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Publication numberUS3354468 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1967
Filing dateJun 29, 1965
Priority dateJun 29, 1965
Publication numberUS 3354468 A, US 3354468A, US-A-3354468, US3354468 A, US3354468A
InventorsJr Charles E Bowers
Original AssigneeFibre Metal Products Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nape strap
US 3354468 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V- 1967 c. E. BOWERS, JR 3,354,468

NAPE STRAP Filed June 29, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 m 2 INVENTOR.

ma/ e M Nov. 28, 1967 c..E. BOWERS, JR I 3,354,468

NAPE S TRAP Filed June 29, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. CW/IHLES .5. 80/1 54 5 J14.

BYWMM United States Patent M 3,354,468 NAPE STRAP Charles E. Bowers, Jr., Newtown Square, Pa., assignor to The Fibre-Metal Products Company, Chester, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed June 29, 1965, Ser. No. 467,868 Claims. (Cl. 2-3) This invention relates to improvements in hats and caps, and is especially concerned with unique means for retaining hats and caps in position on a wearers head.

While the device of the present invention is primarily concerned with a hat construction or attachment for use with a hat construction of the hard-shell type, such as industrial hard hats, and will be illustrated and described hereinafter with particular reference thereto, it is appreciated that the present invention is capable of many varied applications, all of which are intended to be comprehended herein.

In the customary usage of hard hats, such as have a hard outer shell, a flexible headband in spaced relation within the shell, and suspension means supporting the headband within the shell, as often worn by linemen, miners, and other such workmen, a wide variety of attitudes are assumed by the wearers head, some of which may tend toward inadvertent removal or falling of the hat from the head. A common position assumed by wearers of hard hats resulting in removal or loss of the hat from the wearers head is the simple act of bending over, say to look down, as through a manhole, or otherwise.

Accordingly, it is an important object of the present invention to provide a unique hat construction wherein a flexible back or nape strape is selectively engageable with the lower back of the wearers head or nape, to comfortably and effectively insure retention of the hat on the wearers head.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an attachment strap of the type described for use in conjunction with conventional hats and caps.

The invention further contemplates the provision of a hat construction or attachment therefor having the advantageous characteristics mentioned in the preceding paragraphs, which is extremely simple in structure, easy to use, durable and reliable throughout a long useful life, and which can be selectively employed with existing hats requiring little or no modification thereof.

Other objects of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following specification and referring to the accompanying drawings, which form a material part of this disclosure.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, and arrangements of parts, which will be exemplified in the construction hereinafter described, and of which the scope will be indicated by the appended claims.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view, partly broken away showing a hard hat of the general type disclosed in US. Patent No. 3,026,523 to Bowers et al., in position on a wearers head, and illustrating the construction of the present invention in alternate positions;

FIGURE 2 is a bottom plan view of the hat construc tion shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view or development of the attachment of the present invention apart from a hat;

3,354,46 Patented Nov. 28, I967 FIGURE 4 is a partial plan view similar to FIGURE 3, but showing the attachment in greater detail;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse sectional view taken generally along the line 55 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a transverse sectional view taken generally along the line 66 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 7 is a partial bottom view similar to FIGURE 2, but greatly enlarged and partly broken away for clarity of understanding;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary view taken generally along the line 88 of FIGURE 7,also partly broken away;

FIGURE 9 is a view similar to FIGURE 8, but taken from the other side thereof;

FIGURE 10 is a view similar to FIGURE 9, but showing the attachment strap in alternate positions;

FIGURE 11 is a transverse sectional view taken generally along the line 1111 of FIGURE 10; and

FIGURE 12 is a transverse sectional view taken generally along the line 1212 of FIGURE 7.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and specifically to FIGURES 1 and 2 thereof, a hat is there generally designated 20, and may include a generally semispherical outer shell 21, say of plastic or the like. Interiorly of the shell 21 is secured a suspension harness 22, say of the type disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 3,026,523, or other suitable suspension means. The particular illustrated suspension harness 22 includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced outer legs 23 secured to the inner surface of the shell 21, and an additional plurality of circumferentially spaced inner legs 24 spaced within the shell. A generally annular headband 25 is connected at circumferentially spaced points thereabout to the inner legs 24, and thereby supported spacedly within the shell 21. In use, the suspension or harness 22 seats comfortably on the wearers head, see FIGURE 1, and the headband 25 extends circumferentially about the head to support the shell 21 in spaced relation about the wearers head and the headband 25.

