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Publication numberUS3353829 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1967
Filing dateFeb 9, 1965
Priority dateFeb 9, 1965
Publication numberUS 3353829 A, US 3353829A, US-A-3353829, US3353829 A, US3353829A
InventorsRichard G Board
Original AssigneeRichard G Board
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus employing shielded game boards with optical devices for board viewing
US 3353829 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 21, 1967 R. G. BOARD 3,353,829

GAME APPARATUS EMPLOYING SHIELDED GAME BOARDS WITH OPTICAL DEVICES FOR BOARD VIEWING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR Filed Feb. 9, 1965 RICHARD 6. BOARD BY Sha iro and Shapiro ATTORNEYS Nov- 21. 1967 R. G. BOARD 3,353,829 v GAME ARATUS EMPLOYING SHIELDED GAME BOARDS WI OPTICAL DEVICES FOR BOARD VIEW1NG Filed Feb. 9, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VENTOR RICHARD G. BOARD Sha iro and S/Iczpiro F/G. 13 F/@ 14 ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,353,829 GAME APPARATUS EMPLQYING SHIELDED GAME BOARDS WITH OPTICAL DEVICES FOR BOARD VIEWING Richard G. Board, Bethesda, Md. (3000 Connecticut Ave., Washington, D.C. 20008) Filed Feb. 9, 1965. Ser. No. 431,335 Claims. (Cl. 273-431 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE Game apparatus, such as a war game, employing multiple game boards with shield means to prevent viewing of an opponents board except for limited viewing provided by optical devices. Game pieces, boards, and viewing devices are constructed to produce realistic threedimensional displays.

This invention relates to game apparatus, and more particularly to a game of simulated combat.

In a common type of war game, often referred to as a salvo game, each of two players has a game board, which may be merely a sheet of paper, and has a plurality of playing pieces, which may be merely drawn symbols of naval vessels. The game boards are provided with identical arrangements of identifiable squares, and each player arranges his game pieces in appropriate squares of his board while maintaining his board shielded from the view of the other player. During the playing of the game each player may in turn identify squares of the other players board in which detonations are to occur. Hits or misses are scored in accordance with each players ability to guess the location of the other players game pieces.

While games of the foregoing type have a certain ap peal, they are basically guessing games which lack realism or visual interest. It is a principal object of the present invention to provide improved game apparatus, and in particular improved salvo or simulated combat game apparatus, which offers realistic display.

A further object of the invention is to provide improved game apparatus utilizing optical devices in conjunction with one or more game boards.

Another object of the invention is to provide optical devices constructed so as to present a view of a restricted region of a game board.

Still another object of the invention is to provide game apparatus of the foregoing type having three-dimensional optical presentations.

An additional object of the invention is to provide improved game apparatus which may be utilized in the playing of simulated air, naval, or land combat games or combinations thereof.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide improved game apparatus in which a shield is pierced to reveal a restricted region of a game board.

A still further object of the invention is to provide improved game apparatus in which play result is determined by the judgement of each player based upon a restricted display of his opponents game pieces and by chance.

Briefly stated, but without limitation, the present invention is concerned with game apparatus which, in one embodiment, comprises a pair of identical game boards associated with corresponding players, each board being shielded from the view of the opponent. The boards have identical arrangements of identifiable squares. Each player is provided with a set of game pieces, such as miniature naval vessels, which he arranges in appropriate squares of his board. The shield which proscribes viewing an opponents board may be a vertical wall partially surrounding the game boards. At least one optical viewing device is provided so that at the appropriate time each player may utilize the device to inspect a designated restricted region of his opponents board. Depending upon the type of viewing device and the type of shield, each player may, at the appropriate time, look past an edge of the shield or through an aperture in the shield, and the display may simulate an aerial view or a ground or sea level view. In accordance with the rules of the game play results may be determined at least in part by a chance device and/or by the type of playing piece making a simulated search and/or by the type of playing piece located in such a search. Indicators may be used to show hits upon an opponents playing pieces or to show misses for guiding further search or simulated gun fire. Special effects may be employed to provide highly realistic displays.

