re-installed at another point on the rails. Also, when this happens repeatedly, the rails themselves become so damaged that they are no longer capable of properly holding the hooks and must therefore be discarded.

In addition, since the upper harness straps extend vertically downwardly toward the upper rail and the lower straps extend obliquely upwardly toward the lower rail, the hooks on the upper rail are installed perpendicularly while those on the lower rail are oblique, so that the upper and lower hooks are aligned with the directions of pull of the respective straps. This, however, makes the upper and lower rails different from-each other, and both types of rails must be carried in stock for replacement parts.

It is, therefore, the principal object of this invention to eliminate the disadvantages above outlined, this object being attained by the provision of an improved connector which may be used selectively and interchangeably on both the upper and lower rails of the harness frame, so that carrying of two different types of rails in stockis unnecessary.

As such, the connector of the invention comprises a block-shaped body which is adapted to be quickly and easily secured to a frame rail by a pair of woodscrews. The body is formed with two screw-threaded bores, one of which is perpendicular while the other is oblique, these bores being adapted to selectively receive a screw-threaded shank of a harness strap attaching hook. Thus, when the connector is used on the upper frame rail, the connector hook is mounted in the perpendicular bore for proper alignment with and connection to the perpendicular upper harness strap. On the other hand, when the connector is used on the lower frame rail, the hook is mounted in the oblique bore for proper alignment with and connection to the oblique lower harness strap.

In either instance, the hook is firmly held in the connector body rather than in the wooden rail, and since the body is firmly secured to the rail, the heretofore experi enced difliculty of the hook being pulled out of place is eliminated. Also, the connector body may be secured even to a rail which has been damaged by previous installations of conventional hooks, so that the damaged rail need not be discarded.

As another important feature, the invention provides means for locking the hook against rotation in the connector body.

The connector of the invention is simple in construction, efiicient and dependable in use, may be quickly and easily installed on rails of various harness frames, and lends itself to economical manufacture.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

3,353,570 Patented Nov. 21, 1967 FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of a harness frame with connectors of the invention applied thereto;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary, enlarged perspective view showing one of the connectors on the upper frame rail;

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary, enlarged vertical sectional view of the connector shown in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary sectional detail, taken substantially in the plane of the line 22 in FIGURE 3; and

FIGURE 5 is a view, partly in elevation and partly in vertical section, showing one of the connectors on the lower rail.

Referring now to the accompanying drawings in detail, the general reference numeral -10 designates a conventional loom harness frame, including wooden upper and lower rails 11, 12, respectively, connected together by side struts 13, the struts 13 supporting bars 14 which carry a set of heddles 15, as will be clearly apparent. The frame rails 11, 12 are sometimes referred to as sticks or slats.

A pair'of upper harness straps -16 extend perpendicularly downwardly toward the upper rail 11, while a pair of lower straps 17 extend obliquely upwardly toward the lower rail 12, the ends of these straps being provided with eyes 18 for connection to hooks which in accordance with conventional practice are screw-threaded directly into the wooden rails 11, 12. In order that the hooks may be properly aligned with the direction of pull of the straps, the hooks on the upper rail are perpendicular while those on the lower rail are oblique, and it will be understood that under the strain of operation, the hooks when screwthreaded directly into the wooden rails frequently become pulled out and must be reinstalled at some other point on the rails.

, The improved connector of the invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 20 and is so arranged that it may be used selectively and interchangeably on either end portion of either the upper rail 11 or the lower rail 12. Since all the connectors are the same, a description of one will sufiice for all.

Each of the connectors 20 comprises a block-shaped body formed from metal, hard plastic, or the like, the body having a central body portion 21 formed integrally with a pair of lateral ears or wings 22 which are apertured to receive a pair of wood-screws 23 whereby the connector is firmly secured to the associated rail of the harness frame.

The body 21 is formed with a screw-threaded bore 24 which is perpendicular to the base edge 21a of the body, and a second screw-threaded bore 25 is provided in the body obliquely to the base edge. The bores 24, 25 are adapted to selectively receive a screw-threaded shank 26a of a harness strap attaching hook 26.

When the connector 20 is to be used on the upper rail 11 of the frame, the hook shank 26a is installed in the perpendicular bore 24 of the body 21, so that the hook is properly aligned with the direction of pull of the perpendicular upper strap 16. On the other hand, when the connector is used on the lower rail 12, the hook is installed in the oblique bore 25, whereby the hook is obliquely disposed and aligned with the direction of pull of the oblique lower strap 17.