In accordance with the instant invention, a nape strap or attachment, generally designated 30, is of elongate, flexible character and extends generally along the rear or back of the headband 25, with opposite end portions 31 each pivotally connected, as by a button or pin 32 to a respective adjacent side of the headband 25. The strap 30 is thereby mounted for swinging movement between an upper, retracted inoperative position, shown in dotand-dash outline in FIGURE 1, and a lowermost, extended operative position, shown in dashed outline.

The overall configuration and arrangement of strap attachment 30 is best seen in FIGURE 3. The strap may include a generally straight medial portion 34 having its lower edge 35 of outwardly bowed or convex configuration symmetrical about a transverse center line. From opposite ends of the medial portion 34, the strap may extend outwardly and slightly obliquely upwardly, as at intermediate portions 36, and thence outwardly and slightly obliquely downwardly, as by terminal portions 37. In practice, the strap 30 may advantageously be fabricated of flexible, resiliently defiectable material, such as plastic, or other suitable material. On one surface of the medial strap portion 34, the inner surface in its assembled condition, there is advantageously provided a pad 38 of soft, preferably resilient cushioning, such as plastic foam, or the like. The terminal portions 37 of the strap 30 are each provided with a series of thru holes 3" or'apertures 39, each' such' series being" arranged in a row extending longitudinally of the respective terminal portion and oblique to the longitudinal dimension of the strap. An additional thru hole or aperture 40 may be provided in each terminal portion 37 below and out of line with the adjacent series of apertures 39.

As best seen in FIGURES 4, 5 and 6, the strap 30 may advantageously be molded, or otherwise formed with a peripheral head or rib 42 extending entirely about the strap on the outer face thereof. Also, the strap region of each terminal portion 37 formed with the row of apertures 39 may be thickened, as by an interrupted bead or rib 43. The beads or ribs 42 and 43 afford additional strength and effectively resist rupture without appreciably increasing weight or reducing flexibility. In addition, on the inner surface of the strap 30, surrounding the pad 38 may be a relatively small locating head or ridge 44. The pad 38 is thus more effectively retained in position on the medial strap portion 34 by the retaining action of ridge 44, together with suitable intersurface adhesive.

The headband 25 includes an elongate flexible strap 46, see FIGURE 8, bent to an annular configuration and having overlapping inner and outer end portions 47 and 48 at the back of the hat. The strip 46 may be covered on its inner side with a sweatband '49 advantageously having a foam lining 50. The sweatband 49 may be secured to the strip 46 by having one longitudinal edge portion 51 of the sweatband folded upward about the lower edge of strip 46 onto the outer surface thereof and secured thereto, as by stitching 52. At spaced locations about the strip 46 there are provided apertures receiving buttons 53 for attachment to the suspension 22. Additional buttons 54 extend through the overlapping end portions 47 and 48. The buttons-53 and 54 may be similar to conventional collar buttons, including a' shank and endenlargements or heads on opposite ends of the shank.