The foregoing and other objects, advantages, and features of the invention, and the manner in which the same are accomplished, will become more readily apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate preferred and exemplary embodiments, and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view, partially broken away, of an embodiment of the invention which utilizes a pair of game boards, two sets of playing pieces, hit or miss indicators, a shield, a pair of optical devices, and a chance controlled device;

FIGURE 1A is a plan view, partly in section, illustrating an alternative game board arrangement;

FIGURE 1B is an elevation view, partly in section, illustrating another alternative game board arrangement;

FIGURES 2, 3 and 4 are elevation views illustrating different shield arrangements;

FIGURES 5-9 are somewhat diagrammatic, partially sectional, side elevation views illustrating different embodiments of optical devices and cooperating shields and game boards in accordance with the invention;

FIGURE 10 is a front elevation view of the apparatus of FIGURE 9; and

FIGURES 11-14 are somewhat diagrammatic, partially sectional, side elevation views of other forms of optical devices and cooperating shields and game boards in accordance with the invention.

Referring to the drawings, and initially to FIGURE 1 thereof, one embodiment of the invention utilizes a pair of identical game boards 10 and 12 for corresponding players. The boards may be integral or separate. Each board is divided into identifiable regions, such as squares, and the regions are designated by suitable indicia. Thus, each square may have an identifying symbol within its confines or the squares may be identifiable by a coordinate system, such as the letters and numbers shown. The game boards may be arranged side-by-side on a flat surface, such as a table. Each board may be seen fully by the corresponding player but is shielded from the view of his opponent, as by a vertical wall 14, which, in the form shown in FIGURE 1, is Z-shaped so as to extend around two sides of each board. Thus board 10 may be observed by the player located at P, and board 12 may be observed by a player located at 0.

Each player is provided with a set of playing pieces 16, which he may arrange in appropriate squares of his board. In some instances more than one piece may be placed in the same square. The positioning of the pieces is governed by the rules of the game. In a naval game, for example, there may be simulated aircraft carriers, battleships, cruisers, and destroyers, for example. With carrier pieces the game is both aerial and naval, and landbased aircraft may also be used in such a game, if desired. The game boards may be imprinted so as to designate regions of land and water, and the land regions may be upraised from the plane of the board to produce a three-dimensional elfect.

In the embodiment of FIGURE 1 optical viewing towers 18 are employed. Although a pair of towers is shown, one tower may suffice for both players. The cross-dimensions of each tower are selected so that the tower will encompass a prescribed number of squares (four in the illustrated embodiment) when it is properly located with respect to the delineations of the board. In the form shown each tower is supported upon legs 2%) to permit illumination of the region of the board to be viewed, but this may also be achieved, for example, by constructing the tower at least in part of translucent or transparent material. Each tower has a viewing aperture 22 through which a restricted region of an opponents game board may be viewed when the tower is properly positioned. It is apparent that the tower on board 12 is for the use of player P, while the tower on board is for the use of player 0, each player shifting his position laterally at the appropriate time in order to utilize his viewing device. The viewing devices may be removed from the boards between plays.

Different optical systems may be utilized to produce the desired images, and typical systems will be shown and described more fully hereinafter. It sufiices to state here that a simple plane mirror located at the top of the tower in alignment with the aperture 22 and oriented at 45 will provide an image of the portion of the game board surmounted by the tower.

A chance device, such as a die 24, may be utilized by the players in order to determine precedence of play as well as play results. Indicators 26, representing detonations, splashes, or flames, for example, may be employed to designate hits or misses. While many different types of games may be played with the apparatus of the invention, the following is typical.

In a Battle of Midway each game board represents the Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Midway Island and has a mapped representation of the island near its center. The boards are identical. The player representing the Japanese side has game pieces simulating four aircraft carriers, two battleships, four cruisers, and two troop ships. The player representing the United States side has pieces simulating three aircraft carriers and three cruisers and has an airfield on Midway with an assumed number of aircraft. The Japanese player places his ships in the squares comprising the Japanese end of his game board. The American player places his ships in the squares of his game board no nearer the Japanese end of his board than Midway. Each player may move his ships one or no squares on his board in the movement portion of the first turn. Then the players roll a die to determine which one conducts air searches and attacks during the searchattack portion of the first turn. Suppose that the United States wins this privilege. The player then may make an air search from each of his carriers and from Midway. He conducts such a search by instructing his opponent to place the search tower over the squares of the opponents board which it is desired to search. If the selected squares contain no Japanese ship, he requests a search in another area from another carrier. Suppose that within this area a Japanese carrier is located. The American player will have an aerial view of this carrier through the aperture of the tower. The American player may then attack this carrier with one to three planes from the searching carrier.