Means are provided for locking the hook against rotation in the connector body, such means involving the provision of additional screw-threaded bores 27, 28 in the body 21, the bore 27 merging into one end portion of the bore 24 and the bore 28 merging into one end portion of the bore 25. The bores 27, 28 accommodate a pair of set screws 29, 30 respectively, for locking engagement with the shank 26a of the hook 26 when the hook shank is installed in either of the bores 24, 25. To attain such locking engagement positively, the set screws 29, 30 preferably have pointed ends as indicated at 31, receivable in a longitudinal groove 32 formed in the shank 26a of the hook 26, as will be apparent from FIGURES 3-5.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. The combination of a loom harness frame including upper and lower rails, an upper harness strap extending vertically downwardly toward the upper rail, a lower harness strap extending obliquely upwardly toward the lower rail, and upper and lower connectors attaching the respective straps to the respective rails, said upper and lower connectors being identical in construction and therefore usable selectively on the upper and lower rails, each of said connectors comprising a block including a central body and a pair of lateral wings provided with apertures, a pair of mounting screws extending through said wing apertures into the associated rail, said central body being provided with a vertical screw-threaded bore and with an oblique screw-threaded bore, and a harness strap attaching hook having a screw-threaded shank receivable selectively in said vertical and said oblique bores, the hook shank of the upper connector being positioned in the vertical bore for alignment of the hook with the vertical upper harness strap and the hook shank of the lower connector being positioned in the oblique bore for alignment of the hook with the oblique lower strap, said harness straps engaging the hooks of the respective connectors.

2. The combination as defined in claim 1 together with a setscrew provided in the body of each connector for locking a hook shank in the vertical bore.

3. The combination as defined in claim 1 together with a setscrew provided in the body of each connector for locking a hook shank in the oblique bore.

4. The combination as defined in claim 1 wherein the screw-threaded shank of said hook is provided with a longitudinal groove, and a setscrew provided in the body of each connector, said setscrew entering said groove in the hook shank whereby to lock the hook against rotation.

5. A harness strap connector usable selectively on upper and lower rails of a loom harness frame, said connector comprising a block including a central body and means for mounting said block on a frame rail, said central body being provided with a perpendicular screw-threaded bore and with an oblique screw-threaded bore, and a harness strap attaching hook having a screw-threaded shank receivable selectively in said perpendicular and said oblique bores.

6. The connector as defined in claim 5 together with means for locking said hook shank against rotation in said body.

7. The connector as defined in claim 6 wherein said locking means comprise a setscrew provided in said body and engaging said hook shank.

8. The connector as defined in claim 7 wherein said hook shank is provided with a longitudinal groove, said setscrew entering said groove.

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 164,777 6/1875 Sladdin 139-91 2,380,124 7/1945 Streuli 139-88 2,601,872 7/1952 Kaufmann 139-88 2,625,957 1/ 3 Consoletti 139-88 2,659,394 11/1953 Kaufm-ann 139-88 2,910,095 10/1959 Hayden 139-88 2,982,314 5/1961 Hayden 139-88 3,047,029 7/ 1962 Kaufmann 139-88 FOREIGN PATENTS 231,803 12/1909 Germany.

MERVIN STEIN, Primary Examiner.

I. KEE CHI, Assistant Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US164777 *May 20, 1875Jun 22, 1875 Improvement
US2380124 *May 18, 1942Jul 10, 1945Grob & Co AgHeddle frame for looms
US2601872 *Aug 31, 1949Jul 1, 1952Steel Heddle Mfg CoLoom harness
US2625957 *Mar 3, 1950Jan 20, 1953Draper CorpSuspending means for harness frames
US2659394 *Apr 3, 1950Nov 17, 1953Steel Heddle Mfg CoLoom harness connector
US2910095 *Dec 12, 1957Oct 27, 1959Boyd HaydenAdjustable hook for loom harness
US2982314 *May 8, 1959May 2, 1961Boyd HaydenAdjustable hook for harness frame
US3047029 *Nov 29, 1960Jul 31, 1962Steel Heddle Mfg CoLoom harness
*DE231803C Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4398569 *Jun 29, 1981Aug 16, 1983Kabushiki Kaisha Toyoda Jidoshokki SeisakushoDevice for supporting a heald frame in a weaving loom
US6364381 *Jun 15, 1999Apr 2, 2002Universal City Studios, Inc.Queue clip for control gates
US6371582 *May 27, 1999Apr 16, 2002Nec CorporationDevice for preventing thin apparatus from overturning
US6536857Dec 5, 2001Mar 25, 2003Nec CorporationDevice for preventing thin apparatus from overturning
US7128303 *Apr 2, 2004Oct 31, 2006Broan-Nu Tone LlcFan mounting spacer assembly
US7410139 *Jun 2, 2007Aug 12, 2008Spanwell Service, Inc.All-purpose hanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/88, 248/304
International ClassificationD03C9/06, D03C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03C9/0683
European ClassificationD03C9/06D