The pivot members 32-at opposite sides of the headband 25' may be of similar collar-button-type structure, each including a shank 56, an enlarged, relatively large inner head 57, and an enlarged, relatively small outer head 58. The, shank 56 of each button 32 extends through a respective terminal strap portion 37, through a selected one of the apertures 39', and through the-adjacent portion of stI'i-p'46. The inner head 57 lies on the inner side of strip 46 and the outer head 58 on the outer side of terminal strap portion 37. Adjacent to and spaced rearward from each button 32, there is provided extending through the strip 46 an additional button 60,*which may also be of collar-button-type stnucture. As'shownin'FIGURES 7-9, the button 60 passes througb'the' strip 46 and also through aperture 40 of the adjacent terminal strap portion-37, with its end enlargements:onopposite sides of'th'e' strip and terminal strap portion. This is the condition shown in dot-and-dash outline in FIGURE 1, with the strap 30 retained in its retracted'position against swinging movement about the pivots 32. In this condition, the nape strap 30 is located in the spacebetweenthe headband 25 and shell 21. In this inoperative conditionnoextr-a space is required for storage of the strap 30. In the event that relatively frequent swinging movementof'the'st'rap 30 be tween its retracted and extended positions isdesire'd, the use of the buttons 60 may be avoided and the strap swungto its retracted position with thecushion or pad 38frictionally engaging the rear side of'the headband and retaining the nape strap in retracted position. When use of'the nape strap 30 is desired, it is thenonly necessary to pull the strap down to'its comfortable position with the cushion or pad engaging the lower back portion ofthe wearers head.

The effectivelength of the nape strap 30 maybe readily adjusted by insertion of the buttons or pins 32 in' selected apertures 39. For example, in FIGURES 8 and'9' the button 32 passes through one aperture 39 while in FIGURE the button 32. passes through another aperture 39 for longer effective length of the nape strap. Also, while the nonaligned aperture 40 may be employed to positively retain the nape strap 30 in its retracted, nonuse position, as described above, the buttons or pins 60 may be engaged in one of the apertures 39 to hold the nape strap against rotation while in an extended or operative position. This condition is shown in solid lines in FIGURES 1 and 10.

Obviously, with the nape strap 30 swung to its extended position and conformably engaging about the lower back of a wearers head, substantial resistance is provided against removal of the hat by any force having a forward component.

From the foregoing, it is seen that the present invention provides a hat construction or attachment which fully accomplishes its intended objects and is well adapted to meet practical conditions of manufacture, installation and use.

Although the present invention has been described in some detail by way of illustration and example for purposes of clarity of understanding, it is understood that certain changes and modifications may be made within the spirit of the invention and scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a hat or cap, the combination comprising an outer shell, a headband supported in spaced relation within said shell, a resiliently defiectable strap extending externally along the back of said headband within said shell, pivot means connecting opposite ends of said strap to opposite sides of said headband for swinging movement of said strap between a retracted position within said shell and an extended position-externally of said shell for retaining engagement with the lower back'of a wearers head, and holding means for releasably holding the strap in its retracted position.

2. In a hat or cap, the combination comprising an outer shell, a headband supported in spaced relation within said shell, a flexible strap extending externally along the back of said headband within said shell, pivot means connect ing opposite ends of said strap to opposite sides of said headband for swinging movement of'said strap between a retracted position within said shell and an extended position externally of said shell for retaining engagement with the lower back of a wearers neck, and a pad on the medial region of said strap for conforming engagement with a wearershead when saidstrap is" extended and for frictionalretaining engagementwith said-headband when said strap is retracted.

3. In a hat or cap, the combination comprising an outer shell, a headband supported in spaced relation within said shell, a flexible strap extending externally along'the back of said headband within said shell, and pivot means connecting opposite ends of said strap to opposite sides of said headband for swinging movement of saidstr'ap between a retracted position'within said shell and an extended position externally of said shell for retaining en'- gagement with the lower back of a wearers head, said strap including a' medialportion extending along said headband when in-said retracted position, an intermediate portion extending obliquely upwardly and forwardly from each end of said medial portion, and a-terminal portion extending obliquely downwardly and forwardly from each inttermediate portion, said terminal portions each being formed with a row of thru apertures for selective reception of said pivot means to adjust the effective length of said strap.

4. The combination according to claim 3, in combination with a button on each side of said headband adjacent to and spaced rearward from said pivot means and insertable through one of said apertures "for'holding said strap against swinging movement in its extended position.