The Japanese carrier attacked can protect itself with its full complement of three planes. First, the attacking planes must penetrate this screen of defensive planes. A die is rolled for each dog fight. A six downs an attacking plane, a five turns it back, and a four, three, two, or one indicates that the attacking plane gets through to bomb the carrier. Suppose two planes get through and one is turned back. For each of the two bomb runs a die is rolled. Odd numbers score hits, evens misses. Suppose one hit is scored. An indicator 26, which may represent a flame or an explosion, is placed on the Japanese carrier playing piece to indicate the hit. Suppose now that the American elects to make no more air searches (although he could make two more). The Japanese player now makes his searches and attacks.

The Japanese player is particularly interested in finding the attacking United States carrier, because its decks are empty from its air attack, and it has no air defense available. Suppose that three of the Japanese air searches fail to locate ships, but that the fourth, from the just-damaged carrier, locates the attacking United States carrier. These air searches are conducted in the same manner as the United States air searches, by instructions to the American player with respect to the location of the search tower. Since the Japanese carrier has been hit once, its attack capacity is diminished by one, so that it can attack with two planes. The United States carrier has no air defense, its planes being in process of returning. Hence, the two Japanese planes make their bombing runs unmolested. Suppose that the two rolls of the die are both odd numbers. Two hits are scored on the United States carrier and two hit indicators are attached to it. This carrier now has an attacking and defensive capacity of just one plane. If it is struck a third time in the game it is considered sunk.

The next turn now begins, having a movement portion for both sides followed by a roll of the die to determine which side gets to search and attack first during this turn.

Surface ships may engage others when searches, by use of the tower, reveal them to be in adjacent or identical squares, as referred to the coordinate system. Battleships fire three salvos, cruisers two, hits being designated by odd numbers on rolls of the die, Fire power is reduced one salvo for each hit. When fire power reaches zero, the ship is considered sunk.

Midway airfield has three planes for attack or defense plus anti-aircraft defense equivalent to two planes. Attacking Japanese planes must penetrate these anti-aircraft defenses in the same manner as they penetrate defensive aircraft in order to make bomb runs. The first two hits knock out anti-aircraft, and subsequent hits diminish the aircraft available to Midway.

The game ends when the Japanese troop ships are sunk (two hits required on each) or when one troop ship reaches Midway and remains there unsunk one complete turn after its arrival.

The game apparatus of the invention can be modified by variation of the game board, the arrangement of game boards, the shield, the optical device, the playing pieces or the chance controlled device. Variations of these components may be provided in a large set of game apparatus to permit selectivity or the components may be grouped separately to constitute different games.

FIGURES 1A and 1B illustrate different arrangements of game boards and diiferent shields. In FIGURE 1A the boards 28 and 30 for players 0 and P, respectively, are arranged back-to-back and a vertical shield 32 is erected between the boards. The boards or the boards and the shield may be physically connected or may simply be brought together for play. At appropriate times during the play selective viewing of board 28 is permitted for player P, and selective viewing of board 30 is permitted for player 0, as indicated by arrows p and 0, respectively. Such viewing may be accomplished by the use of optical towers, such as the viewing devices 18 of FIGURE 1, or by the use of other optical devices to be described. As will be seen hereinafter, the shield 32 may be entirely opaque or may be provided with viewing apertures.

In FIGURE 18 boards 34 and 36 are arranged one above the other. Board 34 is for player P and board 36 is for player 0. Shield 38 prevents the viewing of board 34 by player 0, except for restricted viewing at appropriate times, as indicated by arrow 0. Shield 40 serves the same purpose with respect to player P, preventing viewing of board 36 except for restricted viewing at the appropriate times, as indicated by arrow 1;. Spacer posts 42 may be used to support board 34 upon board 36, Shield 38 is located along the edge of board 34 adjacent to player 0, while shield 40 is located along the edge of board 36 adjacent to player P. In the form shown, apertures 44 are provided in the shields to afford the restrictive displays, as will be described.

FIGURES 24 illustrate different shield embodiments which may be employed in conjunction with appropriate game boards and appropriate optical devices. Shield 46 is a vertical wall, which may constitute the shield 32 of FIGURE 1A, for example, or the shields 38 and 40 of FIGURE 1B, or the parallel opposite end portions of the shield 14 of FIGURE 1. Shield 46 has an aperture 48 along its lower edge, through which a restricted view of an opponents board may be obtained. In FIGURE 3 shield 50 serves the same purpose but has an aperture 52 elevated above the level of the game board to be viewed. In FIG- URE 4 shield 54 has a plurality of apertures 56 of diiferent size, shape, and location. These may be utilized selectively in accordance with the rules of the game.

FIGURE 5 illustrates an optical device 58 which may be utilized to obtain a ground or sea level view of a restricted portion of a game board 60 which, for example, may be one of the game boards of FIGURE 1. Shield 62 is provided with a ground or sea level aperture 64 and may be constructed like shield 46 of FIGURE 2, for example. The optical device is a periscope having apertures 66 and 68 and associated forty-five degree mirrors 70 and 72. At the appropriate time a player is permitted to place the optical device adjacent to aperture 64 at a selected position along the width of the board and, by looking through aperture 66, to obtain a restricted view of the board in order to search out an opponents playing pieces. Screens or reticules may be provided in the optical device, as at 74, in order to produce special effects and/ or to increase the realism. F0 rexample, a filter may be utilized to produce a clouded or night effect.

The embodiment of FIGURE 6 is substantially the same, except that reducing lenses 76 are provided within the optical device in order to reduce the size of the optical image. Such effects may also be produced by utilizing curved mirrors.

FIGURE 7 illustrates an embodiment for viewing a restricted region of an opponents game board 78 through an elevated aperture 80 in a shield 82, of the type shown in FIGURES 3 and 4, for example. A periscope 84 is utilized, the periscope having an elevated objective aperture 86 and a corresponding mirror 88 oriented to produce an image of a predetermined region of the game board 78. Mirror 88 and cooperating mirror 90 provide the desired display as seen through the viewing aperture 92.

FIGURE 8 illustrates an optical device 94 which may be utilized to look past an edge of an opaque shield 96 to observe a restricted region of a game board 98. The optical device is a periscope with one mirror 100 oriented so as to provide conveniently a view of a portion of the opponents board on the hidden side of shield 96. The positioning of the optical device at the top edge of the shield (or any other edge) may be facilitated by guide marks or by brackets to support the optical device.

FIGURES 9 and illustrate a modification in which an optical device 102 having a mirror 104 is supported upon the top edge (or any other edge) of the shield, as by U-shaped brackets 106. A cooperating mirror 108 is positioned at the side of shield 96 opposite to board 98 in order to provide the desired restricted view. The mirror 104 my be supported upon trunnions and angularly adjusted by means of a knob 110. Furthermore, the mirror may be shifted along the edge of the shield, as indicated in FIGURE 10.

FIGURE 11 illustrates a modified form of optical tower 112, which may be a translucent tube, for example. Mirrors 114 and 116 are oriented as shown to provide, through the viewing aperture 118, an image of the portion of the board surmounted by the tower. A screen or reticule may be provided within the tube as shown at 120. For example, a partially-transparent cloud filter may be used to simulate an aerial view partially obscured by clouds.

FIGURE 12 illustrates a modified optical device 122, a small telescope which may be supported in an aperture 124 of shield 126 to view a restricted portion of board 128.

FIGURE 13 illustrates a modification in which a periscope 130 is supported upon a base 132 and is suitably angulated for viewing a restricted portion of board 134 over the top edge of shield 136.

FIGURE 14 illustrates the use of an optical device which, like the tower of FIGURES 1 and 11, is placed upon the opponents board. However, this device pro duces a ground or sea level view. The optical device 138 is a periscope with a horizontal extension tube 140 provided at its end with a transparent or translucent screen 142 which may .be used to simulate a background behind the playing piece 16 being observed.

To illustrate the use of sea level (or ground level) optical search devices, a typical game will now be described.