5; The combination according to claim 4, said strap terminal portions each being formed with an additional aperture spaced below said row of apertures for optional 6 reception of the adjacent button to hold the strap against 3,026,523 3/ 1962 Bowers et a1 2-3 swinging movement in its retracted position. 3 041, 21 7 19 2 Brockway 2 3 References Cited 3,239,842 3/ 1966 Marchello 2-3 UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 I 2,769,176 11/1956 Grancsay c1111. 2- 3 JORDAN FRmKLIN pr'mary Examme" 2,946,063 7/1960 Boyer 23 JAMES R. BOLER, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2769176 *Sep 24, 1954Nov 6, 1956Stephen V GrancsayNape strap
US2946063 *Apr 28, 1959Jul 26, 1960Electric Storage Battery CoMolded suspension for safety hat
US3026523 *Dec 8, 1959Mar 27, 1962Fibre Metal Products CompanySuspension harness for safety hats
US3041621 *Aug 3, 1959Jul 3, 1962Bullard CoSafety hat
US3239842 *Apr 7, 1964Mar 15, 1966Joseph Buegeleisen CompanySafety helmet
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3628190 *Jan 7, 1970Dec 21, 1971American Safety EquipHelmet neckguard
US3696440 *Mar 11, 1971Oct 10, 1972Gay Toys IncBaseball helmet
US3852821 *Jun 11, 1973Dec 10, 1974L MickelImpact absorbent pad for helmet shell
US3950788 *Nov 18, 1974Apr 20, 1976Lamb Charles Carlisle THead and crown suspension for protective helmet
US4000520 *Mar 21, 1975Jan 4, 1977Arthur D. Little, Inc.Headgear support system
US4263679 *Jan 25, 1979Apr 28, 1981Erlendson Ronald RHead band with nape strap
US5619754 *Feb 13, 1995Apr 15, 1997Fibre-Metal Products, Co.Protective cap with reversible headband
US5659900 *Jul 8, 1993Aug 26, 1997Bell Sports, Inc.Sizing and stabilizing apparatus for bicycle helmets
US5774901 *Aug 15, 1996Jul 7, 1998Bell Sports, Inc.Sport helmet retention apparatus
US5794272 *Jan 31, 1996Aug 18, 1998Specialized Bicycle Components, Inc.For a cyclist
US6032297 *Jul 1, 1997Mar 7, 2000Cairns & Brother Inc.Head-protective helmet and assemblies thereof
US6401261Mar 29, 1999Jun 11, 2002Bell Sports, Inc.Sizing and stabilizing apparatus for bicycle helmets
US6990691 *Jul 18, 2003Jan 31, 2006Depuy Products, Inc.Head gear apparatus
US7114197 *Jan 14, 2005Oct 3, 2006Louis Garneau Sport Inc.Adjustable stabilization strap apparatus
US7200873Dec 29, 2005Apr 10, 2007Depuy Products, Inc.Head gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
US7937779Feb 20, 2007May 10, 2011Depuy ProductsHead gear apparatus having improved air flow arrangement
US8438668May 17, 2010May 14, 2013Louis Garneau Sports Inc.Occipital stabilization strap for helmets
US8505121Aug 21, 2012Aug 13, 20133M Innovative Properties CompanyHead suspension having transition arms and rear support
US8745770Oct 4, 2013Jun 10, 20143M Innovative Properties CompanyHead suspension having transition arms and rear support
US20100229286 *Oct 3, 2008Sep 16, 2010Lars-Olov AhlgrenHead Suspension Having Transition Arms and Rear Support
EP0815755A1 *Jan 2, 1997Jan 7, 19989001 6262 Quebec IncCyclist helmet with stabilizing strap
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/421
International ClassificationA42B3/10, A42B3/04, A42B3/08
Cooperative ClassificationA42B3/085
European ClassificationA42B3/08B