In a Battle of Ironbottom Sound identical game boards are used, each board mapping Savo Island off the North Coast of Guadalcanal. Two sets of playing pieces are provided, one representing the surface ships of Japan, and the other the surface ships of the United States. The boards are divided into identifiable squares, as in FIG- URE 1 for example, and may be placed back-to-back and separated by a shield as in FIGURE 1A, for example. Each player arranges his ships on the appropriate squares of his board, unobserved by the other player. It is assumed that the shield has an aperture along its base, as illustrated in FIGURE 2, for example. Such an aperture precents the viewing of an opponents board when the players are seated at the usual playing height, except when an optical device, such as the periscope 58 of FIGURE 5, is used.

Each ship may be moved one square during the movement portion of each turn. Following the movement portion the players are permitted to observe their opponents ships, using the optical device, which renders a highly realistic sea level view, as if from a distance. The players roll a die to determine which player fires first, each player being entitled to six salvos per turn. Battleships may fire within a range of six squares from the location of the ship, cruisers up to four, and destroyers up to three. Hits are scored when the number of a rolled die is equal to or greater than the range. Thus, at a range of six' squares, only a six on the die is a hit. At a range of five squares both a five and a six are hits. Hits or misses may be indicated by placement of suit-able indicators, as indicated previously. Battleships may fire three salvos, cruisers two, and destroyers one. Each hit on a ship reduces its salvo number by one, and when the salvo number is zero, the ship is sunk and removed from the board. Each salvo is directed to a stated square within the range of the firing vessel. If an enemy ship is located on that square,

the die is rolled to determine if a hit is scored. If no ship is on the square, the opponent places a splash indicator within the square, so that the player firing can observe this indication through the optical device to determine its relationship to the target. This helps to compute the target location for the next salvo. After six salvos the opponent fires in a like manner. Then another movement portion begins, followed by observation and firing as before. The game ends when all ships of one side are sunk or when an agreed number of hits has been scored. The winner is the player scoring the most hits or sinking all of his opponents ships.

Land battles, such as El Alamein, may be fought by providing playing pieces simulating soldiers, tanks, artillery, etc. and game boards mapped in three dimensions.

Strategic games such as Solomon Islands campaign, may be played with ships, soldiers, airfields, etc. over wide areas, such as the South Pacific, using the air search method described in connection with FIGURE 1. Sea and land games utilizing ships, tanks, soldiers, etc., and simulating a landing invasion may be played, for example, Omaha Beach. Sea search games, in which restricted sea level views of an enemy are provided by a periscope having an artificial horizon limiting the number of squares seen on each search, as in FIGURE 14, may also be played. For example, Sink the Bismarck.

The game boards may have identifiable regions other than squares, and when two game boards are used, they need not be identical. The chance controlled device may comprise dice, spinners, or cards, for example, and may be imprinted to give play results directly in terms of hits or misses. Search ranges may be limited for different pieces in accordance with the rules of the game. Search areas from airfields may be delineated upon the board for convenience. Special searches of areas outside the usual range of pieces may be permitted in accordance with the rules of the game under appropriate circumstances. Hits may be determined solely by the square designated or by the square plus the indication of a chance controlled device.

While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes can be made in these embodiments without departing from the principles and spirit of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the appended claims. For example, different combinations of the disclosed components may be used. Accordingly, the foregoing embodiments are to be considered illustrative, rather than restrictive of the invention, and those modifications which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to be included therein.

What is claimed is:

1. A game of the type described comprising a pair of adjacent game boards, one for each of a pair of players, shield means arranged to permit substantially full viewing of each board only by the corresponding player and to shield at least part of the other board from the view of that player when the players are in their normal playing positions with said shield means substantially upright between them, playing pieces adapted for arrangement by each player upon his board, and image-forming optical means for selectively providing a player with images of regions of the board part shielded from him, said optical means having means for providing a predetermined field of view limited to permit viewing of only a predetermined fraction of the shielded part at one time and being at least in part movable relative to a board to provide images of different fractions of said shielded part at different times.

2. The game of claim 1, further comprising chance controlled means for determining play results in the regions viewed selectively.

3. The game of claim 1, said parts of said boards being divided into zones identified by indicia.

4. The game of claim 1, said boards having geographic areas represented thereon, said playing pieces representing diflerent combatants.

5. A game of the type described comprising a game board, means for shielding at least a part of said board from the view of one player but permitting viewing of said part by another player when the players are in their normal playing positions with said shielding means substantially upright between them, a playing piece adapted to be located in said part by said other player, and an image-forming optical device arranged to permit inspection of selected regions of said part by said one player to determine whether said piece is located in the selected regions, said optical device having means for providing a 8 predetermined field of view limited to permit viewing of only a fraction of said shielded part at one time and being at least in part movable relative to said board to provide images of different fractions of said shielded part at different times.

6. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising a viewing tube.

7. The game of claim 6, said tube having at least one mirror therein arranged to provide an image of the selected regions.

8. The game of claim 6, said tube having at least one lens therein.

9. The game of claim 5, said shielding means having an opening therethrough, said optical device comprising means for presenting a view through said opening.

10. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising means for providing a view substantially at the level of said board.

11. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising means for providing a view substantially elevated from said board.

12. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising a periscope.

13. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising means for looking past a boundary of said shielding means.

14. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising a tower arranged to be placed upon said port of said board.

15. The game of claim 14, said part of said board having said regions delineated thereon, the cross-dimensions of said tower being correlated with the cross-dimensions of said regions so that the outline of said tower can be aligned with said regions selectively.

16. The game of claim 5, said optical device having means for superimposing a predetermined pattern upon an image of the regions inspected.

17. The game of claim 5, said optical device having means for producing a reduced image of said regions.

18. The game of claim 5, said optical device comprising means for providing a view substantially at the level of said board and limited in range along said board.

19. The game of claim 5, said optical device having means for providing an image with an artificial background.

20. Game apparatus comprising a game board, means for shielding at least part of said board from the view of one player but permitting viewing of said part by another player when said players are in their normal playing posi tions, playing piece means adapted to be located in said part by said other player, and image-forming optical means associated with said board for providing said one player, when he is in his normal playing position, a view of a board part otherwise concealed by said shielding means, the view provided being substantially at the level of the concealed board part.

References Cited UNTTED STATES PATENTS 1,232,133 7/1917 Warden 273-134 2,293,298 8/ 1942 Macdonald 273- 2,794,641 6/ 1-957 Baker et al. 273-130 2,905,473 9/1959 Giannotti 273--130 3,104,878 9/1963 Roger 273130 3,127,174 3/1964 Ryan 273-130 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,112,851 11/1955 France.

102,865 1/ 1917 Great Britain.

268,192 8/ 1950 Switzerland.

291,442 4/1916 Germany.

DELBERT B. LOWE, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3455556 *Jun 30, 1966Jul 15, 1969Mossman Raymond BBoard game apparatus with playing piece used by all players
US3558137 *Sep 18, 1968Jan 26, 1971Bernard ProginGame board with apertures and selectively mating pieces therefor
US3565436 *Oct 14, 1968Feb 23, 1971Arthur OpmeerStrategy-type military game
US4101127 *May 23, 1977Jul 18, 1978Isgrig Glenn WTarget amusement device
US4194742 *Jul 31, 1978Mar 25, 1980Adams Ezra JLand and sea war game apparatus
US5110134 *Mar 1, 1991May 5, 1992No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5219172 *Oct 9, 1991Jun 15, 1993No Peek 21Playing card marks and card mark sensor for blackjack
US5224712 *Apr 10, 1992Jul 6, 1993No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5364106 *Nov 4, 1992Nov 15, 1994No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US6209873 *Nov 18, 1999Apr 3, 2001Degeorge AndrewRole and war game playing system
US6561513Mar 5, 2001May 13, 2003Degeorge AndrewRole and war game playing system
US7017906Feb 26, 2004Mar 28, 2006Gregory BenjaminMirror checkers/chess
US7749058Mar 15, 2007Jul 6, 2010David John KershawRecursive team-oriented chess-like game for entertainment and training
US8876113Mar 15, 2013Nov 4, 2014The John Marshall Law School Patent ClinicStrategy, and training game and method for enhancing memorization and decision making
US20080227515 *Mar 15, 2007Sep 18, 2008Kershaw David J ERecursive Team-oriented Chess-like Game for Entertainment and Training
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/262, 359/857, 273/148.00R, 273/265
International ClassificationA63F9/06, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0613, A63F3/00075
European ClassificationA63F3/00A8, A63F9/06F